Date   

ordering post 1903 records #galicia

Suzan & Ron Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

Mark Halpern indicated in his reply that post 1903 records can't be ordered.
It is true that they can't be ordered through JRI because JRI deals almost
exclusively with the Polish State Archives system that houses old records.
However, some information about a person can be released by the local
records office, known as the Urzad Stanu Cywilnego (USC). You will not
receive a copy of the record but, instead, some information can be
transferred to a form that Poland uses for this purpose. You may be asked
to prove that the person in question is either dead or alive and has given
you permission to make the inquiry.

To inquire, type a letter in Polish and send it to the local USC. You won't
need a specific street address unless there are multiple towns of the same
name. Not all villages have records offices but someone will know how to
forward the letter to the right place if your village does not have a USC.

Payment is easy but the amount is based on research time. I haven't ordered
a record >from a USC for a few years but the last time I did, the Polish
consulate in Washington notified me that they had the record, gave me the
cost for the research and the record, I sent them a check and they sent me
the record.

What you will get is demographic in nature. For instance, the cause of
death was not on the form, nor were the remarks in the last column. But
names of parents, age and that sort of information was on the form.

Suzan Wynne
Kensington, MD


Archivist - after Care Records for Norwood House #unitedkingdom

NJ55TURTLE@...
 

I'm trying to get an address for a Betty Marks, who is the "Archivist- after
Care Records" for Norwood House. My letter to her was returned "No Longer At This
Address".

I am in need of information on a 7 year old boy, who according to the 1901
English census, was a student at the Jew's Hospital and Orphan Asylum School,
which later became part of Norwood House.

If anyone out there can help or would like more information on the person I am
seeking, please E- mail me.


Stephen Pickholtz
Tabernacle, New Jersey
USA
searching-- PICKHOLTZ (all spellings) and Winitsky (all spellings)


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia ordering post 1903 records #galicia

Suzan & Ron Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

Mark Halpern indicated in his reply that post 1903 records can't be ordered.
It is true that they can't be ordered through JRI because JRI deals almost
exclusively with the Polish State Archives system that houses old records.
However, some information about a person can be released by the local
records office, known as the Urzad Stanu Cywilnego (USC). You will not
receive a copy of the record but, instead, some information can be
transferred to a form that Poland uses for this purpose. You may be asked
to prove that the person in question is either dead or alive and has given
you permission to make the inquiry.

To inquire, type a letter in Polish and send it to the local USC. You won't
need a specific street address unless there are multiple towns of the same
name. Not all villages have records offices but someone will know how to
forward the letter to the right place if your village does not have a USC.

Payment is easy but the amount is based on research time. I haven't ordered
a record >from a USC for a few years but the last time I did, the Polish
consulate in Washington notified me that they had the record, gave me the
cost for the research and the record, I sent them a check and they sent me
the record.

What you will get is demographic in nature. For instance, the cause of
death was not on the form, nor were the remarks in the last column. But
names of parents, age and that sort of information was on the form.

Suzan Wynne
Kensington, MD


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Archivist - after Care Records for Norwood House #unitedkingdom

NJ55TURTLE@...
 

I'm trying to get an address for a Betty Marks, who is the "Archivist- after
Care Records" for Norwood House. My letter to her was returned "No Longer At This
Address".

I am in need of information on a 7 year old boy, who according to the 1901
English census, was a student at the Jew's Hospital and Orphan Asylum School,
which later became part of Norwood House.

If anyone out there can help or would like more information on the person I am
seeking, please E- mail me.


Stephen Pickholtz
Tabernacle, New Jersey
USA
searching-- PICKHOLTZ (all spellings) and Winitsky (all spellings)


