Date   

JGS of Long Island Meeting #general

Jackie Wasserstein
 

The next meeting of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island will
be on Sunday, May 19.

Time: 2:00 PM
Place: Mid-Island Y-JCC 45 Manetto Hill Road Plainview, NY
www.miyjcc.org

Topic: The Secret of Priest's Grotto Cave

Speaker: Chris Nicola

Since the mid-1970's, Chris Nicola has explored dozens of caves around
the world. One of his expeditions was to the Ukrainian cave where a
group of Jews was rumored to have hidden for over a year during the
Holocaust. Chris confirmed the story and went on to locate 14 of
the 38 cave dwellers. He co-authored a book about the cave and
participated in making a documentary, "No Place on Earth", about the
survivors' experiences. Chris runs the Priest's Grotto Heritage project,
a genocide awareness project, which connects the grandchildren of the
survivors who lived in Priest's Grotto Cave with the grandchildren of
those who lived above the cave.

Admission is free and all are welcome. Our "Mavens" are available at
1:30 PM to take your genealogy questions.

Jackie Wasserstein
Past President


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Long Island Meeting #general

Jackie Wasserstein
 

The next meeting of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island will
be on Sunday, May 19.

Time: 2:00 PM
Place: Mid-Island Y-JCC 45 Manetto Hill Road Plainview, NY
www.miyjcc.org

Topic: The Secret of Priest's Grotto Cave

Speaker: Chris Nicola

Since the mid-1970's, Chris Nicola has explored dozens of caves around
the world. One of his expeditions was to the Ukrainian cave where a
group of Jews was rumored to have hidden for over a year during the
Holocaust. Chris confirmed the story and went on to locate 14 of
the 38 cave dwellers. He co-authored a book about the cave and
participated in making a documentary, "No Place on Earth", about the
survivors' experiences. Chris runs the Priest's Grotto Heritage project,
a genocide awareness project, which connects the grandchildren of the
survivors who lived in Priest's Grotto Cave with the grandchildren of
those who lived above the cave.

Admission is free and all are welcome. Our "Mavens" are available at
1:30 PM to take your genealogy questions.

Jackie Wasserstein
Past President


Re: Romanian bible #romania

mauh2o@...
 

Good week to all.
Does anyone in this group know how and where I can buy a Romanian language
copy of The Bible (NOT The New Testament), or even just the Torah (five
books of Moses). Was one ever published?

Moshe Goldwaser
Paris, France

MODERATOR NOTE: When posting a note to the List do not use your
Reply key >from the Digest. This drags the entire Digest with it
and creates a difficult situation for the Moderator. Rather, please
start an entirely new message, with an appropriate Subject.
Thank you, Rom-Sig Moderator on duty.


Romania SIG #Romania RE: Romanian bible #romania

mauh2o@...
 

Good week to all.
Does anyone in this group know how and where I can buy a Romanian language
copy of The Bible (NOT The New Testament), or even just the Torah (five
books of Moses). Was one ever published?

Moshe Goldwaser
Paris, France

MODERATOR NOTE: When posting a note to the List do not use your
Reply key >from the Digest. This drags the entire Digest with it
and creates a difficult situation for the Moderator. Rather, please
start an entirely new message, with an appropriate Subject.
Thank you, Rom-Sig Moderator on duty.


Yizkor Book Project, April 2019 #yiddish

bounce-3681680-772983@...
 

Shalom,

Last week, we marked Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Day, in memory of our 6
million family members murdered in the Holocaust. For the many of us
in the Yizkor Book Project, the task of remembering our people, our
annihilated communities is something that we deal with every day of
the year. Making sure that the events and the memories are not lost
in time, is our everyday endeavor.

And as part of our endeavor, I am pleased to let you know that in
April, a further project has been completed. This time it is the
remarkable "Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields" book which provides a
detailed insight on the Jewish agricultural settlements which were
founded in the Kherson region of Ukraine at the beginning of the 19th
century. This unique book was translated entirely by Moshe Kutten, to
whom we are truly indebted. He was greatly assisted by Yocheved
Klausner and Rafael Manory and in their editing of his translations
and we do send out our grateful thanks to them, as well.

Last month, I was contacted by Meir Gover who has provided us with a
link to his book "Jewish Malta Yok" on the almost unknown Jewish
community of Malta. We have added in a link to his book which depicts
the Jewish history of the 3 Maltese Islands together with photographs
of 122 Jewish headstones >from Malta. We do appreciate his sharing this
unique material with us.

