Date   

Are my husband and I related? #dna

Alison Greengard
 

My husband and I have always wondered if we are actually related
as he and I both have Aron as a family surname in our ancestry.
My husband's Aron family is >from the Strasbourg, Alsace region of
France. My Aron family is on my paternal side and >from Uzventis,
Lithuania to the 1700's. We also know my Aron grandmother
corresponded with a cousin in the Strasbourg area of France. Both
my paternal Aunt and I match my husband exactly on chromosome 9
from the same position 117777859 to 126060649 for a total of 11.33
cM.

My first inclination of course was to say that the match is through
our respective Aron families.

However, my husband's Greengard family is >from Virbalis, Lithuania,
so I then wondered if the connection is through a marriage somewhere
in the past of my Lithuanian Aron family to my husband's Lithuanian
Greengard family. So I added in a Greengard 3rd cousin to the
chromosome browser and he matches my husband, me, and my Aunt in
almost the same position (it mostly overlaps) on chromosome 9 >from
position 115890897 to 123743153 for a total of 10.46 cM. So would
this indicate that perhaps the connection is not through our
respective Aron families, but through an Aron/Greengard marriage?
Or could it be in addition to our respective Aron families?

Also, has anyone else discovered they are related to their spouses?
My connection seems to be at a 5th to distant cousin relationship.
It seems reasonable to me that other Ashkenazi Jews would be
related to their spouses somewhere in the past.

Thank you.

Alison Greengard
Lakewood, Colorado, USA


DNA Research #DNA Are my husband and I related? #dna

Alison Greengard
 

My husband and I have always wondered if we are actually related
as he and I both have Aron as a family surname in our ancestry.
My husband's Aron family is >from the Strasbourg, Alsace region of
France. My Aron family is on my paternal side and >from Uzventis,
Lithuania to the 1700's. We also know my Aron grandmother
corresponded with a cousin in the Strasbourg area of France. Both
my paternal Aunt and I match my husband exactly on chromosome 9
from the same position 117777859 to 126060649 for a total of 11.33
cM.

My first inclination of course was to say that the match is through
our respective Aron families.

However, my husband's Greengard family is >from Virbalis, Lithuania,
so I then wondered if the connection is through a marriage somewhere
in the past of my Lithuanian Aron family to my husband's Lithuanian
Greengard family. So I added in a Greengard 3rd cousin to the
chromosome browser and he matches my husband, me, and my Aunt in
almost the same position (it mostly overlaps) on chromosome 9 >from
position 115890897 to 123743153 for a total of 10.46 cM. So would
this indicate that perhaps the connection is not through our
respective Aron families, but through an Aron/Greengard marriage?
Or could it be in addition to our respective Aron families?

Also, has anyone else discovered they are related to their spouses?
My connection seems to be at a 5th to distant cousin relationship.
It seems reasonable to me that other Ashkenazi Jews would be
related to their spouses somewhere in the past.

Thank you.

Alison Greengard
Lakewood, Colorado, USA


magazine called "Der Israelit" from Germany #germany

Lin <lin2@...>
 

Thank you so much to everyone who translated the death announcement of
my great-great uncle Emanuel HERZ, and written by his brother Lazarus
HERZ. It gave me so much information about him- when we knew absolutely
nothing about him prior. It also was a card of thanks to a burial
society in Berlin and to two individuals who were so kind to the family
who had traveled >from Markt Berolzheim to Berlin when Emanuel died there.

The announcement was in a magazine called "Der Israelit." It is dated 8 October 1901.
Does anyone know if this would have covered all of Germany, or just the Berlin
area, or ?? He writes at the bottom Markt Berolzheim, Bayern, so I assume it
was not a Bavarian publication.

If anyone knows about the publication, I wonder how often it published?.
He mentions that they could not bring the body back to Markt Berolzheim
due to desecrating the Jewish holidays. I assume there is no way of
knowing how long it would have taken to get something published in Der
Israelitbut knowing how often it was published would help me get an
idea of when Emanuel might have died. If it was a Berlin publication he
might have written it and dropped it off at the publisher before he went
home to Markt Berolzheim, or mailed it, which would have extended the
time. However, if i knew more about the publication, I might have a
better idea of when he might have died.

