Date   

Yizkor Book Project, June 2014 #yiddish

bounce-2813810-772983@...
 

Shalom,

from time to time, I ponder the enormity of the project we are involved in -
the Yizkor Book Project, which involves the translation of hundreds of
Yizkor books with their scores of pages, >from their original languages
(usually Hebrew and Yiddish) into English and other languages. It is a huge
undertaking but I am encouraged to see that month by month, section by
section, paragraph by paragraph, more and more of the secrets hidden in
these books are revealed. What we find in them are stories of lives and
lifestyles that no longer exist and, on a darker side, unfathomable stories
of man's inhumanity to man. There is certainly so much to do but my
encouragement comes >from the large number of people who dedicate so much of
their time to the project and am heartened to see that others continue to
join our ranks. For those who have yet to join us, I welcome your
participation in any way you are able and welcome you to contact me so that
I can explain in more detail what is involved.

This past month, yet another book in the Yizkor Book Project has been
completely translated - "In memory of the life and destruction of the Jewish
community of Goniadz" (Goniadz, Poland) which is coordinated by Suzanne
Scheraga. My heartfelt thanks go out to Suzanne for this achievement for her
many years of involvement in another Goniadz Yizkor book which we also hope
to see completed in the very near future.

If I have managed to raise your curiosity about the Yizkor Book Project and
you will be attending the IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
at the end of this month, I warmly invite you to the Yizkor Books Birds of a
Feather meeting which, as in previous years, will be led by Jan Meisels
Allen. This is a golden opportunity to learn and ask questions about the
project >from Jan who has extensive experience in translation coordination
within the Yizkor Book Project and also has wide knowledge in the
genealogical field, in general. For those of you who are attending the
conference, I wish you an enlightening and enjoyable time and, of course,
pleasant get-togethers with your fellow researchers.

Now to facts and figures for June.

During this last month we have added in 2 new projects:

- Parysow, Poland (Parysow; a memorial to the Jewish community of Parysow,
Poland) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Parysow/Parysow.html

- Stoczek, Poland (Memorial Book of Stok, Near Wegrow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stoczek/Stoczek.html

Added in a new entry:

- Skuodas, Lithuania (Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lit1513.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dej, Romania (Des..., Bethlen, Magyarlapos, Retteg, Nagyilonda and
vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dej/dej.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dzialoszyce, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Jewish Community in Dzialoszyce
and Surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzialoszyce/Dzialoszyce.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (In memory of the life and destruction of the Jewish
community of Goniadz) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz1/goniadz1.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Kozienice, Poland (The book of Kozienice; The birth and the destruction of
a Jewish community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kozienice/kozienice.html

- Latvia (The Jews in Latvia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/latvia1/latvia1.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of Stolin
and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stolin/stolin.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Szczebrzeszyn, Poland (The Book of Memory to the Jewish Community of
Shebreshin) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczebrzeszyn/Szczebrzeszyn.html

- Wieliczka, Poland (The Jewish community of Wieliczka; a memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Wieliczka/Wieliczka.html

- Zolochiv, Ukraine (The Destruction of Zloczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zolochiv/Zolochiv.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre Yizkor Book Project, June 2014 #yiddish

bounce-2813810-772983@...
 

Shalom,

from time to time, I ponder the enormity of the project we are involved in -
the Yizkor Book Project, which involves the translation of hundreds of
Yizkor books with their scores of pages, >from their original languages
(usually Hebrew and Yiddish) into English and other languages. It is a huge
undertaking but I am encouraged to see that month by month, section by
section, paragraph by paragraph, more and more of the secrets hidden in
these books are revealed. What we find in them are stories of lives and
lifestyles that no longer exist and, on a darker side, unfathomable stories
of man's inhumanity to man. There is certainly so much to do but my
encouragement comes >from the large number of people who dedicate so much of
their time to the project and am heartened to see that others continue to
join our ranks. For those who have yet to join us, I welcome your
participation in any way you are able and welcome you to contact me so that
I can explain in more detail what is involved.

This past month, yet another book in the Yizkor Book Project has been
completely translated - "In memory of the life and destruction of the Jewish
community of Goniadz" (Goniadz, Poland) which is coordinated by Suzanne
Scheraga. My heartfelt thanks go out to Suzanne for this achievement for her
many years of involvement in another Goniadz Yizkor book which we also hope
to see completed in the very near future.