Just a word about the projects we run. I am frequently contacted by
people interested in seeing the translation of a book on a particular
community become available. My usual reply to them is that the option
of finding a willing volunteer with sufficient knowledge and skills to
translate a whole book, ranging in size form 300 -1000 pages or more,
is very low. The alternative is to engage a professional translator,
which does mean that the financial burden on financing the translation
of these large volumes is usually too much for an individual person. As
such, I then suggest setting up a dedicated translations fund which can
receive the financial support of other people with interest in the same
community.

In this vein, a number of translation funds have recently been setup for
the communities of:

- Khotyn, Ukraine
- Novohrad-Volyns'kyy (Zvhil), Ukraine
- Sokal, Ukraine

Now, if any of these communities are dear to your heart, or to any of
the other 80 plus translation fund projects (link below) we have
running, please assist us in achieving the goal of making these books
available to a wide audience.

Before letting you know about the updates and additions, I would like
to wish those of us in Israel, a memorable, enjoyable and particularly
happy Independence Day.

Last month we added in 5 new entries:

- Kamyanyets, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00312.html

- Kolodne, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar347.html

- Rubel, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00315.html

- Ruzhany, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00315b.html

- Rus'ke Pole, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar314.html

One new book:

- The Mass Migration
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/MassMigration/MassMigration.html


And we have continued to update 19 of our existing projects:

- Braslaw, Belarus (Darkness and desolation)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Braslaw/Braslaw.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Drogobych, Ukraine (Memorial to the Jews of Drohobycz, Boryslaw,
and surroundings) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Drohobycz/Drogobych.html

- Iwye, Belarus (In Memory of the Jewish Community of Iwie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ivye/ivye.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On the Banks of the Vylia; In memory of
the destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Khotyn, Ukraine (The book of the community of Khotin (Bessarabia))
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Khotyn/Khotyn.html

- Kremenets, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kremenets, Vyshgorodok, and
Pochayiv) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets3/kremenets3.html

- Miskolc, Hungary (The martyrs of Miskolc and vicinity)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miskolc/Miskolc.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slutsk/Slutsk.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszow.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Voronovo)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

- Zawiercie, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Holy Community of Zawiercie and
Environs) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zawiercie/zawiercie.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

Yom Ha'atzmaut Sameach/Happy Israel's Independence Day,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre Yizkor Book Project, April 2019 #yiddish

bounce-3681680-772983@...
 

Shalom,

Last week, we marked Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Day, in memory of our 6
million family members murdered in the Holocaust. For the many of us
in the Yizkor Book Project, the task of remembering our people, our
annihilated communities is something that we deal with every day of
the year. Making sure that the events and the memories are not lost
in time, is our everyday endeavor.

And as part of our endeavor, I am pleased to let you know that in
April, a further project has been completed. This time it is the
remarkable "Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields" book which provides a
detailed insight on the Jewish agricultural settlements which were
founded in the Kherson region of Ukraine at the beginning of the 19th
century. This unique book was translated entirely by Moshe Kutten, to
whom we are truly indebted. He was greatly assisted by Yocheved
Klausner and Rafael Manory and in their editing of his translations
and we do send out our grateful thanks to them, as well.

Last month, I was contacted by Meir Gover who has provided us with a
link to his book "Jewish Malta Yok" on the almost unknown Jewish
community of Malta. We have added in a link to his book which depicts
the Jewish history of the 3 Maltese Islands together with photographs
of 122 Jewish headstones >from Malta. We do appreciate his sharing this
unique material with us.

Just a word about the projects we run. I am frequently contacted by
people interested in seeing the translation of a book on a particular
community become available. My usual reply to them is that the option
of finding a willing volunteer with sufficient knowledge and skills to
translate a whole book, ranging in size form 300 -1000 pages or more,
is very low. The alternative is to engage a professional translator,
which does mean that the financial burden on financing the translation
of these large volumes is usually too much for an individual person. As
such, I then suggest setting up a dedicated translations fund which can
receive the financial support of other people with interest in the same
community.

In this vein, a number of translation funds have recently been setup for
the communities of:

- Khotyn, Ukraine
- Novohrad-Volyns'kyy (Zvhil), Ukraine
- Sokal, Ukraine

Now, if any of these communities are dear to your heart, or to any of
the other 80 plus translation fund projects (link below) we have
running, please assist us in achieving the goal of making these books
available to a wide audience.