The Jewish holidays around that time were: I think he must have been
been in September, unless the magazine published daily.
Sukkot (Sept. 28-29, 1901), Shemini Atzeret (5 Oct. 1901), Simchat
Torah (6 Oct. 1901) And Rosh Hashanah was September 14-15 and Yom
Kippur was the September 23rd.

Thanks so much, Lin Herz, Palm Bay, Florida


German SIG #Germany magazine called "Der Israelit" from Germany #germany

Lin <lin2@...>
 

Thank you so much to everyone who translated the death announcement of
my great-great uncle Emanuel HERZ, and written by his brother Lazarus
HERZ. It gave me so much information about him- when we knew absolutely
nothing about him prior. It also was a card of thanks to a burial
society in Berlin and to two individuals who were so kind to the family
who had traveled >from Markt Berolzheim to Berlin when Emanuel died there.

The announcement was in a magazine called "Der Israelit." It is dated 8 October 1901.
Does anyone know if this would have covered all of Germany, or just the Berlin
area, or ?? He writes at the bottom Markt Berolzheim, Bayern, so I assume it
was not a Bavarian publication.

If anyone knows about the publication, I wonder how often it published?.
He mentions that they could not bring the body back to Markt Berolzheim
due to desecrating the Jewish holidays. I assume there is no way of
knowing how long it would have taken to get something published in Der
Israelitbut knowing how often it was published would help me get an
idea of when Emanuel might have died. If it was a Berlin publication he
might have written it and dropped it off at the publisher before he went
home to Markt Berolzheim, or mailed it, which would have extended the
time. However, if i knew more about the publication, I might have a
better idea of when he might have died.

The Jewish holidays around that time were: I think he must have been
been in September, unless the magazine published daily.
Sukkot (Sept. 28-29, 1901), Shemini Atzeret (5 Oct. 1901), Simchat
Torah (6 Oct. 1901) And Rosh Hashanah was September 14-15 and Yom
Kippur was the September 23rd.

Thanks so much, Lin Herz, Palm Bay, Florida


Re: ViewMate #austria-czech

Paul Zoss <paul6zoss@...>
 

For years Ive had several ships manifests which I though contained information
relating to my familys immigration to America in the early 20th century, but the
documents werent much help to me because writing was totally illegible. I
recently became active on JewishGen, and someone familiar with the site suggested
that I post the manifests on VeiwMate and ask for help. I had no idea this service
was available. Last week, I posted three manifests (5 pages) on ViewMate, and
within 2 days, several volunteers helped me to make out over 90% of the information
on the documents. I found out that two of the manifests had crucial information
about the names used by my ancestors and the towns in the Ukraine they came
from. I also determined that the third manifest, which I thought related to
my great grandmother, actually had nothing to do with her. All of this information
changed significantly my understanding of who these people were and where they came
from. ViewMate is an invaluable service. Thanks to everyone who helped with this.
Paul Zoss


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: ViewMate #general

Paul Zoss <paul6zoss@...>
 

For years Ive had several ships manifests which I though contained information
relating to my familys immigration to America in the early 20th century, but the
documents werent much help to me because writing was totally illegible. I
recently became active on JewishGen, and someone familiar with the site suggested
that I post the manifests on VeiwMate and ask for help. I had no idea this service
was available. Last week, I posted three manifests (5 pages) on ViewMate, and
within 2 days, several volunteers helped me to make out over 90% of the information
on the documents. I found out that two of the manifests had crucial information
about the names used by my ancestors and the towns in the Ukraine they came
from. I also determined that the third manifest, which I thought related to
my great grandmother, actually had nothing to do with her. All of this information
changed significantly my understanding of who these people were and where they came
from. ViewMate is an invaluable service. Thanks to everyone who helped with this.
Paul Zoss


Europeana 1914-1918-untold stories & official histories of WW1 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Europeana 1914-1918 has relaunched their website to better cover World War l-see:
http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/en .