If I have managed to raise your curiosity about the Yizkor Book Project and
you will be attending the IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
at the end of this month, I warmly invite you to the Yizkor Books Birds of a
Feather meeting which, as in previous years, will be led by Jan Meisels
Allen. This is a golden opportunity to learn and ask questions about the
project >from Jan who has extensive experience in translation coordination
within the Yizkor Book Project and also has wide knowledge in the
genealogical field, in general. For those of you who are attending the
conference, I wish you an enlightening and enjoyable time and, of course,
pleasant get-togethers with your fellow researchers.

Now to facts and figures for June.

During this last month we have added in 2 new projects:

- Parysow, Poland (Parysow; a memorial to the Jewish community of Parysow,
Poland) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Parysow/Parysow.html

- Stoczek, Poland (Memorial Book of Stok, Near Wegrow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stoczek/Stoczek.html

Added in a new entry:

- Skuodas, Lithuania (Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lit1513.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dej, Romania (Des..., Bethlen, Magyarlapos, Retteg, Nagyilonda and
vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dej/dej.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dzialoszyce, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Jewish Community in Dzialoszyce
and Surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzialoszyce/Dzialoszyce.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (In memory of the life and destruction of the Jewish
community of Goniadz) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz1/goniadz1.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Kozienice, Poland (The book of Kozienice; The birth and the destruction of
a Jewish community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kozienice/kozienice.html

- Latvia (The Jews in Latvia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/latvia1/latvia1.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of Stolin
and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stolin/stolin.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Szczebrzeszyn, Poland (The Book of Memory to the Jewish Community of
Shebreshin) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczebrzeszyn/Szczebrzeszyn.html

- Wieliczka, Poland (The Jewish community of Wieliczka; a memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Wieliczka/Wieliczka.html

- Zolochiv, Ukraine (The Destruction of Zloczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zolochiv/Zolochiv.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


Yizkor Book Project, June 2014 #galicia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

MODERATOR NOTE: See especially the mentions below of Kolomyya, Stryy,
and Zolochiv, Ukraine, and Wieliczka, Poland -- towns once in Galicia.

Shalom,

from time to time, I ponder the enormity of the project we are involved
in - the Yizkor Book Project, which involves the translation of hundreds
of Yizkor books with their scores of pages, >from their original
languages (usually Hebrew and Yiddish) into English and other
languages. It is a huge undertaking but I am encouraged to see that
month by month, section by section, paragraph by paragraph, more
and more of the secrets hidden in these books are revealed. What we
find in them are stories of lives and lifestyles that no longer exist and,
on a darker side, unfathomable stories of man's inhumanity to man.
There is certainly so much to do but my encouragement comes >from
the large number of people who dedicate so much of their time to the
project and am heartened to see that others continue to join our ranks.
For those who have yet to join us, I welcome your participation in any
way you are able and welcome you to contact me so that I can explain
in more detail what is involved.

This past month, yet another book in the Yizkor Book Project has been
completely translated - "In memory of the life and destruction of the
Jewish community of Goniadz" (Goniadz, Poland) which is coordinated by
Suzanne Scheraga. My heartfelt thanks go out to Suzanne for this
achievement for her many years of involvement in another Goniadz
Yizkor book which we also hope to see completed in the very near future.

If I have managed to raise your curiosity about the Yizkor Book Project
and you will be attending the IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy at the end of this month, I warmly invite you to the Yizkor
Books Birds of a Feather meeting which, as in previous years, will be
led by Jan Meisels Allen. This is a golden opportunity to learn and ask
questions about the project >from Jan, who has extensive experience in
translation coordination within the Yizkor Book Project and also has
wide knowledge in the genealogical field, in general. For those of you
who are attending the conference, I wish you an enlightening and
enjoyable time and, of course, pleasant get-togethers with your fellow
researchers.

Now to facts and figures for June.

