Date   
MITNICK family from Odessa #general

Riva Barnett <ribarn_21@...>
 

I am the granddaughter of Esther MITNICK, (born approx. 1885 in Odessa)
daughter of Rivka MITNICK. Esther's younger brother, Willie, (Velvel)
arrived in New York in 1912.

Esther married, had 3 children (two boys and one girl) in Odessa. She then
moved to New York City around 1913 and left the children in the care of
Rivka. Esther divorced the first husband, married Abraham POLLACK, and had
three more children in New York. WWI made it impossible to send for the
three children in Russia. Time marched on, the Russian children grew up.
The daughter was murdered by the Nazis. The older son, Berel, and his
brother were both in Moscow in 1967. That's where my information ends.

I do not know the last name of my grandmother's first husband. Therefore, I
do not know the last name of their children.

The only other thing about the family history that I know is that my
mother's first cousins, also >from Odessa, had the last name of PESOCHINSKY.
There were six first cousins: Dora, Gregory, Sarah, Ethel, Eda and Tanya.
Dora married Aaron GERSHUNOFF and they immigrated to the US in 1921 along
with their older son Alex. The younger son, Maxim, was born in the U.S.

If anyone provide any suggestions or assistance in locating the descendants
of Esther MITNICK's Russian family, I would be very grateful.

Riva Barnett

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen MITNICK family from Odessa #general

Riva Barnett <ribarn_21@...>
 

I am the granddaughter of Esther MITNICK, (born approx. 1885 in Odessa)
daughter of Rivka MITNICK. Esther's younger brother, Willie, (Velvel)
arrived in New York in 1912.

Esther married, had 3 children (two boys and one girl) in Odessa. She then
moved to New York City around 1913 and left the children in the care of
Rivka. Esther divorced the first husband, married Abraham POLLACK, and had
three more children in New York. WWI made it impossible to send for the
three children in Russia. Time marched on, the Russian children grew up.
The daughter was murdered by the Nazis. The older son, Berel, and his
brother were both in Moscow in 1967. That's where my information ends.

I do not know the last name of my grandmother's first husband. Therefore, I
do not know the last name of their children.

The only other thing about the family history that I know is that my
mother's first cousins, also >from Odessa, had the last name of PESOCHINSKY.
There were six first cousins: Dora, Gregory, Sarah, Ethel, Eda and Tanya.
Dora married Aaron GERSHUNOFF and they immigrated to the US in 1921 along
with their older son Alex. The younger son, Maxim, was born in the U.S.

If anyone provide any suggestions or assistance in locating the descendants
of Esther MITNICK's Russian family, I would be very grateful.

Riva Barnett

Resource Center at The 31st IAJGS International Conference #usa

31st IAJGS Conference <dc2011_conference@...>
 

Don't Pass Up the Resource Center at The Conference!

This year’s Resource Center is a real benefit to researchers, and definitely
should not be overlooked. It's a valuable place to spend time studying maps
for ancestral towns, reviewing computerized surname indexes, and searching
through a wide variety of databases to fill in gaps in your research. It's a
"problem worth having" because it's virtually guaranteed to compete with
your equally strong desire to attend Conference sessions, network, see
Judaic films, visit vendors, etc. (You also will be able to avoid going
outside into the August heat of Washington by conducting your research in
the comfort of the Grand Hyatt, and still be close to other Conference
features you want to catch!)

The Resource Center also will be a lively, "happening" place to be because
virtually EVERY Conference attendee will visit the Resource Center! How can
you pass that up? (And when you do come by, we suggest you bring a listing
of your "research goals," the specific surnames, towns, or dates you’re
researching so that you can spend your time more wisely.)

Where’s what this year's Resource Center consists of:
- Carefully selected reference materials, specialized archival
materials, and maps (laminated and available on long tables) >from the
hosting organization, the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington
(JGSGW)’s extensive library collection;
- 5 PC computers dedicated to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum
(USHMM) Central Names Index (CNI). That index will help inform attendees'
Holocaust-era research and be a major aid when conducting research at the
Museum itself; and
- 35 additional PCs loaded with links to websites usually
accessible only through subscription or membership.
- Translation Services located in an adjacent room, with a free
20-minute appointment for conference attendees who sign up at the
Conference, its schedule to be posted.

The Resource Center will be open during these days and hours:
Sunday, August 14, >from 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Monday, August 15, >from 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday, August 16, >from 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday, August 17, >from 7:30 a.m.- 9 p.m.
Thursday, August 18, >from 7:30 a.m.– 5:30 p.m.
Friday, August 19, >from 7:30 a.m. – 11 a.m.

We'll have a large number of links available to both free and subscription
(free at the Conference) genealogy-related websites. These will be on the
Resource Center's 35 computers, and be available for all SIX DAYS of
the Conference.

> Accessible Archives
> Ancestry.com
> British Newspapers Database (British Library)
> Conditions and Politics in Occupied Western Europe
> Find My Past and Ancestors on Board
> Financial Times Historical Archives
> Footnote.com
> Gale News Vault
> GenTeam
> Godfrey Memorial Library (GOLD)
> Guardian and Observer Digital Newspaper Archives
> Israel Genealogy Society
> JGSGB Website Databases
> MyHeritage
> New England Historical and Genealogical Society
> Newspaper Archive
> The Forward
> The Jewish Chronicle (Great Britain)

Save the Date: ProQuest Databases will only be available on Wednesday,
August 16! On that date, and >from 7:30 am to 9 pm, ProQuest has agreed to
provide free access to their numerous and specialized databases. To be fair
to all users wishing access, we'll need to limit use of the computers with
ProQuest on them to one hour per user. Here is what the ProQuest
databases available that day will include:

ProQuest Sanborn Maps Geo Edition (all content)
Ethnic NewsWatch (includes Jewish Newspapers)
Historic Map Works Library Edition (all content)
HeritageQuest Online (all content)
Gannett Military Newspapers (all content)
Canada's Heritage >from 1844- Globe and Mail (all content)
Canadian Newsstand (all content)
Toronto Star (all content >from inception to current, as available)
ProQuest Dissertation and Theses (all content)
American Periodicals Series Online--1741-1900 (all content)
List of 20 Historical Newspapers (16 U.S.-based and 4 International):
U. S.-Based:
The Arizona Republican—1890-1922
Atlanta Constitution—1868-1945
The Baltimore Sun—1837-1985
The Boston Globe—1872-1979
The Chicago Tribune—1849-1987
The Christian Science Monitor—1908-1997
Detroit Free Press—1831-1922
Hartford Courant—1764-1985
Indianapolis Star—1903-1922
Los Angeles Times—1881-1987
The New York Times with Index—1851-2007
New York Tribune—1841-1922
San Francisco Chronicle—1865-1922
St. Louis Post-Dispatch—1874-1922
Wall Street Journal—1889-1993
Washington Post—1877-1994
International Newspapers:
The Guardian & The Observer—1791-2003
Irish Times & Weekly Irish Times—1859-2009
The Scotsman—1817-1950
The Times of India—1838-2001

As you can see, this year's Resource Center is abundantly filled with
versatile research tools. Please come by the Resource Center: you'll thank
yourself!

