Date   

Familiant Record, Viewmate -- German translation #general

joseph just
 

I've posted a familiant record for which I need a translation. It is
on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM70202
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.
Sarah Just


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Familiant Record, Viewmate -- German translation #general

joseph just
 

I've posted a familiant record for which I need a translation. It is
on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM70202
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.
Sarah Just


Recording the burial places of German Jewish soldiers killed in WWI #germany

E Feinstein
 

My name is Eric Feinstein and I am a volunteer for the JOWBR of JewishGen.
I have had the privilege of assisting JewishGen to increase the German
holdings in our collection >from some 25,000 records five or six years
ago to some 280,000 records now (including Germany and the German
records found under Poland-Prussia.)

Part of this project has been an effort to record German Jewish
military burials >from WWI. This effort started some three years ago.
We started with the RJF list and have used some 200-300 sources
to record the burial sites and fates of the German Jewish servicemen.
The RJF list was corrected for errors--as it included soldiers from
the French and K.u.K. armies and missing entries were added.

We have used cemetery records, archival research (many archives across
Germany have produced research projects documenting the fates of the
local Jewish soldiers on the 100th anniversary of WWI), memorial books,
regimental histories, and obituaries >from period newspapers >from Compact
Memory and other sources.

The result is 5300+ burial places for the 12,000 German Jewish soldiers.
The intent is to eventually upload everything in the Gersig Database
of Jewishgen and the burial places in their respective places in the
JOWBR. [JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry]

Note I also have a K.u.K. Jewish project for WWI soldiers but I have
spend much less time on it and there is no master list to work with.
For that I have a list of some 7800+ Jewish soldiers with about 4000
burial locations recorded.

Another note is that the http://www.germanjewishsoldiers.com website
has been broken for a long time and I tried to reach the owner of the
site without any success.

Anyone interested in this project can contact me directly.

All the best, Eric Feinstein, New Jersey <ericfeinstein@yahoo.com>


German SIG #Germany Recording the burial places of German Jewish soldiers killed in WWI #germany

E Feinstein
 

My name is Eric Feinstein and I am a volunteer for the JOWBR of JewishGen.
I have had the privilege of assisting JewishGen to increase the German
holdings in our collection >from some 25,000 records five or six years
ago to some 280,000 records now (including Germany and the German
records found under Poland-Prussia.)

Part of this project has been an effort to record German Jewish
military burials >from WWI. This effort started some three years ago.
We started with the RJF list and have used some 200-300 sources
to record the burial sites and fates of the German Jewish servicemen.
The RJF list was corrected for errors--as it included soldiers from
the French and K.u.K. armies and missing entries were added.

We have used cemetery records, archival research (many archives across
Germany have produced research projects documenting the fates of the
local Jewish soldiers on the 100th anniversary of WWI), memorial books,
regimental histories, and obituaries >from period newspapers >from Compact
Memory and other sources.

The result is 5300+ burial places for the 12,000 German Jewish soldiers.
The intent is to eventually upload everything in the Gersig Database
of Jewishgen and the burial places in their respective places in the
JOWBR. [JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry]

Note I also have a K.u.K. Jewish project for WWI soldiers but I have
spend much less time on it and there is no master list to work with.
For that I have a list of some 7800+ Jewish soldiers with about 4000
burial locations recorded.

Another note is that the http://www.germanjewishsoldiers.com website
has been broken for a long time and I tried to reach the owner of the
site without any success.

Anyone interested in this project can contact me directly.

All the best, Eric Feinstein, New Jersey <ericfeinstein@yahoo.com>


Why so few matches? #dna

Cindy g
 

Over the years I have had 39 people people tested. Typically, the
matches run into the thousands if not tens of thousand. I have one
person whose test results found less than 100 matches. This was the Y
chromosome test. Can anyone explain why this might be? >from what he
has told me know about his family, he seems to come >from a Jewish
family. Would the fact that there are so few matches reflect on his
being Jewish?

Thanks,
Cindy Gallard
Denver


DNA Research #DNA Why so few matches? #dna

Cindy g
 

Over the years I have had 39 people people tested. Typically, the
matches run into the thousands if not tens of thousand. I have one
person whose test results found less than 100 matches. This was the Y
chromosome test. Can anyone explain why this might be? >from what he
has told me know about his family, he seems to come >from a Jewish
family. Would the fact that there are so few matches reflect on his
being Jewish?

