Date   

German SIG #Germany Re: Gnesen, Prussia Jewish records #germany

Jim Bennett
 

Helen Kenvin inquired about the location of Jewish metrical records for
Gnesen [now Gniezno, Poland].

There are, happily, eight years of BMD records on LDA microfilm No. 719426.
It can be ordered >from any of the LDS family history centers.
They cover 1840-1847-- part of the period that Helen is searching.

from 1848-1873 there are no Jewish metrical reconds known to exist.
Beginning in 1874 all Jewish births, marriages and deaths are recorded
in civil records registers in all towns in Prussia, together with
the general population.

These records were also microfilmed by the LDS.

Leo Baeck Institute in New York holds about 25 books and manuscripts
concerning Gnesen.

Jim Bennett, Haifa myrnabennett@...


Re: Gnesen, Prussia Jewish records #germany

Jim Bennett
 

Helen Kenvin inquired about the location of Jewish metrical records for
Gnesen [now Gniezno, Poland].

There are, happily, eight years of BMD records on LDA microfilm No. 719426.
It can be ordered >from any of the LDS family history centers.
They cover 1840-1847-- part of the period that Helen is searching.

from 1848-1873 there are no Jewish metrical reconds known to exist.
Beginning in 1874 all Jewish births, marriages and deaths are recorded
in civil records registers in all towns in Prussia, together with
the general population.

These records were also microfilmed by the LDS.

Leo Baeck Institute in New York holds about 25 books and manuscripts
concerning Gnesen.

Jim Bennett, Haifa myrnabennett@...


German SIG #Germany RE: Escaping Germany via Japan #germany

David & Diana Laufer
 

Paula Weil asked:

"Why did Jews escaping Germany travel to Japan instead of leaving from
a port in Europe? How might they have travelled >from Berlin to Japan?"

As you will be aware WWII had already commenced by 1940, and during that
year most of western Europe was occupied by Nazi forces. Trans-Atlantic
crossings became dangerous, but may have been possible >from neutral
countries such as Spain and Portugal. However, to get there involved
transiting countries in the war zone. At that time Germany and the Soviet
Union had a truce having divided Poland between them. So it was possible to
travel by train >from Berlin to Moscow, then by trans-Siberian railway to
Vladivostok and onwards via Japan to other destinations, most notably
Shanghai where visas were not required. Although I cannot cite references
for this route, I did see lists of passengers at the Central Archives of the
History of the Jewish People in Jerusalem while attending the IAJGS
conference in 2004. Regards,

David Laufer, Sydney, Australia <dlaufer@...>


Re: Escaping Germany via Japan #germany

David & Diana Laufer
 

Paula Weil asked:

"Why did Jews escaping Germany travel to Japan instead of leaving from
a port in Europe? How might they have travelled >from Berlin to Japan?"

As you will be aware WWII had already commenced by 1940, and during that
year most of western Europe was occupied by Nazi forces. Trans-Atlantic
crossings became dangerous, but may have been possible >from neutral
countries such as Spain and Portugal. However, to get there involved
transiting countries in the war zone. At that time Germany and the Soviet
Union had a truce having divided Poland between them. So it was possible to
travel by train >from Berlin to Moscow, then by trans-Siberian railway to
Vladivostok and onwards via Japan to other destinations, most notably
Shanghai where visas were not required. Although I cannot cite references
for this route, I did see lists of passengers at the Central Archives of the
History of the Jewish People in Jerusalem while attending the IAJGS
conference in 2004. Regards,

David Laufer, Sydney, Australia <dlaufer@...>


German SIG #Germany Re: From Germany > USA via Japan #germany

Werner Frank
 

In response to Paula Weil's query on how German Jews escaped to America via
the far east, I offer the following scenario captured in my recent book, The
Curse of Gurs: Way Station to Auschwitz (available on Amazon):

"With affidavit in hand, Jella and Ruth succeeded in obtaining the necessary
visas on May 10, 1940. They were now faced with the challenge of how to get
to America. World War II had broken out in September 1939 and traveling
across the Atlantic became ever more difficult. Even under these conditions,
a booking had been made for a Holland-America ship crossing >from Amsterdam
on September 10, 1940. This opportunity was doomed after Germany invaded
Holland. Hopes to reach other ports in Italy and Portugal were also
shattered. Only one option seemed to present itself, the eastern route via
Russia and Asia to America.

On August 12, 1940, Jella and Ruth left Mannheim by train for Berlin and
then flew Lufthansa to Moscow where they spent three days as tourists. >from
Moscow, they made a ten-day trip on the Trans-Siberian railroad to the far-
eastern part of Russia. They then crossed into Manchuria, and after one night
in Harbin continued to the southern tip of Korea, finally ending up in Kobe,
Japan. This journey required transit visas through Russia, Korea and Japan,
providing a considerable challenge in breaking through bureaucratic red tape.