The collection includes previously unpublished letters, photographs and keepsakes
from the war and added 90,000 items and more than 7,000 stories->from 12 countries.
The website also contains a substantial collection of over 400,000 pieces of
material and 660 hours of film >from eight different national libraries. In addition
to European collections the site includes materials >from the Digital Pubic Library
of America, Trove (Australia) and Digital New Zealand.

You can put your ancestral town name in the search engine and see what they have.
I put in the name of my ancestral towns which also returned a number of "hits".
I put the term "Jewish" in the search engine and many items were retrieved.. While
the website can be displayed in several languages, including English, the
documents are in the native language. Google translate is a way to assist in
translating the materials.

If you would like to add your story or objects you need to register. For
more information see: http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributor

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Europeana 1914-1918-untold stories & official histories of WW1 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Europeana 1914-1918 has relaunched their website to better cover World War l-see:
http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/en .

The collection includes previously unpublished letters, photographs and keepsakes
from the war and added 90,000 items and more than 7,000 stories->from 12 countries.
The website also contains a substantial collection of over 400,000 pieces of
material and 660 hours of film >from eight different national libraries. In addition
to European collections the site includes materials >from the Digital Pubic Library
of America, Trove (Australia) and Digital New Zealand.

You can put your ancestral town name in the search engine and see what they have.
I put in the name of my ancestral towns which also returned a number of "hits".
I put the term "Jewish" in the search engine and many items were retrieved.. While
the website can be displayed in several languages, including English, the
documents are in the native language. Google translate is a way to assist in
translating the materials.

If you would like to add your story or objects you need to register. For
more information see: http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributor

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Re: Jews outside the Pale of Settlement #ukraine

Tomasz Jankowski / JFS <info@...>
 

Dear Siggers,

There were 14 groups of Jews who could live outside the Pale of Settlement:

1) merchants belonging to the 1st guild longer than 5 years, their family, home servants and employees in their business.
2) commercial or industrial counsellors with their family
3) Jews with MA and PhD degrees and University assistants with their family and two home servants.
4) graduates of institution of higher education
5) pharmacy assistants, dentists, obstetrician
6) students of pharmacy, feldshery, and obstetrics
7) wives of Jews mentioned in 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 has right to stay outside the Pale after husbandâ??s death provided that they wonâ??t marry again. Their sons till adulthood or gaining higher education (but not later that 25 years); daughters till marriage.
8) retired soldiers and their children
9) soldiers who participated in far east wars
10) students in institutions of higher educations (universities, academies)
11) students of Technical Institute of Petersburg may live only in Petersburg
12) active master craftsmen, submaster craftsmen with their family (wife, children and minor siblings)
13) tailors working for army and military schools
14) ennobled Jews.
Of course there were additional conditions for members of each of these groups.

And one more forgotten detail: the Kingdom of Poland (10 most west governorates) did not belong to the Pale of Settlement, though Jews were obviously allowed to live there.
Kind regards
Tomasz Jankowski
Lviv, Ukraine


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Jews outside the Pale of Settlement #ukraine

Tomasz Jankowski / JFS <info@...>
 

Dear Siggers,

There were 14 groups of Jews who could live outside the Pale of Settlement:

1) merchants belonging to the 1st guild longer than 5 years, their family, home servants and employees in their business.
2) commercial or industrial counsellors with their family
3) Jews with MA and PhD degrees and University assistants with their family and two home servants.
4) graduates of institution of higher education
5) pharmacy assistants, dentists, obstetrician
6) students of pharmacy, feldshery, and obstetrics
7) wives of Jews mentioned in 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 has right to stay outside the Pale after husbandâ??s death provided that they wonâ??t marry again. Their sons till adulthood or gaining higher education (but not later that 25 years); daughters till marriage.
8) retired soldiers and their children
9) soldiers who participated in far east wars
10) students in institutions of higher educations (universities, academies)
11) students of Technical Institute of Petersburg may live only in Petersburg
12) active master craftsmen, submaster craftsmen with their family (wife, children and minor siblings)
13) tailors working for army and military schools
14) ennobled Jews.
Of course there were additional conditions for members of each of these groups.

