Date   

New LDS Data on the JRI-Poland Database #poland

hadassahlipsius
 

The recent JRI-Poland database update included LDS Data updates for 14
Towns

from the LDS Microfilms, Jewish records files were updated for the towns of
Baranow, Bedzin, Checiny, Gniewoszow, Jedzrejow, Kepno, Krasniczyn, Lowicz,
Rybnik, Tarnow, Warka, Warszawa, Widawa, and Wolborz

Four town files, Tarnow, Baranow, Krasniczyn and Kepno, now include some
links to images >from the Polish National Digital Archives. Now when you
Search the database at jri-poland.org these records will each have a 'View
Image' control to click on that will bring you to the exact image containing
that record.

I would like to thank our wonderful team of volunteers who worked tirelessly
to make JRI-Poland such a success.

Many thanks to:

Warren Blatt, Howard Fink, Fred Frenkel, Nicole Heyman, Freda Leiba, Roger
Lustig, Robinn Magid, Madeleine Okladek, David Price, Michael Tobias,
Nicolas Trokiner .


A very special thank you to Haim Ghiuzeli at Beit Hatfutsot for the Lowicz,
Wolborz and Gniewoszow data.

Happy Searching!

Hadassah Lipsius
On Behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland.


JRI Poland #Poland New LDS Data on the JRI-Poland Database #poland

hadassahlipsius
 

The recent JRI-Poland database update included LDS Data updates for 14
Towns

from the LDS Microfilms, Jewish records files were updated for the towns of
Baranow, Bedzin, Checiny, Gniewoszow, Jedzrejow, Kepno, Krasniczyn, Lowicz,
Rybnik, Tarnow, Warka, Warszawa, Widawa, and Wolborz

Four town files, Tarnow, Baranow, Krasniczyn and Kepno, now include some
links to images >from the Polish National Digital Archives. Now when you
Search the database at jri-poland.org these records will each have a 'View
Image' control to click on that will bring you to the exact image containing
that record.

I would like to thank our wonderful team of volunteers who worked tirelessly
to make JRI-Poland such a success.

Many thanks to:

Warren Blatt, Howard Fink, Fred Frenkel, Nicole Heyman, Freda Leiba, Roger
Lustig, Robinn Magid, Madeleine Okladek, David Price, Michael Tobias,
Nicolas Trokiner .


A very special thank you to Haim Ghiuzeli at Beit Hatfutsot for the Lowicz,
Wolborz and Gniewoszow data.

Happy Searching!

Hadassah Lipsius
On Behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland.


BOCHNER Family from Galicia #general

Linda Shefler
 

I just discovered that there is a good chance my ggg grandmother was Sara
BOCHNER, but I'm not 100% sure. Here is where the confusion arises: My
ggg grandfather Leib REICHER was born about 1838, possibly in either
Pilzno or Tarnow. I just learned that he was married to Sarah BOCHNER.
My gg grandmother, Rosa REICHER, (daughter of Leib and a woman named Sara)
was 20 years older than her next sibling (Samuel REICHER) that I've been
able to find, and 29 years older than the youngest sibling (Fani REICHER).

While they can be full siblings, I'm not sure if they are, mainly because
of the huge age difference and because the daughter of the youngest
sibling never knew that her mother had a sister, just a brother. All of
them lived in Cleveland, Ohio.

Samuel immigrated in 1904. He came over with my gg grandparents (on one
of their frequent trips back and forth to Europe) and was listed as the
brother-in-law of my gg grandfather. Fani immigrated 2 years later. She
lived with family friends by the name of BLACHMAN, in Cleveland, until she
married. On his marriage license, Samuel indicated his mother's name was
Sara BACHMAN. Fani indicated that her mother's name was Sara BOCHNER. I
can't find a record for my gg grandmother which indicates her mother's
maiden name, just that her name was Sara.