The air and train fares, as well as the hotel stays >from Mannheim to the
port of embarkation in Yokahama, were prepaid in Reichsmark since travelers
were limited to 10 RM each on leaving Germany. The voyage to Seattle was on
a Japanese vessel and required funding in dollars, which was provided by
Jella's brother Carl Furth of Omaha Nebraska. After arrival in the United
States on September 10, 1940, mother and daughter travelled to Omaha to meet
their benefactor before settling with our family in Chjcago's Hyde Park on
September 18, 1940. "

Werner Frank, Thousand Oaks CA <wlfrank82@...>


Re: From Germany > USA via Japan #germany

Werner Frank
 

In response to Paula Weil's query on how German Jews escaped to America via
the far east, I offer the following scenario captured in my recent book, The
Curse of Gurs: Way Station to Auschwitz (available on Amazon):

"With affidavit in hand, Jella and Ruth succeeded in obtaining the necessary
visas on May 10, 1940. They were now faced with the challenge of how to get
to America. World War II had broken out in September 1939 and traveling
across the Atlantic became ever more difficult. Even under these conditions,
a booking had been made for a Holland-America ship crossing >from Amsterdam
on September 10, 1940. This opportunity was doomed after Germany invaded
Holland. Hopes to reach other ports in Italy and Portugal were also
shattered. Only one option seemed to present itself, the eastern route via
Russia and Asia to America.

On August 12, 1940, Jella and Ruth left Mannheim by train for Berlin and
then flew Lufthansa to Moscow where they spent three days as tourists. >from
Moscow, they made a ten-day trip on the Trans-Siberian railroad to the far-
eastern part of Russia. They then crossed into Manchuria, and after one night
in Harbin continued to the southern tip of Korea, finally ending up in Kobe,
Japan. This journey required transit visas through Russia, Korea and Japan,
providing a considerable challenge in breaking through bureaucratic red tape.

The air and train fares, as well as the hotel stays >from Mannheim to the
port of embarkation in Yokahama, were prepaid in Reichsmark since travelers
were limited to 10 RM each on leaving Germany. The voyage to Seattle was on
a Japanese vessel and required funding in dollars, which was provided by
Jella's brother Carl Furth of Omaha Nebraska. After arrival in the United
States on September 10, 1940, mother and daughter travelled to Omaha to meet
their benefactor before settling with our family in Chjcago's Hyde Park on
September 18, 1940. "

Werner Frank, Thousand Oaks CA <wlfrank82@...>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish European Refugees in Morocco during WW II #general

Mathilde
 

Shalom,
I looking for persons >from various places in Europe who lived as refugees in Morocco
during WW II. Please answer in private.

Happy Independen Day! Yom Atzmaut Sameah!
Mathilde Tagger
Jerusalem


Jewish European Refugees in Morocco during WW II #general

Mathilde
 

Shalom,
I looking for persons >from various places in Europe who lived as refugees in Morocco
during WW II. Please answer in private.

Happy Independen Day! Yom Atzmaut Sameah!
Mathilde Tagger
Jerusalem


International Conference on Jewish Genealogy Speakers #poland

Florence Schumacher, Boston 2013 Publicity Chair
 

A rich and varied roster of speakers will be presenting during
the five and a half days of the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in Boston beginning
August 4.

Attendees will be able to choose >from 250 programs on seven
different tracks covering a wide range of topics including a
beginner's track on August 4/5, as well as computer tracks and a
film festival. The preliminary program (subject to change) will
be posted on the conference website on Tuesday, April 16th
(http://www.iajgs2013.org/program_schedule.cfm).

Many IAJGS Lifetime Achievement award winners, the luminaries of
Jewish genealogy, will give talks, including Steve Morse, Miriam
Weiner, Peter Lande, Jeff Malka, Hal Bookbinder, Warren Blatt,
Michael Tobias, and Stanley Diamond. Archivists >from Belgium, the
Czech Republic, Hungary, Israel, and Ukraine will be giving the
latest information about doing research in their countries.
Historians and experts >from England, Germany, Ireland, Lithuania,
Poland, Spain, Sweden, and the U.S. will provide the historical
context to our ancestors' lives and the methodologies to find them.

Unique to the Boston location of the conference will be several
talented local experts who have never presented at previous IAJGS
conferences. The keynote speaker will be Aaron Lansky, the famous
and dynamic founder of the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, MA.
Ellen Smith, co-author of The Jews of Boston and a well-known
historian, museum curator, and professor at Brandeis University,
will give a talk as well as conduct walking tours of Boston's
Jewish historical sites. Sharon Pucker Rivo, Director of the
National Center for Jewish Film at Brandeis University, will
present "Jews in Focus" about the important Jewish role in film.
Genealogical research in the New England states will be featured,
including immigration to the Port of Boston.

