Date   

Names Ovsey and Kalman #lithuania

Marcus Shapiro <m.shapiro@...>
 

My father's Hebrew name is Kalman (English: Carl) and his great grandfather
was Kalonymus Berman >from Zagare, Lithuania, later Belfast Ireland via
Riga.

An on-line directory states: Kalman - Kalman, short for Kalonymos, is a
Hungarian name meaning "merciful." - http://www.aish.com/jl/l/b/48967016.html

There is a long Wikipedia entry on Kalonymus at
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalonymos_family , the first sentence of
which reads: Kalonymos or Kalonymus (Hebrew) is a prominent Jewish
family originally >from Lucca, Italy, which, after the settlement at
Mainz and Speyer of several of its members, took during many generations
a leading part in the development of Jewish learning in Germany.
The family is according to many considered the foundation of Hachmei
and Hasidei Ashkenaz.

Regards
Marcus Shapiro


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Names Ovsey and Kalman #lithuania

Marcus Shapiro <m.shapiro@...>
 

My father's Hebrew name is Kalman (English: Carl) and his great grandfather
was Kalonymus Berman >from Zagare, Lithuania, later Belfast Ireland via
Riga.

An on-line directory states: Kalman - Kalman, short for Kalonymos, is a
Hungarian name meaning "merciful." - http://www.aish.com/jl/l/b/48967016.html

There is a long Wikipedia entry on Kalonymus at
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalonymos_family , the first sentence of
which reads: Kalonymos or Kalonymus (Hebrew) is a prominent Jewish
family originally >from Lucca, Italy, which, after the settlement at
Mainz and Speyer of several of its members, took during many generations
a leading part in the development of Jewish learning in Germany.
The family is according to many considered the foundation of Hachmei
and Hasidei Ashkenaz.

Regards
Marcus Shapiro


FW: Explanation opf the name Ovsey #lithuania

Sam Aaron <sa@...>
 

This was a common nickname for Yehoshua.

Sam Aaron


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania FW: Explanation opf the name Ovsey #lithuania

Sam Aaron <sa@...>
 

This was a common nickname for Yehoshua.

Sam Aaron


Re: Names Ovsey and Kalman #lithuania

bentsion <bentsion@...>
 

Yehoshua in Russian is Ovsey.

Kalman is derived >from the Greek (or Latin) name Kalonimus/Kalonimos.
The Yiddish version was common in Lithuania.

Ben-Tsion Klibansky
Elkana, Israel


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania RE: Names Ovsey and Kalman #lithuania

bentsion <bentsion@...>
 

Yehoshua in Russian is Ovsey.

Kalman is derived >from the Greek (or Latin) name Kalonimus/Kalonimos.
The Yiddish version was common in Lithuania.

Ben-Tsion Klibansky
Elkana, Israel


Re: Brozen-Brezin Levites? #lithuania

Ann Rabinowitz
 

In regard to the Brozin family, I think it would be more helpful to use
available vital and tax records and family history rather than looking for
individuals who were Levites or had supposed Levitical given names.

The earliest Brozin I am familiar with is Rakhmiel and it is >from his son
Itsik Brozin (born 1838 in Panevezys, died Kupiskis) and his five
children that the South African Brozin family descends. The only "Leib"
in their family was Noakh-Leib or Louis, a son of Itsik Brozin. As far
as I know, the family came >from both Kupiskis and Panevezys due to
births, marriages and deaths in those two places. Something else to
consider is that the town of Panevezys had a Jewish maternity hospital
and that was the cause of a number of Kupiskis and other surrounding area
Jews to be born there rather than in the towns or villages where their
families lived. In addition, very often, if the mother was >from Panevezys,
she might return there to have her children and vice versa if the
mother was >from Kupiskis.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania RE: Brozen-Brezin Levites? #lithuania

Ann Rabinowitz
 

In regard to the Brozin family, I think it would be more helpful to use
available vital and tax records and family history rather than looking for
individuals who were Levites or had supposed Levitical given names.