During this last month we have added in 2 new projects:

- Parysow, Poland
(Parysow; a memorial to the Jewish community of Parysow, Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Parysow/Parysow.html

- Stoczek, Poland (Memorial Book of Stok, Near Wegrow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stoczek/Stoczek.html

Added in a new entry:

- Skuodas, Lithuania (Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lit1513.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dej, Romania
(Des..., Bethlen, Magyarlapos, Retteg, Nagyilonda and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dej/dej.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dzialoszyce, Poland
(Yizkor Book of the Jewish Community in Dzialoszyce and Surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzialoszyce/Dzialoszyce.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland
(In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (In memory of the life and destruction
of the Jewish community of Goniadz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz1/goniadz1.html

- Karelichy, Belarus
(Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko;
in memory of a martyred community which was destroyed)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Kozienice, Poland (The book of Kozienice;
The birth and the destruction of a Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kozienice/kozienice.html

- Latvia (The Jews in Latvia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/latvia1/latvia1.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie
and the neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stolin, Belarus
(Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of Stolin and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stolin/stolin.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Szczebrzeszyn, Poland
(The Book of Memory to the Jewish Community of Shebreshin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczebrzeszyn/Szczebrzeszyn.html

- Wieliczka, Poland
(The Jewish community of Wieliczka; a memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Wieliczka/Wieliczka.html

- Zolochiv, Ukraine (The Destruction of Zloczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zolochiv/Zolochiv.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Yizkor Book Project, June 2014 #galicia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

MODERATOR NOTE: See especially the mentions below of Kolomyya, Stryy,
and Zolochiv, Ukraine, and Wieliczka, Poland -- towns once in Galicia.

Shalom,

from time to time, I ponder the enormity of the project we are involved
in - the Yizkor Book Project, which involves the translation of hundreds
of Yizkor books with their scores of pages, >from their original
languages (usually Hebrew and Yiddish) into English and other
languages. It is a huge undertaking but I am encouraged to see that
month by month, section by section, paragraph by paragraph, more
and more of the secrets hidden in these books are revealed. What we
find in them are stories of lives and lifestyles that no longer exist and,
on a darker side, unfathomable stories of man's inhumanity to man.
There is certainly so much to do but my encouragement comes >from
the large number of people who dedicate so much of their time to the
project and am heartened to see that others continue to join our ranks.
For those who have yet to join us, I welcome your participation in any
way you are able and welcome you to contact me so that I can explain
in more detail what is involved.

This past month, yet another book in the Yizkor Book Project has been
completely translated - "In memory of the life and destruction of the
Jewish community of Goniadz" (Goniadz, Poland) which is coordinated by
Suzanne Scheraga. My heartfelt thanks go out to Suzanne for this
achievement for her many years of involvement in another Goniadz
Yizkor book which we also hope to see completed in the very near future.

If I have managed to raise your curiosity about the Yizkor Book Project
and you will be attending the IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy at the end of this month, I warmly invite you to the Yizkor
Books Birds of a Feather meeting which, as in previous years, will be
led by Jan Meisels Allen. This is a golden opportunity to learn and ask
questions about the project >from Jan, who has extensive experience in
translation coordination within the Yizkor Book Project and also has
wide knowledge in the genealogical field, in general. For those of you
who are attending the conference, I wish you an enlightening and
enjoyable time and, of course, pleasant get-togethers with your fellow
researchers.

Now to facts and figures for June.

During this last month we have added in 2 new projects:

- Parysow, Poland
(Parysow; a memorial to the Jewish community of Parysow, Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Parysow/Parysow.html

- Stoczek, Poland (Memorial Book of Stok, Near Wegrow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stoczek/Stoczek.html

Added in a new entry:

- Skuodas, Lithuania (Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lit1513.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dej, Romania
(Des..., Bethlen, Magyarlapos, Retteg, Nagyilonda and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dej/dej.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dzialoszyce, Poland
(Yizkor Book of the Jewish Community in Dzialoszyce and Surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzialoszyce/Dzialoszyce.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland
(In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (In memory of the life and destruction
of the Jewish community of Goniadz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz1/goniadz1.html

- Karelichy, Belarus
(Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko;
in memory of a martyred community which was destroyed)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Kozienice, Poland (The book of Kozienice;
The birth and the destruction of a Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kozienice/kozienice.html

- Latvia (The Jews in Latvia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/latvia1/latvia1.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie
and the neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stolin, Belarus
(Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of Stolin and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stolin/stolin.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Szczebrzeszyn, Poland
(The Book of Memory to the Jewish Community of Shebreshin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczebrzeszyn/Szczebrzeszyn.html