Hirek az Elhurcoltakrol #hungary

Gábor Hirsch <hirsch@...>
 

Through a fortmer info >from jewishgen I became aware that there is a
list of Displaced Person camps shortly after liberation, so I took a
look to see what does it contain. I knew about the list as in November
2002 I informed H-SIG about the paper, the camps and more datailed about
"Sluzk a camp near Minsk" where I spent a few month with some 850 other
inmates. I was and still am disturbed by the incorrect information of
the camps in former Soviet Union. I can't speak for the other S.U. camps
but in Sluzk the majority of the Hungarian inmates were the ones
liberated in different KZ-s, Auschwitz, Stutthof, etc.more than the half
were women, several of Mengele's twins, in the Italian sector of the
camp was Primo Levi, even a baby born Dec. 1944 in Birkenau is listed,
today she lives in Canada. I would expect that the information supplied
should be correct or corrected if an obvious failure is pointed out. The
introduction to the Sluzk list indicates clearly who the victims were:
"Deportaltak Feheroroszorszagban", for complettness you can see the
Hungarian foreword, it can be find on Viewmate under

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=4598

May be that USHMM gave the incorrect information and should be informed
too, by the way the "Hirek az elhurcoltakrol" are 88 pages and is
available fromm USHMM as paper copy or microfiche for affordable prices.

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch


> Hungarian Jewish Survivors listed in a Hungarian Periodical
>
> This is a list of Hungarian Jewish camp survivors that was published
> in the Hungarian periodical Hirek az Elhurcoltakrol.
>
> General Information About the Lists
> In 1945 a now defunct Hungarian periodical, Hirek az Elhurcoltakrol
> (News about the Deportees)published five issues listing Hungarian
> Jewish survivors located in various European Displaced Person camps.
> Most of these camps were in Germany and Austria, but there are also
> lists >from Sweden, France, Czechoslovakia, Poland and the former
> Soviet Union. In the latter case, these were Hungarian Jewish
> prisoners of war (forced laborers) captured by the Russians.


> The first installment of 8,644 names has now been computerized.




Other Author(s)/Editor(s): Sándor, Dezsö.
Magyarországi Zsidók Deportáltakat Gondozó Országos Bizottság.
Title: Hirek az elhurcoltakról = News about the deportees / [felelös
szerkesztö, Sándor Dezsö].
Publisher: Budapest : Magyarországi Zsidók Deportáltakat Gondozó
Országos Bizottság, 1945.
Extent: [88] leaves
Location: Names Lists
Location Note: Names List section: Hungary.
Call Number: DS135.H9 H56 1945
Status: Available


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hirek az Elhurcoltakrol #hungary

Gábor Hirsch <hirsch@...>
 

Through a fortmer info >from jewishgen I became aware that there is a
list of Displaced Person camps shortly after liberation, so I took a
look to see what does it contain. I knew about the list as in November
2002 I informed H-SIG about the paper, the camps and more datailed about
"Sluzk a camp near Minsk" where I spent a few month with some 850 other
inmates. I was and still am disturbed by the incorrect information of
the camps in former Soviet Union. I can't speak for the other S.U. camps
but in Sluzk the majority of the Hungarian inmates were the ones
liberated in different KZ-s, Auschwitz, Stutthof, etc.more than the half
were women, several of Mengele's twins, in the Italian sector of the
camp was Primo Levi, even a baby born Dec. 1944 in Birkenau is listed,
today she lives in Canada. I would expect that the information supplied
should be correct or corrected if an obvious failure is pointed out. The
introduction to the Sluzk list indicates clearly who the victims were:
"Deportaltak Feheroroszorszagban", for complettness you can see the
Hungarian foreword, it can be find on Viewmate under

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=4598

May be that USHMM gave the incorrect information and should be informed
too, by the way the "Hirek az elhurcoltakrol" are 88 pages and is
available fromm USHMM as paper copy or microfiche for affordable prices.

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch


> Hungarian Jewish Survivors listed in a Hungarian Periodical
>
> This is a list of Hungarian Jewish camp survivors that was published
> in the Hungarian periodical Hirek az Elhurcoltakrol.
>
> General Information About the Lists
> In 1945 a now defunct Hungarian periodical, Hirek az Elhurcoltakrol
> (News about the Deportees)published five issues listing Hungarian
> Jewish survivors located in various European Displaced Person camps.
> Most of these camps were in Germany and Austria, but there are also
> lists >from Sweden, France, Czechoslovakia, Poland and the former
> Soviet Union. In the latter case, these were Hungarian Jewish
> prisoners of war (forced laborers) captured by the Russians.


> The first installment of 8,644 names has now been computerized.