In 1938 David BOCHNER and his family immigrated to the US, David was born
in Jodlowa (near both Pilzno and Tarnow). His wife Dora was >from Tarnow
and their children were born in Berlin. Samuel and Fani sponsored them
and the manifest indicated they were cousins. They spent a few years in
Cleveland and then moved to Saratoga Springs where they managed the New
Windsor Hotel.

I've contacted everyone in JGFF who might be connected to the BOCHNER
family, but so far I've only had one response with no known connection.
I've been through the JRI Poland records but can't seem to find the
appropriate family. Is anyone familiar with the family of David BOCHNER
(born about 1890), or Sara (nee BOCHNER) REICHER (born about 1840)? I
would love to learn more about this family and piece it all together. I
would also like to confirm one way or the other if my gg grandmother Rosa
was a full or half sibling to Samuel and Fani.

As always, many thanks for your time!
Linda Silverman Shefler
San Francisco East Bay
linda.shefler@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BOCHNER Family from Galicia #general

Linda Shefler
 

I just discovered that there is a good chance my ggg grandmother was Sara
BOCHNER, but I'm not 100% sure. Here is where the confusion arises: My
ggg grandfather Leib REICHER was born about 1838, possibly in either
Pilzno or Tarnow. I just learned that he was married to Sarah BOCHNER.
My gg grandmother, Rosa REICHER, (daughter of Leib and a woman named Sara)
was 20 years older than her next sibling (Samuel REICHER) that I've been
able to find, and 29 years older than the youngest sibling (Fani REICHER).

While they can be full siblings, I'm not sure if they are, mainly because
of the huge age difference and because the daughter of the youngest
sibling never knew that her mother had a sister, just a brother. All of
them lived in Cleveland, Ohio.

Samuel immigrated in 1904. He came over with my gg grandparents (on one
of their frequent trips back and forth to Europe) and was listed as the
brother-in-law of my gg grandfather. Fani immigrated 2 years later. She
lived with family friends by the name of BLACHMAN, in Cleveland, until she
married. On his marriage license, Samuel indicated his mother's name was
Sara BACHMAN. Fani indicated that her mother's name was Sara BOCHNER. I
can't find a record for my gg grandmother which indicates her mother's
maiden name, just that her name was Sara.

In 1938 David BOCHNER and his family immigrated to the US, David was born
in Jodlowa (near both Pilzno and Tarnow). His wife Dora was >from Tarnow
and their children were born in Berlin. Samuel and Fani sponsored them
and the manifest indicated they were cousins. They spent a few years in
Cleveland and then moved to Saratoga Springs where they managed the New
Windsor Hotel.

I've contacted everyone in JGFF who might be connected to the BOCHNER
family, but so far I've only had one response with no known connection.
I've been through the JRI Poland records but can't seem to find the
appropriate family. Is anyone familiar with the family of David BOCHNER
(born about 1890), or Sara (nee BOCHNER) REICHER (born about 1840)? I
would love to learn more about this family and piece it all together. I
would also like to confirm one way or the other if my gg grandmother Rosa
was a full or half sibling to Samuel and Fani.

As always, many thanks for your time!
Linda Silverman Shefler
San Francisco East Bay
linda.shefler@...


Lithuania Internal Passports #general

Howard Margol
 

3,534 additional Internal Passport records have been added to the
Jewishgen Lithuania Database and to the Litvak SIG All Lithuania
Database (ALD) [http://www.litvaksig.org/all-lithuania-database-ald
-- MODERATOR]

These records, and many more, are also available on the appropriate
Litvak SIG District Research Group web site.

These internal passports were applied for in the following towns in
Lithuania - Panevezys, Klaipeda, Palanga, Velvirzeniai, Kartena,
Darbeniai, Andriejavas, Kuliai, Nosedis, and Plateliai.

Even if you are not interested in any of these towns, you should search
the database anyway because the records include the place of birth which
could be entirely different >from the town where the applicant obtained their
internal passport. In addition to doing a surname search, I suggest you also
do a town search if the town of your interest is a small one. Doing a town
search for Vilnius or Kaunas, as an example, will not bring any results as
it would provide a large response that cannot be transmitted.