Books and archival materials can be checked out for use by turning in a
government-issued picture ID to be left with Resource Center staff. This
ensures that materials are returned. No one will be permitted to leave the
room with library materials.

But you do have to be a Conference registrant to use the maps, books,
archival materials, and computerized databases there. With that in mind,
Conference registration rates are very flexible and include full week or
single day registration, as well as discount rates for spouses/companions,
college and high school students. You also can arrange for Grand Hyatt
Washington hotel lodging through the Conference website.

For further information, please contact info@.... The Conference
website is www.dc2011.org.

See you in August!
Suzan Wynne
Resource Center Coordinator

Early American SIG #USA Resource Center at The 31st IAJGS International Conference #usa

31st IAJGS Conference <dc2011_conference@...>
 

Don't Pass Up the Resource Center at The Conference!

This year’s Resource Center is a real benefit to researchers, and definitely
should not be overlooked. It's a valuable place to spend time studying maps
for ancestral towns, reviewing computerized surname indexes, and searching
through a wide variety of databases to fill in gaps in your research. It's a
"problem worth having" because it's virtually guaranteed to compete with
your equally strong desire to attend Conference sessions, network, see
Judaic films, visit vendors, etc. (You also will be able to avoid going
outside into the August heat of Washington by conducting your research in
the comfort of the Grand Hyatt, and still be close to other Conference
features you want to catch!)

The Resource Center also will be a lively, "happening" place to be because
virtually EVERY Conference attendee will visit the Resource Center! How can
you pass that up? (And when you do come by, we suggest you bring a listing
of your "research goals," the specific surnames, towns, or dates you’re
researching so that you can spend your time more wisely.)

Where’s what this year's Resource Center consists of:
- Carefully selected reference materials, specialized archival
materials, and maps (laminated and available on long tables) >from the
hosting organization, the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington
(JGSGW)’s extensive library collection;
- 5 PC computers dedicated to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum
(USHMM) Central Names Index (CNI). That index will help inform attendees'
Holocaust-era research and be a major aid when conducting research at the
Museum itself; and
- 35 additional PCs loaded with links to websites usually
accessible only through subscription or membership.
- Translation Services located in an adjacent room, with a free
20-minute appointment for conference attendees who sign up at the
Conference, its schedule to be posted.

The Resource Center will be open during these days and hours:
Sunday, August 14, >from 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Monday, August 15, >from 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday, August 16, >from 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday, August 17, >from 7:30 a.m.- 9 p.m.
Thursday, August 18, >from 7:30 a.m.– 5:30 p.m.
Friday, August 19, >from 7:30 a.m. – 11 a.m.

We'll have a large number of links available to both free and subscription
(free at the Conference) genealogy-related websites. These will be on the
Resource Center's 35 computers, and be available for all SIX DAYS of
the Conference.

> Accessible Archives
> Ancestry.com
> British Newspapers Database (British Library)
> Conditions and Politics in Occupied Western Europe
> Find My Past and Ancestors on Board
> Financial Times Historical Archives
> Footnote.com
> Gale News Vault
> GenTeam
> Godfrey Memorial Library (GOLD)
> Guardian and Observer Digital Newspaper Archives
> Israel Genealogy Society
> JGSGB Website Databases
> MyHeritage
> New England Historical and Genealogical Society
> Newspaper Archive
> The Forward
> The Jewish Chronicle (Great Britain)

Save the Date: ProQuest Databases will only be available on Wednesday,
August 16! On that date, and >from 7:30 am to 9 pm, ProQuest has agreed to
provide free access to their numerous and specialized databases. To be fair
to all users wishing access, we'll need to limit use of the computers with
ProQuest on them to one hour per user. Here is what the ProQuest
databases available that day will include:

ProQuest Sanborn Maps Geo Edition (all content)
Ethnic NewsWatch (includes Jewish Newspapers)
Historic Map Works Library Edition (all content)
HeritageQuest Online (all content)
Gannett Military Newspapers (all content)
Canada's Heritage >from 1844- Globe and Mail (all content)
Canadian Newsstand (all content)
Toronto Star (all content >from inception to current, as available)
ProQuest Dissertation and Theses (all content)
American Periodicals Series Online--1741-1900 (all content)
List of 20 Historical Newspapers (16 U.S.-based and 4 International):
U. S.-Based:
The Arizona Republican—1890-1922
Atlanta Constitution—1868-1945
The Baltimore Sun—1837-1985
The Boston Globe—1872-1979
The Chicago Tribune—1849-1987
The Christian Science Monitor—1908-1997
Detroit Free Press—1831-1922
Hartford Courant—1764-1985
Indianapolis Star—1903-1922
Los Angeles Times—1881-1987
The New York Times with Index—1851-2007
New York Tribune—1841-1922
San Francisco Chronicle—1865-1922
St. Louis Post-Dispatch—1874-1922
Wall Street Journal—1889-1993
Washington Post—1877-1994
International Newspapers:
The Guardian & The Observer—1791-2003
Irish Times & Weekly Irish Times—1859-2009
The Scotsman—1817-1950
The Times of India—1838-2001

As you can see, this year's Resource Center is abundantly filled with
versatile research tools. Please come by the Resource Center: you'll thank
yourself!

Books and archival materials can be checked out for use by turning in a
government-issued picture ID to be left with Resource Center staff. This
ensures that materials are returned. No one will be permitted to leave the
room with library materials.