The annual Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the Jewish
Genealogical Society of New York, will feature two noted historians,
Annie Polland, Education Vice President at the Tenement Museum in
New York, and Daniel Soyer, professor at Fordham University. They
are co-authors of Emerging Metropolis -- the second volume of the
2012 award-winning book, City of Promises: History of Jews in New
York, which describes New York's transformation into a Jewish city.
They will speak together about the book and separately. Annie will
talk about the "Adaptation of Ritual," the complex adjustments
immigrant ancestors made to succeed, and Daniel will talk about
immigrant "landsmanschaften." Zvi Gitelman, Professor of Judaic
Studies at the University of Michigan and author of several important
books on Jewish ethnicity and identity among Eastern European Jews,
will present "Litvak-Galitsianer Wars, Jewish Cultural Geography."

In addition to updates on DNA, Holocaust research, and immigration,
areas of new focus include Sephardic Jews, Jewish cooking and
cookbooks, and a panel on cemetery restoration in both Europe and the
United States.

There also will be many hands-on computer workshops (for both Mac and
PC) and workshops on photo identification and preservation, on document
restoration, and on various languages (German, Russian, Polish and
Hebrew). Continuing the tradition of excellence of previous conferences,
there will be an Exhibitor Hall, a Resource Center, author events, and
book signings throughout the week.

from the first day's SHARE Fair, featuring an expanded number of Special
Interest Groups (SIGs) and Birds of a Feather (BOFs) as well as local
archives and historical societies, to the many programs offered all week
long, attendees will have trouble choosing which to attend >from Sunday
morning to Friday noon.

For more detailed information about the programs and to register, visit
<www.iajgs2013.org>. Early registration discounts end on April 30, so
register today.

Florence Schumacher
Publicity Chair
33rd IAJGS Conference on International Genealogy


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland International Conference on Jewish Genealogy Speakers #poland

Florence Schumacher, Boston 2013 Publicity Chair
 

A rich and varied roster of speakers will be presenting during
the five and a half days of the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in Boston beginning
August 4.

Attendees will be able to choose >from 250 programs on seven
different tracks covering a wide range of topics including a
beginner's track on August 4/5, as well as computer tracks and a
film festival. The preliminary program (subject to change) will
be posted on the conference website on Tuesday, April 16th
(http://www.iajgs2013.org/program_schedule.cfm).

Many IAJGS Lifetime Achievement award winners, the luminaries of
Jewish genealogy, will give talks, including Steve Morse, Miriam
Weiner, Peter Lande, Jeff Malka, Hal Bookbinder, Warren Blatt,
Michael Tobias, and Stanley Diamond. Archivists >from Belgium, the
Czech Republic, Hungary, Israel, and Ukraine will be giving the
latest information about doing research in their countries.
Historians and experts >from England, Germany, Ireland, Lithuania,
Poland, Spain, Sweden, and the U.S. will provide the historical
context to our ancestors' lives and the methodologies to find them.

Unique to the Boston location of the conference will be several
talented local experts who have never presented at previous IAJGS
conferences. The keynote speaker will be Aaron Lansky, the famous
and dynamic founder of the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, MA.
Ellen Smith, co-author of The Jews of Boston and a well-known
historian, museum curator, and professor at Brandeis University,
will give a talk as well as conduct walking tours of Boston's
Jewish historical sites. Sharon Pucker Rivo, Director of the
National Center for Jewish Film at Brandeis University, will
present "Jews in Focus" about the important Jewish role in film.
Genealogical research in the New England states will be featured,
including immigration to the Port of Boston.

The annual Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the Jewish
Genealogical Society of New York, will feature two noted historians,
Annie Polland, Education Vice President at the Tenement Museum in
New York, and Daniel Soyer, professor at Fordham University. They
are co-authors of Emerging Metropolis -- the second volume of the
2012 award-winning book, City of Promises: History of Jews in New
York, which describes New York's transformation into a Jewish city.
They will speak together about the book and separately. Annie will
talk about the "Adaptation of Ritual," the complex adjustments
immigrant ancestors made to succeed, and Daniel will talk about
immigrant "landsmanschaften." Zvi Gitelman, Professor of Judaic
Studies at the University of Michigan and author of several important
books on Jewish ethnicity and identity among Eastern European Jews,
will present "Litvak-Galitsianer Wars, Jewish Cultural Geography."

