Date   

Re: Ellis Island. What's next? #belarus

yael polat
 

... You go to JewishGen and you find a wonderful community of people
ready to help, to give advice, to find information and support!

Thank you so much to each and each of you.
Yael Polat
Israel
DININ, SUISSA, BENADI, WENBERG, PODOLSKY, LOPATNIK ETC.


French SIG #France RE: Ellis Island. What's next? #france

yael polat
 

... You go to JewishGen and you find a wonderful community of people
ready to help, to give advice, to find information and support!

Thank you so much to each and each of you.
Yael Polat
Israel
DININ, SUISSA, BENADI, WENBERG, PODOLSKY, LOPATNIK ETC.


Issue 117 of the journal of the French JGS #france

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

The issue 117, Spring 2014 of Genealo-J, Journal of the Jewish
Genealogical Society of France, has just been published.

On January 17, 1670, Raphael Levy was burnt alive at Glatigny (Moselle)
since he was unjustly accused of the ritual murder of a 3 year old
child. On January 19, 2014, a plate was inaugurated in the same village,
telling he was innocent. Pierre-Andre Meyer tells us about the life of
his ancestor Raphael Levy and his family.

Another Jewish victim in this issue is Rabbi Elie Bloch (1909-1943)
whose name has been recently given to a street in Metz and whose life is
sketched by Jacques Bloch. Born in Dambach (Alsace), he became rabbi in
Metz where he took care of all the refugees before the war. Transferred
to Poitiers he was in charge of the interned Jews during German
occupation until he was himself deported to Auschwitz.

Genealogical researches in Tunisia are very difficult since no official
BMD records are available before 1909. There are two distinct Jewish
communities in Tunisia, the Grana, initially coming >from Leghorn (Italy)
and the Twansa, who are the local ones. Gilles Boulu focuses on the
Twansa community and especially on the Scemama/Samama family, which
provided many caïds (influent civil servants or tax collector). He spent
several decades to browse into all the available literature, press
announcements, obituaries and some registers to outline the personality
of his ancestor Chalom Semama (ca 1815 – 1893), who was bigamous and had
a large offspring.

Sylvie Gsell travelled four times in Romania and Ukraine to track her
ancestors. She gives advices to travellers in these countries and
explains why she plans furthers trips.

French people think that after 1808, when all Jews had to choose a
permanent family name and a fixed first name, genealogical research is
easy. Anne-Marie Fribourg shows that it is not always the case. She
solved a puzzle, a real headache about an Henriette Godechau born in
1825 in Saint-Mihiel (Meuse) >from Elisabeth, herself daughter of Salomon
Godechau. In fact, these Godechau should be called Crehange and Godechau
is only the first name of Salomon’s father. When Henriette died in 1872,
she was registered as the daughter of Salomon Goudechaux and Elisabeth
Créhange, obscuring even more the puzzle. Now, thanks to Anne-Marie
Fribourg, everything is clear.

In a scholarly paper, Mathilde Tagger explains the difficulties
encountered in transcribing family names >from Hebrew to French, >from
Judeo-Arabic to French, >from Arabic to French and >from Spanish to
Judeo-Arabic.

Another competent paleographer, Eliane Roos Schuhl, analyzes all names
found in the Bible, those of Adam, Eva and their children as well as
those of judges, prophets, angels and kings. Each of these names has a
meaning in Hebrew.

Georges Graner
France


French SIG #France Issue 117 of the journal of the French JGS #france

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

The issue 117, Spring 2014 of Genealo-J, Journal of the Jewish
Genealogical Society of France, has just been published.

On January 17, 1670, Raphael Levy was burnt alive at Glatigny (Moselle)
since he was unjustly accused of the ritual murder of a 3 year old
child. On January 19, 2014, a plate was inaugurated in the same village,
telling he was innocent. Pierre-Andre Meyer tells us about the life of
his ancestor Raphael Levy and his family.

Another Jewish victim in this issue is Rabbi Elie Bloch (1909-1943)
whose name has been recently given to a street in Metz and whose life is
sketched by Jacques Bloch. Born in Dambach (Alsace), he became rabbi in
Metz where he took care of all the refugees before the war. Transferred
to Poitiers he was in charge of the interned Jews during German
occupation until he was himself deported to Auschwitz.

Genealogical researches in Tunisia are very difficult since no official
BMD records are available before 1909. There are two distinct Jewish
communities in Tunisia, the Grana, initially coming >from Leghorn (Italy)
and the Twansa, who are the local ones. Gilles Boulu focuses on the
Twansa community and especially on the Scemama/Samama family, which
provided many caïds (influent civil servants or tax collector). He spent
several decades to browse into all the available literature, press
announcements, obituaries and some registers to outline the personality
of his ancestor Chalom Semama (ca 1815 – 1893), who was bigamous and had
a large offspring.

Sylvie Gsell travelled four times in Romania and Ukraine to track her
ancestors. She gives advices to travellers in these countries and
explains why she plans furthers trips.

French people think that after 1808, when all Jews had to choose a
permanent family name and a fixed first name, genealogical research is
easy. Anne-Marie Fribourg shows that it is not always the case. She
solved a puzzle, a real headache about an Henriette Godechau born in
1825 in Saint-Mihiel (Meuse) >from Elisabeth, herself daughter of Salomon
Godechau. In fact, these Godechau should be called Crehange and Godechau
is only the first name of Salomon’s father. When Henriette died in 1872,
she was registered as the daughter of Salomon Goudechaux and Elisabeth
Créhange, obscuring even more the puzzle. Now, thanks to Anne-Marie
Fribourg, everything is clear.