Thanks,
Cindy Gallard
Denver


Announcing the publication the Memorial Book of Stryj, Ukraine by YBIP #general

Joel Alpert
 

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project of JewishGen is proud to announce
the publication of its 74th title "Book of Stryj (Ukraine)" --
"Translation of Sefer Stryj"

The Original Yizkor Book: Edited by N. Kudish, Tel Aviv, Published by
the Former Residents of Stryj in Israel, 1962

Translated by Susan Rosin, Yocheved Klausner, Israel Pickholtz, Ganit
Eiron, Daniella Heller, and Susannah Juni. Cover Design: Nili
Goldman

The translation is hard cover, 11" by 8.5", 742 pages with all the
illustrations and photographs of the original Yizkor book.

Amazon List Price is $66.95. It is available on Amazon for around
$48. Make sure to look for the lowest price. This is a wonderful
Chanukah Gift for an deserving relative or yourself.

Stryj was first populated by Jews in the middle 16thcentury. The
permit to build the first synagogue was given in 1689. Since the
beginning of their settlement in Stryj the Jews made their living by
selling spirits, wholesale and retail merchandising, providing tax and
customs services and banking for the nobles. After Poland was
partitioned in 1772, Stryj became part of the Austrian Empire. At the
time there were about 440 Jewish families in the town and its suburbs.
After World War I, Stryj briefly became a part of the West Ukrainian
People's Republic (a short-lived republic that existed >from November
1918 to July 1919 in eastern Galicia). In 1919, the area became a part
of free and sovereign Poland. The town had a Jewish population of
10,988 in 1921 and about 12,000 in 1939. Jews were merchants,
craftsmen and many were professionals: doctors, lawyers, engineers,
etc.

The Germans occupied Stryj on July 2nd, 1941 after breaking the
Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact and hundreds of Jews were immediately killed.
Murders and deportations followed and in August of 1943 the Stryj
ghetto and labor camps around town were liquidated. When the Soviet
army occupied Stryj in August 1944 there were only a few Jewish
survivors. No Jewish community was re-established.

This book tells the story of Stryj's Jews during a period of 400 years
of the existence of their community: their struggles and achievements,
their dreams and hopes, the institutions they established and the many
great and famous personalities >from town.This book serves to
commemorate the once vital and flourishing community of Stryj that no
longer exists.

For more information go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Stryj.html

Alternate names for the town are: Stryy [Ukrainian], Stryj [Polish],
Stry [Yiddish], Stryi, Stri, Stria, Stryje

Nearby Jewish Communities:
Lysyatychi 7 miles NE
Sokolow 9 miles ESE
Mizhrichchya 10 miles SSE
Woloska Wies 13 miles S
Bolekhiv 13 miles S
Stebnyk 13 miles WNW
Medenychi 13 miles NNW
Hnizdychiv 14 miles ENE
Orov 15 miles WSW
Zhydachiv 16 miles NE
Verkhneye Sinevidnoye 16 miles SW
Truskavets 16 miles W
Drohobych 17 miles WNW
Rozdil 18 miles NNE
Berezdivtsi 19 miles NE
Mykolayiv 19 miles NNE
Zhuravno 20 miles E

We hope you find this of interest for you and your family in
discovering the history of your ancestors. This would make a birthday
gift for a loved one.

For orders 4 or more books to one address in the US, UK, Canada or
Australia, we can offer you a significantly reduced price of $30 per
book including shipping (Amazon discount price is about $49 plus
shipping). Email to ybip@jewishgen.org. Consider this as a Chanukah
Gift, or donation to your local university or public library. Email
to ybip@jewishgen.org to get prices for other locations outside of the
US.

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Announcing the publication the Memorial Book of Stryj, Ukraine by YBIP #general

Joel Alpert
 

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project of JewishGen is proud to announce
the publication of its 74th title "Book of Stryj (Ukraine)" --
"Translation of Sefer Stryj"

The Original Yizkor Book: Edited by N. Kudish, Tel Aviv, Published by
the Former Residents of Stryj in Israel, 1962

Translated by Susan Rosin, Yocheved Klausner, Israel Pickholtz, Ganit
Eiron, Daniella Heller, and Susannah Juni. Cover Design: Nili
Goldman

The translation is hard cover, 11" by 8.5", 742 pages with all the
illustrations and photographs of the original Yizkor book.