The earliest Brozin I am familiar with is Rakhmiel and it is >from his son
Itsik Brozin (born 1838 in Panevezys, died Kupiskis) and his five
children that the South African Brozin family descends. The only "Leib"
in their family was Noakh-Leib or Louis, a son of Itsik Brozin. As far
as I know, the family came >from both Kupiskis and Panevezys due to
births, marriages and deaths in those two places. Something else to
consider is that the town of Panevezys had a Jewish maternity hospital
and that was the cause of a number of Kupiskis and other surrounding area
Jews to be born there rather than in the towns or villages where their
families lived. In addition, very often, if the mother was >from Panevezys,
she might return there to have her children and vice versa if the
mother was >from Kupiskis.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


Looking for Descendants of Michael Breslin of Mir #belarus

Eli Rabinowitz
 

The Museum at Mir Castle in Belarus is searching for the descendants of
Marek (Michael) Breslin

During WWII, Breslin was a partisan in Mir.

Michael survived the war and in 1945, became the editor of the district
newspaper.
He gave a written testimony about the atrocities of the Nazis in Mir.
Breslin left for South Africa in 1946.

Please contact me if you have any info that can help locate his
descendants.

Thanks

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth Australia
eli@elirab.com
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Belarus SIG #Belarus Looking for Descendants of Michael Breslin of Mir #belarus

Eli Rabinowitz
 

The Museum at Mir Castle in Belarus is searching for the descendants of
Marek (Michael) Breslin

During WWII, Breslin was a partisan in Mir.

Michael survived the war and in 1945, became the editor of the district
newspaper.
He gave a written testimony about the atrocities of the Nazis in Mir.
Breslin left for South Africa in 1946.

Please contact me if you have any info that can help locate his
descendants.

Thanks

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth Australia
eli@elirab.com
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Photos of Belarus Shtetls: Dolginovo, Dokshitsy, Volozhin #belarus

Dov Sandy
 

I participated in this year's Litvak Trip organized by Howard Margol and
Peggy Freedman (which I highly recommend), and would like to share my comments
and photos of the following Belarus shtetls that I had the opportunity to visit:
Dolginovo (Dalhinev), Dokshitsy & Volozhin.

Please visit my blog below and scroll through the July 2012 Archives for the
following:

1. Blog entries titled "Belarus, It's Complicated" (in three parts), including
some photos

2. Three earlier entries with all of my photos for each shtetl. Please note that
the most photos are for Dolginovo, including many photos of legible grave markers
from the cemetery, the synagogue, and some shtetl houses.
http://socallitvak.wordpress.com/

If anyone has additional photos of Dolginovo e.g. marketplace area and houses,
I would be interested in seeing them.

Best regards,
Sandy Ruderman Hack
Valencia, CA


Belarus SIG #Belarus Photos of Belarus Shtetls: Dolginovo, Dokshitsy, Volozhin #belarus

Dov Sandy
 

I participated in this year's Litvak Trip organized by Howard Margol and
Peggy Freedman (which I highly recommend), and would like to share my comments
and photos of the following Belarus shtetls that I had the opportunity to visit:
Dolginovo (Dalhinev), Dokshitsy & Volozhin.

Please visit my blog below and scroll through the July 2012 Archives for the
following:

1. Blog entries titled "Belarus, It's Complicated" (in three parts), including
some photos

2. Three earlier entries with all of my photos for each shtetl. Please note that
the most photos are for Dolginovo, including many photos of legible grave markers
from the cemetery, the synagogue, and some shtetl houses.
http://socallitvak.wordpress.com/

If anyone has additional photos of Dolginovo e.g. marketplace area and houses,
I would be interested in seeing them.

Best regards,
Sandy Ruderman Hack
Valencia, CA


POCHAPOVSKY family from Gorodische, Novogrudok, Minsk. #belarus

csofer@...
 

As a result of a family history, "The Descendants of Velvel POCHAPOVSKY" written
by my cousin Howard Picker in 1978, we know a great deal about this family.
We know that Velvel was born around 1800, and was the son of Meir. Until I looked
at the revision list for Gorodische, Belarus the other day, there were no known
siblings of my 3X great grandfather Velvel POCHAPOVSKY.