Before letting you know about the updates and additions, I would like
to wish those of us in Israel, a memorable, enjoyable and particularly
happy Independence Day.

Last month we added in 5 new entries:

- Kamyanyets, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00312.html

- Kolodne, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar347.html

- Rubel, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00315.html

- Ruzhany, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00315b.html

- Rus'ke Pole, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar314.html

One new book:

- The Mass Migration
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/MassMigration/MassMigration.html


And we have continued to update 19 of our existing projects:

- Braslaw, Belarus (Darkness and desolation)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Braslaw/Braslaw.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Drogobych, Ukraine (Memorial to the Jews of Drohobycz, Boryslaw,
and surroundings) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Drohobycz/Drogobych.html

- Iwye, Belarus (In Memory of the Jewish Community of Iwie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ivye/ivye.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On the Banks of the Vylia; In memory of
the destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Khotyn, Ukraine (The book of the community of Khotin (Bessarabia))
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Khotyn/Khotyn.html

- Kremenets, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kremenets, Vyshgorodok, and
Pochayiv) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets3/kremenets3.html

- Miskolc, Hungary (The martyrs of Miskolc and vicinity)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miskolc/Miskolc.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slutsk/Slutsk.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszow.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Voronovo)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

- Zawiercie, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Holy Community of Zawiercie and
Environs) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zawiercie/zawiercie.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

Yom Ha'atzmaut Sameach/Happy Israel's Independence Day,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


DNA percentages on Gedmatch #dna

Martin Davis (com)
 

David Goldman wrote: "Although my basic DNA report on FTDNA and Ancestry
record being 100% Ashkenazi, this appears different according to the
reports appearing in Ged Match using Admixture Heritage, the project
Eurogenes through JTest and Eurogenes 13. I don't understand this. But
maybe the experts can explain it to us in layman's languages. It includes
the largest percentages (25-30% each) for "Ashkenazi," East European,
West Mediterranean, East Mediterranean, and others, even 2% for West
African and East African. I guess one could contemplate migration
patterns involving converts along the way, including slaves way back when
from this data (which would be great for a historical novel). The Jtest
also brings up "Amerindian," Bulgaria, Romania. How does one put this all
into some kind of perspective beyond the simple category of Ashkenazi Jew?"

Each of the commercial companies has its own algorithm for calculating
genetic heritage via autosomal DNA. Most base this on a combination of
reputable academic research and the individual companies own research; the
latter using their own database of kits registered with their company. The
influence of the database seems to vary >from company to company. There are
obvious flaws in using a 'local' database - the obvious one being the
accurate identification of origins of the particular segments of DNA. This
is as much an issue of policy as it is of science.

As a pertinent example, although Ashkenazi Jews have been an identifiable
entity for around 1000 years, the actual fine detail of the genetic
admixture of 'Ashkenazim' has changed over time - for instance with the
migration (and total absorption) of some Sephardim into Ashkenazi
communities of northern and central Europe. Using FTDNA calculations, that
flaw can be obvious - with the results of the FTDNA myOrigins calculator
showing 100% Ashkenazi origin but FTDNA's Family Finder database
identifying many linked, but often distant, non-Ashkenazi kits. The 'why'
of that seems to be that FTDNA did not develop a 'deep ancestry' calculator
(say one which would show heritage >from 500 years plus - which would have
diminishing accuracy) but developed one with samples which would be
'guaranteed' correct - that is one where all four grandparents are/were
identified as >from known Ashkenazi origins; rather than more distant and
speculative indicators of earlier origins.

The Gedmatch calculators, which have their own quirks and inaccuracies,
normally use a range of academic samples to build a calculator to analyse
the data and to come up with a picture for the targeted groups for which
the calculator is intended. So for instance MDLP is a Gedmatch based
global calculator which attempts to break down results into different
parts of the world. To quote >from the Genealogical Musings blog, "It's
good as an overview, but if, for example, if you already know you're
European, it's probably unnecessary. It's also heavy on ancient groups."-
http://genealogical-musings.blogspot.com/2017/04/finally-gedmatch-admixture-guide.html .
The Eurogenes calculators tend to be the go-to calculators for people of
European origin but the JTest has been virtually disowned by its creator
Davidski, " Let me reiterate that this test was only supposed to be a fun
experiment. It was never meant to be the definitive online Ashkenazi
ancestry test. And even as fun experiments with Admixture go, it's now
horribly outdated, and probably useless for anyone with less than 15-20%
Ashkenazi ancestry." See
http://bga101.blogspot.com/2012/09/eurogenes-ashkenazim-ancestry-test-files.html
for the full blog.