And one more forgotten detail: the Kingdom of Poland (10 most west governorates) did not belong to the Pale of Settlement, though Jews were obviously allowed to live there.
Kind regards
Tomasz Jankowski
Lviv, Ukraine


Re: Jews outside the Pale of Settlement #ukraine

mathov@...
 

Every Government, in history, except and change their own rules
Russian Empire was in a lack of professionals...and certain Jews having
those degrees were welcome to settle inside the Empire, in any big city they
choose.

Yehuda Mathov Israel


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: Jews outside the Pale of Settlement #ukraine

mathov@...
 

Every Government, in history, except and change their own rules
Russian Empire was in a lack of professionals...and certain Jews having
those degrees were welcome to settle inside the Empire, in any big city they
choose.

Yehuda Mathov Israel


Re: Jews outside the Pale of Settlement #ukraine

Doug Cohen
 

My family, as well, came >from the same area -- Olyka, about 15 km from
Lutsk. They described themselves as Russian, which they distinguished from
Polish, Lithuanian, or Galician.
There is an interesting book, Beyond the Pale, by Ben Nathans, which talks
about the process by which there was a selective integration of certain Jews
into interior Russia. I guess I'm saying that her knowledge of Russian
doesn't prove that they lived outside the Pale; by the end of the 19th
century, Jews, including girls, had dramatically increased their education
levels. But there were Jews who moved beyond the Pale, although after 1882,
the May Laws forced a great many of them back to the Pale. But after 1917,
many things changed.

Doug Cohen
Lexington, MA
Sarasota, FL

-----Original Message-----
From: Hana Abdul-Haq [mailto:abdulhaq.hana@gmail.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2014 2:48 PM
To: Ukraine SIG
Subject: [ukraine] Jews outside the Pale of Settlement

I recently got in contact with somebody who knew my family and he told me
something extremely surprising. He said that at some point my
great-grandmother and her family lived in Saratov which is in inland Russia
and outside the Pale.

This would explain a lot of things I haven't been able to understand about
my family like the fact that my great-grandmother spoke and wrote a lot in
Russian. She was born in Lutsk and I assumed women >from the shtetl were
never really that educated so I thought it was strange. She always said with
a lot of pride that she came >from Russia. I thought she meant the Russian
Empire. I never imagined she meant Russia proper. She also had a lot of
Russian silver spoons and forks with very nice decorations. I assumed these
things would have been available everywhere in the Empire but now I'm
wondering if such items were really available in Lutsk or maybe she brought
them with her >from Saratov.

My question is: what were Jews doing outside the Pale? As far as I knew,
they were forbidden to reside outside of it. Were there any exceptions to
this rule? Also, does anyone know anything about the Jewish community in
Saratov? And if it's possible to get in contact with anyone there? I assume
it never was a huge community.

Thanks for any information.

Hana
Timisoara - Romania


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: Jews outside the Pale of Settlement #ukraine

Doug Cohen
 

My family, as well, came >from the same area -- Olyka, about 15 km from
Lutsk. They described themselves as Russian, which they distinguished from
Polish, Lithuanian, or Galician.
There is an interesting book, Beyond the Pale, by Ben Nathans, which talks
about the process by which there was a selective integration of certain Jews
into interior Russia. I guess I'm saying that her knowledge of Russian
doesn't prove that they lived outside the Pale; by the end of the 19th
century, Jews, including girls, had dramatically increased their education
levels. But there were Jews who moved beyond the Pale, although after 1882,
the May Laws forced a great many of them back to the Pale. But after 1917,
many things changed.

Doug Cohen
Lexington, MA
Sarasota, FL

-----Original Message-----
From: Hana Abdul-Haq [mailto:abdulhaq.hana@gmail.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2014 2:48 PM
To: Ukraine SIG
Subject: [ukraine] Jews outside the Pale of Settlement

I recently got in contact with somebody who knew my family and he told me
something extremely surprising. He said that at some point my
great-grandmother and her family lived in Saratov which is in inland Russia
and outside the Pale.