But you do have to be a Conference registrant to use the maps, books,
archival materials, and computerized databases there. With that in mind,
Conference registration rates are very flexible and include full week or
single day registration, as well as discount rates for spouses/companions,
college and high school students. You also can arrange for Grand Hyatt
Washington hotel lodging through the Conference website.

For further information, please contact info@.... The Conference
website is www.dc2011.org.

See you in August!
Suzan Wynne
Resource Center Coordinator

Yizkor Book Project, June 2011 #usa

Lance Ackerfeld
 

Shalom,

As we head out into the long hot summer or the long cold winter, for those
on the other side of the planet, I have to report that June was yet another
"hyperactive" month for the Yizkor Book Project. Happily, quite a large
number of new books and entries were added and notably, a new Translation
project has been added this month for Dej, Romania (Des, Hungary) and we are
looking for financial support of this project in order to allow those of you
with roots there, to read about the people and thriving culture that existed
before the Holocaust. If you feel able to assist in helping to finance this
or any of our currently running translation projects at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
, your help would be much appreciated. The importance of these funds is
clearly illustrated in this month's updates, half of which are projects in
our Translations Funds.

June also saw the addition of a large number of necrologies which not only
immortalize the names of our loved ones but also can provide their family
relationships, professions, dates of birth and more or these people. As
such, these lists are also an invaluable genealogical resource and to assist
in research, the names >from the necrologies are periodically added to the
searchable Yizkor Book Necrology Database at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/ These days, this important but
time-taking work of adding to the database is carried out by Max Heffler,
who also carries out a myriad of other tasks for JewishGen and elsewhere. I
would truly like to spread the heavy load which these days falls heavily on
Max's shoulders alone and am eager to hear >from any of you who have some
time to help in preparing the lists in Excel which are then added to the
database.

As far as the June figures go, during this last month we have added these 9
new projects:

- Burshtyn, Ukraine (Book of Bursztyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Burshtyn/Burshtyn.html

- Carpathian Mountains (Youth >from the Carpathian Mountains)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Carpathian_Mountains/Carpathian_Mountains.html
or http://tinyurl.com/3qejcy6
[includes Izki, Pilipets, Rostoka and Verkhne-Studenyy in the Ukraine]

- Dej, Romania (Des..., Bethlen, Magyarlapos, Retteg, Nagyilonda and
vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dej/dej.html

- Kremenets', Ukraine (Voice of Kremenets Emigrants in Israel and the
Diaspora - Booklet 10)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets1/Kre1_1000.html

- Kremenets', Ukraine (Voice of Kremenets Emigrants in Israel and the
Diaspora - Booklet 16)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets1/Kre1_1600.html

- Kremenets', Ukraine (Voice of Kremenets Emigrants in Israel and the
Diaspora - Booklet 17)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets1/Kre1_1700.html

- Kremenets', Ukraine (Voice of Kremenets Emigrants in Israel and the
Diaspora - Booklet 18)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets1/Kre1_1800.html

- Murska Sobota, Slovenia (They Died in the Fight for Freedom)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Murska_Sobota/Murska_Sobota.html

- Nyiregyhaza, Hungary (Jewish Life in Nyiregyhaza)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Nyiregyhaza/Nyiregyhaza.html


Added in 27 new entries:

- Aukshtadvaris, Lithuania (Lite)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lita/lit1869.html

- Bad Nauheim, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_germany/ger3_00084.html

- Haradok (Horodok), Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland,
Volume VIII) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00229.html

- Komyan, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00561.html

- Katiliske, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00559.html

- Kietaviskes, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00559b.html

- Kriukai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00616.html

- Krincinas, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00621d.html

- Krivlyan, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00621e.html

- Kulbes, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00561b.html

- Kuliai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00559c.html

- Kursenai, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/lit6_108.html

- Laizuva, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/lit6_130.html

- Laukuva, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/lit6_135.html

- Liudvinavas, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/lit6_147.html

- Lucinava (Marijampole), Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities:
Lithuania) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00346b.html

- Lucinava (Raseiniai), Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities:
Lithuania) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00346c.html

- Luksiai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00348.html

- Luoke, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/lit6_152.html

- Lyduvenai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00354.html

- Miroslavas, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/lit6_161.html

- Nacioniskis, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00410.html

- Nakan, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00410b.html

- Narikishok, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00410c.html

- Naujamiestis, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00401.html

- Sobrance, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo368.html

- Warszawa, Poland (Jewish Warsaw that was; a Yiddish literary anthology)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/warsaw1/warsaw1.html


We have continued to update 26 of our existing projects:

- Bialystok, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno, Wolyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubno/Dubno.html

- Dzyarzhynsk, Belarus (Koidanov; Memorial Volume of the Martyrs of
Koidanov) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzyarzhynsk/Dzyarzhynsk.html

- Fehergyarmat, Hungary (Our Former City Fehergyarmat)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Fehergyarmat/Fehergyarmat.html

- Garwolin, Poland (Garwolin Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/garwolin/garp000.html [Polish]

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/Goniadz.html

- Gorodets, Belarus (Horodetz; history of a town, 1142-1942)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodets/gorodets.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grajewo/Grajewo.html

- Katowice, Poland (Katowice: the Rise and Decline of the Jewish community;
Memorial Book) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/katowice/katowice.html

- Khmelnytskyy, Ukraine (The destruction of Proskurov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Khmelnytskyy/Khmelnytskyy.html

- Kolki, Ukraine (Summoned >from the Ashes)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolki/kolki.html

- Lithuania http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Lowicz, Poland (Lowicz; a Town in Mazovia, Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lowicz/lowicz.html

- Oradea, Romania (A city and yesterday; memorial book to the Jews of
Grosswardein) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/oradea/oradea.html

- Ostrolenka, Poland (Book of Kehilat Ostrolenka; Yizkor Book of the Jewish
Community of Ostrolenka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrolenka1/ostrolenka1.html

- Ostrow-Mazowiecka, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of
Ostrow-Mazowiecka) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrow/ostrow.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rafalovka/rafalovka.html

- Ratno, Ukraine (Ratno; Story of a Destroyed Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ratno/ratno.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk, memorial book of the martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Svir, Poland (Our Townlet Swir)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svir/svir.html

- Valkininkai, Lithuania (Olkeniki in flames; a memorial book to the
community of Olkenik in the Vilna district)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Valkininkai/Valkininkai.html

- Wadowice, Poland (Memorial Book of the Communities Wadowice, Andrychow,
Kalwarja, Myslenice, Sucha)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wadowice/wadowice.html

- Wysokie-Mazowieckie, Poland (Wysokie-Mazowieckie; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wysokie/Wysokie-Mazowieckie.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them.