David asked "How does one put this all into some kind of perspective
beyond the simple category of Ashkenazi Jew?". The most straightforward
answer to that question is that one needs to familiarise yourself with
the calculators, what they are intended to do and their results for your
kit. Unless one wants to pay a professional, there is no avoiding that
hard work, which includes reading through the guidance material which
Gedmatch link to their home page ('DNA for Dummies') and also doing the
same with material provided by the commercial company of your choice.

Martin Davis (London - UK)


DNA Research #DNA DNA percentages on Gedmatch #dna

Martin Davis (com)
 

David Goldman wrote: "Although my basic DNA report on FTDNA and Ancestry
record being 100% Ashkenazi, this appears different according to the
reports appearing in Ged Match using Admixture Heritage, the project
Eurogenes through JTest and Eurogenes 13. I don't understand this. But
maybe the experts can explain it to us in layman's languages. It includes
the largest percentages (25-30% each) for "Ashkenazi," East European,
West Mediterranean, East Mediterranean, and others, even 2% for West
African and East African. I guess one could contemplate migration
patterns involving converts along the way, including slaves way back when
from this data (which would be great for a historical novel). The Jtest
also brings up "Amerindian," Bulgaria, Romania. How does one put this all
into some kind of perspective beyond the simple category of Ashkenazi Jew?"

Each of the commercial companies has its own algorithm for calculating
genetic heritage via autosomal DNA. Most base this on a combination of
reputable academic research and the individual companies own research; the
latter using their own database of kits registered with their company. The
influence of the database seems to vary >from company to company. There are
obvious flaws in using a 'local' database - the obvious one being the
accurate identification of origins of the particular segments of DNA. This
is as much an issue of policy as it is of science.

As a pertinent example, although Ashkenazi Jews have been an identifiable
entity for around 1000 years, the actual fine detail of the genetic
admixture of 'Ashkenazim' has changed over time - for instance with the
migration (and total absorption) of some Sephardim into Ashkenazi
communities of northern and central Europe. Using FTDNA calculations, that
flaw can be obvious - with the results of the FTDNA myOrigins calculator
showing 100% Ashkenazi origin but FTDNA's Family Finder database
identifying many linked, but often distant, non-Ashkenazi kits. The 'why'
of that seems to be that FTDNA did not develop a 'deep ancestry' calculator
(say one which would show heritage >from 500 years plus - which would have
diminishing accuracy) but developed one with samples which would be
'guaranteed' correct - that is one where all four grandparents are/were
identified as >from known Ashkenazi origins; rather than more distant and
speculative indicators of earlier origins.

The Gedmatch calculators, which have their own quirks and inaccuracies,
normally use a range of academic samples to build a calculator to analyse
the data and to come up with a picture for the targeted groups for which
the calculator is intended. So for instance MDLP is a Gedmatch based
global calculator which attempts to break down results into different
parts of the world. To quote >from the Genealogical Musings blog, "It's
good as an overview, but if, for example, if you already know you're
European, it's probably unnecessary. It's also heavy on ancient groups."-
http://genealogical-musings.blogspot.com/2017/04/finally-gedmatch-admixture-guide.html .
The Eurogenes calculators tend to be the go-to calculators for people of
European origin but the JTest has been virtually disowned by its creator
Davidski, " Let me reiterate that this test was only supposed to be a fun
experiment. It was never meant to be the definitive online Ashkenazi
ancestry test. And even as fun experiments with Admixture go, it's now
horribly outdated, and probably useless for anyone with less than 15-20%
Ashkenazi ancestry." See
http://bga101.blogspot.com/2012/09/eurogenes-ashkenazim-ancestry-test-files.html
for the full blog.

David asked "How does one put this all into some kind of perspective
beyond the simple category of Ashkenazi Jew?". The most straightforward
answer to that question is that one needs to familiarise yourself with
the calculators, what they are intended to do and their results for your
kit. Unless one wants to pay a professional, there is no avoiding that
hard work, which includes reading through the guidance material which
Gedmatch link to their home page ('DNA for Dummies') and also doing the
same with material provided by the commercial company of your choice.

