Date   

Geni projects for towns of Stankov and Meclov in Bohemia #austria-czech

Tony Hausner
 

I have just created geni projects for these two towns.

The town sites are

http://www.geni.com/projects/Meclov/13902

http://www.geni.com/projects/Stankov/13901

They are part of the Geni project

Jewish Communities in Bohemia and Moravia, Czech Republic
http://www.geni.com/projects/Jewish-Communities-in-Bohemia-and-Moravia-Czech-Republic/12452

Many thanks to Ann Fuller who guided me through creating these projects.

I welcome comments and additions to these projects.

Tony Hausner
Silver Spring, MD 20901
301--587-6943
(primary email address: thausner@...)


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Geni projects for towns of Stankov and Meclov in Bohemia #austria-czech

Tony Hausner
 

I have just created geni projects for these two towns.

The town sites are

http://www.geni.com/projects/Meclov/13902

http://www.geni.com/projects/Stankov/13901

They are part of the Geni project

Jewish Communities in Bohemia and Moravia, Czech Republic
http://www.geni.com/projects/Jewish-Communities-in-Bohemia-and-Moravia-Czech-Republic/12452

Many thanks to Ann Fuller who guided me through creating these projects.

I welcome comments and additions to these projects.

Tony Hausner
Silver Spring, MD 20901
301--587-6943
(primary email address: thausner@...)


February 17th Meeting of the Jewish Genealogy Soc of Broward County #general

rb.pinsky@...
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Broward County
Presents: General Meeting & Martin Shames Speaker's Program

Featuring:
Hal Bookbinder
of Los Angeles, CA

~ speaking on ~
Ships of our Ancestors

Sunday, February 17, 2013 | 1:00PM - 3:00 PM
Alvin Sherman Library of Nova Southeastern University, Lab A, 3301
College Ave., (Davie) Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

Hal Bookbinder is the former President of the IAJGS; founding
member and President of JGS of Los Angeles, California; Editor of
the Annual Genealogical Yearbook; and recipient of the IAJGS
Lifetime Achievement Award in 2010. He has been researching eight
family lines, identifying 4,000 relatives back to the late 1700's.

His presentation will focus on the ships that brought our ancestors
to these shores, including governmental regulations, the experiences
of getting to the ports of embarkation, being processed for passage,
and life aboard the vessels and at ports of entry.

Mr. Bookbinder's presentation will be telecast live on screen >from
Los Angeles with a question and answer period to follow.

Program is free of charge.

Directions:>from University Drive north or south, travel east on
SW 30th Street. Turn right at Ray Ferrero Jr. Boulevard. Turn right
into the Parking Garage- $1.00 per hour. Library is SW of the
parking garage.

For more information: info@... Phone:754-223-9201

Thank you,
Rosa Pinsky
Publicity Manager
Jewish Genealogical Society of Broward County


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen February 17th Meeting of the Jewish Genealogy Soc of Broward County #general

rb.pinsky@...
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Broward County
Presents: General Meeting & Martin Shames Speaker's Program

Featuring:
Hal Bookbinder
of Los Angeles, CA

~ speaking on ~
Ships of our Ancestors

Sunday, February 17, 2013 | 1:00PM - 3:00 PM
Alvin Sherman Library of Nova Southeastern University, Lab A, 3301
College Ave., (Davie) Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

Hal Bookbinder is the former President of the IAJGS; founding
member and President of JGS of Los Angeles, California; Editor of
the Annual Genealogical Yearbook; and recipient of the IAJGS
Lifetime Achievement Award in 2010. He has been researching eight
family lines, identifying 4,000 relatives back to the late 1700's.

His presentation will focus on the ships that brought our ancestors
to these shores, including governmental regulations, the experiences
of getting to the ports of embarkation, being processed for passage,
and life aboard the vessels and at ports of entry.

Mr. Bookbinder's presentation will be telecast live on screen >from
Los Angeles with a question and answer period to follow.

Program is free of charge.

Directions:>from University Drive north or south, travel east on
SW 30th Street. Turn right at Ray Ferrero Jr. Boulevard. Turn right
into the Parking Garage- $1.00 per hour. Library is SW of the
parking garage.