By-the way, the Yizkor Book Project now contains 1,301 entries, 627 books,
9,468 pages, 20,023 images and we continue to grow and grow with all of your
help.

Wishing you all the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@...

Early American SIG #USA Yizkor Book Project, June 2011 #usa

Lance Ackerfeld
 

Shalom,

As we head out into the long hot summer or the long cold winter, for those
on the other side of the planet, I have to report that June was yet another
"hyperactive" month for the Yizkor Book Project. Happily, quite a large
number of new books and entries were added and notably, a new Translation
project has been added this month for Dej, Romania (Des, Hungary) and we are
looking for financial support of this project in order to allow those of you
with roots there, to read about the people and thriving culture that existed
before the Holocaust. If you feel able to assist in helping to finance this
or any of our currently running translation projects at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
, your help would be much appreciated. The importance of these funds is
clearly illustrated in this month's updates, half of which are projects in
our Translations Funds.

June also saw the addition of a large number of necrologies which not only
immortalize the names of our loved ones but also can provide their family
relationships, professions, dates of birth and more or these people. As
such, these lists are also an invaluable genealogical resource and to assist
in research, the names >from the necrologies are periodically added to the
searchable Yizkor Book Necrology Database at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/ These days, this important but
time-taking work of adding to the database is carried out by Max Heffler,
who also carries out a myriad of other tasks for JewishGen and elsewhere. I
would truly like to spread the heavy load which these days falls heavily on
Max's shoulders alone and am eager to hear >from any of you who have some
time to help in preparing the lists in Excel which are then added to the
database.

As far as the June figures go, during this last month we have added these 9
new projects:

- Burshtyn, Ukraine (Book of Bursztyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Burshtyn/Burshtyn.html

- Carpathian Mountains (Youth >from the Carpathian Mountains)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Carpathian_Mountains/Carpathian_Mountains.html
or http://tinyurl.com/3qejcy6
[includes Izki, Pilipets, Rostoka and Verkhne-Studenyy in the Ukraine]

- Dej, Romania (Des..., Bethlen, Magyarlapos, Retteg, Nagyilonda and
vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dej/dej.html

- Kremenets', Ukraine (Voice of Kremenets Emigrants in Israel and the
Diaspora - Booklet 10)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets1/Kre1_1000.html

- Kremenets', Ukraine (Voice of Kremenets Emigrants in Israel and the
Diaspora - Booklet 16)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets1/Kre1_1600.html

- Kremenets', Ukraine (Voice of Kremenets Emigrants in Israel and the
Diaspora - Booklet 17)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets1/Kre1_1700.html

- Kremenets', Ukraine (Voice of Kremenets Emigrants in Israel and the
Diaspora - Booklet 18)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets1/Kre1_1800.html

- Murska Sobota, Slovenia (They Died in the Fight for Freedom)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Murska_Sobota/Murska_Sobota.html

- Nyiregyhaza, Hungary (Jewish Life in Nyiregyhaza)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Nyiregyhaza/Nyiregyhaza.html


Added in 27 new entries:

- Aukshtadvaris, Lithuania (Lite)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lita/lit1869.html

- Bad Nauheim, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_germany/ger3_00084.html

- Haradok (Horodok), Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland,
Volume VIII) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00229.html

- Komyan, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00561.html

- Katiliske, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00559.html

- Kietaviskes, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00559b.html

- Kriukai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00616.html

- Krincinas, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00621d.html

- Krivlyan, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00621e.html

- Kulbes, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00561b.html

- Kuliai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00559c.html

- Kursenai, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/lit6_108.html

- Laizuva, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/lit6_130.html

- Laukuva, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/lit6_135.html

- Liudvinavas, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/lit6_147.html

- Lucinava (Marijampole), Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities:
Lithuania) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00346b.html

- Lucinava (Raseiniai), Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities:
Lithuania) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00346c.html

- Luksiai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00348.html

- Luoke, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/lit6_152.html

- Lyduvenai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00354.html

- Miroslavas, Lithuania (Protecting Our Litvak Heritage)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lithuania6/lit6_161.html

- Nacioniskis, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00410.html

- Nakan, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00410b.html

- Narikishok, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00410c.html

- Naujamiestis, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_Lita/lit_00401.html

- Sobrance, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities: Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo368.html

- Warszawa, Poland (Jewish Warsaw that was; a Yiddish literary anthology)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/warsaw1/warsaw1.html


We have continued to update 26 of our existing projects:

- Bialystok, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno, Wolyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubno/Dubno.html

- Dzyarzhynsk, Belarus (Koidanov; Memorial Volume of the Martyrs of
Koidanov) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzyarzhynsk/Dzyarzhynsk.html

- Fehergyarmat, Hungary (Our Former City Fehergyarmat)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Fehergyarmat/Fehergyarmat.html

- Garwolin, Poland (Garwolin Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/garwolin/garp000.html [Polish]

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/Goniadz.html

- Gorodets, Belarus (Horodetz; history of a town, 1142-1942)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodets/gorodets.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grajewo/Grajewo.html

- Katowice, Poland (Katowice: the Rise and Decline of the Jewish community;
Memorial Book) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/katowice/katowice.html

- Khmelnytskyy, Ukraine (The destruction of Proskurov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Khmelnytskyy/Khmelnytskyy.html

- Kolki, Ukraine (Summoned >from the Ashes)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolki/kolki.html

- Lithuania http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Lowicz, Poland (Lowicz; a Town in Mazovia, Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lowicz/lowicz.html

- Oradea, Romania (A city and yesterday; memorial book to the Jews of
Grosswardein) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/oradea/oradea.html

- Ostrolenka, Poland (Book of Kehilat Ostrolenka; Yizkor Book of the Jewish
Community of Ostrolenka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrolenka1/ostrolenka1.html

- Ostrow-Mazowiecka, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of
Ostrow-Mazowiecka) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrow/ostrow.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rafalovka/rafalovka.html

- Ratno, Ukraine (Ratno; Story of a Destroyed Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ratno/ratno.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk, memorial book of the martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Svir, Poland (Our Townlet Swir)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svir/svir.html

- Valkininkai, Lithuania (Olkeniki in flames; a memorial book to the
community of Olkenik in the Vilna district)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Valkininkai/Valkininkai.html

- Wadowice, Poland (Memorial Book of the Communities Wadowice, Andrychow,
Kalwarja, Myslenice, Sucha)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wadowice/wadowice.html

- Wysokie-Mazowieckie, Poland (Wysokie-Mazowieckie; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wysokie/Wysokie-Mazowieckie.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them.