Martin Davis (London - UK)


ViewMate Photo Inquiry - Romania or Russia #general

Denise Azbill <famaz1@...>
 

Hello. I've posted a photo on ViewMate for which I need information. I would like
to know if the photo was taken in Romania or Russia and possibly when, and if the
clothing the elderly gentleman is wearing signifies anything. It is on ViewMate at
the following address
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73099
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much!
Denise Azbill


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate Photo Inquiry - Romania or Russia #general

Denise Azbill <famaz1@...>
 

Hello. I've posted a photo on ViewMate for which I need information. I would like
to know if the photo was taken in Romania or Russia and possibly when, and if the
clothing the elderly gentleman is wearing signifies anything. It is on ViewMate at
the following address
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73099
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much!
Denise Azbill


Yizkor Book Project, April 2019 [Malta but not "Germany" mentioned] #germany

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Last week, we marked Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Day, in memory of our 6
million family members murdered in the Holocaust. For the many of us
in the Yizkor Book Project, the task of remembering our people, our
annihilated communities is something that we deal with every day of
the year. Making sure that the events and the memories are not lost
in time, is our everyday endeavor.

And as part of our endeavor, I am pleased to let you know that in
April, a further project has been completed. This time it is the
remarkable "Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields" book which provides a
detailed insight on the Jewish agricultural settlements which were
founded in the Kherson region of Ukraine at the beginning of the 19th
century. This unique book was translated entirely by Moshe Kutten, to
whom we are truly indebted. He was greatly assisted by Yocheved
Klausner and Rafael Manory and in their editing of his translations
and we do send out our grateful thanks to them, as well.

Last month, I was contacted by Meir Gover who has provided us with a
link to his book "Jewish Malta Yok" on the almost unknown Jewish
community of Malta. We have added in a link to his book which depicts
the Jewish history of the 3 Maltese Islands together with photographs
of 122 Jewish headstones >from Malta. We do appreciate his sharing this
unique material with us.

Just a word about the projects we run. I am frequently contacted by
people interested in seeing the translation of a book on a particular
community become available. My usual reply to them is that the option
of finding a willing volunteer with sufficient knowledge and skills to
translate a whole book, ranging in size form 300 -1000 pages or more,
is very low. The alternative is to engage a professional translator,
which does mean that the financial burden on financing the translation
of these large volumes is usually too much for an individual person. As
such, I then suggest setting up a dedicated translations fund which can
receive the financial support of other people with interest in the same
community.

In this vein, a number of translation funds have recently been setup for
the communities of:

- Khotyn, Ukraine
- Novohrad-Volyns'kyy (Zvhil), Ukraine
- Sokal, Ukraine

Now, if any of these communities are dear to your heart, or to any of
the other 80 plus translation fund projects (link below) we have
running, please assist us in achieving the goal of making these books
available to a wide audience.

Before letting you know about the updates and additions, I would like
to wish those of us in Israel, a memorable, enjoyable and particularly
happy Independence Day.

Last month we added in 5 new entries:

- Kamyanyets, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00312.html

- Kolodne, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar347.html

- Rubel, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00315.html

- Ruzhany, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00315b.html

- Rus'ke Pole, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar314.html

One new book:

- The Mass Migration
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/MassMigration/MassMigration.html


And we have continued to update 19 of our existing projects:

- Braslaw, Belarus (Darkness and desolation)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Braslaw/Braslaw.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Drogobych, Ukraine (Memorial to the Jews of Drohobycz, Boryslaw,
and surroundings) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Drohobycz/Drogobych.html

- Iwye, Belarus (In Memory of the Jewish Community of Iwie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ivye/ivye.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On the Banks of the Vylia; In memory of
the destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Khotyn, Ukraine (The book of the community of Khotin (Bessarabia))
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Khotyn/Khotyn.html

- Kremenets, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kremenets, Vyshgorodok, and
Pochayiv) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets3/kremenets3.html

- Miskolc, Hungary (The martyrs of Miskolc and vicinity)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miskolc/Miskolc.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slutsk/Slutsk.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszow.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Voronovo)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

- Zawiercie, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Holy Community of Zawiercie and
Environs) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zawiercie/zawiercie.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

Yom Ha'atzmaut Sameach/Happy Israel's Independence Day, Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


German SIG #Germany Yizkor Book Project, April 2019 [Malta but not "Germany" mentioned] #germany

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Last week, we marked Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Day, in memory of our 6
million family members murdered in the Holocaust. For the many of us
in the Yizkor Book Project, the task of remembering our people, our
annihilated communities is something that we deal with every day of
the year. Making sure that the events and the memories are not lost
in time, is our everyday endeavor.