The 1834 Revision list on the Jewishgen Belarus Database show that there was a
Movshe POCHEPOVSKY, son of Meer, born in about 1816.
Movsha had a wife Rokha and a daughter Ginda in 1834. They were living with a
family named NEVAKHOVICH in Gorodische, Novogrudok, Minsk. Also in the home was
a family named VONKHADLO.

The 1850 RL mentions Movsha, still in the listing for the NEVAKHOVICH home.
It says that he died in 1842. There is no mention in that RL of Rokha or Ginda.
I have no clue as to whether Movsha and Rokha had other children between 1834 and
1842.

If any of this is ringing any bells with anyone, please let me know.

Cheryl Alpert Sofer
Melville, NY
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Belarus SIG #Belarus POCHAPOVSKY family from Gorodische, Novogrudok, Minsk. #belarus

csofer@...
 

As a result of a family history, "The Descendants of Velvel POCHAPOVSKY" written
by my cousin Howard Picker in 1978, we know a great deal about this family.
We know that Velvel was born around 1800, and was the son of Meir. Until I looked
at the revision list for Gorodische, Belarus the other day, there were no known
siblings of my 3X great grandfather Velvel POCHAPOVSKY.

The 1834 Revision list on the Jewishgen Belarus Database show that there was a
Movshe POCHEPOVSKY, son of Meer, born in about 1816.
Movsha had a wife Rokha and a daughter Ginda in 1834. They were living with a
family named NEVAKHOVICH in Gorodische, Novogrudok, Minsk. Also in the home was
a family named VONKHADLO.

The 1850 RL mentions Movsha, still in the listing for the NEVAKHOVICH home.
It says that he died in 1842. There is no mention in that RL of Rokha or Ginda.
I have no clue as to whether Movsha and Rokha had other children between 1834 and
1842.

If any of this is ringing any bells with anyone, please let me know.

Cheryl Alpert Sofer
Melville, NY
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Book on Jews in Alsace digitized and published #germany

Olaf Ruhl <Olaf.Ruhl@...>
 

Hallo,

I read on Facebook that a book about the Jews in Alsace and beyond has
benn digitized and can be viewed on Google books. Here is the link:
http://books.google.de/books?id=89I-AAAAcAAJ&pg=PA269&lpg=PA269&dq=ingenheim+juden&source=bl&ots=TtRmwKxVFZ&sig=xlA4Az3IdQ80V2l_jmrCivYVyW8&hl=en&sa=X&ei=ldEMUJfRO46n0AG2vYDDAw&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=ingenheim%20juden&f=false
[Moderator note: http://tinyurl.com/bmb9y5m is the shorter URL I created
for the above. It takes you to page 269. Use the scroll bar
to go to the beginning. The book is in German and printed in old typeface.
Published 1825 in Strasburg.]

Best wishes >from Berlin Olaf Ruhl Olaf.Ruhl@gmx.de


German SIG #Germany Book on Jews in Alsace digitized and published #germany

Olaf Ruhl <Olaf.Ruhl@...>
 

Hallo,

I read on Facebook that a book about the Jews in Alsace and beyond has
benn digitized and can be viewed on Google books. Here is the link:
http://books.google.de/books?id=89I-AAAAcAAJ&pg=PA269&lpg=PA269&dq=ingenheim+juden&source=bl&ots=TtRmwKxVFZ&sig=xlA4Az3IdQ80V2l_jmrCivYVyW8&hl=en&sa=X&ei=ldEMUJfRO46n0AG2vYDDAw&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=ingenheim%20juden&f=false
[Moderator note: http://tinyurl.com/bmb9y5m is the shorter URL I created
for the above. It takes you to page 269. Use the scroll bar
to go to the beginning. The book is in German and printed in old typeface.
Published 1825 in Strasburg.]

Best wishes >from Berlin Olaf Ruhl Olaf.Ruhl@gmx.de


Intro - Researching GINSBURG / HEINEMANN family from Gunzburg/Frankfurt #germany

Richard Sloan <rsloanper@...>
 

Hello GerSig,
I just joined the group. I have been doing genealogy research for a number
of years, off and on. My immediate ancestry is >from Poland. My mother's
maiden name was of German origin (although I prefer not to disclose it here).
However, her mother's maiden name was possibly GUTMAN, which also sounds German.