Amazon List Price is $66.95. It is available on Amazon for around
$48. Make sure to look for the lowest price. This is a wonderful
Chanukah Gift for an deserving relative or yourself.

Stryj was first populated by Jews in the middle 16thcentury. The
permit to build the first synagogue was given in 1689. Since the
beginning of their settlement in Stryj the Jews made their living by
selling spirits, wholesale and retail merchandising, providing tax and
customs services and banking for the nobles. After Poland was
partitioned in 1772, Stryj became part of the Austrian Empire. At the
time there were about 440 Jewish families in the town and its suburbs.
After World War I, Stryj briefly became a part of the West Ukrainian
People's Republic (a short-lived republic that existed >from November
1918 to July 1919 in eastern Galicia). In 1919, the area became a part
of free and sovereign Poland. The town had a Jewish population of
10,988 in 1921 and about 12,000 in 1939. Jews were merchants,
craftsmen and many were professionals: doctors, lawyers, engineers,
etc.

The Germans occupied Stryj on July 2nd, 1941 after breaking the
Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact and hundreds of Jews were immediately killed.
Murders and deportations followed and in August of 1943 the Stryj
ghetto and labor camps around town were liquidated. When the Soviet
army occupied Stryj in August 1944 there were only a few Jewish
survivors. No Jewish community was re-established.

This book tells the story of Stryj's Jews during a period of 400 years
of the existence of their community: their struggles and achievements,
their dreams and hopes, the institutions they established and the many
great and famous personalities >from town.This book serves to
commemorate the once vital and flourishing community of Stryj that no
longer exists.

For more information go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Stryj.html

Alternate names for the town are: Stryy [Ukrainian], Stryj [Polish],
Stry [Yiddish], Stryi, Stri, Stria, Stryje

Nearby Jewish Communities:
Lysyatychi 7 miles NE
Sokolow 9 miles ESE
Mizhrichchya 10 miles SSE
Woloska Wies 13 miles S
Bolekhiv 13 miles S
Stebnyk 13 miles WNW
Medenychi 13 miles NNW
Hnizdychiv 14 miles ENE
Orov 15 miles WSW
Zhydachiv 16 miles NE
Verkhneye Sinevidnoye 16 miles SW
Truskavets 16 miles W
Drohobych 17 miles WNW
Rozdil 18 miles NNE
Berezdivtsi 19 miles NE
Mykolayiv 19 miles NNE
Zhuravno 20 miles E

We hope you find this of interest for you and your family in
discovering the history of your ancestors. This would make a birthday
gift for a loved one.

For orders 4 or more books to one address in the US, UK, Canada or
Australia, we can offer you a significantly reduced price of $30 per
book including shipping (Amazon discount price is about $49 plus
shipping). Email to ybip@jewishgen.org. Consider this as a Chanukah
Gift, or donation to your local university or public library. Email
to ybip@jewishgen.org to get prices for other locations outside of the
US.

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project


Updates to the JRI-Poland database #general

hadassahlipsius
 

Updates, additions and/or image links were added for the towns of Czarnkow,
Glogowek, Kolo, Koniecpol, Plonsk, Prudnik, Wrzesnia, Zagorow, Zgierz

Special thanks to the tireless work of our volunteers who made this
possible.

Thank you to:

Stanley Diamond, Howard Fink, Nicole Heymans, Roger Lustig, Madeleine
Okladek, Juergen Pfaff and Michael Tobias

Special thanks to our friend Haim Ghiuzeli, Director of the Beit Hatfutsot
database Department, for his continued support.

Hadassah Lipsius
On Behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland
http://www.jri-poland.org


JRI-Poland adds more Warszawa Data to the Database #general

hadassahlipsius
 

The new additions include the following:

Fond 200 - Sygnatura 89, 1894 Marriages District 5;
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 159, 1892-1899 Deaths District 11;
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 157, 1899 Births, District 10;
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 216, 1896, 1897, 1899, Births, Marriages and Deaths,
District 1;
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 153, 1893 Births, Extended the extracts, District 10

All of these entries are linked the images. We continue to work on adding
additional data, links and extracting more information on the data already
on line.