And as part of our endeavor, I am pleased to let you know that in
April, a further project has been completed. This time it is the
remarkable "Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields" book which provides a
detailed insight on the Jewish agricultural settlements which were
founded in the Kherson region of Ukraine at the beginning of the 19th
century. This unique book was translated entirely by Moshe Kutten, to
whom we are truly indebted. He was greatly assisted by Yocheved
Klausner and Rafael Manory and in their editing of his translations
and we do send out our grateful thanks to them, as well.

Last month, I was contacted by Meir Gover who has provided us with a
link to his book "Jewish Malta Yok" on the almost unknown Jewish
community of Malta. We have added in a link to his book which depicts
the Jewish history of the 3 Maltese Islands together with photographs
of 122 Jewish headstones >from Malta. We do appreciate his sharing this
unique material with us.

Just a word about the projects we run. I am frequently contacted by
people interested in seeing the translation of a book on a particular
community become available. My usual reply to them is that the option
of finding a willing volunteer with sufficient knowledge and skills to
translate a whole book, ranging in size form 300 -1000 pages or more,
is very low. The alternative is to engage a professional translator,
which does mean that the financial burden on financing the translation
of these large volumes is usually too much for an individual person. As
such, I then suggest setting up a dedicated translations fund which can
receive the financial support of other people with interest in the same
community.

In this vein, a number of translation funds have recently been setup for
the communities of:

- Khotyn, Ukraine
- Novohrad-Volyns'kyy (Zvhil), Ukraine
- Sokal, Ukraine

Now, if any of these communities are dear to your heart, or to any of
the other 80 plus translation fund projects (link below) we have
running, please assist us in achieving the goal of making these books
available to a wide audience.

Before letting you know about the updates and additions, I would like
to wish those of us in Israel, a memorable, enjoyable and particularly
happy Independence Day.

Last month we added in 5 new entries:

- Kamyanyets, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00312.html

- Kolodne, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar347.html

- Rubel, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00315.html

- Ruzhany, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00315b.html

- Rus'ke Pole, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar314.html

One new book:

- The Mass Migration
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/MassMigration/MassMigration.html


And we have continued to update 19 of our existing projects:

- Braslaw, Belarus (Darkness and desolation)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Braslaw/Braslaw.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Drogobych, Ukraine (Memorial to the Jews of Drohobycz, Boryslaw,
and surroundings) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Drohobycz/Drogobych.html

- Iwye, Belarus (In Memory of the Jewish Community of Iwie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ivye/ivye.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On the Banks of the Vylia; In memory of
the destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Khotyn, Ukraine (The book of the community of Khotin (Bessarabia))
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Khotyn/Khotyn.html

- Kremenets, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kremenets, Vyshgorodok, and
Pochayiv) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets3/kremenets3.html

- Miskolc, Hungary (The martyrs of Miskolc and vicinity)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miskolc/Miskolc.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slutsk/Slutsk.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszow.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Voronovo)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

- Zawiercie, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Holy Community of Zawiercie and
Environs) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zawiercie/zawiercie.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

Yom Ha'atzmaut Sameach/Happy Israel's Independence Day, Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Help With Locating An Address in Leipzig #germany

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Gersiggers,

I am a long time member of the group,alas have no experience with locating
addresses.

I am looking for the address of Hugo ALTMANN born in Leipzig on 20/9/1872.
His father was Leopold Altmann >from Stenau.

Hugo married Jutte LANGER born in Cernowitz on 1/11/1875. At a certain
stage they relocated to the Netherlands.

Can anyone help?

Jacob Rosen-Koenigsbuch Jerusalem


German SIG #Germany Help With Locating An Address in Leipzig #germany

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Gersiggers,

I am a long time member of the group,alas have no experience with locating
addresses.

I am looking for the address of Hugo ALTMANN born in Leipzig on 20/9/1872.
His father was Leopold Altmann >from Stenau.