In addition to updates on DNA, Holocaust research, and immigration,
areas of new focus include Sephardic Jews, Jewish cooking and
cookbooks, and a panel on cemetery restoration in both Europe and the
United States.

There also will be many hands-on computer workshops (for both Mac and
PC) and workshops on photo identification and preservation, on document
restoration, and on various languages (German, Russian, Polish and
Hebrew). Continuing the tradition of excellence of previous conferences,
there will be an Exhibitor Hall, a Resource Center, author events, and
book signings throughout the week.

from the first day's SHARE Fair, featuring an expanded number of Special
Interest Groups (SIGs) and Birds of a Feather (BOFs) as well as local
archives and historical societies, to the many programs offered all week
long, attendees will have trouble choosing which to attend >from Sunday
morning to Friday noon.

For more detailed information about the programs and to register, visit
<www.iajgs2013.org>. Early registration discounts end on April 30, so
register today.

Florence Schumacher
Publicity Chair
33rd IAJGS Conference on International Genealogy


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland International Conference on Jewish Genealogy Speakers #lodz #poland

Florence Schumacher, Boston 2013 Publicity Chair
 

A rich and varied roster of speakers will be presenting during
the five and a half days of the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in Boston beginning
August 4.

Attendees will be able to choose >from 250 programs on seven
different tracks covering a wide range of topics including a
beginner's track on August 4/5, as well as computer tracks and a
film festival. The preliminary program (subject to change) will
be posted on the conference website on Tuesday, April 16th
(http://www.iajgs2013.org/program_schedule.cfm).

Many IAJGS Lifetime Achievement award winners, the luminaries of
Jewish genealogy, will give talks, including Steve Morse, Miriam
Weiner, Peter Lande, Jeff Malka, Hal Bookbinder, Warren Blatt,
Michael Tobias, and Stanley Diamond. Archivists >from Belgium, the
Czech Republic, Hungary, Israel, and Ukraine will be giving the
latest information about doing research in their countries.
Historians and experts >from England, Germany, Ireland, Lithuania,
Poland, Spain, Sweden, and the U.S. will provide the historical
context to our ancestors' lives and the methodologies to find them.

Unique to the Boston location of the conference will be several
talented local experts who have never presented at previous IAJGS
conferences. The keynote speaker will be Aaron Lansky, the famous
and dynamic founder of the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, MA.
Ellen Smith, co-author of The Jews of Boston and a well-known
historian, museum curator, and professor at Brandeis University,
will give a talk as well as conduct walking tours of Boston's
Jewish historical sites. Sharon Pucker Rivo, Director of the
National Center for Jewish Film at Brandeis University, will
present "Jews in Focus" about the important Jewish role in film.
Genealogical research in the New England states will be featured,
including immigration to the Port of Boston.

The annual Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the Jewish
Genealogical Society of New York, will feature two noted historians,
Annie Polland, Education Vice President at the Tenement Museum in
New York, and Daniel Soyer, professor at Fordham University. They
are co-authors of Emerging Metropolis -- the second volume of the
2012 award-winning book, City of Promises: History of Jews in New
York, which describes New York's transformation into a Jewish city.
They will speak together about the book and separately. Annie will
talk about the "Adaptation of Ritual," the complex adjustments
immigrant ancestors made to succeed, and Daniel will talk about
immigrant "landsmanschaften." Zvi Gitelman, Professor of Judaic
Studies at the University of Michigan and author of several important
books on Jewish ethnicity and identity among Eastern European Jews,
will present "Litvak-Galitsianer Wars, Jewish Cultural Geography."

In addition to updates on DNA, Holocaust research, and immigration,
areas of new focus include Sephardic Jews, Jewish cooking and
cookbooks, and a panel on cemetery restoration in both Europe and the
United States.

There also will be many hands-on computer workshops (for both Mac and
PC) and workshops on photo identification and preservation, on document
restoration, and on various languages (German, Russian, Polish and
Hebrew). Continuing the tradition of excellence of previous conferences,
there will be an Exhibitor Hall, a Resource Center, author events, and
book signings throughout the week.

from the first day's SHARE Fair, featuring an expanded number of Special
Interest Groups (SIGs) and Birds of a Feather (BOFs) as well as local
archives and historical societies, to the many programs offered all week
long, attendees will have trouble choosing which to attend >from Sunday
morning to Friday noon.

For more detailed information about the programs and to register, visit
<www.iajgs2013.org>. Early registration discounts end on April 30, so
register today.

Florence Schumacher
Publicity Chair
33rd IAJGS Conference on International Genealogy


International Conference on Jewish Genealogy Speakers #lodz #poland

Florence Schumacher, Boston 2013 Publicity Chair
 

A rich and varied roster of speakers will be presenting during
the five and a half days of the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in Boston beginning
August 4.

