Date   

question regarding: a Sephardi MOSES in Germany #sephardic

karen roffe.com <karen@...>
 

Hi Everyone,

I am trying to determine if a family named MOSES who went >from
Germany to the United States in the mid 1800's could have been
Sephardi. Does anyone know of any MOSES family who fits this
description? Were there many Sephardim living in Germany at that
time?

Specifically I am looking for a family, Joseph and Betsy (could be
Betty) WEILER (maiden name MOSES), who lived in PA in 1871.
I have a birth record that says their son, Alfred, was born in
Pennsylvania (1871) and Alfred's death record specifies that he
was born in York PA. I believe they were buried in Chicago.

Thanks to the Early American discussion list, I have several leads.
However, they all indicate that the family was >from Germany or Prussia.

BTW, I am a librarian and have just started doing genealogy research.
I have looked at Ancestry, FamilySearch,
http://usgwarchives.net/pa/york/, FamilyHart database etc.and have
started to contact synagogues. I found Alfred's marriage record to
Sarah Perlstein (1903), but it only contains names and ages. I have
also found other possible sibs, but again roads point to Germany.

Any information would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

Karen Erani, Brooklyn, NY, karen@roffe.com


JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #sephardic

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@lyris.jewishgen.org .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #yizkorbooks

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@lyris.jewishgen.org .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim question regarding: a Sephardi MOSES in Germany #sephardic

karen roffe.com <karen@...>
 

Hi Everyone,

I am trying to determine if a family named MOSES who went >from
Germany to the United States in the mid 1800's could have been
Sephardi. Does anyone know of any MOSES family who fits this
description? Were there many Sephardim living in Germany at that
time?

Specifically I am looking for a family, Joseph and Betsy (could be
Betty) WEILER (maiden name MOSES), who lived in PA in 1871.
I have a birth record that says their son, Alfred, was born in
Pennsylvania (1871) and Alfred's death record specifies that he
was born in York PA. I believe they were buried in Chicago.

Thanks to the Early American discussion list, I have several leads.
However, they all indicate that the family was >from Germany or Prussia.

BTW, I am a librarian and have just started doing genealogy research.
I have looked at Ancestry, FamilySearch,
http://usgwarchives.net/pa/york/, FamilyHart database etc.and have
started to contact synagogues. I found Alfred's marriage record to
Sarah Perlstein (1903), but it only contains names and ages. I have
also found other possible sibs, but again roads point to Germany.

Any information would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

Karen Erani, Brooklyn, NY, karen@roffe.com


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #sephardic

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@lyris.jewishgen.org .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #yizkorbooks

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@lyris.jewishgen.org .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


Transcriptions of birth records for Liepaja "Father's place of registration" #latvia

Joyaa Antares
 

Dear LatviaSIG folk,

Some of you will be familiar with the late and wonderful Christine Usdin's
transcriptions of certain BMD records >from the Latvian archive.

On the birth records (for example for Libau) is a column entitled "Father's
Place of Registration". This doesn't say Libau/Libava in many instances,
but gives other town names. Does anyone know the relevance of this column?
Given that these records are the Libau records, what does "father's place of
registration" mean if it says Kretingen or Shavel ((Siauliai)) or Shkud or
whatever?

In particular, what if anything can we deduce about the the child's place of
birth?

Thanks. All the best.

Joyaa ANTARES

Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
___
Researching ZAUSMER, ZOUSMER, ZESMER, CHOUSMER, CHAUSMER, TSOUZMER etc,
MARCUS, DAVIDOFF in Polangen, Kretinga, Darbenai, Libau, Riga, Memel
SCHORR, SCHERZER, JURIS and DAWID in Buckaczowce, Ottynia, Nadworna, and
Kolomyya
ZUNDER in Buckaczowce and Ivano-Frankivsk
KEMPNER in Berlin, Lodz, Warszawa and London


JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #latvia

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@lyris.jewishgen.org .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #scandinavia

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@lyris.jewishgen.org .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


Latvia SIG #Latvia Transcriptions of birth records for Liepaja "Father's place of registration" #latvia

Joyaa Antares
 

Dear LatviaSIG folk,

Some of you will be familiar with the late and wonderful Christine Usdin's
transcriptions of certain BMD records >from the Latvian archive.

On the birth records (for example for Libau) is a column entitled "Father's
Place of Registration". This doesn't say Libau/Libava in many instances,
but gives other town names. Does anyone know the relevance of this column?
Given that these records are the Libau records, what does "father's place of
registration" mean if it says Kretingen or Shavel ((Siauliai)) or Shkud or
whatever?