This would explain a lot of things I haven't been able to understand about
my family like the fact that my great-grandmother spoke and wrote a lot in
Russian. She was born in Lutsk and I assumed women >from the shtetl were
never really that educated so I thought it was strange. She always said with
a lot of pride that she came >from Russia. I thought she meant the Russian
Empire. I never imagined she meant Russia proper. She also had a lot of
Russian silver spoons and forks with very nice decorations. I assumed these
things would have been available everywhere in the Empire but now I'm
wondering if such items were really available in Lutsk or maybe she brought
them with her >from Saratov.

My question is: what were Jews doing outside the Pale? As far as I knew,
they were forbidden to reside outside of it. Were there any exceptions to
this rule? Also, does anyone know anything about the Jewish community in
Saratov? And if it's possible to get in contact with anyone there? I assume
it never was a huge community.

Thanks for any information.

Hana
Timisoara - Romania


Question about first names #galicia

Caroline Curvan <Caroline.Curvan@...>
 

Thanks to all who responded to my question about first names.

This is such a wonderfully helpful and knowledgeable community. I'm
so glad I stumbled upon it!

Cheers --

Caroline Ranald Curvan
Ossining, NY

Researching Zinker, Zimand, Ramras
Towns Lemberg, Sokal, Mosty Wielke, Stobudka Lesna


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Question about first names #galicia

Caroline Curvan <Caroline.Curvan@...>
 

Thanks to all who responded to my question about first names.

This is such a wonderfully helpful and knowledgeable community. I'm
so glad I stumbled upon it!

Cheers --

Caroline Ranald Curvan
Ossining, NY

Researching Zinker, Zimand, Ramras
Towns Lemberg, Sokal, Mosty Wielke, Stobudka Lesna


Gesher Galicia Cadastral Map Room - New Zurow (Zhuriv) Maps #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia's cadastral map room has added two new maps for the
town of Zurow (Zhuriv). You can go to the Map Room home page:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org, and scroll down to the town name, or
use the direct links provided below.

Zurow Cadastral Map Sketch 1848:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/zurow-zhuriv-1848-1/

A hand-sketched cadastral map of Zurow (Zhuriv), surveyed and drawn in
1848. Labeled "Part 1", the map is complete in 22 sheets for the small
town and extensive farmlands surrounding its large pond. This map was
probably a second-generation sketch and is near-scale and very
detailed, with many property numbers in the residential area and many
property owners' names throughout.

The market/residential area (which departs somewhat >from the
traditional market "square" pattern) is located on an island formed by
the pond outlets, and was drawn at double scale. We've presented it
as part of the complete cadastral map, but also as a separate link
here:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/zurow-zhuriv-1848-1w/

This portion of the map is oriented to enable reading the annotations
with west up; an alternate view with north up is also available. An
interesting observation is that the Jewish landowners are all on one side
of the market area (with some Polish names found as well) and the other
side appears to have no Jewish names. All the houses on this island are
wood, but the "Jewish side" has shorter property and bigger houses. The
Jewish cemetery, noted as "Israelitische Freidhof," can be located on the
right hand side of the larger map.

We also offer the "Zurow Cadastral Map Outline 1848/1876," which is an
incomplete cadastral map, surveyed in 1848 and partially revised in 1876.
Labeled "Part 2", the map is very incomplete in five cut sheets, partially
lithographed and overdrawn by hand. Only the cadastral area border is
complete, with names of suburban communities labeled and one farm /
residential area partially developed in the drawing. Nevertheless, this map
may be useful to researchers, despite its lack of detail, which is why we
have included it.

We are trying to decipher the word written in Kurrent (Old German script)
on the central building in the market area of the residential map. There
is a flag coming out of the building, which usually denotes post office,
but if anyone knows the translation please contact me privately.

Thanks, as always, to the GG map room coordinator, Jay Osborn, for his
talented work on creating these re-constructed maps and keeping up
with the pace of acquisitions. The stitching, designing and uploading of
maps -- many of which are scanned in 50 different sections -- is a
time-consuming challenge. If Gesher Galicia has obtained maps for your
towns already, then know that they are in the queue and we hope to add
many more over the next few months.