- Wieliczka, Poland
(The Jewish community of Wieliczka; a memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Wieliczka/Wieliczka.html

- Zolochiv, Ukraine (The Destruction of Zloczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zolochiv/Zolochiv.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


Yizkor Book Project, June 2014 #ukraine

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

from time to time, I ponder the enormity of the project we are involved in -
the Yizkor Book Project, which involves the translation of hundreds of
Yizkor books with their scores of pages, >from their original languages
(usually Hebrew and Yiddish) into English and other languages. It is a huge
undertaking but I am encouraged to see that month by month, section by
section, paragraph by paragraph, more and more of the secrets hidden in
these books are revealed. What we find in them are stories of lives and
lifestyles that no longer exist and, on a darker side, unfathomable stories
of man's inhumanity to man. There is certainly so much to do but my
encouragement comes >from the large number of people who dedicate so much of
their time to the project and am heartened to see that others continue to
join our ranks. For those who have yet to join us, I welcome your
participation in any way you are able and welcome you to contact me so that
I can explain in more detail what is involved.

This past month, yet another book in the Yizkor Book Project has been
completely translated - "In memory of the life and destruction of the Jewish
community of Goniadz" (Goniadz, Poland) which is coordinated by Suzanne
Scheraga. My heartfelt thanks go out to Suzanne for this achievement for her
many years of involvement in another Goniadz Yizkor book which we also hope
to see completed in the very near future.

If I have managed to raise your curiosity about the Yizkor Book Project and
you will be attending the IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
at the end of this month, I warmly invite you to the Yizkor Books Birds of a
Feather meeting which, as in previous years, will be led by Jan Meisels
Allen. This is a golden opportunity to learn and ask questions about the
project >from Jan who has extensive experience in translation coordination
within the Yizkor Book Project and also has wide knowledge in the
genealogical field, in general. For those of you who are attending the
conference, I wish you an enlightening and enjoyable time and, of course,
pleasant get-togethers with your fellow researchers.

Now to facts and figures for June.

During this last month we have added in 2 new projects:

- Parysow, Poland (Parysow; a memorial to the Jewish community of Parysow,
Poland) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Parysow/Parysow.html

- Stoczek, Poland (Memorial Book of Stok, Near Wegrow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stoczek/Stoczek.html

Added in a new entry:

- Skuodas, Lithuania (Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lit1513.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dej, Romania (Des..., Bethlen, Magyarlapos, Retteg, Nagyilonda and
vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dej/dej.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dzialoszyce, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Jewish Community in Dzialoszyce
and Surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzialoszyce/Dzialoszyce.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (In memory of the life and destruction of the Jewish
community of Goniadz) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz1/goniadz1.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Kozienice, Poland (The book of Kozienice; The birth and the destruction of
a Jewish community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kozienice/kozienice.html

- Latvia (The Jews in Latvia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/latvia1/latvia1.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of Stolin
and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stolin/stolin.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Szczebrzeszyn, Poland (The Book of Memory to the Jewish Community of
Shebreshin) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczebrzeszyn/Szczebrzeszyn.html

- Wieliczka, Poland (The Jewish community of Wieliczka; a memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Wieliczka/Wieliczka.html

- Zolochiv, Ukraine (The Destruction of Zloczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zolochiv/Zolochiv.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Yizkor Book Project, June 2014 #ukraine

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

from time to time, I ponder the enormity of the project we are involved in -
the Yizkor Book Project, which involves the translation of hundreds of
Yizkor books with their scores of pages, >from their original languages
(usually Hebrew and Yiddish) into English and other languages. It is a huge
undertaking but I am encouraged to see that month by month, section by
section, paragraph by paragraph, more and more of the secrets hidden in
these books are revealed. What we find in them are stories of lives and
lifestyles that no longer exist and, on a darker side, unfathomable stories
of man's inhumanity to man. There is certainly so much to do but my
encouragement comes >from the large number of people who dedicate so much of
their time to the project and am heartened to see that others continue to
join our ranks. For those who have yet to join us, I welcome your
participation in any way you are able and welcome you to contact me so that
I can explain in more detail what is involved.