The indexing project for the City of Warszawa is extensive and JRI-Poland
has made the commitment to support the completion of the effort.

Good luck in your search!

Hadassah Lipsius
Warszawa Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
Warszawa Archive Coordinator
JRI-Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Updates to the JRI-Poland database #general

hadassahlipsius
 

Updates, additions and/or image links were added for the towns of Czarnkow,
Glogowek, Kolo, Koniecpol, Plonsk, Prudnik, Wrzesnia, Zagorow, Zgierz

Special thanks to the tireless work of our volunteers who made this
possible.

Thank you to:

Stanley Diamond, Howard Fink, Nicole Heymans, Roger Lustig, Madeleine
Okladek, Juergen Pfaff and Michael Tobias

Special thanks to our friend Haim Ghiuzeli, Director of the Beit Hatfutsot
database Department, for his continued support.

Hadassah Lipsius
On Behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland
http://www.jri-poland.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JRI-Poland adds more Warszawa Data to the Database #general

hadassahlipsius
 

The new additions include the following:

Fond 200 - Sygnatura 89, 1894 Marriages District 5;
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 159, 1892-1899 Deaths District 11;
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 157, 1899 Births, District 10;
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 216, 1896, 1897, 1899, Births, Marriages and Deaths,
District 1;
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 153, 1893 Births, Extended the extracts, District 10

All of these entries are linked the images. We continue to work on adding
additional data, links and extracting more information on the data already
on line.

The indexing project for the City of Warszawa is extensive and JRI-Poland
has made the commitment to support the completion of the effort.

Good luck in your search!

Hadassah Lipsius
Warszawa Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
Warszawa Archive Coordinator
JRI-Poland


The Four Days of Kristallnacht in Hessen started November 7, 1938 #general

Stephen Denker
 

This week, the Lehrhaus website (https://www.thelehrhaus.com/) features
my article -- Four Days of Kristallnacht in Hessen -- about one family's
experiences on Kristallnacht in the small rural village of Nentershausen.

It describes the events and the story of the rescue and reconstruction of
the Nentershausen synagogue building in Hessenpark.

It also reports the dedication-day-moral-challenge that the leadership of
Hessenpark made to the Germans of today, and and also to ourselves.

Stephen Denker
Brookline, MA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Four Days of Kristallnacht in Hessen started November 7, 1938 #general

Stephen Denker
 

This week, the Lehrhaus website (https://www.thelehrhaus.com/) features
my article -- Four Days of Kristallnacht in Hessen -- about one family's
experiences on Kristallnacht in the small rural village of Nentershausen.

It describes the events and the story of the rescue and reconstruction of
the Nentershausen synagogue building in Hessenpark.

It also reports the dedication-day-moral-challenge that the leadership of
Hessenpark made to the Germans of today, and and also to ourselves.

Stephen Denker
Brookline, MA


JRI-Poland adds more Warszawa Data to the Database #poland

hadassahlipsius
 

Jewish Records Indexing-Poland recently added another 2685 more Warszawa
records to the JRI-Poland database.

The new additions include the following:

Fond 200 - Sygnatura 89, 1894 Marriages District 5
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 159, 1892-1899 Deaths District 11
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 157, 1899 Births, District 10
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 216, 1896, 1897, 1899, Births, Marriages and Deaths,
District 1
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 153, 1893 Births, Extended the extracts, District 10

All of these entries are linked the images. We continue to work on adding
additional data, links and extracting more information on the data already
on line.

The indexing project for the City of Warszawa is extensive and JRI-Poland
has made the commitment to support the completion of the effort. Please
consider making a donation to the Warszawa PSA project to help further the
indexing.

Good luck in your search!

Hadassah Lipsius
Warszawa Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
Warszawa Archive Coordinator
JRI-Poland


JRI Poland #Poland JRI-Poland adds more Warszawa Data to the Database #poland

hadassahlipsius
 

Jewish Records Indexing-Poland recently added another 2685 more Warszawa
records to the JRI-Poland database.

