Date   

Seeking family KRAYN - Israel. #general

Nigel Wilson <wilsonettes@...>
 

Calling all KRAYN families in Israel.

Wilhelm KRAYN , born Dec. 1885 in Pudewitz, Posen, died about 1931 in Berlin.
Profession - Lawyer.

In the late 1930s his widow Ruth, a dressmaker/tailor, came to Palestine with
her 2 children - Alice b 1914 and Heinz b around 1919.

It is thought the family settled in Haifa.

If anyone has knowledge of this family and their descendants
please contact me privately.

Thank you.

Patricia Wilson (Israel)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking family KRAYN - Israel. #general

Nigel Wilson <wilsonettes@...>
 

Calling all KRAYN families in Israel.

Wilhelm KRAYN , born Dec. 1885 in Pudewitz, Posen, died about 1931 in Berlin.
Profession - Lawyer.

In the late 1930s his widow Ruth, a dressmaker/tailor, came to Palestine with
her 2 children - Alice b 1914 and Heinz b around 1919.

It is thought the family settled in Haifa.

If anyone has knowledge of this family and their descendants
please contact me privately.

Thank you.

Patricia Wilson (Israel)


Re: Request of what to put on a tombstone #general

Ira Leviton
 

Marie Lubman asked...
When a person dies, would the stone be made >from the
cemetery or an outside company? ...would they have the original
information as to what they would need to put on the tombstone (the
request >from a relative as to what to carve on the stone)? How would I
find this information (the tombstone maker and request?) I am looking
during the years of 1907-1948, cemeteries in NY and NJ.

I answer...
Tombstones are made by monument makers or stonecutters, not by
cemeteries or funeral homes. While it's possible for a cemetery to own,
or have an ownership interest in a funeral home or monument maker, or vice
versa, some areas may have laws against cross-ownership because a cemetery
or funeral home could then recommend that a person use the monument maker
they own, without it being apparent.

In any case, if the cemetery or funeral home is still active or
functioning, you can ask which monument makers are in the area and are
thus more likely to have been used. (A monument maker near the relatives'
home is also likely.) If the cemetery keeps meticulous records, there's
also a chance that they have a drawing of the design of the stone even if
they didn't make and install it.

Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Request of what to put on a tombstone #general

Ira Leviton
 

Marie Lubman asked...
When a person dies, would the stone be made >from the
cemetery or an outside company? ...would they have the original
information as to what they would need to put on the tombstone (the
request >from a relative as to what to carve on the stone)? How would I
find this information (the tombstone maker and request?) I am looking
during the years of 1907-1948, cemeteries in NY and NJ.

I answer...
Tombstones are made by monument makers or stonecutters, not by
cemeteries or funeral homes. While it's possible for a cemetery to own,
or have an ownership interest in a funeral home or monument maker, or vice
versa, some areas may have laws against cross-ownership because a cemetery
or funeral home could then recommend that a person use the monument maker
they own, without it being apparent.

In any case, if the cemetery or funeral home is still active or
functioning, you can ask which monument makers are in the area and are
thus more likely to have been used. (A monument maker near the relatives'
home is also likely.) If the cemetery keeps meticulous records, there's
also a chance that they have a drawing of the design of the stone even if
they didn't make and install it.

Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


Factor 11 #general

Evelyn Filippi
 

Hiiiiiii
This might be of interest I have something called Factor 11.
Its a form of hemophilia It is a Jewish blood disorder.
It takes my blood longer to clot then other peoples
I was told this about 10 years ago and I
found 1 distant distant cousin that her son has it.

Evelyn Filippi
New York

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send replies on medical aspects of this disorder
privately.


Guide in Salzburg, Austria #general

Alex Woodle <awoodle@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I will be in Salzburg, Austria for two days in May. I am looking for a
driver who speaks English. Please reply privately and thank you.

Alex Woodle
Groton, MA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Factor 11 #general

Evelyn Filippi
 

Hiiiiiii
This might be of interest I have something called Factor 11.
Its a form of hemophilia It is a Jewish blood disorder.
It takes my blood longer to clot then other peoples
I was told this about 10 years ago and I
found 1 distant distant cousin that her son has it.

Evelyn Filippi
New York

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send replies on medical aspects of this disorder
privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Guide in Salzburg, Austria #general

Alex Woodle <awoodle@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I will be in Salzburg, Austria for two days in May. I am looking for a
driver who speaks English. Please reply privately and thank you.

Alex Woodle
Groton, MA


Vienna School for Tailors #general

rlmilton@...
 

