Date   

ViewMate Translation Request - Russian #general

Pat Fuller
 

Hi Genners - I have posted a death record in Russian for which I need a
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address:

https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=69681

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much.

Pat Redman Fuller
Simi Valley, California, USA

RESEARCHING: FAINBOIM Basarabeasca Moldova; KAPLITS Ukmerge Lithuania;
LEVITAN Kaliningrad Russia; LIPPMAN Taurage Lithuania; MUSS Ukmerge
Lithuania; NATHANSON Taurage Lithuania; RACHBUCH Husi Romania; ROITMAN
Carpineni Moldova; SHKOLNIK Hincesti Moldova


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate Translation Request - Russian #general

Pat Fuller
 

Hi Genners - I have posted a death record in Russian for which I need a
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address:

https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=69681

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much.

Pat Redman Fuller
Simi Valley, California, USA

RESEARCHING: FAINBOIM Basarabeasca Moldova; KAPLITS Ukmerge Lithuania;
LEVITAN Kaliningrad Russia; LIPPMAN Taurage Lithuania; MUSS Ukmerge
Lithuania; NATHANSON Taurage Lithuania; RACHBUCH Husi Romania; ROITMAN
Carpineni Moldova; SHKOLNIK Hincesti Moldova


ViewMate translation request - Polish or German #general

Barbara Ellman
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish or German for which I need a
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69421

The document is a birth record >from 1877 with a notation >from 1913.
It is the notation that I'm looking for a translation of. It may lead
me to more information on a previous dead end in my family tree.

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.

Barbara Ellman
Secaucus NJ USA

HIRSCHHORN - Khorostkow & Dolyna Ukraine
ELLMAN, COIRA - Minkovsty Ukraine
HASSMAN, SONENTHAL, DAUERMAN, LUCHS - Drohobych Ukraine
FASS, KAGLE - Ulanow, Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Polish or German #general

Barbara Ellman
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish or German for which I need a
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69421

The document is a birth record >from 1877 with a notation >from 1913.
It is the notation that I'm looking for a translation of. It may lead
me to more information on a previous dead end in my family tree.

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.

Barbara Ellman
Secaucus NJ USA

HIRSCHHORN - Khorostkow & Dolyna Ukraine
ELLMAN, COIRA - Minkovsty Ukraine
HASSMAN, SONENTHAL, DAUERMAN, LUCHS - Drohobych Ukraine
FASS, KAGLE - Ulanow, Poland


Inconsistent Ancestry Results #dna

Herbert Lazerow
 

Greetings, all. Here is something I don't understand. Ancestry shows a young
relative whose great-great grandmother was an elder sister to my
grandfather. She is a "very high match" (49 centimorgans shared across 7 DNA
segments) whereas her own sister shows as an "extremely high match" (72
centimorgans shared across 8 DNA segments).>
Those are only high matches for 4th cousins or more distant
relations. 49/7 means that the longest string is at least 7
centiMorgans long, probably a bit longer. 72/8 means that the longest
string is at least 9. None of those indicates a closer relationship
than 4th cousins, and the 72/8 sibling is more likely to be a 4th
cousin than the 49/7.
I am stumped why two siblings
would not have the same match numbers.>
They are likely to have similar match numbers to their parents
because we each receive roughly 50% of our dna >from each parent. They
are unlikely to have similar match numbers with other relatives
because the 50% we receive >from each parent is a random 50%. So each
sibling may have received the same percentage of dna >from each parent,
but unless they are identical twins, it will be a different mixture of
each parent's genes.
Illustration: Assume siblings of the same parents. S1 receives
genes A-D >from dad and E-H >from mom. S2 receives genes A-B and E-F
from dad, and genes C-D and G-H >from mom. They share only genes A-B
from dad and genes G-H >from mom.
S1 has a son GS1 who receives 50% of S1's genes. GS1 receives
genes A-B (dad's genes) and F-G (mom's genes) >from S1. GS1's other
genes (C, D, E & H) come >from S1's marriage partner. S2 has a son
GS2. GS2 receives genes A (dad's gene) C (mom's gene), F (dad's gene)
and H (mom's gene) >from S2. GS2's other genes (B, D, E & G) come from
S2's marriage partner. Note that only gene A matches between GS1 and
GS2 because it came in both cases >from dad. Each GS continues to carry
some of mom's genes and other genes >from dad, but the genes GS1
carries >from mom do not match the genes that GS2 carries >from mom, nor
do the other genes each inherited >from dad.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego CA 92110