This past month, yet another book in the Yizkor Book Project has been
completely translated - "In memory of the life and destruction of the Jewish
community of Goniadz" (Goniadz, Poland) which is coordinated by Suzanne
Scheraga. My heartfelt thanks go out to Suzanne for this achievement for her
many years of involvement in another Goniadz Yizkor book which we also hope
to see completed in the very near future.

If I have managed to raise your curiosity about the Yizkor Book Project and
you will be attending the IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
at the end of this month, I warmly invite you to the Yizkor Books Birds of a
Feather meeting which, as in previous years, will be led by Jan Meisels
Allen. This is a golden opportunity to learn and ask questions about the
project >from Jan who has extensive experience in translation coordination
within the Yizkor Book Project and also has wide knowledge in the
genealogical field, in general. For those of you who are attending the
conference, I wish you an enlightening and enjoyable time and, of course,
pleasant get-togethers with your fellow researchers.

Now to facts and figures for June.

During this last month we have added in 2 new projects:

- Parysow, Poland (Parysow; a memorial to the Jewish community of Parysow,
Poland) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Parysow/Parysow.html

- Stoczek, Poland (Memorial Book of Stok, Near Wegrow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stoczek/Stoczek.html

Added in a new entry:

- Skuodas, Lithuania (Lithuania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lit1513.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dej, Romania (Des..., Bethlen, Magyarlapos, Retteg, Nagyilonda and
vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dej/dej.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dzialoszyce, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Jewish Community in Dzialoszyce
and Surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzialoszyce/Dzialoszyce.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (In memory of the life and destruction of the Jewish
community of Goniadz) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz1/goniadz1.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Kozienice, Poland (The book of Kozienice; The birth and the destruction of
a Jewish community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kozienice/kozienice.html

- Latvia (The Jews in Latvia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/latvia1/latvia1.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of Stolin
and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stolin/stolin.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Szczebrzeszyn, Poland (The Book of Memory to the Jewish Community of
Shebreshin) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczebrzeszyn/Szczebrzeszyn.html

- Wieliczka, Poland (The Jewish community of Wieliczka; a memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Wieliczka/Wieliczka.html

- Zolochiv, Ukraine (The Destruction of Zloczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zolochiv/Zolochiv.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


Checiny, Poland #yizkorbooks

Ofer Manela
 

Dear all,

I would like to know if there is any Yizkor Book for the town Checiny.

Thanks,
Ofer Manela
Petach-Tikva
Isreal


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Checiny, Poland #yizkorbooks

Ofer Manela
 

Dear all,

I would like to know if there is any Yizkor Book for the town Checiny.

Thanks,
Ofer Manela
Petach-Tikva
Isreal


Interpreting the FTDNA Chromosome Browser results #dna

Jill Shapiro <Uppsala1@...>
 

Could someone please explain how to assign meaning to the Chromosome
Browser in FTDNA? Here are some questions......
1. Is the right side paternal and the left side maternal?
2. Does the matching on particular bars but not others have meaning?
3. Where can I find guidelines for determining how closely related
someone is by examining the size of the matching?
4. How many bars does a person need to match to be a first, second
or third cousin?

Many thanks,
Jill Shapiro
Northern California


DNA Research #DNA Interpreting the FTDNA Chromosome Browser results #dna

Jill Shapiro <Uppsala1@...>
 

Could someone please explain how to assign meaning to the Chromosome
Browser in FTDNA? Here are some questions......
1. Is the right side paternal and the left side maternal?
2. Does the matching on particular bars but not others have meaning?
3. Where can I find guidelines for determining how closely related
someone is by examining the size of the matching?
4. How many bars does a person need to match to be a first, second
or third cousin?

Many thanks,
Jill Shapiro
Northern California


Late arrivals #general

David Schreiber
 

How does one track down people and families who arrived later
than the Ellis Island dates? Also how does one find the people
who entered the US by other than NY entry points that may not
have been published yet by Ancestry and such?

Thanks in advance,
David Schreiber
Melbourne, FL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Late arrivals #general

David Schreiber
 

How does one track down people and families who arrived later
than the Ellis Island dates? Also how does one find the people
who entered the US by other than NY entry points that may not
have been published yet by Ancestry and such?

Thanks in advance,
David Schreiber
Melbourne, FL


Given names Edith, Judesa #general

David Schreiber
 

I have just run across a marriage certificate where the groom's
mother's names is Edith. I believe this is the same person who is
listed in JRI Poland as Judesa. I was wondering if these too names
are more or less interchangeable as US and Polish given names are
concerned.