By-the way, the Yizkor Book Project now contains 1,301 entries, 627 books,
9,468 pages, 20,023 images and we continue to grow and grow with all of your
help.

Wishing you all the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@...

Re: Keeping records straight #general

Paul Silverstone
 

While the divorced persons without children do not contribute to the
heritage of the family, nevertheless their parents, children by another
parent and siblings are part of the family as it existed at the time of the
marriage. I believe it is useful to know about them. Otherwise you may have
a one-sided family lacking information about the relatives by marriage as
they were at the time. If someone refers to "Uncle Sam" and you show no such
uncle you are not giving the full picture of the family.

Paul Silverstone

On 6/29/2011 11:54 PM, Janette Silverman wrote:
...My question is only about keeping extended family on the tree of a
person who married into the family and divorced with no children - do you
keep their parents, grandparents, siblings, etc on the tree?...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Keeping records straight #general

Paul Silverstone
 

While the divorced persons without children do not contribute to the
heritage of the family, nevertheless their parents, children by another
parent and siblings are part of the family as it existed at the time of the
marriage. I believe it is useful to know about them. Otherwise you may have
a one-sided family lacking information about the relatives by marriage as
they were at the time. If someone refers to "Uncle Sam" and you show no such
uncle you are not giving the full picture of the family.

Paul Silverstone

On 6/29/2011 11:54 PM, Janette Silverman wrote:
...My question is only about keeping extended family on the tree of a
person who married into the family and divorced with no children - do you
keep their parents, grandparents, siblings, etc on the tree?...

Re: A Jewish woman explores her family's past in Eastern Europe #general

Paul Silverstone
 

When I visited my ancestral town of Makow Mazowiecki a few years ago, I
found that the local bus station had been built where the Jewish cemetery
had previously existed. All one could see was a large paved over area for
buses. Gravestones had been used as paving stones (face down fortunately).
A local resident has made it his business to retrieve these stones and a
memorial cairn was erected.

It is notable that the synagogue also was destroyed and is now an empty
space in the town. Who did these acts? Even if done by local citizens, it
would not and probably could not have been done without the Nazi occupation.
I don't believe the Nazis didn't care, at least not in this place. Not only
was the Jewish population removed and killed, but their artifacts were also
destroyed.

Paul Silverstone

On 7/2/2011 8:52 AM, Howard Margol wrote:
From: "m.steinberg@..."
In view of Howard Margol's statement, the photograph at the following link
should be brought into this discussion:
"Jewish Cemetery After Wartime Destruction (Gargzdai (Gorzd), Lithuania)
Photograph taken by George Birman 1944 Looking Northwest
Photograph provided courtesy of George Birman"
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Gargzdai/Birmanphoto4.htm
It appears that my simple statement that the Nazis did not care about Jewish
cemeteries because the Jews there were already dead, seems to have
triggered a number of dissenting opinions. Basically, I was referring to the
Jews themselves and not the cemeteries or gravestones.

Referring to the photograph referenced above, it appears to me that the
Jewish cemetery was destroyed by bombs or artillery shells during combat and
not by a deliberate act by the Nazis. Even the caption says, Wartime
Destruction which could mean almost anything.

As a combat veteran of World War II, in France and Germany, I can attest
to the fact that a lot of destruction occurred everywhere in Europe and
cemeteries were no exception.
MODERATOR NOTE: This discussion thread has run its course and is straying beyond
the mission of this forum: Jewish Genealogy. Further posts will not be
entertained unless they directly relate to Jewish Genealogy.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: A Jewish woman explores her family's past in Eastern Europe #general

Paul Silverstone
 

When I visited my ancestral town of Makow Mazowiecki a few years ago, I
found that the local bus station had been built where the Jewish cemetery
had previously existed. All one could see was a large paved over area for
buses. Gravestones had been used as paving stones (face down fortunately).
A local resident has made it his business to retrieve these stones and a
memorial cairn was erected.

It is notable that the synagogue also was destroyed and is now an empty
space in the town. Who did these acts? Even if done by local citizens, it
would not and probably could not have been done without the Nazi occupation.
I don't believe the Nazis didn't care, at least not in this place. Not only
was the Jewish population removed and killed, but their artifacts were also
destroyed.

Paul Silverstone

On 7/2/2011 8:52 AM, Howard Margol wrote:
From: "m.steinberg@..."
In view of Howard Margol's statement, the photograph at the following link
should be brought into this discussion:
"Jewish Cemetery After Wartime Destruction (Gargzdai (Gorzd), Lithuania)
Photograph taken by George Birman 1944 Looking Northwest
Photograph provided courtesy of George Birman"
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Gargzdai/Birmanphoto4.htm
It appears that my simple statement that the Nazis did not care about Jewish
cemeteries because the Jews there were already dead, seems to have
triggered a number of dissenting opinions. Basically, I was referring to the
Jews themselves and not the cemeteries or gravestones.

Referring to the photograph referenced above, it appears to me that the
Jewish cemetery was destroyed by bombs or artillery shells during combat and
not by a deliberate act by the Nazis. Even the caption says, Wartime
Destruction which could mean almost anything.

As a combat veteran of World War II, in France and Germany, I can attest
to the fact that a lot of destruction occurred everywhere in Europe and
cemeteries were no exception.
MODERATOR NOTE: This discussion thread has run its course and is straying beyond
the mission of this forum: Jewish Genealogy. Further posts will not be
entertained unless they directly relate to Jewish Genealogy.