Attendees will be able to choose >from 250 programs on seven
different tracks covering a wide range of topics including a
beginner's track on August 4/5, as well as computer tracks and a
film festival. The preliminary program (subject to change) will
be posted on the conference website on Tuesday, April 16th
(http://www.iajgs2013.org/program_schedule.cfm).

Many IAJGS Lifetime Achievement award winners, the luminaries of
Jewish genealogy, will give talks, including Steve Morse, Miriam
Weiner, Peter Lande, Jeff Malka, Hal Bookbinder, Warren Blatt,
Michael Tobias, and Stanley Diamond. Archivists >from Belgium, the
Czech Republic, Hungary, Israel, and Ukraine will be giving the
latest information about doing research in their countries.
Historians and experts >from England, Germany, Ireland, Lithuania,
Poland, Spain, Sweden, and the U.S. will provide the historical
context to our ancestors' lives and the methodologies to find them.

Unique to the Boston location of the conference will be several
talented local experts who have never presented at previous IAJGS
conferences. The keynote speaker will be Aaron Lansky, the famous
and dynamic founder of the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, MA.
Ellen Smith, co-author of The Jews of Boston and a well-known
historian, museum curator, and professor at Brandeis University,
will give a talk as well as conduct walking tours of Boston's
Jewish historical sites. Sharon Pucker Rivo, Director of the
National Center for Jewish Film at Brandeis University, will
present "Jews in Focus" about the important Jewish role in film.
Genealogical research in the New England states will be featured,
including immigration to the Port of Boston.

The annual Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the Jewish
Genealogical Society of New York, will feature two noted historians,
Annie Polland, Education Vice President at the Tenement Museum in
New York, and Daniel Soyer, professor at Fordham University. They
are co-authors of Emerging Metropolis -- the second volume of the
2012 award-winning book, City of Promises: History of Jews in New
York, which describes New York's transformation into a Jewish city.
They will speak together about the book and separately. Annie will
talk about the "Adaptation of Ritual," the complex adjustments
immigrant ancestors made to succeed, and Daniel will talk about
immigrant "landsmanschaften." Zvi Gitelman, Professor of Judaic
Studies at the University of Michigan and author of several important
books on Jewish ethnicity and identity among Eastern European Jews,
will present "Litvak-Galitsianer Wars, Jewish Cultural Geography."

In addition to updates on DNA, Holocaust research, and immigration,
areas of new focus include Sephardic Jews, Jewish cooking and
cookbooks, and a panel on cemetery restoration in both Europe and the
United States.

There also will be many hands-on computer workshops (for both Mac and
PC) and workshops on photo identification and preservation, on document
restoration, and on various languages (German, Russian, Polish and
Hebrew). Continuing the tradition of excellence of previous conferences,
there will be an Exhibitor Hall, a Resource Center, author events, and
book signings throughout the week.

from the first day's SHARE Fair, featuring an expanded number of Special
Interest Groups (SIGs) and Birds of a Feather (BOFs) as well as local
archives and historical societies, to the many programs offered all week
long, attendees will have trouble choosing which to attend >from Sunday
morning to Friday noon.

For more detailed information about the programs and to register, visit
<www.iajgs2013.org>. Early registration discounts end on April 30, so
register today.

Florence Schumacher
Publicity Chair
33rd IAJGS Conference on International Genealogy


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Time for Photoduplication Requests #poland

Cyndi Norwitz
 

On Apr 12, 2013, at 4:47 AM, Steve Gold wrote:

I sent in a request on February 9 - more than eight weeks ago - and
have not received a response yet. Does anyone know what the typical
response time is currently?
I sent in my first request Feb 22 and had some back and forth emails to =
clarify something and got part of my request on Mar 28 and the rest on =
Apr 3. =20

I sent in a second request on Apr 1 (boo me, it duplicates some of what =
I got on the 3rd because I figured that part wasn't coming) and haven't =
yet heard anything.

Also, the Photoduplication Services information page seems to say that
if you "have access to a local Family History Center" they may not
fulfill a record request. It's not clear what they mean by "access" -
within five miles? Fifty miles? Same state? Does anyone know
specifically how inaccessible the local Family History Center has to
be before Photoduplication Services will reject a request? Thanks.
It is unclear to me if they mean access to any FHC or to one that has =
the films you need on site. For example, if I needed to look up a =
California Census record, that would be in one of the several FHCs =
within an hour's drive of me, so I wouldn't expect them to fulfill that =
request. All the records I've asked for are ones that would require me =
to order the film. So far *knock wood* this has not been a problem.

What a great service though. So far I'm thrilled with what I've gotten, =
even if it's slow and they have dropped some requests and also sent =
records that weren't mine.