In particular, what if anything can we deduce about the the child's place of
birth?

Thanks. All the best.

Joyaa ANTARES

Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
___
Researching ZAUSMER, ZOUSMER, ZESMER, CHOUSMER, CHAUSMER, TSOUZMER etc,
MARCUS, DAVIDOFF in Polangen, Kretinga, Darbenai, Libau, Riga, Memel
SCHORR, SCHERZER, JURIS and DAWID in Buckaczowce, Ottynia, Nadworna, and
Kolomyya
ZUNDER in Buckaczowce and Ivano-Frankivsk
KEMPNER in Berlin, Lodz, Warszawa and London


Latvia SIG #Latvia JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #latvia

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@lyris.jewishgen.org .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #scandinavia

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@lyris.jewishgen.org .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #germany #poland #danzig #gdansk

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@lyris.jewishgen.org .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #dna

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@lyris.jewishgen.org .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@lyris.jewishgen.org .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


DNA Research #DNA JewishGen's Success! Stories -- newest edition available #dna

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read three amazing stories in the latest issue of
JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us' button on our website or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/testimonials/index.htm

Myra Waddell posts her Borkovsky family surname on JewishGen's Family
Finder database, connects with two previously unknown cousins, and
learns about her great-grandparents' migration >from Russia to China.

Sarah Rembiszewski finds her mother's name on an index of people
mentioned in a memoir of the Kielce Ghetto. Tracking down a copy of
the memoir, she discovers information that her mother, a Holocaust
survivor, never shared with her children.

Robin Koerner posts her family names in JewishGen's Family Finder
database andreconnects with her Maniches family in South America and
Israel after 100 years of separation and more than 50 years without
any contact. They are now planning a family reunion in Montevideo,
Uruguay.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We hope you will be inspired by
these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at success@lyris.jewishgen.org .

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects


Re: The Yiddish name Tsirke -and other variants of given names #germany

Gary Mokotoff
 

Variants of given names are common in many cultures. The most common variant
is an affectionate name for children that may continue into adulthood.
Charles becomes Charlie, Chuck, etc.

Sarah is possibly the most common female given name because of its
association with the Biblical Sarah. -le is a Yiddish affectionate term. My
grandparents called me Garile instead of Gary. The Slavic version is -ke.

Alexander Beider in his "A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names" identifies
nearly 100 variants of Sara including Tsirke. He shows the derivation of Tsurke
is Sara > Tsure > Tsurke.

Gary Mokotoff, <gary@mokotoff.net>


German SIG #Germany Re: The Yiddish name Tsirke -and other variants of given names #germany

Gary Mokotoff
 

Variants of given names are common in many cultures. The most common variant
is an affectionate name for children that may continue into adulthood.
Charles becomes Charlie, Chuck, etc.

Sarah is possibly the most common female given name because of its
association with the Biblical Sarah. -le is a Yiddish affectionate term. My
grandparents called me Garile instead of Gary. The Slavic version is -ke.

Alexander Beider in his "A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names" identifies
nearly 100 variants of Sara including Tsirke. He shows the derivation of Tsurke
is Sara > Tsure > Tsurke.

Gary Mokotoff, <gary@mokotoff.net>


Abraham KATZENSTEIN #germany

Steven Leof <sleof.sln25@...>
 

Abraham KATZENSTEIN,the eldest son of my great-great-grandparents Loeb
aka Leopold KATZENSTEIN and Sarah HECHT appears in the 1880 census. I
have found no other records of him and no one in the family know
anything about him. Not surprisingly, he was named after his paternal
grandfather. Loeb and Sarah's second son was named Jacob after his
maternal grandfather.

According to the 1880 census, Abraham was born about 1874 in New York.
Given that he does not appear on the 1900 census, I presume he died
before then. How can I find other evidence of his life and death and
burial? Thank you. Regards

Steven Leof, London UK steven.leof@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany Abraham KATZENSTEIN #germany

Steven Leof <sleof.sln25@...>
 

Abraham KATZENSTEIN,the eldest son of my great-great-grandparents Loeb
aka Leopold KATZENSTEIN and Sarah HECHT appears in the 1880 census. I
have found no other records of him and no one in the family know
anything about him. Not surprisingly, he was named after his paternal
grandfather. Loeb and Sarah's second son was named Jacob after his
maternal grandfather.

According to the 1880 census, Abraham was born about 1874 in New York.
Given that he does not appear on the 1900 census, I presume he died
before then. How can I find other evidence of his life and death and
burial? Thank you. Regards

Steven Leof, London UK steven.leof@gmail.com

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