The value of maps (whether cadastral, hand-drawn memory maps,
Holocaust-era maps, etc.) as integral components of genealogical
research, should not be underestimated. These visual representations
of the places where our ancestors lived should be viewed as graphic
(versus written) portraits of the neighborhoods, economics and culture
of a town >from which a more complete picture of shtetl life can be
gained, to say nothing of their value if one returns to visit.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
http://www.geshergalicia.org
http://maps.geshergalicia.org


Re: Question about first names #galicia

Janette <janettes@...>
 

Although instinctively, we might be inclined to point out the
connection between Chana (Hannah) and Anna, and dismiss any
connection between Fania and Anna, we really should not do that.
Why, well, my immediate reaction is because I have run across Fania
(and Feiges) who became Anna. Perhaps the connection was through
an English name Fanny, which many Feiges and Fanias became.
Perhaps though, it was just because someone liked a name. There is
frequently, as has been pointed out many times, little or no
connection between a Hebrew or Yiddish name (at least in the
United States) and an English name.

We see this often in modernity, where the resemblance between a
child's Hebrew name and their English name may be absolutely
non-existent, or may be based on the meaning of the names, of the
first letter. This isn't just a modern trend, though. My grandfather
and his siblings, all born in Romania (Suceava) in the last decades of
the 19th century and the beginning of the twentieth, had two sets of
names in Europe - a secular and and a religious name. A new name
was chosen by several of them when they arrived in the US. My
grandfather, Meir Hirsch, was Max Heinrich and then became Harry.
Going back to the 1890's on a different side of the family, Tzvi
Hirsch became Harris and sometimes was called Harry.

On a US census record, in 1930 a family in Brooklyn was recorded -
correct surname, first names I had never heard of. This family lived
at the address where my relatives lived, and the census taker was
someone the family knew of - in fact a neighbor of my relatives. For
whatever reason, the first names that were recorded were not names
anyone in this family ever used, but this was my family. Examine the
records thoroughly.

Look for other clues of connection between two people, don't just
rely on the name. We know to do this with surnames, where
immigrants and their offspring may have used a variety of different
surnames. Let us not dismiss that this happened with first names as
well, and examine the records to see whether or not there is
justification for dismissing the records or for acknowledging the
likelihood of the records with two different names being for the
same person.

Janette Silverman
Phoenix, AZ & NY, NY


Caroline Curvan wrote:

<<I had two great aunts who were named Rose and Fania (aka Feige
Hinde). I've come across a register which seems to indicate that my
great-grandparents also had two other daughters as well, named
Ana and Breta (aka Brakha). I've never heard of these two before and
I'm wondering if somehow Ana is a version of Fania? And
Breta/Brakha somehow a version of Rose?>>

David Ellis wrote:

<<My sense is that all four names were distinct. Rose is often
connected to the Yiddish name Raizl. Bracha is separate >from that.
Ana is often connected to the Yiddish name Chana. Feige is separate

from that....>>


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Gesher Galicia Cadastral Map Room - New Zurow (Zhuriv) Maps #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia's cadastral map room has added two new maps for the
town of Zurow (Zhuriv). You can go to the Map Room home page:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org, and scroll down to the town name, or
use the direct links provided below.

Zurow Cadastral Map Sketch 1848:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/zurow-zhuriv-1848-1/

A hand-sketched cadastral map of Zurow (Zhuriv), surveyed and drawn in
1848. Labeled "Part 1", the map is complete in 22 sheets for the small
town and extensive farmlands surrounding its large pond. This map was
probably a second-generation sketch and is near-scale and very
detailed, with many property numbers in the residential area and many
property owners' names throughout.

The market/residential area (which departs somewhat >from the
traditional market "square" pattern) is located on an island formed by
the pond outlets, and was drawn at double scale. We've presented it
as part of the complete cadastral map, but also as a separate link
here:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/zurow-zhuriv-1848-1w/

This portion of the map is oriented to enable reading the annotations
with west up; an alternate view with north up is also available. An
interesting observation is that the Jewish landowners are all on one side
of the market area (with some Polish names found as well) and the other
side appears to have no Jewish names. All the houses on this island are
wood, but the "Jewish side" has shorter property and bigger houses. The
Jewish cemetery, noted as "Israelitische Freidhof," can be located on the
right hand side of the larger map.