The new additions include the following:

Fond 200 - Sygnatura 89, 1894 Marriages District 5
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 159, 1892-1899 Deaths District 11
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 157, 1899 Births, District 10
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 216, 1896, 1897, 1899, Births, Marriages and Deaths,
District 1
Fond 200 - Sygnatura 153, 1893 Births, Extended the extracts, District 10

All of these entries are linked the images. We continue to work on adding
additional data, links and extracting more information on the data already
on line.

The indexing project for the City of Warszawa is extensive and JRI-Poland
has made the commitment to support the completion of the effort. Please
consider making a donation to the Warszawa PSA project to help further the
indexing.

Good luck in your search!

Hadassah Lipsius
Warszawa Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
Warszawa Archive Coordinator
JRI-Poland


Updates to the JRI-Poland database #poland

hadassahlipsius
 

Recently the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland updated our database with
additional data and image links to the LDS Data on the database.

Updates, additions and/or image links were added for the towns of Czarnkow,
Glogowek, Kolo, Koniecpol, Plonsk, Prudnik, Wrzesnia, Zagorow, Zgierz

Special thanks to the tireless work of our volunteers who made this
possible.

Thank you to:

Stanley Diamond, Howard Fink, Nicole Heymans, Roger Lustig, Madeleine
Okladek, Juergen Pfaff and Michael Tobias

Special thanks to our friend Haim Ghiuzeli, Director of the Beit Hatfutsot
database Department, for his continued support.

Hadassah Lipsius
On Behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland
http://www.jri-poland.org


JRI Poland #Poland Updates to the JRI-Poland database #poland

hadassahlipsius
 

Recently the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland updated our database with
additional data and image links to the LDS Data on the database.

Updates, additions and/or image links were added for the towns of Czarnkow,
Glogowek, Kolo, Koniecpol, Plonsk, Prudnik, Wrzesnia, Zagorow, Zgierz

Special thanks to the tireless work of our volunteers who made this
possible.

Thank you to:

Stanley Diamond, Howard Fink, Nicole Heymans, Roger Lustig, Madeleine
Okladek, Juergen Pfaff and Michael Tobias

Special thanks to our friend Haim Ghiuzeli, Director of the Beit Hatfutsot
database Department, for his continued support.

Hadassah Lipsius
On Behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland
http://www.jri-poland.org


Brest-Litovsk, Palestine and Marseilles #belarus

Harry Auerbach
 

My grandfather was born, according to family lore, in Brest-Litovsk c.
1885. When he was very young, his mother took him to Palestine, where
she died, and he lived for some years in an orphanage, which I am
guessing was the Diskin Orphanage in Jerusalem. In 1903, he emigrated.
He evidently had some eye problem, for which he was quarantined in
Marseilles, before eventually landing in New York in 1904. I have been
able to find no documentary evidence of any of this. I would
appreciate any insight anyone might have regarding:emigration from
Brest-Litovsk to Palestine in the 1880's and 1890's; the Diskin
Orphanage, or quarantined emigrants in Marseilles at the turn of the
20th century. Thanks for any leads or hints.


Harry Auerbach
AUERBACH/MIRSKY (Brest Litovsk)
KOROBOV/NAHINSKY (Romny-Poltava)
GREENFELD/LEWKOWICZ (Lodz, Piortrokow Tribunalski)
RICE/MARGET (Vilnius)


Belarus SIG #Belarus Brest-Litovsk, Palestine and Marseilles #belarus

Harry Auerbach
 

My grandfather was born, according to family lore, in Brest-Litovsk c.
1885. When he was very young, his mother took him to Palestine, where
she died, and he lived for some years in an orphanage, which I am
guessing was the Diskin Orphanage in Jerusalem. In 1903, he emigrated.
He evidently had some eye problem, for which he was quarantined in
Marseilles, before eventually landing in New York in 1904. I have been
able to find no documentary evidence of any of this. I would
appreciate any insight anyone might have regarding:emigration from
Brest-Litovsk to Palestine in the 1880's and 1890's; the Diskin
Orphanage, or quarantined emigrants in Marseilles at the turn of the
20th century. Thanks for any leads or hints.


Harry Auerbach
AUERBACH/MIRSKY (Brest Litovsk)
KOROBOV/NAHINSKY (Romny-Poltava)
GREENFELD/LEWKOWICZ (Lodz, Piortrokow Tribunalski)
RICE/MARGET (Vilnius)

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