Thanks in advance,
David Schreiber
Melbourne, FL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Given names Edith, Judesa #general

David Schreiber
 

I have just run across a marriage certificate where the groom's
mother's names is Edith. I believe this is the same person who is
listed in JRI Poland as Judesa. I was wondering if these too names
are more or less interchangeable as US and Polish given names are
concerned.

Thanks in advance,
David Schreiber
Melbourne, FL


Re: Researching: STRASS #general

Naomi Leon <naomi.leon@...>
 

Hi Robert,

Perversely it's often much harder to find someone in mid-late
20th century Britain that it is in earlier records.

A couple of things occur to me in the first instance:

If Leo Strass' background was as you suggest, it seems likely he
naturalised after the war. Searching the naturalisation case
papers (1934-1968) on the National Archives catalogue there is a
reference to a Home Office file relating to an L Strass and an M
Strass, born 1885, who seem to have naturalised during the period
1953-1965. The reference is HO 405/53900.

You will have to submit a Freedom of Information request to access
the file as it less than 100 years old, but usually if the
person(s) are deceased, you will be granted access. The process
takes a little while but you can order a colour copy of the complete
file for a fee and download it directly >from the website. Usually,
they are very detailed and well worth waiting for. If you have any
other particulars, you might want to email first to check that this
file corresponds with what you know. The archivist will confirm or
deny the information you provide but will not volunteer fresh info.

The London Gazette which you can search for free suggests a 'Peter
STRASS, Czechoslovakia, independent, of 84 St Peter's Court,
Porchester Road, London W2, naturalised on 25 Nov 1958.' You can
search the London Gazette for free.

Leo Strass (same address) appears in the London Electoral Rolls
1960-1965 available on Ancestry. Quite a lot of the Strasses are
listed here too.

Finally, have you checked Yad Vashem to see whether Leo left any
testimony about the family he supposedly lost?

Hope this helps.

Naomi Leon

From: "Robert Fraser" <girof@iinet.net.au>
Date: Wed, 2 Jul 2014 11:52:10 +0800

This is another attempt to break through a Brick Wall. I
must admit, though, that I haven't actually done any
research to speak of on this character; he's a 'minor'
member of my family tree who I met many times but know
practically nothing about.

He's an uncle-by marriage named Leo STRASS. He married my
father's cousin Margarete Eisinger (>from Austria) in 1954
and they lived in London, where they married. There were no
children.

My parents and I visited them fairly often when we went to
London >from Wales, but it never occurred to me to ask
anything about him - I was too young to care.

He was aged about 70 when he married. This leads me to
suspect that maybe he was married before and his family
didn't survive the Holocaust. But that's mere conjecture.

He died on Dec 8 1964 and is buried in Willesden in North
London. I don't know where he came from, but he was probably
also a refugee >from Europe.

I believe he had family in London, including possibly
Glauber or Klauber. I only met them once at his wife's
funeral and we didn't keep in touch with them.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Researching: STRASS #general

Naomi Leon <naomi.leon@...>
 

Hi Robert,

Perversely it's often much harder to find someone in mid-late
20th century Britain that it is in earlier records.

A couple of things occur to me in the first instance:

If Leo Strass' background was as you suggest, it seems likely he
naturalised after the war. Searching the naturalisation case
papers (1934-1968) on the National Archives catalogue there is a
reference to a Home Office file relating to an L Strass and an M
Strass, born 1885, who seem to have naturalised during the period
1953-1965. The reference is HO 405/53900.

You will have to submit a Freedom of Information request to access
the file as it less than 100 years old, but usually if the
person(s) are deceased, you will be granted access. The process
takes a little while but you can order a colour copy of the complete
file for a fee and download it directly >from the website. Usually,
they are very detailed and well worth waiting for. If you have any
other particulars, you might want to email first to check that this
file corresponds with what you know. The archivist will confirm or
deny the information you provide but will not volunteer fresh info.

The London Gazette which you can search for free suggests a 'Peter
STRASS, Czechoslovakia, independent, of 84 St Peter's Court,
Porchester Road, London W2, naturalised on 25 Nov 1958.' You can
search the London Gazette for free.