We also offer the "Zurow Cadastral Map Outline 1848/1876," which is an
incomplete cadastral map, surveyed in 1848 and partially revised in 1876.
Labeled "Part 2", the map is very incomplete in five cut sheets, partially
lithographed and overdrawn by hand. Only the cadastral area border is
complete, with names of suburban communities labeled and one farm /
residential area partially developed in the drawing. Nevertheless, this map
may be useful to researchers, despite its lack of detail, which is why we
have included it.

We are trying to decipher the word written in Kurrent (Old German script)
on the central building in the market area of the residential map. There
is a flag coming out of the building, which usually denotes post office,
but if anyone knows the translation please contact me privately.

Thanks, as always, to the GG map room coordinator, Jay Osborn, for his
talented work on creating these re-constructed maps and keeping up
with the pace of acquisitions. The stitching, designing and uploading of
maps -- many of which are scanned in 50 different sections -- is a
time-consuming challenge. If Gesher Galicia has obtained maps for your
towns already, then know that they are in the queue and we hope to add
many more over the next few months.

The value of maps (whether cadastral, hand-drawn memory maps,
Holocaust-era maps, etc.) as integral components of genealogical
research, should not be underestimated. These visual representations
of the places where our ancestors lived should be viewed as graphic
(versus written) portraits of the neighborhoods, economics and culture
of a town >from which a more complete picture of shtetl life can be
gained, to say nothing of their value if one returns to visit.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
http://www.geshergalicia.org
http://maps.geshergalicia.org


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Question about first names #galicia

Janette <janettes@...>
 

Although instinctively, we might be inclined to point out the
connection between Chana (Hannah) and Anna, and dismiss any
connection between Fania and Anna, we really should not do that.
Why, well, my immediate reaction is because I have run across Fania
(and Feiges) who became Anna. Perhaps the connection was through
an English name Fanny, which many Feiges and Fanias became.
Perhaps though, it was just because someone liked a name. There is
frequently, as has been pointed out many times, little or no
connection between a Hebrew or Yiddish name (at least in the
United States) and an English name.

We see this often in modernity, where the resemblance between a
child's Hebrew name and their English name may be absolutely
non-existent, or may be based on the meaning of the names, of the
first letter. This isn't just a modern trend, though. My grandfather
and his siblings, all born in Romania (Suceava) in the last decades of
the 19th century and the beginning of the twentieth, had two sets of
names in Europe - a secular and and a religious name. A new name
was chosen by several of them when they arrived in the US. My
grandfather, Meir Hirsch, was Max Heinrich and then became Harry.
Going back to the 1890's on a different side of the family, Tzvi
Hirsch became Harris and sometimes was called Harry.

On a US census record, in 1930 a family in Brooklyn was recorded -
correct surname, first names I had never heard of. This family lived
at the address where my relatives lived, and the census taker was
someone the family knew of - in fact a neighbor of my relatives. For
whatever reason, the first names that were recorded were not names
anyone in this family ever used, but this was my family. Examine the
records thoroughly.

Look for other clues of connection between two people, don't just
rely on the name. We know to do this with surnames, where
immigrants and their offspring may have used a variety of different
surnames. Let us not dismiss that this happened with first names as
well, and examine the records to see whether or not there is
justification for dismissing the records or for acknowledging the
likelihood of the records with two different names being for the
same person.

Janette Silverman
Phoenix, AZ & NY, NY


Caroline Curvan wrote:

<<I had two great aunts who were named Rose and Fania (aka Feige
Hinde). I've come across a register which seems to indicate that my
great-grandparents also had two other daughters as well, named
Ana and Breta (aka Brakha). I've never heard of these two before and
I'm wondering if somehow Ana is a version of Fania? And
Breta/Brakha somehow a version of Rose?>>

David Ellis wrote:

<<My sense is that all four names were distinct. Rose is often
connected to the Yiddish name Raizl. Bracha is separate >from that.
Ana is often connected to the Yiddish name Chana. Feige is separate

from that....>>

125921 - 125940 of 665631