Hugo married Jutte LANGER born in Cernowitz on 1/11/1875. At a certain
stage they relocated to the Netherlands.

Can anyone help?

Jacob Rosen-Koenigsbuch Jerusalem


Re: DNA percentages on GedMatch #dna

David Ellis
 

David Goldman <lugman@verizon.net> writes:

Although my basic DNA report on FTDNA and Ancestry record being 100%
Ashkenazi, this appears different according to the reports appearing in Ged
Match using Admixture Heritage, the project Eurogenes through JTest and
Eurogenes 13.
I don't understand this. But maybe the experts can explain it to us in
layman's languages.

---

FTDNA and Ancestry DNA maintain reference groups of people who identify as
Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) across all their ancestral branches. Because of our
endogamy, we cluster pretty closely, and this is picked up directly in their
ethnicity reports. FTDNA reports me as 90% AJ, while Ancestry has me as 99%
AJ.

The Eurogenes project doesn't show AJ as a segment of their ethnicity pie
charts. The slices appear to reflect a time period prior to the formation
of Ashkenazi Jewry, when our ancestors were living in places categorized as
Italian, Near Eastern, East Mediterranean and Iberian. I've looked at the
results for a number of Ashkenazi Jews in the Eurogenes K36 model, and the
results all seem to be similar. The mix changes significantly for people
who are non-Jewish and even for people with one Jewish parent and one
non-Jewish parent. So our clustering is reflected in the GEDmatch ethnicity
results, but in a much less obvious way than with the other DNA services.

---
David J Ellis
Natick, MA 01760
djemkitso@verizon.net


DNA Research #DNA RE: DNA percentages on GedMatch #dna

David Ellis
 

David Goldman <lugman@verizon.net> writes:

Although my basic DNA report on FTDNA and Ancestry record being 100%
Ashkenazi, this appears different according to the reports appearing in Ged
Match using Admixture Heritage, the project Eurogenes through JTest and
Eurogenes 13.
I don't understand this. But maybe the experts can explain it to us in
layman's languages.

---

FTDNA and Ancestry DNA maintain reference groups of people who identify as
Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) across all their ancestral branches. Because of our
endogamy, we cluster pretty closely, and this is picked up directly in their
ethnicity reports. FTDNA reports me as 90% AJ, while Ancestry has me as 99%
AJ.

The Eurogenes project doesn't show AJ as a segment of their ethnicity pie
charts. The slices appear to reflect a time period prior to the formation
of Ashkenazi Jewry, when our ancestors were living in places categorized as
Italian, Near Eastern, East Mediterranean and Iberian. I've looked at the
results for a number of Ashkenazi Jews in the Eurogenes K36 model, and the
results all seem to be similar. The mix changes significantly for people
who are non-Jewish and even for people with one Jewish parent and one
non-Jewish parent. So our clustering is reflected in the GEDmatch ethnicity
results, but in a much less obvious way than with the other DNA services.

---
David J Ellis
Natick, MA 01760
djemkitso@verizon.net


Orsan, Belarus Camp #subcarpathia

Judith Shamian <shamianjudith@...>
 

My father Noe Grunfeld is listed to have been taken >from Hungary
during WWII: to Orsan
Belarus Camp 189. I am a novice in my search and wonder if anyone
heard of this Camp and what info or references can you share with me.

Greatly appreciate any help

Grunfeld-Shamian Judith


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Orsan, Belarus Camp #subcarpathia

Judith Shamian <shamianjudith@...>
 

My father Noe Grunfeld is listed to have been taken >from Hungary
during WWII: to Orsan
Belarus Camp 189. I am a novice in my search and wonder if anyone
heard of this Camp and what info or references can you share with me.

Greatly appreciate any help

Grunfeld-Shamian Judith


Status of Mokom Sholom Cemetery, NY ? #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Does anyone have any current information on the status of Mokom Sholom Cemetery in
Ozone Park, NY?

It there a caretaker or anyone who would have maps tot locate a grave in the
cemetery? Is it being maintained? Is it safe to visit?

Thank you
Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Status of Mokom Sholom Cemetery, NY ? #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Does anyone have any current information on the status of Mokom Sholom Cemetery in
Ozone Park, NY?

It there a caretaker or anyone who would have maps tot locate a grave in the
cemetery? Is it being maintained? Is it safe to visit?

Thank you
Allan Jordan

34601 - 34620 of 665465