Cyndi

_______________
Cyndi Norwitz
Petaluma, California
cyndi@...

Kotesova, Slovakia: DEUTELBAUM, ZELENKA
Kosice, Slovakia: KRIEGER
Budapest, Hungary: DEUTELBAUM, KARPATI, GROSZMANN
Cleveland, OH & Chicago, IL & Pittsburgh, PA: DEUTELBAUM
Boston, MA: KARPATI
Chudnov, Ukraine: DUBIN
Cherykov, Belarus & Newark, New Jersey: FRIEDMAN
Warsaw, Poland & Bronx, New York: NAIMSKY
Lomza, Poland & Washington DC: NITOWITZ, NORWITZ
Lativa & Baltimore, MD: GOLDSTEIN
Lithuana: SHAVEL, SHAVELLE


Re: Time for Photoduplication Requests #poland

Cyndi Norwitz
 

On Apr 12, 2013, at 4:47 AM, Steve Gold wrote:

I sent in a request on February 9 - more than eight weeks ago - and
have not received a response yet. Does anyone know what the typical
response time is currently?
I sent in my first request Feb 22 and had some back and forth emails to =
clarify something and got part of my request on Mar 28 and the rest on =
Apr 3. =20

I sent in a second request on Apr 1 (boo me, it duplicates some of what =
I got on the 3rd because I figured that part wasn't coming) and haven't =
yet heard anything.

Also, the Photoduplication Services information page seems to say that
if you "have access to a local Family History Center" they may not
fulfill a record request. It's not clear what they mean by "access" -
within five miles? Fifty miles? Same state? Does anyone know
specifically how inaccessible the local Family History Center has to
be before Photoduplication Services will reject a request? Thanks.
It is unclear to me if they mean access to any FHC or to one that has =
the films you need on site. For example, if I needed to look up a =
California Census record, that would be in one of the several FHCs =
within an hour's drive of me, so I wouldn't expect them to fulfill that =
request. All the records I've asked for are ones that would require me =
to order the film. So far *knock wood* this has not been a problem.

What a great service though. So far I'm thrilled with what I've gotten, =
even if it's slow and they have dropped some requests and also sent =
records that weren't mine.

Cyndi

_______________
Cyndi Norwitz
Petaluma, California
cyndi@...

Kotesova, Slovakia: DEUTELBAUM, ZELENKA
Kosice, Slovakia: KRIEGER
Budapest, Hungary: DEUTELBAUM, KARPATI, GROSZMANN
Cleveland, OH & Chicago, IL & Pittsburgh, PA: DEUTELBAUM
Boston, MA: KARPATI
Chudnov, Ukraine: DUBIN
Cherykov, Belarus & Newark, New Jersey: FRIEDMAN
Warsaw, Poland & Bronx, New York: NAIMSKY
Lomza, Poland & Washington DC: NITOWITZ, NORWITZ
Lativa & Baltimore, MD: GOLDSTEIN
Lithuana: SHAVEL, SHAVELLE


JRI Poland #Poland Naturalization Papers: Harris Cohen #poland

Marilyn Robinson
 

I received copies of naturalization papers for Harris COHEN (1871), NY
Supreme Court: Petition #C500, Vol. # 219. If this is your ancestor,
please contact me privately. I had requested papers for "Morris"
Cohen---

--The cover page says, "Morris" but copies of the original paperwork
(both handwritten & typed) says "Harris" Cohen/Cohn---

--Also his former foreign residence is written as "Kamenetz" (Russia)
with another word or abbreviation, possibly "Lit", so I'm not sure if
this is Kamenetz-Litovsk or Kamenetz-Podolsk---I am confused!!!

Occupation: Vender
Arrived from: Kamenetz to NY July or January (?) 15, 1893
Intention to become citizen filed: Nov. (?) 21, 1896, residence:
198_____St.

Residence: 266 Broome St., NY, NY (1903)
Petition Filed: April 14, 1903
Witness: David Eisner--83 Allen St (Vender)
Affidavits, etc. filed, Naturalized: May 18, 1903

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Naturalization Papers: Harris Cohen #poland

Marilyn Robinson
 

I received copies of naturalization papers for Harris COHEN (1871), NY
Supreme Court: Petition #C500, Vol. # 219. If this is your ancestor,
please contact me privately. I had requested papers for "Morris"
Cohen---

--The cover page says, "Morris" but copies of the original paperwork
(both handwritten & typed) says "Harris" Cohen/Cohn---

--Also his former foreign residence is written as "Kamenetz" (Russia)
with another word or abbreviation, possibly "Lit", so I'm not sure if
this is Kamenetz-Litovsk or Kamenetz-Podolsk---I am confused!!!