Other Author(s)/Editor(s): Sándor, Dezsö.
Magyarországi Zsidók Deportáltakat Gondozó Országos Bizottság.
Title: Hirek az elhurcoltakról = News about the deportees / [felelös
szerkesztö, Sándor Dezsö].
Publisher: Budapest : Magyarországi Zsidók Deportáltakat Gondozó
Országos Bizottság, 1945.
Extent: [88] leaves
Location: Names Lists
Location Note: Names List section: Hungary.
Call Number: DS135.H9 H56 1945
Status: Available


Re: h-sig digest: August 15, 2004 Register Index #hungary

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

Dear Andras.

I went back to look at the film, and I think you have it exactly.

If you don't mind, I have two questions. On the microfilm photographed by
the Mormons, the title says "Register Index" and then 1801 - 1878. What
would that year range represent? Wouldn't the census be taken at a
particular time, or was it a running census, in which new people are added
over time?

My other questions concerns the number of people in the Register Index. The
leftmost column contains a sequential number. In this instance, the highest
number reached is 2684. That seems like a great many Jews for Galszecs. Do
you have any idea why there would be so many? Perhaps I do not realize how
large Galszecs was. Or perhaps this is caused by what I said above, about a
running census.

Your thoughts on both questions are much appreciated.

Thank you.

Sam Schleman

----- Original Message -----
From: "Andras Koltai" <kolamcg@yahoo.com>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Monday, August 16, 2004 2:34 AM
Subject: Re:[h-sig] h-sig digest: August 15, 2004 Register Index


Dear Sam Schleman,

I believe what you are looking at is a census file -
that is what they usually call a "Register Index."
They listed the families living at the place one after
the other. This is why you have those sequential
numbers. After the name and the birthyear (or the age)
of the person you have his birthplace. Sohn is son and
Tochter means daughter. Instead of repeating the
surname they used these words for the children of the
couple. In the blank column they usually have the
father's occupation.

Regards,
Andras Koltai
Budapest, Hungary

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Register Index
From: "Sam Schleman" <Samara99@comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 15 Aug 2004 23:39:02 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

Hello All;

I am researching the family Grunberger >from Galszecs,
now known as
Secovce,
Slovakia. On the microfilm I have obtained >from the
FHC (1924884), the
third
item is called a "Register Index". It covers the
period 1801 - 1878,
although some of the entries appear to predate 1801.

The register consists of a sequential number, followed
by a name, a
year,
the town (Almost always Galszecs), and a column for
notes, which are
mainly
blank. The items are not in any discernible order -
the years go 1790,
1837,
1827, 1843, 1818, etc.

Can someone explain to me what I am looking at? I
can't tell whether it
is
births, deaths or what? If births, why isn't it in
date sequence?

On some of the names, the last name is given as "Sohn"
or "Tochter",
but
these do not seem to conform to the dates, such as to
suggest the lack
of a
surname prior to a certain period.

I would appreciate any enlightenment that comes my
way.

Thanks.

Sam Schleman
Malvern, PA
Samara99@comcast.net


Re: Deutsch family name #hungary

BruceKitty@...
 

Robert,
Thank you for this info. The history of sources for names is so
interesting.
Kitty Sauber


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Re:h-sig digest: August 15, 2004 Register Index #hungary

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

Dear Andras.

I went back to look at the film, and I think you have it exactly.

If you don't mind, I have two questions. On the microfilm photographed by
the Mormons, the title says "Register Index" and then 1801 - 1878. What
would that year range represent? Wouldn't the census be taken at a
particular time, or was it a running census, in which new people are added
over time?

My other questions concerns the number of people in the Register Index. The
leftmost column contains a sequential number. In this instance, the highest
number reached is 2684. That seems like a great many Jews for Galszecs. Do
you have any idea why there would be so many? Perhaps I do not realize how
large Galszecs was. Or perhaps this is caused by what I said above, about a
running census.

Your thoughts on both questions are much appreciated.

Thank you.