Re: Stockholm Cemetery - look-up - thank you. #general

nigel wilson
 

Dear Genners,

I would like to say a big thank you to all who responded to my request for
a tombstone photograph in a Stockholm cemetery.

A wonderful person has already been to the cemetery and I am now in possession
of photographs.

Thank you all again.

Patricia Wilson (Israel)

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Stockholm Cemetery - look-up - thank you. #general

nigel wilson
 

Dear Genners,

I would like to say a big thank you to all who responded to my request for
a tombstone photograph in a Stockholm cemetery.

A wonderful person has already been to the cemetery and I am now in possession
of photographs.

Thank you all again.

Patricia Wilson (Israel)

Family EMANUEL in New York #germany

Steven Emanuel <steven.emanuel@...>
 

Dear All

With the enormous amount of assistance given by readers of this list I was
able to trace much of the lives of three great uncles who emigrated to New
York >from Obrigheim in Germany. However I have had little success in finding
their descendants. The brief details of each family are:

Simon EMANUEL. Arrived firstly in 1884 (San Francisco) , later returned
home, studied, married Eugenia and went to New York in 1905. There were two
children:
1. Paul (aka Edward P),born 1906, a lawyer & Immigration Judge who married
Dorothy Silverman in later life. He died in 1997. Was there an earlier
marriage and children?
2. Helen born 1919 no definitive further trace found.

Adolf EMANUEL. Arrived New York in 1940 with wife Johanna. Adolf seems to
have died within a few months and Johanna in 1978. They had one son:
Erich, born 1903 and arrived in New York in 1938 with wife Trude. He died
1964 and she in 2001. The name was changed to EDEN. Their son:
Hans (aka John), born 1933, became an Opthalmologist. I understand that his
partner was male but there may have been adopted children.

Eugen EMANUEL. Arrived in New York in 1935, with wife Flora and their two
children following in 1936. I have not traced either of them further. The
two sons are:
1. Werner (aka Donald), born 1921, also no further trace.
2. Cola (aka Nick C) born 1924. He died in WW2 in "The Rheims Accident" of
1945. So possibly no wife or children.

Does anyone know of these families? If so I would be delighted to hear >from
them!

Steven Emanuel, Blackwater, UK JGID 185680 <steven.emanuel@...>

German SIG #Germany Family EMANUEL in New York #germany

Steven Emanuel <steven.emanuel@...>
 

Dear All

With the enormous amount of assistance given by readers of this list I was
able to trace much of the lives of three great uncles who emigrated to New
York >from Obrigheim in Germany. However I have had little success in finding
their descendants. The brief details of each family are:

Simon EMANUEL. Arrived firstly in 1884 (San Francisco) , later returned
home, studied, married Eugenia and went to New York in 1905. There were two
children:
1. Paul (aka Edward P),born 1906, a lawyer & Immigration Judge who married
Dorothy Silverman in later life. He died in 1997. Was there an earlier
marriage and children?
2. Helen born 1919 no definitive further trace found.

Adolf EMANUEL. Arrived New York in 1940 with wife Johanna. Adolf seems to
have died within a few months and Johanna in 1978. They had one son:
Erich, born 1903 and arrived in New York in 1938 with wife Trude. He died
1964 and she in 2001. The name was changed to EDEN. Their son:
Hans (aka John), born 1933, became an Opthalmologist. I understand that his
partner was male but there may have been adopted children.

Eugen EMANUEL. Arrived in New York in 1935, with wife Flora and their two
children following in 1936. I have not traced either of them further. The
two sons are:
1. Werner (aka Donald), born 1921, also no further trace.
2. Cola (aka Nick C) born 1924. He died in WW2 in "The Rheims Accident" of
1945. So possibly no wife or children.

Does anyone know of these families? If so I would be delighted to hear >from
them!

Steven Emanuel, Blackwater, UK JGID 185680 <steven.emanuel@...>

Re: Two Towns #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Hi,

Zablotow is currently known as Zabolotiv, Western Ukraine at
4828 2517. This Jewish community was located within Sniatyn
district in Stanislawow Province.

"Brezovica" - most probably Berezhnitsa (ex Bereznica) located
at 4817 2522, some 15 miles distance >from Zabolotiv.

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor

Steve Jaron <sjaron@...> wrote:

So in May I went to visit Vienna and had the opportunity to visit the
Jewish Archives. While there I found out about two additional towns that I
am curious about.

1. Brezovica (spelling?) - Apparently my maternal grandfather's paternal
grandfather Michael Rothstein was >from that town however I can't seem to
find anything about it on any database.
The only instance I have found is on Wikipedia it lists it as a town in
Kosovo. So out of curiosity is anyone looking for Rothsteins >from that town
as well as Tarnopol. Is there some connection between the two towns? Does it
have a different name now?

2. Zablotow (spelling?) - This one might be a little easier mostly I was
just wondering if anyone was researching Tillingers >from this area that
would have moved to Stanislawow/Ivano-Frankivsk....

Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia RE: Two Towns #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Hi,

Zablotow is currently known as Zabolotiv, Western Ukraine at
4828 2517. This Jewish community was located within Sniatyn
district in Stanislawow Province.

"Brezovica" - most probably Berezhnitsa (ex Bereznica) located
at 4817 2522, some 15 miles distance >from Zabolotiv.

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor

Steve Jaron <sjaron@...> wrote:

So in May I went to visit Vienna and had the opportunity to visit the
Jewish Archives. While there I found out about two additional towns that I
am curious about.

1. Brezovica (spelling?) - Apparently my maternal grandfather's paternal
grandfather Michael Rothstein was >from that town however I can't seem to
find anything about it on any database.
The only instance I have found is on Wikipedia it lists it as a town in
Kosovo. So out of curiosity is anyone looking for Rothsteins >from that town
as well as Tarnopol. Is there some connection between the two towns? Does it
have a different name now?

2. Zablotow (spelling?) - This one might be a little easier mostly I was
just wondering if anyone was researching Tillingers >from this area that
would have moved to Stanislawow/Ivano-Frankivsk....

Resource Center at The 31st IAJGS International Conference #general

31st IAJGS Conference <dc2011_conference@...>
 

Don't Pass Up the Resource Center at The Conference!