The internal passport records cover the period, 1919-1940. However, do not
be misled by those dates if your family left there prior to 1919. Your
immediate family may have left but everyone did not leave. Siblings, uncles,
aunts, cousins, etc. remained.

Howard Margol
Founder - Coordinator - Internal Passport Project


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Lithuania Internal Passports #general

Howard Margol
 

3,534 additional Internal Passport records have been added to the
Jewishgen Lithuania Database and to the Litvak SIG All Lithuania
Database (ALD) [http://www.litvaksig.org/all-lithuania-database-ald
-- MODERATOR]

These records, and many more, are also available on the appropriate
Litvak SIG District Research Group web site.

These internal passports were applied for in the following towns in
Lithuania - Panevezys, Klaipeda, Palanga, Velvirzeniai, Kartena,
Darbeniai, Andriejavas, Kuliai, Nosedis, and Plateliai.

Even if you are not interested in any of these towns, you should search
the database anyway because the records include the place of birth which
could be entirely different >from the town where the applicant obtained their
internal passport. In addition to doing a surname search, I suggest you also
do a town search if the town of your interest is a small one. Doing a town
search for Vilnius or Kaunas, as an example, will not bring any results as
it would provide a large response that cannot be transmitted.

The internal passport records cover the period, 1919-1940. However, do not
be misled by those dates if your family left there prior to 1919. Your
immediate family may have left but everyone did not leave. Siblings, uncles,
aunts, cousins, etc. remained.

Howard Margol
Founder - Coordinator - Internal Passport Project


Origin of the surname BAUMGARTEN #general

isak@bm.technion.ac.il
 

Hello Genners

Does anybody know of any scientific resources to the origins of the
surname BAUMGARTEN? I am interested particularly it it's East European
version, pronounced in Yiddish "Boymagarten". When did it first apear
in East Europe and where? Was it an "invented name" like Appelbaum,
Rosenbaum. etc?

Thank you
Isak Gath, Haifa


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Origin of the surname BAUMGARTEN #general

isak@bm.technion.ac.il
 

Hello Genners

Does anybody know of any scientific resources to the origins of the
surname BAUMGARTEN? I am interested particularly it it's East European
version, pronounced in Yiddish "Boymagarten". When did it first apear
in East Europe and where? Was it an "invented name" like Appelbaum,
Rosenbaum. etc?

Thank you
Isak Gath, Haifa


Seeking the Genealogy of Rabbi Avigdor (Victor) APTOWITZER #rabbinic

Stanley and Shelda Sandler
 

Dear Genners,

Can anyone share with me the genealogy of Rabbi Avigdor (Victor) APTOWITZER,
especially going back to his grandparents, great-grandparents, and even
further if possible? Rabbi Avigdor (Victor) APTOWITZER (his birth is
recorded as Victor Kassner)was born in Galicia (Tarnopol) in 1871 and died
in 1942 in Israel. His bio is in the book "Morei Galicia;" however, his
genealogy is not given. I am a descendent of an APTOWITZER family >from
Galicia and am searching for some connection between Rabbi Avigdor
APTOWITZER's family and my APTOWITZER family.

My grandfather had many cousins; and I have been searching to learn if Rabbi
Avigdor APTOWITZER could have been one of them. My grandfather and his
siblings were born in Tarnopol Gubernia in the town of Cecowa (pronounced
"Tzetziv"), near Zborow, during the 1880's. Rabbi Victor APTOWITZER was
born to Moshe Aharon KASSNER and Cirel APTOWITZER (his mother's surname).
At some point in time, he legally changed his surname to APTOWITZER.

I am also seeking the names of Rabbi APTOWITZER's siblings. My
Great-Great-Grandfather, Aron Isak APTOWITZER, had a brother named Benzion
APTOWITZER, and perhaps seven other siblings whose names are unknown to my
generation. The only sibling of Aron Isak APTOWITZER who we can identify is
Benzion APTOWITZER. No one in my family knows the names of the other
APTOWITZER siblings.