Sam Schleman

----- Original Message -----
From: "Andras Koltai" <kolamcg@yahoo.com>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Monday, August 16, 2004 2:34 AM
Subject: Re:[h-sig] h-sig digest: August 15, 2004 Register Index


Dear Sam Schleman,

I believe what you are looking at is a census file -
that is what they usually call a "Register Index."
They listed the families living at the place one after
the other. This is why you have those sequential
numbers. After the name and the birthyear (or the age)
of the person you have his birthplace. Sohn is son and
Tochter means daughter. Instead of repeating the
surname they used these words for the children of the
couple. In the blank column they usually have the
father's occupation.

Regards,
Andras Koltai
Budapest, Hungary

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Register Index
From: "Sam Schleman" <Samara99@comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 15 Aug 2004 23:39:02 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

Hello All;

I am researching the family Grunberger >from Galszecs,
now known as
Secovce,
Slovakia. On the microfilm I have obtained >from the
FHC (1924884), the
third
item is called a "Register Index". It covers the
period 1801 - 1878,
although some of the entries appear to predate 1801.

The register consists of a sequential number, followed
by a name, a
year,
the town (Almost always Galszecs), and a column for
notes, which are
mainly
blank. The items are not in any discernible order -
the years go 1790,
1837,
1827, 1843, 1818, etc.

Can someone explain to me what I am looking at? I
can't tell whether it
is
births, deaths or what? If births, why isn't it in
date sequence?

On some of the names, the last name is given as "Sohn"
or "Tochter",
but
these do not seem to conform to the dates, such as to
suggest the lack
of a
surname prior to a certain period.

I would appreciate any enlightenment that comes my
way.

Thanks.

Sam Schleman
Malvern, PA
Samara99@comcast.net


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Re:Deutsch family name #hungary

BruceKitty@...
 

Robert,
Thank you for this info. The history of sources for names is so
interesting.
Kitty Sauber


Re: Deutsch family name #hungary

Oudeyis <victor@...>
 

Consensus!
Considering the name's generic nature (Deutch: German origin, German
descent, German speaking, speaker of Judeo-German or Yiddish, and possibly
others) and the number of people with the Deutch surname this appears to be
the best explanation.
Does Dr. Beider have anything specific to say about Friedlanders?
Victor

----- Original Message -----
From: "Robert Neu" <roneu1@yahoo.com>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Monday, August 16, 2004 5:30 PM
Subject: Spam: Re:[h-sig] Deutsch family name


The best authority on Jewish names is Dr. Beider. I am certainly not an
expert on the matter. However, within the framework of my experience,
all the options presented thus far have validity and most certainly
all people with the name "Deutsch" (and variations) are not related
(even if >from the same town), and could have acquired their name while
in Germany, having come >from Germany, speaking German, Judeo-German or
Yiddish.

Where and when they acquired it depends on where they were at the time
they acquired it.

The only common point is that they were in Europe when they did, and it
could have been as early as the 13th Century or as late as the early
19th Century.

Robert Neu.


Re: Hungarian Group in NYC #hungary

rose@...
 

Hi Sam,
There was a Socialist group in Yorkville (Manhattan) during the 20s,30s and
40s called Munkas Otthon ( worker's home). It was an active social,cultural and
educational group and also had a restaurant serving all the great Hungarian
dishes.
Rose Linden
Little Silver, N.J.

I have learned >from older relatives that my Grandfather was a member of a
"Hungarian society or group" that was active in New York City (Manhattan) in
the 1930's, perhaps earlier and later than that, as well.

Would anyone have any idea about the group(s) to which this applied and
where I might obtain more information?

Thank you.

Sam Schleman
Malvern, PA
Samara99@comcast.net


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Re:Deutsch family name #hungary

Oudeyis <victor@...>
 

Consensus!
Considering the name's generic nature (Deutch: German origin, German
descent, German speaking, speaker of Judeo-German or Yiddish, and possibly
others) and the number of people with the Deutch surname this appears to be
the best explanation.
Does Dr. Beider have anything specific to say about Friedlanders?
Victor

----- Original Message -----
From: "Robert Neu" <roneu1@yahoo.com>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Monday, August 16, 2004 5:30 PM
Subject: Spam: Re:[h-sig] Deutsch family name


The best authority on Jewish names is Dr. Beider. I am certainly not an
expert on the matter. However, within the framework of my experience,
all the options presented thus far have validity and most certainly
all people with the name "Deutsch" (and variations) are not related
(even if >from the same town), and could have acquired their name while
in Germany, having come >from Germany, speaking German, Judeo-German or
Yiddish.