Greetings;

My great grandfather was sent to Vienna, Austria to be trained as a tailor.
Does anyone know of any such school in the 1870-80s?
Many thanks for your help.

Renee Lehman Milton
JewishGen ID #309178
Coos Bay, Oregon
rlmilton@verizon.net

Searching for: COHEN (Germany), KAPLAN (Poland/Russia), LEHMAN (Berlin, Germany).


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Vienna School for Tailors #general

rlmilton@...
 

Greetings;

My great grandfather was sent to Vienna, Austria to be trained as a tailor.
Does anyone know of any such school in the 1870-80s?
Many thanks for your help.

Renee Lehman Milton
JewishGen ID #309178
Coos Bay, Oregon
rlmilton@verizon.net

Searching for: COHEN (Germany), KAPLAN (Poland/Russia), LEHMAN (Berlin, Germany).


Re: An mtDNA and Y-DNA match #dna

Jacob D. Goldstein <jake@...>
 

On 2008.03.05, Bob Kosovsky <kos@panix.com> wrote:

Has anyone figured the probability of this kind of situation - where
both a Y-DNA and mtDNA match points to the same person?
Bob,

How surprised should you be to eventually find an mtDNA and Y-DNA
match when you place your data in a database to which thousands and
thousands of Ashkenazi Jews keep adding their own? Don't you think
that sooner or later this was bound to happen?

Jake Goldstein


DNA Research #DNA Re: An mtDNA and Y-DNA match #dna

Jacob D. Goldstein <jake@...>
 

On 2008.03.05, Bob Kosovsky <kos@panix.com> wrote:

Has anyone figured the probability of this kind of situation - where
both a Y-DNA and mtDNA match points to the same person?
Bob,

How surprised should you be to eventually find an mtDNA and Y-DNA
match when you place your data in a database to which thousands and
thousands of Ashkenazi Jews keep adding their own? Don't you think
that sooner or later this was bound to happen?

Jake Goldstein


Spelling variations in surnames #galicia

Barbara Zimmer
 

Any knowledge of first names (and names used within a family cluster)
can become very important in genealogical research when the surname
has variious spellings. For example, if you know that the father
was Jacob and the mother was Basia with children named Israel and
Loeb and that they moved to the US, you can look for families with
the father named Jacob, mother named Bess(ie) and sons of a certain
age whose name might have been changed to Isadore or Irving, and
Lewis/Louis.... Sometimes this works!

Barbara Zimmer
Norfolk VA


Spelling issues #galicia

Suzan & Ron Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

The issue of surname spelling variations is a common one for many. The
vast majority of Galitizianers took or were given surnames based in the
German language because when they required to adopt fixed surnames, they
didn't have one. Like Hebrew, the spoken German language is largely
controlled by how vowels are pronounced. Like the umlaut, for instance.
We often forget about this because when our ancestors arrived in English
speaking countries, these vowel designations were dropped. But, even in
Galicia, you can see tremendous variation in the records.

Good example. I am researching a man named Hersch Meilach Langsam
married to Golda Beller. But, ahah, there was also a Margule Buhler with
the umlaut over the "u." This was the same woman. Margule was her
"street" name and Golda her Yiddish name. But Beller vs. Buhler? That's
because the umlaut gives us a rough approximation of the sound Beller.
Similarly, Miller vs Muller with the umlaut which is so common in my
family. Perhaps different members of the family chose to use these
different forms or, more likely, the registrars hired by the kehilla
weren't up on their German so much.

So, yes, we all need to be alert to the many variations possible in
some names and to consider that spelling was a whole lot less important
to our ancestors than to us today.

Suzan Wynne
Kensington, MD


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Spelling variations in surnames #galicia

Barbara Zimmer
 

Any knowledge of first names (and names used within a family cluster)
can become very important in genealogical research when the surname
has variious spellings. For example, if you know that the father
was Jacob and the mother was Basia with children named Israel and
Loeb and that they moved to the US, you can look for families with
the father named Jacob, mother named Bess(ie) and sons of a certain
age whose name might have been changed to Isadore or Irving, and
Lewis/Louis.... Sometimes this works!

Barbara Zimmer
Norfolk VA


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Spelling issues #galicia

Suzan & Ron Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

The issue of surname spelling variations is a common one for many. The
vast majority of Galitizianers took or were given surnames based in the
German language because when they required to adopt fixed surnames, they
didn't have one. Like Hebrew, the spoken German language is largely
controlled by how vowels are pronounced. Like the umlaut, for instance.
We often forget about this because when our ancestors arrived in English
speaking countries, these vowel designations were dropped. But, even in
Galicia, you can see tremendous variation in the records.