For more information: info@... Phone:754-223-9201

Thank you,
Rosa Pinsky
Publicity Manager
Jewish Genealogical Society of Broward County


Rabbi Akiva Eger descendant #rabbinic

Judy Wolkovitch <judywolk@...>
 

For years I have been trying to solve a puzzle and yesterday got
one step closer. Perhaps someone can close the loop. In his book
"Forty Years a Chief Rabbi" about Rabbi Solomon Hirschell of
England, the author Hyman Symons states that Rabbi Hirschell's
daughter Fanny married a grandson of Rabbi Akiva of Posen in 1827
in Poland. Later in the book he states that Rabbi Hirschell's
grandson Simon Eiger attended the funeral. Another source states
that Eiger was the chief mourner.

Yesterday I found a reference attributed to Duschinsky that states
that one of Solomon Hirschell's daughters was married to R. Shlomo
Eger's son, making her a granddaughter in marriage of R. Akiva.

Can anyone close the loop and tell me which of Shlomo Eiger's son
married Fanny?

Many thanks,

Judy Wolkovitch


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbi Akiva Eger descendant #rabbinic

Judy Wolkovitch <judywolk@...>
 

For years I have been trying to solve a puzzle and yesterday got
one step closer. Perhaps someone can close the loop. In his book
"Forty Years a Chief Rabbi" about Rabbi Solomon Hirschell of
England, the author Hyman Symons states that Rabbi Hirschell's
daughter Fanny married a grandson of Rabbi Akiva of Posen in 1827
in Poland. Later in the book he states that Rabbi Hirschell's
grandson Simon Eiger attended the funeral. Another source states
that Eiger was the chief mourner.

Yesterday I found a reference attributed to Duschinsky that states
that one of Solomon Hirschell's daughters was married to R. Shlomo
Eger's son, making her a granddaughter in marriage of R. Akiva.

Can anyone close the loop and tell me which of Shlomo Eiger's son
married Fanny?

Many thanks,

Judy Wolkovitch


Re: newbie questions #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

Laurie Budgar <lbudgar@...> wrote:
I've been researching my genealogy for years, but have not yet used a
DNA test, and have lots of very basic questions about them:
--I'm hoping to confirm a relationship between my family (BUDGAR) and
another family (BUDGOR). This seems like a dumb question, but to do this
do I need to have both my brother and a male member of the BUDGOR family
take the Y-DNA test, or is my brother sufficient?
No one with either name have used Family Tree DNA for testing yet. (I
used http://familytreedna.com and on the main page, entered both of the
surnames.)

You need one male >from each family. The best result is that they belong
to different haplogroups. Then you know your answer and you can stopping
looking. If they are in the same haplogroup, then one may eliminate some
because of their genetic distances. However, that you still need to do
the paper search to see if the two families are the same. However, in any
case, you should join every projects that you could, especially the
haplogroup ones.

What information,
exactly, can I expect to get >from the Y-DNA test my brother takes? Will
it give names of relatives, or just numbers of haplotypes, etc.?
You would get a list of persons that have a similar Y-dna with the testee.

--Can I get even more information if my brother (and/or I) take the
FamilyFinder test instead? Would that be more info than if my brother
took the Y-DNA and I took the Mt-DNA test?
--Also, I understand that 23andme provides health info in addition to
genealogical information, but that their genealogical info is considered
inferior to Family Tree; can anyone explain why?
Family Tree DNA, 23 and me, and Ancestry.DNA all used the same chip to do
the autosomal testing. The testing would tried to find cousins on all the
branches on the tree. Ancestry is very good if you have a very large
amount of data within their system already. However, the DNA data is not
available to you. 23andMe give the most information and it then can be
transfer to FamilyTreeDNA for a price. I think if you are getting the
autosomal testing done, the best way is to have 23andMe do it and than
transfer the information to FamilyTreeDNA with its larger data base. That
way you get both. However, there is a disadvantage to this. It is that
the later would keep your DNA sample for 25 years and when new tests are
available, it can do it on the same sample. I heard of several times of
new tests run after a person is died.

I believe new federal laws are stopping other companies >from providing
health info. 23andme started before that law was passed and are allow to
keep doing it. Anyway, I do not think that which company one used should
be based on information that I think is not very useful.

Sidney Sachs
Lorton, VA


DNA Research #DNA Re: newbie questions #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

Laurie Budgar <lbudgar@...> wrote:
I've been researching my genealogy for years, but have not yet used a
DNA test, and have lots of very basic questions about them:
--I'm hoping to confirm a relationship between my family (BUDGAR) and
another family (BUDGOR). This seems like a dumb question, but to do this
do I need to have both my brother and a male member of the BUDGOR family
take the Y-DNA test, or is my brother sufficient?
No one with either name have used Family Tree DNA for testing yet. (I
used http://familytreedna.com and on the main page, entered both of the
surnames.)