Where and when they acquired it depends on where they were at the time
they acquired it.

The only common point is that they were in Europe when they did, and it
could have been as early as the 13th Century or as late as the early
19th Century.

Robert Neu.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Hungarian Group in NYC #hungary

rose@...
 

Hi Sam,
There was a Socialist group in Yorkville (Manhattan) during the 20s,30s and
40s called Munkas Otthon ( worker's home). It was an active social,cultural and
educational group and also had a restaurant serving all the great Hungarian
dishes.
Rose Linden
Little Silver, N.J.

I have learned >from older relatives that my Grandfather was a member of a
"Hungarian society or group" that was active in New York City (Manhattan) in
the 1930's, perhaps earlier and later than that, as well.

Would anyone have any idea about the group(s) to which this applied and
where I might obtain more information?

Thank you.

Sam Schleman
Malvern, PA
Samara99@comcast.net


Seeking GERECHTER in Israel #germany

A & B Algaze <Algaze@...>
 

I am looking for the descendants of two daughters of Leo GERECHTER who was
born in Germany, worked as a baker, survived Auschwitz, and emigrated to
Israel where he died after 1947.

The daughters were both born in Germany and emigrated to Israel. Their
names were Liddie and Miriam. Miriam would have been born about 1923 and
married a man with the surname of Sherman.

If anyone has any information on either of these GERECHTER daughters, please
let me know. With many thanks,

Barbara Algaze Los Angeles, California Algaze@comcast.net


German SIG #Germany Seeking GERECHTER in Israel #germany

A & B Algaze <Algaze@...>
 

I am looking for the descendants of two daughters of Leo GERECHTER who was
born in Germany, worked as a baker, survived Auschwitz, and emigrated to
Israel where he died after 1947.

The daughters were both born in Germany and emigrated to Israel. Their
names were Liddie and Miriam. Miriam would have been born about 1923 and
married a man with the surname of Sherman.

If anyone has any information on either of these GERECHTER daughters, please
let me know. With many thanks,

Barbara Algaze Los Angeles, California Algaze@comcast.net


Adolph HERZ from Terra Haute, Indiana and Baden (?) Germany #germany

A & B Algaze <Algaze@...>
 

I am looking for information regarding the German ancestry of Adolph HERZ
who lived in Terra Haute, Indiana. He arrived in the US about 1866 via New
York and settled in Indiana pretty soon after his arrival. He was betrothed
to Pauline EINSTEIN before he left, and she arrived about 1870, also into
New York. They married about 1872 and had three children, two girls and a
boy by the name of Milton.

Adolph HERZ was a prominent member of the Terra Haute business and Jewish
community and there is a lot of information about his Indiana business and
philanthropic activities available. I am looking for any German connections
for either Adolph HERZ or Pauline EINSTEIN. I have reason to believe that
they came >from Baden, but have no additional data besides that.

I was unable to find any connections on the JGFF or the Family Tree of the
Jewish People.

Any assistance would be ***greaatly**** appreciated. Thank you,

Barbara Algaze Los Angeles, California Algaze@comcast.net


German SIG #Germany Adolph HERZ from Terra Haute, Indiana and Baden (?) Germany #germany

A & B Algaze <Algaze@...>
 

I am looking for information regarding the German ancestry of Adolph HERZ
who lived in Terra Haute, Indiana. He arrived in the US about 1866 via New
York and settled in Indiana pretty soon after his arrival. He was betrothed
to Pauline EINSTEIN before he left, and she arrived about 1870, also into
New York. They married about 1872 and had three children, two girls and a
boy by the name of Milton.

Adolph HERZ was a prominent member of the Terra Haute business and Jewish
community and there is a lot of information about his Indiana business and
philanthropic activities available. I am looking for any German connections
for either Adolph HERZ or Pauline EINSTEIN. I have reason to believe that
they came >from Baden, but have no additional data besides that.

I was unable to find any connections on the JGFF or the Family Tree of the
Jewish People.