I have searched and searched and have found nothing. Are there any Genners
who can help? I have been told there is a library in Jerusalem with a book
(or books) that may show Rabbi Avigdor APTOWITZER's genealogy.
Unfortunately, I do not know the name of this book (or these books) nor do I
know the name or address of the library.

Can anyone help me?

Many thanks in advance.

Shelda Bachin Sandler
Springfield, Pennsylvania
USA


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Seeking the Genealogy of Rabbi Avigdor (Victor) APTOWITZER #rabbinic

Stanley and Shelda Sandler
 

Dear Genners,

Can anyone share with me the genealogy of Rabbi Avigdor (Victor) APTOWITZER,
especially going back to his grandparents, great-grandparents, and even
further if possible? Rabbi Avigdor (Victor) APTOWITZER (his birth is
recorded as Victor Kassner)was born in Galicia (Tarnopol) in 1871 and died
in 1942 in Israel. His bio is in the book "Morei Galicia;" however, his
genealogy is not given. I am a descendent of an APTOWITZER family >from
Galicia and am searching for some connection between Rabbi Avigdor
APTOWITZER's family and my APTOWITZER family.

My grandfather had many cousins; and I have been searching to learn if Rabbi
Avigdor APTOWITZER could have been one of them. My grandfather and his
siblings were born in Tarnopol Gubernia in the town of Cecowa (pronounced
"Tzetziv"), near Zborow, during the 1880's. Rabbi Victor APTOWITZER was
born to Moshe Aharon KASSNER and Cirel APTOWITZER (his mother's surname).
At some point in time, he legally changed his surname to APTOWITZER.

I am also seeking the names of Rabbi APTOWITZER's siblings. My
Great-Great-Grandfather, Aron Isak APTOWITZER, had a brother named Benzion
APTOWITZER, and perhaps seven other siblings whose names are unknown to my
generation. The only sibling of Aron Isak APTOWITZER who we can identify is
Benzion APTOWITZER. No one in my family knows the names of the other
APTOWITZER siblings.

I have searched and searched and have found nothing. Are there any Genners
who can help? I have been told there is a library in Jerusalem with a book
(or books) that may show Rabbi Avigdor APTOWITZER's genealogy.
Unfortunately, I do not know the name of this book (or these books) nor do I
know the name or address of the library.

Can anyone help me?

Many thanks in advance.

Shelda Bachin Sandler
Springfield, Pennsylvania
USA


Re: I tested - why don't we match? #dna

elanc@...
 

Scott Ehrlich wrote:

I recently saw Bennett Greenspan, the President of FamilyTreeDNA.com
talk at a local temple. He educated/reminded us that we have 22
chromosomes in our DNA that are autosomal. These 22 are used for
their Family Finder test, and it casts the widest net for matching you
to others who have also tested with the same company. It is also the
cheapest.

The Autosomall test is *the* test to take if nothing else.

We also have a 23rd chromosome - our sex chromosome.

For males, it is X Y. For females, it is X X.

Males, thus, can trace their strict male (father to son) line through
the Y-DNA test.

Males and females can test their strict maternal line through the
mtDNA test which uses the X chromosome.
===

There's are some inaccuracies here. We each have 46 chromosomes in 23
pairs. In each pair, we inherit one chromosome >from our father and one
from our mother.
The X chromosome, of which women have two and men have one, is
completely separate >from the mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA). A single copy
of mtDNA is passed >from a mother to all her children.

Elan Caspi
Belmont, CA


DNA Research #DNA Re: I tested - why don't we match? #dna

elanc@...
 

Scott Ehrlich wrote:

I recently saw Bennett Greenspan, the President of FamilyTreeDNA.com
talk at a local temple. He educated/reminded us that we have 22
chromosomes in our DNA that are autosomal. These 22 are used for
their Family Finder test, and it casts the widest net for matching you
to others who have also tested with the same company. It is also the
cheapest.