You need one male >from each family. The best result is that they belong
to different haplogroups. Then you know your answer and you can stopping
looking. If they are in the same haplogroup, then one may eliminate some
because of their genetic distances. However, that you still need to do
the paper search to see if the two families are the same. However, in any
case, you should join every projects that you could, especially the
haplogroup ones.

What information,
exactly, can I expect to get >from the Y-DNA test my brother takes? Will
it give names of relatives, or just numbers of haplotypes, etc.?
You would get a list of persons that have a similar Y-dna with the testee.

--Can I get even more information if my brother (and/or I) take the
FamilyFinder test instead? Would that be more info than if my brother
took the Y-DNA and I took the Mt-DNA test?
--Also, I understand that 23andme provides health info in addition to
genealogical information, but that their genealogical info is considered
inferior to Family Tree; can anyone explain why?
Family Tree DNA, 23 and me, and Ancestry.DNA all used the same chip to do
the autosomal testing. The testing would tried to find cousins on all the
branches on the tree. Ancestry is very good if you have a very large
amount of data within their system already. However, the DNA data is not
available to you. 23andMe give the most information and it then can be
transfer to FamilyTreeDNA for a price. I think if you are getting the
autosomal testing done, the best way is to have 23andMe do it and than
transfer the information to FamilyTreeDNA with its larger data base. That
way you get both. However, there is a disadvantage to this. It is that
the later would keep your DNA sample for 25 years and when new tests are
available, it can do it on the same sample. I heard of several times of
new tests run after a person is died.

I believe new federal laws are stopping other companies >from providing
health info. 23andme started before that law was passed and are allow to
keep doing it. Anyway, I do not think that which company one used should
be based on information that I think is not very useful.

Sidney Sachs
Lorton, VA


Seeking 1950s Caracas family who later moved to Israel #general

Katie Bess
 

Hello,

We hope you can help my cousins and me in this quest or know someone
who can. We welcome any connections you can make for us.

We're looking for our family who owned the Shalom restaurant in
Caracas, Venezuela in the 1950s--or anyone who remembers them.

We're related to the wife, but ***married surname unknown***.

Here's what we know about them:
- They arrived in Caracas after 1935, possibly just before, during or
after World War 2.
- They were >from Romania, where they operated a restaurant.
- The wife was born a GARTENLAUB, but we don't know her husband's
family name.
- The wife's first name may have been Fanny; if not, then Fanny was
her sister's name.
- The husband's name may have been Josef David; if not, it was their
brother-in-law's name.
- In the late 1950s, a son was about 25-30 years old when he flew
from Caracas, changing airplanes in New York City on his way to or
from Israel. He called his mother's New York relatives, who met him at
Idlewild airport. He would be in his 80s now.
- The Caracas family later emigrated to Israel. They planned to open
a restaurant.

Hopefully, someone who lived in Caracas in the 1950s will remember
them or someone in Israel will recognize their story. Or perhaps
someone in Caracas can find a record of the Shalom restaurant's
ownership,

Our goal is to find their children and descendants.

Thank you for any help you can provide. Please respond privately.

Katie Gold
USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking 1950s Caracas family who later moved to Israel #general

Katie Bess
 

Hello,

We hope you can help my cousins and me in this quest or know someone
who can. We welcome any connections you can make for us.

We're looking for our family who owned the Shalom restaurant in
Caracas, Venezuela in the 1950s--or anyone who remembers them.

We're related to the wife, but ***married surname unknown***.

Here's what we know about them:
- They arrived in Caracas after 1935, possibly just before, during or
after World War 2.
- They were >from Romania, where they operated a restaurant.
- The wife was born a GARTENLAUB, but we don't know her husband's
family name.
- The wife's first name may have been Fanny; if not, then Fanny was
her sister's name.
- The husband's name may have been Josef David; if not, it was their
brother-in-law's name.
- In the late 1950s, a son was about 25-30 years old when he flew
from Caracas, changing airplanes in New York City on his way to or
from Israel. He called his mother's New York relatives, who met him at
Idlewild airport. He would be in his 80s now.
- The Caracas family later emigrated to Israel. They planned to open
a restaurant.

Hopefully, someone who lived in Caracas in the 1950s will remember
them or someone in Israel will recognize their story. Or perhaps
someone in Caracas can find a record of the Shalom restaurant's
ownership,

Our goal is to find their children and descendants.

Thank you for any help you can provide. Please respond privately.