DNA Research #DNA Inconsistent Ancestry Results #dna

Herbert Lazerow
 

Greetings, all. Here is something I don't understand. Ancestry shows a young
relative whose great-great grandmother was an elder sister to my
grandfather. She is a "very high match" (49 centimorgans shared across 7 DNA
segments) whereas her own sister shows as an "extremely high match" (72
centimorgans shared across 8 DNA segments).>
Those are only high matches for 4th cousins or more distant
relations. 49/7 means that the longest string is at least 7
centiMorgans long, probably a bit longer. 72/8 means that the longest
string is at least 9. None of those indicates a closer relationship
than 4th cousins, and the 72/8 sibling is more likely to be a 4th
cousin than the 49/7.
I am stumped why two siblings
would not have the same match numbers.>
They are likely to have similar match numbers to their parents
because we each receive roughly 50% of our dna >from each parent. They
are unlikely to have similar match numbers with other relatives
because the 50% we receive >from each parent is a random 50%. So each
sibling may have received the same percentage of dna >from each parent,
but unless they are identical twins, it will be a different mixture of
each parent's genes.
Illustration: Assume siblings of the same parents. S1 receives
genes A-D >from dad and E-H >from mom. S2 receives genes A-B and E-F
from dad, and genes C-D and G-H >from mom. They share only genes A-B
from dad and genes G-H >from mom.
S1 has a son GS1 who receives 50% of S1's genes. GS1 receives
genes A-B (dad's genes) and F-G (mom's genes) >from S1. GS1's other
genes (C, D, E & H) come >from S1's marriage partner. S2 has a son
GS2. GS2 receives genes A (dad's gene) C (mom's gene), F (dad's gene)
and H (mom's gene) >from S2. GS2's other genes (B, D, E & G) come from
S2's marriage partner. Note that only gene A matches between GS1 and
GS2 because it came in both cases >from dad. Each GS continues to carry
some of mom's genes and other genes >from dad, but the genes GS1
carries >from mom do not match the genes that GS2 carries >from mom, nor
do the other genes each inherited >from dad.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego CA 92110


Re: Inconsistent Ancestry Results #dna

Adam Cherson
 

Dear Mr. Goldman,

Please have a look at this article which should help:

https://isogg.org/wiki/Autosomal_DNA_statistics

Good Luck,
Adam Cherson


DNA Research #DNA RE: Inconsistent Ancestry Results #dna

Adam Cherson
 

Dear Mr. Goldman,

Please have a look at this article which should help:

https://isogg.org/wiki/Autosomal_DNA_statistics

Good Luck,
Adam Cherson


Re: inconcistent Ancestry results #dna

Sarah L Meyer
 

David,
This is not unique to Ancestry, it is because unless the two siblings are
identical twins they have different DNA. They each inherited 50% >from each
parent, but it is a different 50% mix. That is why we test siblings because
the matches are different and we get new places to test.
Sarah Meyer


Re: dna digest: September 29, 2018 #dna

Sandy Crystall
 

David-
We inherit different proportions of DNA >from our two parents --that is
why it is so important to test siblings. >from matches on different
sides of my family, I can see that my sister has more DNA >from our
maternal side than I do, and thus has stronger matches on that side as
a consequence. I can see that in cousins who have tested -- some more
closely match the side of the family through which we are related.

Hope this is helpful. There are articles online that address this -
perhaps someone else will post some links.

Best
Sandy Crystall
New Hampshire, USA


DNA Research #DNA RE:inconcistent Ancestry results #dna

Sarah L Meyer
 

David,
This is not unique to Ancestry, it is because unless the two siblings are
identical twins they have different DNA. They each inherited 50% >from each
parent, but it is a different 50% mix. That is why we test siblings because
the matches are different and we get new places to test.
Sarah Meyer


DNA Research #DNA Re: dna digest: September 29, 2018 #dna

Sandy Crystall
 

David-
We inherit different proportions of DNA >from our two parents --that is
why it is so important to test siblings. >from matches on different
sides of my family, I can see that my sister has more DNA >from our
maternal side than I do, and thus has stronger matches on that side as
a consequence. I can see that in cousins who have tested -- some more
closely match the side of the family through which we are related.

Hope this is helpful. There are articles online that address this -
perhaps someone else will post some links.

Best
Sandy Crystall
New Hampshire, USA


Re: Inconsistent Ancestry Results #dna

David Ellis
 

This is a perfect example of recombination affecting the DNA matches between
him and his second cousins twice removed. He is related to one of their two
parents (say, for the sake of argument, their mother). Each of the two
sisters inherited randomly chosen segments amounting to half of their
mother's DNA, but they inherited different amounts of the segments of her
DNA that matched him.

---
David J Ellis
Natick, MA 01760
djemkitso@verizon.net


DNA Research #DNA RE: Inconsistent Ancestry Results #dna

David Ellis
 

This is a perfect example of recombination affecting the DNA matches between
him and his second cousins twice removed. He is related to one of their two
parents (say, for the sake of argument, their mother). Each of the two
sisters inherited randomly chosen segments amounting to half of their
mother's DNA, but they inherited different amounts of the segments of her
DNA that matched him.