My original last name was SMULEVITZ; I changed it to Sloan in 1986.
SMULEVITZ was assigned to my father's family on Ellis Island, c. 1921.

The previous family name was SHMUELOVICH, or something like it. My brother
said that our father, and a cousin, told him that the prior family
name was GINZBURG. The Russians changed it to a patrynomic (sic) Russian
format when they took over parts of Poland. That is, the Russians
told an ancestor that since his father's name had been Samuel (or a
European form), his name would be son of Samuel, or SHMUELOVICH. From
Internet research, I learned that the Russian namechanging began in 1809,
and continued until about 1840, with registration continuing for about
10 years. I think this was recent enough that there would be an oral
family history.

I researched the origin of the name GINZBURG. Apparently, it goes back to
the city of Gunzburg in southwestern Germany. When people left Gunzburg
for other locations, they often received the town name as a surname.
Apparently, GUNZBURG was a common name in Frankfurt, which is due
north of Gunzburg.

Also, when I was about 9 years old, I heard my father tell someone that
the original family name had been HEINEMANN, which sounds German
to me. Apparently, as Jewish families moved around, they took on
different surnames, for various reasons.

I understand that Jewish families did not have standard surnames until
after 1700. Before that, they had rolling 'surnames', like Joseph son of
Jacob, Jacob son of Isaac, etc. Therefore, my SWAG (Scientific Wild A*s
Guess) is that some male ancestor left Gunzburg sometime after 1700,
and by the early 1800s, my paternal ancestry had moved to Poland.

Also, I had my Dna tested by FTDNa, 37 markers. The results showed that
of my closest matches (0 to 2 Genetic Distance), several listed
ancestry >from Germany. I contacted the closest matches by email.
Several more said their ancestry came >from Germany, also. According
to the TIP Rport >from FtDNa, there is a very high probability (over 90%)
of having a common ancestor 12 or more generations back.

Furthermore, using 30 years per generation, this would go back to the
late Middle Ages, sometime around 1580. At 16 generations, this would
go back to about 1460, with an even higher probability of common ancestry.
This is supposedly the general time period when the Ashkenazi population
exploded in Europe.

My particular questions or issues right now are:
1. if possible, learning more specific information about my ancestry
in or around Germany.

2. identifying when and >from where my ancestry might have come to Germany.

That is, there are numerous Internet references saying that there was
a Jewish migration >from northern Italy to the Rhineland. The time
periods given range >from about 600 - 700 A.D. to about 1200-1300 A.D.

Also, the number of people given ranges >from 400 up to about 10,000.
Possibly, there were multiple migrations.

Alternately, there may have been migrations >from southeastern Europe,
although I haven't been able to find too much information about
this. The only information I could find is that around 1500 or later,
there were Romaniot Jews coming >from the Ottoman Empire.

FYI, my paternal genetic profile does show great similarity to people
from Anatolia (present day Turkey), southeastern Europe, and southern Italy
and the nearby islands (Sicily and Malta).


I will look forward to communicating with you in the near future.
I will be happy to provide any information that I can. Sincerely yours,

Richard 'Rick' Sloan Kansas City, Missouri rsloanper@hotmail.com


German SIG #Germany Intro - Researching GINSBURG / HEINEMANN family from Gunzburg/Frankfurt #germany

Richard Sloan <rsloanper@...>
 

Hello GerSig,
I just joined the group. I have been doing genealogy research for a number
of years, off and on. My immediate ancestry is >from Poland. My mother's
maiden name was of German origin (although I prefer not to disclose it here).
However, her mother's maiden name was possibly GUTMAN, which also sounds German.

My original last name was SMULEVITZ; I changed it to Sloan in 1986.
SMULEVITZ was assigned to my father's family on Ellis Island, c. 1921.