Katie Gold
USA


HR 466- Death Master File/SSDI Bill Introduced #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The second bill addressing access to the Death Master File and the
commercial version known as the Social Security Death Index was introduced
in Congress on February 4. The printed version is now available >from the
Government Printing Office see:
http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/BILLS-113hr466ih/pdf/BILLS-113hr466ih.pdf .
HR 466 was introduced by Congressman Capuano (D-MA) and is called: "Social
Security Death Master File Privacy Act of 2013". At the time of
introduction there were no co-sponsors. The bill was referred to the House
Ways and Means Committee. At this time no hearings are scheduled. We are
expecting more bills to be introduced that affect access to the SSDI and the
genealogists/public access to Social Security numbers of deceased
individuals. To monitor the actions on this bill go to:
http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/z?c113:H.R.466:

HR 466 prohibits the Commissioner of Social Security >from publishing the
death master file or any public database that includes the Social Security
numbers of any deceased individual. The bill permits the Commissioner to
share information with the appropriate federal or state agency which pays
federally funded benefits regarding the deceased. The bill also states the
Commissioner would not be compelled to release the information under the
provisions of providing information to the public-Freedom of Information Act
(http://www.fdic.gov/regulations/laws/rules/8000-300.html)

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen HR 466- Death Master File/SSDI Bill Introduced #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The second bill addressing access to the Death Master File and the
commercial version known as the Social Security Death Index was introduced
in Congress on February 4. The printed version is now available >from the
Government Printing Office see:
http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/BILLS-113hr466ih/pdf/BILLS-113hr466ih.pdf .
HR 466 was introduced by Congressman Capuano (D-MA) and is called: "Social
Security Death Master File Privacy Act of 2013". At the time of
introduction there were no co-sponsors. The bill was referred to the House
Ways and Means Committee. At this time no hearings are scheduled. We are
expecting more bills to be introduced that affect access to the SSDI and the
genealogists/public access to Social Security numbers of deceased
individuals. To monitor the actions on this bill go to:
http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/z?c113:H.R.466:

HR 466 prohibits the Commissioner of Social Security >from publishing the
death master file or any public database that includes the Social Security
numbers of any deceased individual. The bill permits the Commissioner to
share information with the appropriate federal or state agency which pays
federally funded benefits regarding the deceased. The bill also states the
Commissioner would not be compelled to release the information under the
provisions of providing information to the public-Freedom of Information Act
(http://www.fdic.gov/regulations/laws/rules/8000-300.html)

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Re: Kremenitzer Manifest #general

gilah@...
 

Phyllis Kramer provided a spot-on response to Barbara Zimmer's question:
Barbara asked:
On the manifest are a long number and a date, which I assume
correspond to Wolf's naturalization papers, How can I find those
papers,, knowing the date of May 22 1936 and the number 2-405931?
Phyllis' reply included:
...those numbers indeed refer to the naturalization process; the
date refers to INS search to verify that he entered the US legally.
The 2 refers to New York...
I would add the following to remind all of the wonderful resource
located in the InfoFiles section of JewishGen.org. It is Marian L.
Smith's "Manifest Markings: A Guide to Interpreting Passenger List
Annotations."

One may find it >from the JG Home page under Get Started - InfoFiles
- Immigration.
http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Manifests/
Click on "In the Occupation Column." At the bottom of that page one
will find District Key # Tables, which provide translation of the
first digit of the naturalization notation on manifests.

Marian's article opens a world of additional information that one may
find on manifests. It is just one of the great resources one needs to
frequent on JewishGen.

As Phyllis might add: "Isn't JewishGen wonderful!"

Emily Garber
Phoenix, AZ
http://www.extrayad.blogspot.com
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/yurovshchina/index.html


Newspapers Poland, 1870s, 1880s #general

Paula Eisenstein Baker
 

Karen Amato inquired about Jewish newspapers in Poland in the late
1800s, and Jeff Marx suggested his article in _Landsmen_, vol. 4.

I wrote Karen privately to suggest Sarah Abrevaya Stein's book
_Making Jews Modern: The Yiddish and Ladino Press in the Russian
and Ottoman Empires_. It might be of interest to others on this list.

Paula Eisenstein Baker
Houston, TX


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Kremenitzer Manifest #general

gilah@...
 