This year’s Resource Center is a real benefit to researchers, and definitely
should not be overlooked. It's a valuable place to spend time studying maps
for ancestral towns, reviewing computerized surname indexes, and searching
through a wide variety of databases to fill in gaps in your research. It's a
"problem worth having" because it's virtually guaranteed to compete with your
equally strong desire to attend Conference sessions, network, see Judaic
films, visit vendors, etc. (You also will be able to avoid going outside
into the August heat of Washington by conducting your research in the comfort
of the Grand Hyatt, and still be close to other Conference features you want
to catch!)

The Resource Center also will be a lively, "happening" place to be because
virtually EVERY Conference attendee will visit the Resource Center! How can
you pass that up? (And when you do come by, we suggest you bring a listing
of your "research goals," the specific surnames, towns, or dates you’re
researching so that you can spend your time more wisely.)

Where’s what this year's Resource Center consists of:
- Carefully selected reference materials, specialized archival
materials, and maps (laminated and available on long tables) >from the
hosting organization, the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington
(JGSGW)’s extensive library collection;
- 5 PC computers dedicated to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum
(USHMM) Central Names Index (CNI). That index will help inform attendees'
Holocaust-era research and be a major aid when conducting research at the
Museum itself; and
- 35 additional PCs loaded with links to websites usually
accessible only through subscription or membership.
- Translation Services located in an adjacent room, with a free
20-minute appointment for conference attendees who sign up at the
Conference, its schedule to be posted.

The Resource Center will be open during these days and hours:
Sunday, August 14, >from 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Monday, August 15, >from 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday, August 16, >from 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday, August 17, >from 7:30 a.m.- 9 p.m.
Thursday, August 18, >from 7:30 a.m.– 5:30 p.m.
Friday, August 19, >from 7:30 a.m. – 11 a.m.

We'll have a large number of links available to both free and subscription
(free at the Conference) genealogy-related websites. These will be on the
Resource Center's 35 computers, and be available for all SIX DAYS of
the Conference.
> Accessible Archives
> Ancestry.com
> British Newspapers Database (British Library)
> Conditions and Politics in Occupied Western Europe
> Find My Past and Ancestors on Board
> Financial Times Historical Archives
> Footnote.com
> Gale News Vault
> GenTeam
> Godfrey Memorial Library (GOLD)
> Guardian and Observer Digital Newspaper Archives
> Israel Genealogy Society
> JGSGB Website Databases
> MyHeritage
> New England Historical and Genealogical Society
> Newspaper Archive
> The Forward
> The Jewish Chronicle (Great Britain)

Save the Date: ProQuest Databases will only be available on Wednesday,
August 16! On that date, and >from 7:30 am to 9 pm, ProQuest has agreed to
provide free access to their numerous and specialized databases. To be fair
to all users wishing access, we'll need to limit use of the computers with
ProQuest on them to one hour per user. Here is what the ProQuest
databases available that day will include:
ProQuest Sanborn Maps Geo Edition (all content)
Ethnic NewsWatch (includes Jewish Newspapers)
Historic Map Works Library Edition (all content)
HeritageQuest Online (all content)
Gannett Military Newspapers (all content)
Canada's Heritage >from 1844- Globe and Mail (all content)
Canadian Newsstand (all content)
Toronto Star (all content >from inception to current, as available)
ProQuest Dissertation and Theses (all content)
American Periodicals Series Online--1741-1900 (all content)
List of 20 Historical Newspapers (16 U.S.-based and 4 International):
U. S.-Based:
The Arizona Republican—1890-1922
Atlanta Constitution—1868-1945
The Baltimore Sun—1837-1985
The Boston Globe—1872-1979
The Chicago Tribune—1849-1987
The Christian Science Monitor—1908-1997
Detroit Free Press—1831-1922
Hartford Courant—1764-1985
Indianapolis Star—1903-1922
Los Angeles Times—1881-1987
The New York Times with Index—1851-2007
New York Tribune—1841-1922
San Francisco Chronicle—1865-1922
St. Louis Post-Dispatch—1874-1922
Wall Street Journal—1889-1993
Washington Post—1877-1994
International Newspapers:
The Guardian & The Observer—1791-2003
Irish Times & Weekly Irish Times—1859-2009
The Scotsman—1817-1950
The Times of India—1838-2001

As you can see, this year's Resource Center is abundantly filled with
versatile research tools. Please come by the Resource Center: you'll thank
yourself!

Books and archival materials can be checked out for use by turning in a
government-issued picture ID to be left with Resource Center staff. This
ensures that materials are returned. No one will be permitted to leave the
room with library materials.

But you do have to be a Conference registrant to use the maps, books,
archival materials, and computerized databases there. With that in mind,
Conference registration rates are very flexible and include full week or
single day registration, as well as discount rates for spouses/companions,
college and high school students. You also can arrange for Grand Hyatt
Washington hotel lodging through the Conference website.

For further information, please contact info@.... The Conference
website is www.dc2011.org

See you in August!
Suzan Wynne
Resource Center Coordinator

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Resource Center at The 31st IAJGS International Conference #general

31st IAJGS Conference <dc2011_conference@...>
 

Don't Pass Up the Resource Center at The Conference!

This year’s Resource Center is a real benefit to researchers, and definitely
should not be overlooked. It's a valuable place to spend time studying maps
for ancestral towns, reviewing computerized surname indexes, and searching
through a wide variety of databases to fill in gaps in your research. It's a
"problem worth having" because it's virtually guaranteed to compete with your
equally strong desire to attend Conference sessions, network, see Judaic
films, visit vendors, etc. (You also will be able to avoid going outside
into the August heat of Washington by conducting your research in the comfort
of the Grand Hyatt, and still be close to other Conference features you want
to catch!)

The Resource Center also will be a lively, "happening" place to be because
virtually EVERY Conference attendee will visit the Resource Center! How can
you pass that up? (And when you do come by, we suggest you bring a listing
of your "research goals," the specific surnames, towns, or dates you’re
researching so that you can spend your time more wisely.)

Where’s what this year's Resource Center consists of:
- Carefully selected reference materials, specialized archival
materials, and maps (laminated and available on long tables) >from the
hosting organization, the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington
(JGSGW)’s extensive library collection;
- 5 PC computers dedicated to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum
(USHMM) Central Names Index (CNI). That index will help inform attendees'
Holocaust-era research and be a major aid when conducting research at the
Museum itself; and
- 35 additional PCs loaded with links to websites usually
accessible only through subscription or membership.
- Translation Services located in an adjacent room, with a free
20-minute appointment for conference attendees who sign up at the
Conference, its schedule to be posted.