The previous family name was SHMUELOVICH, or something like it. My brother
said that our father, and a cousin, told him that the prior family
name was GINZBURG. The Russians changed it to a patrynomic (sic) Russian
format when they took over parts of Poland. That is, the Russians
told an ancestor that since his father's name had been Samuel (or a
European form), his name would be son of Samuel, or SHMUELOVICH. From
Internet research, I learned that the Russian namechanging began in 1809,
and continued until about 1840, with registration continuing for about
10 years. I think this was recent enough that there would be an oral
family history.

I researched the origin of the name GINZBURG. Apparently, it goes back to
the city of Gunzburg in southwestern Germany. When people left Gunzburg
for other locations, they often received the town name as a surname.
Apparently, GUNZBURG was a common name in Frankfurt, which is due
north of Gunzburg.

Also, when I was about 9 years old, I heard my father tell someone that
the original family name had been HEINEMANN, which sounds German
to me. Apparently, as Jewish families moved around, they took on
different surnames, for various reasons.

I understand that Jewish families did not have standard surnames until
after 1700. Before that, they had rolling 'surnames', like Joseph son of
Jacob, Jacob son of Isaac, etc. Therefore, my SWAG (Scientific Wild A*s
Guess) is that some male ancestor left Gunzburg sometime after 1700,
and by the early 1800s, my paternal ancestry had moved to Poland.

Also, I had my Dna tested by FTDNa, 37 markers. The results showed that
of my closest matches (0 to 2 Genetic Distance), several listed
ancestry >from Germany. I contacted the closest matches by email.
Several more said their ancestry came >from Germany, also. According
to the TIP Rport >from FtDNa, there is a very high probability (over 90%)
of having a common ancestor 12 or more generations back.

Furthermore, using 30 years per generation, this would go back to the
late Middle Ages, sometime around 1580. At 16 generations, this would
go back to about 1460, with an even higher probability of common ancestry.
This is supposedly the general time period when the Ashkenazi population
exploded in Europe.

My particular questions or issues right now are:
1. if possible, learning more specific information about my ancestry
in or around Germany.

2. identifying when and >from where my ancestry might have come to Germany.

That is, there are numerous Internet references saying that there was
a Jewish migration >from northern Italy to the Rhineland. The time
periods given range >from about 600 - 700 A.D. to about 1200-1300 A.D.

Also, the number of people given ranges >from 400 up to about 10,000.
Possibly, there were multiple migrations.

Alternately, there may have been migrations >from southeastern Europe,
although I haven't been able to find too much information about
this. The only information I could find is that around 1500 or later,
there were Romaniot Jews coming >from the Ottoman Empire.

FYI, my paternal genetic profile does show great similarity to people
from Anatolia (present day Turkey), southeastern Europe, and southern Italy
and the nearby islands (Sicily and Malta).


I will look forward to communicating with you in the near future.
I will be happy to provide any information that I can. Sincerely yours,

Richard 'Rick' Sloan Kansas City, Missouri rsloanper@hotmail.com


Re: Enticing Relatives to do DNA testing #dna

Judy Simon
 

Paying for their test often helps. Also, telling them what they can
learn >from the test, and what you have already learned; letting them
know that others in the family already tested. Sometimes you can
entice them with information about deep ancestry and the National
Geographic Genographic Project, or with the TV programs such as Who Do
You Think You Are and Finding Your Roots (Henry Louis Gates). Try to
make the information understandable to the relative at whatever level
they need to be able
to understand.

Judy Simon
Stony Brook, NY

What strategies have you used to successfully get relatives to
do DNA testing??
Al Ruben
Chicago


DNA Research #DNA re: Enticing Relatives to do DNA testing #dna

Judy Simon
 

Paying for their test often helps. Also, telling them what they can
learn >from the test, and what you have already learned; letting them
know that others in the family already tested. Sometimes you can
entice them with information about deep ancestry and the National
Geographic Genographic Project, or with the TV programs such as Who Do
You Think You Are and Finding Your Roots (Henry Louis Gates). Try to
make the information understandable to the relative at whatever level
they need to be able
to understand.

Judy Simon
Stony Brook, NY

What strategies have you used to successfully get relatives to
do DNA testing??
Al Ruben
Chicago

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