Phyllis Kramer provided a spot-on response to Barbara Zimmer's question:
Barbara asked:
On the manifest are a long number and a date, which I assume
correspond to Wolf's naturalization papers, How can I find those
papers,, knowing the date of May 22 1936 and the number 2-405931?
Phyllis' reply included:
...those numbers indeed refer to the naturalization process; the
date refers to INS search to verify that he entered the US legally.
The 2 refers to New York...
I would add the following to remind all of the wonderful resource
located in the InfoFiles section of JewishGen.org. It is Marian L.
Smith's "Manifest Markings: A Guide to Interpreting Passenger List
Annotations."

One may find it >from the JG Home page under Get Started - InfoFiles
- Immigration.
http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Manifests/
Click on "In the Occupation Column." At the bottom of that page one
will find District Key # Tables, which provide translation of the
first digit of the naturalization notation on manifests.

Marian's article opens a world of additional information that one may
find on manifests. It is just one of the great resources one needs to
frequent on JewishGen.

As Phyllis might add: "Isn't JewishGen wonderful!"

Emily Garber
Phoenix, AZ
http://www.extrayad.blogspot.com
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/yurovshchina/index.html


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Newspapers Poland, 1870s, 1880s #general

Paula Eisenstein Baker
 

Karen Amato inquired about Jewish newspapers in Poland in the late
1800s, and Jeff Marx suggested his article in _Landsmen_, vol. 4.

I wrote Karen privately to suggest Sarah Abrevaya Stein's book
_Making Jews Modern: The Yiddish and Ladino Press in the Russian
and Ottoman Empires_. It might be of interest to others on this list.

Paula Eisenstein Baker
Houston, TX


JGSPBCI - FL, February 13 Membership meeting reminder #general

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

JGSPalm Beach County, FL - February Membership Meeting Reminder

Wednesday, February 13, 2013
10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
South County Civic Center, 16700 Jog Road, Delray Beach, FL
By popular request, the All Sig Meeting, "Worlds of our Ancestors"
is returning in an all new expanded format.
The special meeting will begin at an earlier hour - 10:00 AM.
Bring your lunch or a snack.

Special Interest Group (SIG) Leaders representing Belarus, Galicia,
Hungary, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, the Ukraine, Latin America,
South Africa, Australia, and Germany will present Power Point
programs. The SIG leaders include Mona Morris, Chairperson, Ina
Getzoff, Sylvia Furshman Nusinov, Paul Baranick and Mark Jacobson.

Member volunteers include Mitch Heide, Eric Sharenow, Gary Stone,
Dennis Rice, Patti Couture,Phyllis Kramer, and Irv Skorka.

Stations representing the countries our members are researching
will be placed around the "country room" - the main room, and a
special rooom for our JGSPBCI Library Collection will feature
reference and research books. Enlarged maps and a computer station
will be available to locate ancestral towns. Board members and
other experts with knowledge of specific towns will be available
to help attendeees in their search for their ancestry.

Three time slots will allow a "walk around" to visit the various
stations and meet the leaders: 10AM-10:45AM, 12 noon-1PM and
2PM - 3PM

Handouts, listing suggested web sites, will be available.

With Mona Freedman Morris acting as moderator, SIG leaders will
present Powerpoint presentations at 11:00 am and 1:00 pm., with
time for questions after each presentation. The SIG leaders will
be available at their tables for consultation again after the
1:00 PM presentation.

SIG leaders and board members will staff display tables for most
European countries. They will be available to answer questions and
assist members in their research. Bring your documents and
information with you if you need answers for "brick walls" or
information on where to go for research information.

Research books, borrowed >from the JGSPBCI Library, will be available
at the various stations for information pertaining to countries in
Eastern Europe, Western Europe, the Middle East and Latin America in
addition to Australia, South Africa, Greece and Turkey.

Contact SIG chairperson Mona Morris for further information:
geniemona@...
or visit our website:
www.jgspalmbeachcounty.org

Guests are welcome. There is a $5 guest fee, which may be applied
toward membership.

Submitted by Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
President Emerita
Workbook Editor
Speakers Bureau Chair


JGS NY Meeting Sunday February 17 #general

Harriet Mayer <mayharri@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society (NY) invites you to join us at our
Sunday, February 17th meeting.
Place: Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th St. New York NY
Time: 2:00 PM

Program: "Legacy: A Genetic History of the Jewish People"
Speaker: Dr. Harry Ostrer, Professor of Pathology and Genetics at
Albert Einstein School of Medicine (AECOM)

At a time when many Jews are investigating genetic testing as a tool
for family history research, Dr. Ostrer will provide the perspective
of a scientist who has studied the genetics of Jewish people for 30
years. In 2007, he launched the "Jewish HapMap Project," a
collaboration of AECOM, New York University School of Medicine and
Jewish communities to understand the structure of the genomes in
Jewish populations. The significance of the new genetic analysis is,
in Dr. Ostrer's words, demonstrating "that the history of the Jews
can be seen in their genes". A book signing will follow Dr. Ostrer's
presentation.