Any assistance would be ***greaatly**** appreciated. Thank you,

Barbara Algaze Los Angeles, California Algaze@comcast.net


DAUST family from St. Louis, Mo.; seeking descendants #usa

Martin Fischer
 

My great-grandfather's brother, Adolf DAUST, whose name was originally DAUS,
was born in about 1856, probably in Wongrowitz, Posen, Prussia (today:
Wagrowiec, Pila, Poland).

Adolf DAUST lived in St. Louis, Mo., >from 1883 through 1906, after which he
is believed to have returned to his homeland of Germany and lived in Berlin,
where he was the second president of the Wongrowitzer Landmanschaften.

During his time in St. Louis, Adolf married Henriette SACHS in St. Louis in
1884. They had two daughters, Mollie, born in about 1885, and Fannie, born
in about 1888.

For their first few years in St. Louis, Adolf had a store selling notions,
then he shifted to specializing in selling hats (in partnership with a man
named Theodore Marglous). (Adolf's brother, my great-grandfather Salo DAUST,
first appeared in St. Louis in 1895 as a dry goods store owner.)

By 1904, Adolph had move up in the world as he became the vice president of
the Washington National Bank in St. Louis, a position he held until 1905.

In that year, according to a ship's manifest on the Ellis Island
Foundation's database, Adolf and his wife and daughters returned >from a
visit to Europe. Adolf is listed as a U.S. citizen and "retired merchant"
whose "last permanent residence" is listed as Wongrowitz and whose "final
destination" is St. Louis, Mo.

If in 1906 he returned to Germany for good, I would like to find out if
anyone knows what became of his two daughters and whether they have any
living descendants. Did they go with him and his wife back to Germany or did
they stay in St. Louis or elsewhere in the U.S.? Mollie DAUST would have
been age 21 in 1906 and Fannie DAUST would have been age 18.

Martin Fischer Oak Park, Illinois

Surnames researching in St. Louis include: FISCHER, DAUST, GELHORN, KOBER,
ROMANSKY, SLUPSKY, WEISSKOPF The Fischer and Levin family history Web site is at:
http://mefischer1.home.comcast.net/


Early American SIG #USA DAUST family from St. Louis, Mo.; seeking descendants #usa

Martin Fischer
 

My great-grandfather's brother, Adolf DAUST, whose name was originally DAUS,
was born in about 1856, probably in Wongrowitz, Posen, Prussia (today:
Wagrowiec, Pila, Poland).

Adolf DAUST lived in St. Louis, Mo., >from 1883 through 1906, after which he
is believed to have returned to his homeland of Germany and lived in Berlin,
where he was the second president of the Wongrowitzer Landmanschaften.

During his time in St. Louis, Adolf married Henriette SACHS in St. Louis in
1884. They had two daughters, Mollie, born in about 1885, and Fannie, born
in about 1888.

For their first few years in St. Louis, Adolf had a store selling notions,
then he shifted to specializing in selling hats (in partnership with a man
named Theodore Marglous). (Adolf's brother, my great-grandfather Salo DAUST,
first appeared in St. Louis in 1895 as a dry goods store owner.)

By 1904, Adolph had move up in the world as he became the vice president of
the Washington National Bank in St. Louis, a position he held until 1905.

In that year, according to a ship's manifest on the Ellis Island
Foundation's database, Adolf and his wife and daughters returned >from a
visit to Europe. Adolf is listed as a U.S. citizen and "retired merchant"
whose "last permanent residence" is listed as Wongrowitz and whose "final
destination" is St. Louis, Mo.

If in 1906 he returned to Germany for good, I would like to find out if
anyone knows what became of his two daughters and whether they have any
living descendants. Did they go with him and his wife back to Germany or did
they stay in St. Louis or elsewhere in the U.S.? Mollie DAUST would have
been age 21 in 1906 and Fannie DAUST would have been age 18.

Martin Fischer Oak Park, Illinois

Surnames researching in St. Louis include: FISCHER, DAUST, GELHORN, KOBER,
ROMANSKY, SLUPSKY, WEISSKOPF The Fischer and Levin family history Web site is at:
http://mefischer1.home.comcast.net/