Occupation: Vender
Arrived from: Kamenetz to NY July or January (?) 15, 1893
Intention to become citizen filed: Nov. (?) 21, 1896, residence:
198_____St.

Residence: 266 Broome St., NY, NY (1903)
Petition Filed: April 14, 1903
Witness: David Eisner--83 Allen St (Vender)
Affidavits, etc. filed, Naturalized: May 18, 1903

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


JRI Poland #Poland International Conference on Jewish Genealogy Speakers #poland

Florence Schumacher, Boston 2013 Publicity Chair
 

A rich and varied roster of speakers will be presenting during
the five and a half days of the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in Boston beginning
August 4.

Attendees will be able to choose >from 250 programs on seven
different tracks covering a wide range of topics including a
beginner's track on August 4/5, as well as computer tracks and a
film festival. The preliminary program (subject to change) will
be posted on the conference website on Tuesday, April 16th
(http://www.iajgs2013.org/program_schedule.cfm).

Many IAJGS Lifetime Achievement award winners, the luminaries of
Jewish genealogy, will give talks, including Steve Morse, Miriam
Weiner, Peter Lande, Jeff Malka, Hal Bookbinder, Warren Blatt,
Michael Tobias, and Stanley Diamond. Archivists >from Belgium, the
Czech Republic, Hungary, Israel, and Ukraine will be giving the
latest information about doing research in their countries.
Historians and experts >from England, Germany, Ireland, Lithuania,
Poland, Spain, Sweden, and the U.S. will provide the historical
context to our ancestors' lives and the methodologies to find them.

Unique to the Boston location of the conference will be several
talented local experts who have never presented at previous IAJGS
conferences. The keynote speaker will be Aaron Lansky, the famous
and dynamic founder of the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, MA.
Ellen Smith, co-author of The Jews of Boston and a well-known
historian, museum curator, and professor at Brandeis University,
will give a talk as well as conduct walking tours of Boston's
Jewish historical sites. Sharon Pucker Rivo, Director of the
National Center for Jewish Film at Brandeis University, will
present "Jews in Focus" about the important Jewish role in film.
Genealogical research in the New England states will be featured,
including immigration to the Port of Boston.

The annual Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the Jewish
Genealogical Society of New York, will feature two noted historians,
Annie Polland, Education Vice President at the Tenement Museum in
New York, and Daniel Soyer, professor at Fordham University. They
are co-authors of Emerging Metropolis -- the second volume of the
2012 award-winning book, City of Promises: History of Jews in New
York, which describes New York's transformation into a Jewish city.
They will speak together about the book and separately. Annie will
talk about the "Adaptation of Ritual," the complex adjustments
immigrant ancestors made to succeed, and Daniel will talk about
immigrant "landsmanschaften." Zvi Gitelman, Professor of Judaic
Studies at the University of Michigan and author of several important
books on Jewish ethnicity and identity among Eastern European Jews,
will present "Litvak-Galitsianer Wars, Jewish Cultural Geography."

In addition to updates on DNA, Holocaust research, and immigration,
areas of new focus include Sephardic Jews, Jewish cooking and
cookbooks, and a panel on cemetery restoration in both Europe and the
United States.

There also will be many hands-on computer workshops (for both Mac and
PC) and workshops on photo identification and preservation, on document
restoration, and on various languages (German, Russian, Polish and
Hebrew). Continuing the tradition of excellence of previous conferences,
there will be an Exhibitor Hall, a Resource Center, author events, and
book signings throughout the week.

from the first day's SHARE Fair, featuring an expanded number of Special
Interest Groups (SIGs) and Birds of a Feather (BOFs) as well as local
archives and historical societies, to the many programs offered all week
long, attendees will have trouble choosing which to attend >from Sunday
morning to Friday noon.

For more detailed information about the programs and to register, visit
<www.iajgs2013.org>. Early registration discounts end on April 30, so
register today.

Florence Schumacher
Publicity Chair
33rd IAJGS Conference on International Genealogy


International Conference on Jewish Genealogy Speakers #poland

Florence Schumacher, Boston 2013 Publicity Chair
 

A rich and varied roster of speakers will be presenting during
the five and a half days of the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in Boston beginning
August 4.

Attendees will be able to choose >from 250 programs on seven
different tracks covering a wide range of topics including a
beginner's track on August 4/5, as well as computer tracks and a
film festival. The preliminary program (subject to change) will
be posted on the conference website on Tuesday, April 16th
(http://www.iajgs2013.org/program_schedule.cfm).