Leo Strass (same address) appears in the London Electoral Rolls
1960-1965 available on Ancestry. Quite a lot of the Strasses are
listed here too.

Finally, have you checked Yad Vashem to see whether Leo left any
testimony about the family he supposedly lost?

Hope this helps.

Naomi Leon

From: "Robert Fraser" <girof@iinet.net.au>
Date: Wed, 2 Jul 2014 11:52:10 +0800

This is another attempt to break through a Brick Wall. I
must admit, though, that I haven't actually done any
research to speak of on this character; he's a 'minor'
member of my family tree who I met many times but know
practically nothing about.

He's an uncle-by marriage named Leo STRASS. He married my
father's cousin Margarete Eisinger (>from Austria) in 1954
and they lived in London, where they married. There were no
children.

My parents and I visited them fairly often when we went to
London >from Wales, but it never occurred to me to ask
anything about him - I was too young to care.

He was aged about 70 when he married. This leads me to
suspect that maybe he was married before and his family
didn't survive the Holocaust. But that's mere conjecture.

He died on Dec 8 1964 and is buried in Willesden in North
London. I don't know where he came from, but he was probably
also a refugee >from Europe.

I believe he had family in London, including possibly
Glauber or Klauber. I only met them once at his wife's
funeral and we didn't keep in touch with them.


KAMINKER Passage #general

Elaine Halprin
 

Hello >from blazing hot Las Vegas. I am trying to find passage information
about my great grandmother and her five children and have hit a brick wall.
My great grandmother, Yente Schneiderman KAMINKER and her children traveled
from possibly Korets, Ukraine, in 1898 or 1899. At the time of travel,
Yente (Jenny) was approximately 30 years old. She brought with her
children Pauline (Perel?), age 15, Simon, age 8, Ida (Chaya) age 5, Ester,
age 3 and Louis, age 2. She was going to her husband Baruch (Barnet)
Kaminker who had come the year before on 5 Jan 1898 >from Vilna through
Canada to Lawrence, Mass. I have looked everywhere. Can anyone help with
this mystery? Thanks in advance.

Elaine Halprin
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
researching KAMINKER >from Korets, Ukraine and GREENBERG >from Mezherich


Baron de Hirsch and the people he sent to South Jersey #general

Steve Pickoltz
 

Is there any kind of a list that would have on it the people
Baron de Hirsch helped to come to the USA and settle at one of
the farming colonies in South Jersey? I am looking for three
different families that are all related to me. All three came
and settled in the Norman, NJ area in 1890 and moved to Phila.,
by 1900. One member of this group is buried at the Alliance
cemetery, in Pittsgrove, Salem County, New Jersey. The
families were PICKHOLTZ, BERNSTEIN, and KACZOR (Katcher).

All help greatly appreciated.

Steve Pickholtz
New Jersey


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen KAMINKER Passage #general

Elaine Halprin
 

Hello >from blazing hot Las Vegas. I am trying to find passage information
about my great grandmother and her five children and have hit a brick wall.
My great grandmother, Yente Schneiderman KAMINKER and her children traveled
from possibly Korets, Ukraine, in 1898 or 1899. At the time of travel,
Yente (Jenny) was approximately 30 years old. She brought with her
children Pauline (Perel?), age 15, Simon, age 8, Ida (Chaya) age 5, Ester,
age 3 and Louis, age 2. She was going to her husband Baruch (Barnet)
Kaminker who had come the year before on 5 Jan 1898 >from Vilna through
Canada to Lawrence, Mass. I have looked everywhere. Can anyone help with
this mystery? Thanks in advance.

Elaine Halprin
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
researching KAMINKER >from Korets, Ukraine and GREENBERG >from Mezherich


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Baron de Hirsch and the people he sent to South Jersey #general

Steve Pickoltz
 

Is there any kind of a list that would have on it the people
Baron de Hirsch helped to come to the USA and settle at one of
the farming colonies in South Jersey? I am looking for three
different families that are all related to me. All three came
and settled in the Norman, NJ area in 1890 and moved to Phila.,
by 1900. One member of this group is buried at the Alliance
cemetery, in Pittsgrove, Salem County, New Jersey. The
families were PICKHOLTZ, BERNSTEIN, and KACZOR (Katcher).

All help greatly appreciated.

Steve Pickholtz
New Jersey

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