The Autosomall test is *the* test to take if nothing else.

We also have a 23rd chromosome - our sex chromosome.

For males, it is X Y. For females, it is X X.

Males, thus, can trace their strict male (father to son) line through
the Y-DNA test.

Males and females can test their strict maternal line through the
mtDNA test which uses the X chromosome.
===

There's are some inaccuracies here. We each have 46 chromosomes in 23
pairs. In each pair, we inherit one chromosome >from our father and one
from our mother.
The X chromosome, of which women have two and men have one, is
completely separate >from the mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA). A single copy
of mtDNA is passed >from a mother to all her children.

Elan Caspi
Belmont, CA


Re: Family match help and DNA #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

About Scott Ehrlick's 3 message on 21 April 2014. He is right in stating
that Family Tree DNA is best company for genealogy usage. Beside being
the best for finding ones matches, there are other reasons it the best.
Some of them are they e-mail you when you have a new match without any
additional cost, by having many projects, and they stores your DNA for 25
years so when new tests are available after ones death, additional testing
can be done.

However Scott did have some wrong information in his last email. We have
46 chromosomes, 23 >from each parent that are pair off to make 23 pair of
chromosomes. One main problem in testing the chromosomes is the companies
do not know >from which parent any part of the DNA came >from except for a
male's X and Y chromosomes. One result of this is that a child may have a
reporting relationship closer then either of his parent to someone.

What I gathered >from his message, he family line is as followed:
great-grandfather/mother is Cohen/Newman
greatfather is Cohen
mother became an Ehrlick
Scott
If the above is correct, there may be a way of using of results >from the
autosomal testing who is >from the Newman line >from his mother results.
His mother got one quarter of her autosomal DNA >from each of her
grandparent. However, one of her X chromosomes is the one >from her father
which is the same as the one he received >from his mother. Therefore the
percentage on the X should be higher than >from the autosomal chromosomes.
I think since the testing companies do not use X chromosomes in their
matching processes, I think the best way of testing for the Newman line is
with GEDmatch.com.

Sidney Sachs
Lorton, VA


DNA Research #DNA Re: Family match help and DNA #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

About Scott Ehrlick's 3 message on 21 April 2014. He is right in stating
that Family Tree DNA is best company for genealogy usage. Beside being
the best for finding ones matches, there are other reasons it the best.
Some of them are they e-mail you when you have a new match without any
additional cost, by having many projects, and they stores your DNA for 25
years so when new tests are available after ones death, additional testing
can be done.

However Scott did have some wrong information in his last email. We have
46 chromosomes, 23 >from each parent that are pair off to make 23 pair of
chromosomes. One main problem in testing the chromosomes is the companies
do not know >from which parent any part of the DNA came >from except for a
male's X and Y chromosomes. One result of this is that a child may have a
reporting relationship closer then either of his parent to someone.

What I gathered >from his message, he family line is as followed:
great-grandfather/mother is Cohen/Newman
greatfather is Cohen
mother became an Ehrlick
Scott
If the above is correct, there may be a way of using of results >from the
autosomal testing who is >from the Newman line >from his mother results.
His mother got one quarter of her autosomal DNA >from each of her
grandparent. However, one of her X chromosomes is the one >from her father
which is the same as the one he received >from his mother. Therefore the
percentage on the X should be higher than >from the autosomal chromosomes.
I think since the testing companies do not use X chromosomes in their
matching processes, I think the best way of testing for the Newman line is
with GEDmatch.com.

Sidney Sachs
Lorton, VA


Sephardic Performances Online as Webcasts #sephardic

janicemsj@...
 