In addition, >from 12:30 to 1:30: Bring your lunch and meet with
fellow JGS members and experts in an informal setting to share
research stories and ask questions.

The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at CJH will be open at
11:00 AM with access to research materials and computers.

Admission is free for members of JGS (NY); guests are welcome, $5.
For more information, please visit jgsny.org or our Facebook page.

Harriet Mayer
JGS NY VP Communications


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSPBCI - FL, February 13 Membership meeting reminder #general

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

JGSPalm Beach County, FL - February Membership Meeting Reminder

Wednesday, February 13, 2013
10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
South County Civic Center, 16700 Jog Road, Delray Beach, FL
By popular request, the All Sig Meeting, "Worlds of our Ancestors"
is returning in an all new expanded format.
The special meeting will begin at an earlier hour - 10:00 AM.
Bring your lunch or a snack.

Special Interest Group (SIG) Leaders representing Belarus, Galicia,
Hungary, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, the Ukraine, Latin America,
South Africa, Australia, and Germany will present Power Point
programs. The SIG leaders include Mona Morris, Chairperson, Ina
Getzoff, Sylvia Furshman Nusinov, Paul Baranick and Mark Jacobson.

Member volunteers include Mitch Heide, Eric Sharenow, Gary Stone,
Dennis Rice, Patti Couture,Phyllis Kramer, and Irv Skorka.

Stations representing the countries our members are researching
will be placed around the "country room" - the main room, and a
special rooom for our JGSPBCI Library Collection will feature
reference and research books. Enlarged maps and a computer station
will be available to locate ancestral towns. Board members and
other experts with knowledge of specific towns will be available
to help attendeees in their search for their ancestry.

Three time slots will allow a "walk around" to visit the various
stations and meet the leaders: 10AM-10:45AM, 12 noon-1PM and
2PM - 3PM

Handouts, listing suggested web sites, will be available.

With Mona Freedman Morris acting as moderator, SIG leaders will
present Powerpoint presentations at 11:00 am and 1:00 pm., with
time for questions after each presentation. The SIG leaders will
be available at their tables for consultation again after the
1:00 PM presentation.

SIG leaders and board members will staff display tables for most
European countries. They will be available to answer questions and
assist members in their research. Bring your documents and
information with you if you need answers for "brick walls" or
information on where to go for research information.

Research books, borrowed >from the JGSPBCI Library, will be available
at the various stations for information pertaining to countries in
Eastern Europe, Western Europe, the Middle East and Latin America in
addition to Australia, South Africa, Greece and Turkey.

Contact SIG chairperson Mona Morris for further information:
geniemona@...
or visit our website:
www.jgspalmbeachcounty.org

Guests are welcome. There is a $5 guest fee, which may be applied
toward membership.

Submitted by Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
President Emerita
Workbook Editor
Speakers Bureau Chair


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS NY Meeting Sunday February 17 #general

Harriet Mayer <mayharri@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society (NY) invites you to join us at our
Sunday, February 17th meeting.
Place: Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th St. New York NY
Time: 2:00 PM

Program: "Legacy: A Genetic History of the Jewish People"
Speaker: Dr. Harry Ostrer, Professor of Pathology and Genetics at
Albert Einstein School of Medicine (AECOM)

At a time when many Jews are investigating genetic testing as a tool
for family history research, Dr. Ostrer will provide the perspective
of a scientist who has studied the genetics of Jewish people for 30
years. In 2007, he launched the "Jewish HapMap Project," a
collaboration of AECOM, New York University School of Medicine and
Jewish communities to understand the structure of the genomes in
Jewish populations. The significance of the new genetic analysis is,
in Dr. Ostrer's words, demonstrating "that the history of the Jews
can be seen in their genes". A book signing will follow Dr. Ostrer's
presentation.

In addition, >from 12:30 to 1:30: Bring your lunch and meet with
fellow JGS members and experts in an informal setting to share
research stories and ask questions.

The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at CJH will be open at
11:00 AM with access to research materials and computers.

Admission is free for members of JGS (NY); guests are welcome, $5.
For more information, please visit jgsny.org or our Facebook page.

Harriet Mayer
JGS NY VP Communications

153741 - 153760 of 669868