---
David J Ellis
Natick, MA 01760
djemkitso@verizon.net


Re: Inconsistent Ancestry Results #dna

Dorann Cafaro
 

Not so confusing if you stop and think about the fact each of us
inherits some DNA >from each parent and it is specific to us. So your
sibling would have inherited a different mix of DNA than you - some
from your mother & some >from your father but different >from you. Yes
very similar but different. Than consider that each generation back
that mix would have been different again thus one distant mix might be
closer to your mix and one mix closer to some other relative.

The good news is they inherited some on many of the same segments thus
a strong match.

Dorann Cafaro

From: "David Goldman" <lugman@verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 29 Sep 2018 20:49:47 -0400

Greetings, all. Here is something I don't understand. Ancestry shows a young
relative whose great-great grandmother was an elder sister to my
grandfather. She is a "very high match" (49 centimorgans shared across 7 DNA
segments) whereas her own sister shows as an "extremely high match" (72
centimorgans shared across 8 DNA segments). I am stumped why two siblings
would not have the same match numbers. The more I get into this the more
confusing it gets!


DNA Research #DNA Re: Inconsistent Ancestry Results #dna

Dorann Cafaro
 

Not so confusing if you stop and think about the fact each of us
inherits some DNA >from each parent and it is specific to us. So your
sibling would have inherited a different mix of DNA than you - some
from your mother & some >from your father but different >from you. Yes
very similar but different. Than consider that each generation back
that mix would have been different again thus one distant mix might be
closer to your mix and one mix closer to some other relative.

The good news is they inherited some on many of the same segments thus
a strong match.

Dorann Cafaro

From: "David Goldman" <lugman@verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 29 Sep 2018 20:49:47 -0400

Greetings, all. Here is something I don't understand. Ancestry shows a young
relative whose great-great grandmother was an elder sister to my
grandfather. She is a "very high match" (49 centimorgans shared across 7 DNA
segments) whereas her own sister shows as an "extremely high match" (72
centimorgans shared across 8 DNA segments). I am stumped why two siblings
would not have the same match numbers. The more I get into this the more
confusing it gets!


HEINZE area Johannisburg (eastprussia) and Unna #germany

Mike Redel <redel.mike@...>
 

Dear gersigs,

I'm searching vor Arthur HEINZE. I don't know where he came from
but I have read that many Heinzes came >from Breslau.

Arthur HEINZE (Jewish) was married to Ottilie Haraschensk (nonjewish)
born 13.02.1880 in Johannisburg (Eastprussia). Both have had 3 sons.
Heinz was born 26.06.1912 in Unna, Hans was born 18.10.1916 in Unna
and Arthur was born 03.06.1919 in Unna.

Hans is missed in the II WW since 05.10.1945.

The life of them in Unna is not clear. Arthur (father) established a
store in Unna 1901 - nothing more! His son Heinz was the owner of this
store in 1946.

I think that the father died before 1939 because I could not find him
in the census 1939. Has anyone informations for me about this family?

Regards, Mike Redel, Unna - Germany redel.mike@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany HEINZE area Johannisburg (eastprussia) and Unna #germany

Mike Redel <redel.mike@...>
 

Dear gersigs,

I'm searching vor Arthur HEINZE. I don't know where he came from
but I have read that many Heinzes came >from Breslau.

Arthur HEINZE (Jewish) was married to Ottilie Haraschensk (nonjewish)
born 13.02.1880 in Johannisburg (Eastprussia). Both have had 3 sons.
Heinz was born 26.06.1912 in Unna, Hans was born 18.10.1916 in Unna
and Arthur was born 03.06.1919 in Unna.

Hans is missed in the II WW since 05.10.1945.

The life of them in Unna is not clear. Arthur (father) established a
store in Unna 1901 - nothing more! His son Heinz was the owner of this
store in 1946.

I think that the father died before 1939 because I could not find him
in the census 1939. Has anyone informations for me about this family?

Regards, Mike Redel, Unna - Germany redel.mike@gmail.com


Mt. Carmel Cemetery, Philadelphia #ukraine

bevhaas@...
 

I am looking for Lois Sernoff's list of names of the Hordisher Wilsher
Lodge Burial Lodge buried at Mt. Carmel. Any help would be
appreciated. Beverly Haas

--
---
Beverly Haas
bevhaas@gmail.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Mt. Carmel Cemetery, Philadelphia #ukraine

bevhaas@...
 

I am looking for Lois Sernoff's list of names of the Hordisher Wilsher
Lodge Burial Lodge buried at Mt. Carmel. Any help would be
appreciated. Beverly Haas

--
---
Beverly Haas
bevhaas@gmail.com

40781 - 40800 of 663994