The Resource Center will be open during these days and hours:
Sunday, August 14, >from 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Monday, August 15, >from 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday, August 16, >from 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday, August 17, >from 7:30 a.m.- 9 p.m.
Thursday, August 18, >from 7:30 a.m.– 5:30 p.m.
Friday, August 19, >from 7:30 a.m. – 11 a.m.

We'll have a large number of links available to both free and subscription
(free at the Conference) genealogy-related websites. These will be on the
Resource Center's 35 computers, and be available for all SIX DAYS of
the Conference.
> Accessible Archives
> Ancestry.com
> British Newspapers Database (British Library)
> Conditions and Politics in Occupied Western Europe
> Find My Past and Ancestors on Board
> Financial Times Historical Archives
> Footnote.com
> Gale News Vault
> GenTeam
> Godfrey Memorial Library (GOLD)
> Guardian and Observer Digital Newspaper Archives
> Israel Genealogy Society
> JGSGB Website Databases
> MyHeritage
> New England Historical and Genealogical Society
> Newspaper Archive
> The Forward
> The Jewish Chronicle (Great Britain)

Save the Date: ProQuest Databases will only be available on Wednesday,
August 16! On that date, and >from 7:30 am to 9 pm, ProQuest has agreed to
provide free access to their numerous and specialized databases. To be fair
to all users wishing access, we'll need to limit use of the computers with
ProQuest on them to one hour per user. Here is what the ProQuest
databases available that day will include:
ProQuest Sanborn Maps Geo Edition (all content)
Ethnic NewsWatch (includes Jewish Newspapers)
Historic Map Works Library Edition (all content)
HeritageQuest Online (all content)
Gannett Military Newspapers (all content)
Canada's Heritage >from 1844- Globe and Mail (all content)
Canadian Newsstand (all content)
Toronto Star (all content >from inception to current, as available)
ProQuest Dissertation and Theses (all content)
American Periodicals Series Online--1741-1900 (all content)
List of 20 Historical Newspapers (16 U.S.-based and 4 International):
U. S.-Based:
The Arizona Republican—1890-1922
Atlanta Constitution—1868-1945
The Baltimore Sun—1837-1985
The Boston Globe—1872-1979
The Chicago Tribune—1849-1987
The Christian Science Monitor—1908-1997
Detroit Free Press—1831-1922
Hartford Courant—1764-1985
Indianapolis Star—1903-1922
Los Angeles Times—1881-1987
The New York Times with Index—1851-2007
New York Tribune—1841-1922
San Francisco Chronicle—1865-1922
St. Louis Post-Dispatch—1874-1922
Wall Street Journal—1889-1993
Washington Post—1877-1994
International Newspapers:
The Guardian & The Observer—1791-2003
Irish Times & Weekly Irish Times—1859-2009
The Scotsman—1817-1950
The Times of India—1838-2001

As you can see, this year's Resource Center is abundantly filled with
versatile research tools. Please come by the Resource Center: you'll thank
yourself!

Books and archival materials can be checked out for use by turning in a
government-issued picture ID to be left with Resource Center staff. This
ensures that materials are returned. No one will be permitted to leave the
room with library materials.

But you do have to be a Conference registrant to use the maps, books,
archival materials, and computerized databases there. With that in mind,
Conference registration rates are very flexible and include full week or
single day registration, as well as discount rates for spouses/companions,
college and high school students. You also can arrange for Grand Hyatt
Washington hotel lodging through the Conference website.

For further information, please contact info@.... The Conference
website is www.dc2011.org

See you in August!
Suzan Wynne
Resource Center Coordinator

ViewMate translation request - German, Image #19439 (Hanne ADLER, ship manifest) #hungary

Karen Hirsch
 

I've posted a vital record (ship manifest >from the ship Deutschland,
departing Hamburg, 25 August 1900) in German for which I need a few
loose translations.

My g-grandmother, Hanne ADLER (>from Kisvarda, Hungary), immigrated to
the US on this ship. She is the second to last entry in the image. I
would like a loose translation of the headers for columns 8 and 9, as
well as the entries in those columns for Hanne ADLER. The entry in
column 9 seems to be a "ditto" to the entry above, but I cannot
read/translate it. You will likely need to open the scan in a separate
window in order to see it at a large enough size.

The image is on ViewMate at the following address:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3D19439

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much for any help you can give!

Karen Hirsch

Researching ADLER (Kisv=E1rda, Hungary), BERG (Prussia/Germany), BERGER
(Kisv=E1rda, Hungary), EINSTEIN (Bad Buchau, Biberach, Germany), FISCHER
(Germany), HIRSCH (Bohemia/Austria/Czechoslovakia), LAZARUS
(Prussia/Germany), LOWENTHAL (Freudenthal, Germany), SCHWARTZ
(Germany)

Moderator: Please respond off-list.

Hungary SIG #Hungary ViewMate translation request - German, Image #19439 (Hanne ADLER, ship manifest) #hungary

Karen Hirsch
 

I've posted a vital record (ship manifest >from the ship Deutschland,
departing Hamburg, 25 August 1900) in German for which I need a few
loose translations.

My g-grandmother, Hanne ADLER (>from Kisvarda, Hungary), immigrated to
the US on this ship. She is the second to last entry in the image. I
would like a loose translation of the headers for columns 8 and 9, as
well as the entries in those columns for Hanne ADLER. The entry in
column 9 seems to be a "ditto" to the entry above, but I cannot
read/translate it. You will likely need to open the scan in a separate
window in order to see it at a large enough size.

The image is on ViewMate at the following address:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3D19439

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much for any help you can give!

Karen Hirsch

Researching ADLER (Kisv=E1rda, Hungary), BERG (Prussia/Germany), BERGER
(Kisv=E1rda, Hungary), EINSTEIN (Bad Buchau, Biberach, Germany), FISCHER
(Germany), HIRSCH (Bohemia/Austria/Czechoslovakia), LAZARUS
(Prussia/Germany), LOWENTHAL (Freudenthal, Germany), SCHWARTZ
(Germany)

Moderator: Please respond off-list.