Many IAJGS Lifetime Achievement award winners, the luminaries of
Jewish genealogy, will give talks, including Steve Morse, Miriam
Weiner, Peter Lande, Jeff Malka, Hal Bookbinder, Warren Blatt,
Michael Tobias, and Stanley Diamond. Archivists >from Belgium, the
Czech Republic, Hungary, Israel, and Ukraine will be giving the
latest information about doing research in their countries.
Historians and experts >from England, Germany, Ireland, Lithuania,
Poland, Spain, Sweden, and the U.S. will provide the historical
context to our ancestors' lives and the methodologies to find them.

Unique to the Boston location of the conference will be several
talented local experts who have never presented at previous IAJGS
conferences. The keynote speaker will be Aaron Lansky, the famous
and dynamic founder of the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, MA.
Ellen Smith, co-author of The Jews of Boston and a well-known
historian, museum curator, and professor at Brandeis University,
will give a talk as well as conduct walking tours of Boston's
Jewish historical sites. Sharon Pucker Rivo, Director of the
National Center for Jewish Film at Brandeis University, will
present "Jews in Focus" about the important Jewish role in film.
Genealogical research in the New England states will be featured,
including immigration to the Port of Boston.

The annual Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the Jewish
Genealogical Society of New York, will feature two noted historians,
Annie Polland, Education Vice President at the Tenement Museum in
New York, and Daniel Soyer, professor at Fordham University. They
are co-authors of Emerging Metropolis -- the second volume of the
2012 award-winning book, City of Promises: History of Jews in New
York, which describes New York's transformation into a Jewish city.
They will speak together about the book and separately. Annie will
talk about the "Adaptation of Ritual," the complex adjustments
immigrant ancestors made to succeed, and Daniel will talk about
immigrant "landsmanschaften." Zvi Gitelman, Professor of Judaic
Studies at the University of Michigan and author of several important
books on Jewish ethnicity and identity among Eastern European Jews,
will present "Litvak-Galitsianer Wars, Jewish Cultural Geography."

In addition to updates on DNA, Holocaust research, and immigration,
areas of new focus include Sephardic Jews, Jewish cooking and
cookbooks, and a panel on cemetery restoration in both Europe and the
United States.

There also will be many hands-on computer workshops (for both Mac and
PC) and workshops on photo identification and preservation, on document
restoration, and on various languages (German, Russian, Polish and
Hebrew). Continuing the tradition of excellence of previous conferences,
there will be an Exhibitor Hall, a Resource Center, author events, and
book signings throughout the week.

from the first day's SHARE Fair, featuring an expanded number of Special
Interest Groups (SIGs) and Birds of a Feather (BOFs) as well as local
archives and historical societies, to the many programs offered all week
long, attendees will have trouble choosing which to attend >from Sunday
morning to Friday noon.

For more detailed information about the programs and to register, visit
<www.iajgs2013.org>. Early registration discounts end on April 30, so
register today.

Florence Schumacher
Publicity Chair
33rd IAJGS Conference on International Genealogy


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Cohen/Kogan from Kriukai and Zagare, Lithuania: Raisa Gittel (to NY and Atlantic City) , Moshe (to Phila.), Alfred (Israel) and Kayla (to Manhatten) #lithuania

Ziegelman <zieg_exp@...>
 

I'm looking for cousins of mine related to me via my nee Cohen great
grandmother, Raisa Gittel (born 1850's), who married Khatzkel
Mishli/Mishler. I'm looking for a cousin who can help identify the
Cohens/Kogans is a 1950 picture of Raisa Gittel's Cohen family, that has in
it, on a table, a very old picture of what must be Cohens/Kogans in
Lithuania.

Please respond privately: andi@...
Best wishes, Andi Alpert Ziegelman
Searching for:
Mishli/Mishler >from Vilkomir
Cohen/Kogan >from Kriukai and Zagare
Sukkot/Schohet/FEINBERG >from Kavaraskas and Moletai


Cohen/Kogan from Kriukai and Zagare, Lithuania: Raisa Gittel (to NY and Atlantic City) , Moshe (to Phila.), Alfred (Israel) and Kayla (to Manhatten) #lithuania

Ziegelman <zieg_exp@...>
 

I'm looking for cousins of mine related to me via my nee Cohen great
grandmother, Raisa Gittel (born 1850's), who married Khatzkel
Mishli/Mishler. I'm looking for a cousin who can help identify the
Cohens/Kogans is a 1950 picture of Raisa Gittel's Cohen family, that has in
it, on a table, a very old picture of what must be Cohens/Kogans in
Lithuania.

Please respond privately: andi@...
Best wishes, Andi Alpert Ziegelman
Searching for:
Mishli/Mishler >from Vilkomir
Cohen/Kogan >from Kriukai and Zagare
Sukkot/Schohet/FEINBERG >from Kavaraskas and Moletai

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