Good example. I am researching a man named Hersch Meilach Langsam
married to Golda Beller. But, ahah, there was also a Margule Buhler with
the umlaut over the "u." This was the same woman. Margule was her
"street" name and Golda her Yiddish name. But Beller vs. Buhler? That's
because the umlaut gives us a rough approximation of the sound Beller.
Similarly, Miller vs Muller with the umlaut which is so common in my
family. Perhaps different members of the family chose to use these
different forms or, more likely, the registrars hired by the kehilla
weren't up on their German so much.

So, yes, we all need to be alert to the many variations possible in
some names and to consider that spelling was a whole lot less important
to our ancestors than to us today.

Suzan Wynne
Kensington, MD


Re: An mtDNA and Y-DNA match #dna

DonnDevine@...
 

On 2008.03.05, Bob Kosovsky <kos@panix.com> wrote:

Has anyone figured the probability of this kind of situation - where
both a Y-DNA and mtDNA match points to the same person?
Bob, the two matches point to two different persons--one male, the
other female. While there is a 90 percent probability that the
male-line ancestor lived within the last 10 generations, the
probability for the female line would extend many generations
further back, because mutations in mtDNA take place at a much slower
rate, no more than a tenth of that for the Y-DNA.

Donn

Donn Devine,
Wilmington, Delaware, USA


DNA Research #DNA Re: An mtDNA and Y-DNA match #dna

DonnDevine@...
 

On 2008.03.05, Bob Kosovsky <kos@panix.com> wrote:

Has anyone figured the probability of this kind of situation - where
both a Y-DNA and mtDNA match points to the same person?
Bob, the two matches point to two different persons--one male, the
other female. While there is a 90 percent probability that the
male-line ancestor lived within the last 10 generations, the
probability for the female line would extend many generations
further back, because mutations in mtDNA take place at a much slower
rate, no more than a tenth of that for the Y-DNA.

Donn

Donn Devine,
Wilmington, Delaware, USA


Re: An mtDNA and Y-DNA match #dna

Judy Simon
 

On 2008.03.05, Bob Kosovsky <kos@panix.com> wrote:

Has anyone figured the probability of this kind of situation - where
both a Y-DNA and mtDNA match points to the same person?
I also have a mtDNA match who matches my maternal grandfather's
line, which is a similar, though not an exact, situation to yours.
I would think the phenomenon where a person matches both Y-DNA and
mtDNA to another person is not a rare occurrence. There were many
instances of brothers in one family marrying sisters >from another
family (or brother-sister >from one family marrying sister-brother
from another family) as well as cousins marrying cousins, so when
you calculate how many ancestors a person has in the last n
generations, the number will be much smaller than 2 to the nth
power.

I don't know a lot about population statistics, but I would think
that if (big if!) enough people >from a given region had their DNA
tested so that most of the haplotypes >from that area are
represented, and we know what the population was, the chance of a
person being a mtDNA and Y-DNA match to the same person could be
estimated. Another way to think about it- if we go back far enough,
most of the people in a relatively isolated region would be related
to each other; what proportion of those would be related to each
other on both the direct paternal and direct maternal lines?

I will take a wild stab at a guess: 5% to 10%

Judy Simon


DNA Research #DNA Re: An mtDNA and Y-DNA match #dna

Judy Simon
 

On 2008.03.05, Bob Kosovsky <kos@panix.com> wrote:

Has anyone figured the probability of this kind of situation - where
both a Y-DNA and mtDNA match points to the same person?
I also have a mtDNA match who matches my maternal grandfather's
line, which is a similar, though not an exact, situation to yours.
I would think the phenomenon where a person matches both Y-DNA and
mtDNA to another person is not a rare occurrence. There were many
instances of brothers in one family marrying sisters >from another
family (or brother-sister >from one family marrying sister-brother
from another family) as well as cousins marrying cousins, so when
you calculate how many ancestors a person has in the last n
generations, the number will be much smaller than 2 to the nth
power.

I don't know a lot about population statistics, but I would think
that if (big if!) enough people >from a given region had their DNA
tested so that most of the haplotypes >from that area are
represented, and we know what the population was, the chance of a
person being a mtDNA and Y-DNA match to the same person could be
estimated. Another way to think about it- if we go back far enough,
most of the people in a relatively isolated region would be related
to each other; what proportion of those would be related to each
other on both the direct paternal and direct maternal lines?

I will take a wild stab at a guess: 5% to 10%

Judy Simon