In honor of Jewish Heritage Month, the Library of Congress "Folklife
Today" blog has a post about Jewish music, including links to several
online recordings. Two of the links are to Webcasts of performances
in Ladino by Flory Jagoda: "Flory Jagoda and Friends" (2007) and "A
Concert of Ladino Music" (2012).

http://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2014/04/a-dudele-a-little-song-for-jewish-heritage-month

Janice Sellers


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Sephardic Performances Online as Webcasts #sephardic

janicemsj@...
 

In honor of Jewish Heritage Month, the Library of Congress "Folklife
Today" blog has a post about Jewish music, including links to several
online recordings. Two of the links are to Webcasts of performances
in Ladino by Flory Jagoda: "Flory Jagoda and Friends" (2007) and "A
Concert of Ladino Music" (2012).

http://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2014/04/a-dudele-a-little-song-for-jewish-heritage-month

Janice Sellers


JewishGen Success! Stories #scandinavia

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read the inspiring stories in the
latest issue of JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine.

You can access these stories >from the "About Us" button
on the JewishGen website, or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/

Judy Simon connects with previously unknown cousins
through the JewishGen Family Finder, and learns that she
is related to the prominent sculptor, Simon Moselsio.

Marla Raucher Osborn was curious about her grandmother's
aunt, Jete Horn. Her research takes surprising twists
and turns -- and eventually leads her to Israel.

Barbara Lichtman Tayar recently learned her Latvian
great-grandmother's surname was Hummel -- a name she
hadn't heard before.
Through the JewishGen Family Finder, Barbara connects
with cousins >from the around the world.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers --
Nancy Siegel, Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster.
We think you will be moved by these stories, and we
encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at: < success@... >.

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.


JewishGen Success! Stories #yizkorbooks

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read the inspiring stories in the
latest issue of JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine.

You can access these stories >from the "About Us" button
on the JewishGen website, or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/

Judy Simon connects with previously unknown cousins
through the JewishGen Family Finder, and learns that she
is related to the prominent sculptor, Simon Moselsio.

Marla Raucher Osborn was curious about her grandmother's
aunt, Jete Horn. Her research takes surprising twists
and turns -- and eventually leads her to Israel.

Barbara Lichtman Tayar recently learned her Latvian
great-grandmother's surname was Hummel -- a name she
hadn't heard before.
Through the JewishGen Family Finder, Barbara connects
with cousins >from the around the world.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers --
Nancy Siegel, Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster.
We think you will be moved by these stories, and we
encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at: < success@... >.

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia JewishGen Success! Stories #scandinavia

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read the inspiring stories in the
latest issue of JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine.

You can access these stories >from the "About Us" button
on the JewishGen website, or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/

Judy Simon connects with previously unknown cousins
through the JewishGen Family Finder, and learns that she
is related to the prominent sculptor, Simon Moselsio.

Marla Raucher Osborn was curious about her grandmother's
aunt, Jete Horn. Her research takes surprising twists
and turns -- and eventually leads her to Israel.

Barbara Lichtman Tayar recently learned her Latvian
great-grandmother's surname was Hummel -- a name she
hadn't heard before.
Through the JewishGen Family Finder, Barbara connects
with cousins >from the around the world.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers --
Nancy Siegel, Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster.
We think you will be moved by these stories, and we
encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at: < success@... >.

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks JewishGen Success! Stories #yizkorbooks

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read the inspiring stories in the
latest issue of JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine.

You can access these stories >from the "About Us" button
on the JewishGen website, or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/

Judy Simon connects with previously unknown cousins
through the JewishGen Family Finder, and learns that she
is related to the prominent sculptor, Simon Moselsio.

Marla Raucher Osborn was curious about her grandmother's
aunt, Jete Horn. Her research takes surprising twists
and turns -- and eventually leads her to Israel.

Barbara Lichtman Tayar recently learned her Latvian
great-grandmother's surname was Hummel -- a name she
hadn't heard before.
Through the JewishGen Family Finder, Barbara connects
with cousins >from the around the world.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers --
Nancy Siegel, Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster.
We think you will be moved by these stories, and we
encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at: < success@... >.

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.

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