In a scholarly paper, Mathilde Tagger explains the difficulties
encountered in transcribing family names >from Hebrew to French, >from
Judeo-Arabic to French, >from Arabic to French and >from Spanish to
Judeo-Arabic.

Another competent paleographer, Eliane Roos Schuhl, analyzes all names
found in the Bible, those of Adam, Eva and their children as well as
those of judges, prophets, angels and kings. Each of these names has a
meaning in Hebrew.

Georges Graner
France


The DITTMAN / DITTMANN family of Bavaria and New York #usa

Diana da Costa
 

Hello

I have hit a number of brick walls. Charlotte (nee ROSENFELD) was born on
18th July 1833 in Bamberg, Bavaria and died in New York on 26th September
1925. She arrived in the US in 1850. She married Eduard DITTMANN, born 8th
May 1826 in Tuechersfeld and died in NY 5th August 1882. Edward arrived in
US between 1845 - 1848. Charlotte and Edward had seven children, all born
in NY, of whom six have been accounted. If anyone wants to know more about
the ROSENFELD DITTMAN(N)s, please ask but here are my queries for which all
help gratefully received:

1. The date of their marriage is 1854, highly likely as their first child
was born the following year. But I cannot track down a marriage place or
date. I would assume it is unlikely that they returned to Germany to wed
and therefore the marriage presumably took place in the US and I am assuming
(?) NY as that is where they lived and where all their children were born.
2. One son Semon DITTMAN (also recorded as Simeon and Simon) was born on
28th June 1858. But in 1896 Semon left for South Africa where he lived until
1906 when he turns up in Shanghai where he remains until 1919 - or at least
this is the last passport application found for him. What then happened to
Semon? Did he return to the US or did he remain in China? Where and when
did he die? On the passport applications, he states he is single.
3. Semon had five siblings who have been traced: Frances (my great-great
grandmother), Louisa, Mortimer, Henry and Marie. Only Frances married. The
seventh was learnt about >from the 1900 Census where it is stated that
Charlotte had five living children having given birth to seven. We know that
Mortimer was killed in 1893 in a tragic rail accident but where is this
mystery child? Could he/she have been stillborn or perhaps was born and
died in between census'? All ideas welcome.
4. To date, I have found nothing about the ROSENFELD forebears in Bamberg
or the DITTMANN ancestors in Tuechersfeld - both new territories for me as
hitherto my researches have more or less been confined to Furth and
Nurnberg. If anyone has any hints of where to look, I should be most
grateful.

Many thanks
Diana (MOHR) GOMES da COSTA, Kent UK - formerly >from London
Please note new email address: dianadacosta@...
Researcher number: 166938

Researches include ARNSTEIN, BACH, BASS, BERLIN, COHN, DITTMANN, FLACHFELD,
GUETERMANN, HAHN, HELLMANN, HIRSCHMANN, KOHN, KRAILSHEIMER, LOEWI, MANES,
MARX, MENDEL, MORGENTHAU, MOHR, ROSENWALD, UHLMANN, WEIKERSHEIMER and
ZIRNDORFER - all originally >from Bavaria


Early American SIG #USA The DITTMAN / DITTMANN family of Bavaria and New York #usa

Diana da Costa
 

Hello

I have hit a number of brick walls. Charlotte (nee ROSENFELD) was born on
18th July 1833 in Bamberg, Bavaria and died in New York on 26th September
1925. She arrived in the US in 1850. She married Eduard DITTMANN, born 8th
May 1826 in Tuechersfeld and died in NY 5th August 1882. Edward arrived in
US between 1845 - 1848. Charlotte and Edward had seven children, all born
in NY, of whom six have been accounted. If anyone wants to know more about
the ROSENFELD DITTMAN(N)s, please ask but here are my queries for which all
help gratefully received:

1. The date of their marriage is 1854, highly likely as their first child
was born the following year. But I cannot track down a marriage place or
date. I would assume it is unlikely that they returned to Germany to wed
and therefore the marriage presumably took place in the US and I am assuming
(?) NY as that is where they lived and where all their children were born.
2. One son Semon DITTMAN (also recorded as Simeon and Simon) was born on
28th June 1858. But in 1896 Semon left for South Africa where he lived until
1906 when he turns up in Shanghai where he remains until 1919 - or at least
this is the last passport application found for him. What then happened to
Semon? Did he return to the US or did he remain in China? Where and when
did he die? On the passport applications, he states he is single.
3. Semon had five siblings who have been traced: Frances (my great-great
grandmother), Louisa, Mortimer, Henry and Marie. Only Frances married. The
seventh was learnt about >from the 1900 Census where it is stated that
Charlotte had five living children having given birth to seven. We know that
Mortimer was killed in 1893 in a tragic rail accident but where is this
mystery child? Could he/she have been stillborn or perhaps was born and
died in between census'? All ideas welcome.
4. To date, I have found nothing about the ROSENFELD forebears in Bamberg
or the DITTMANN ancestors in Tuechersfeld - both new territories for me as
hitherto my researches have more or less been confined to Furth and
Nurnberg. If anyone has any hints of where to look, I should be most
grateful.

Many thanks
Diana (MOHR) GOMES da COSTA, Kent UK - formerly >from London
Please note new email address: dianadacosta@...
Researcher number: 166938

Researches include ARNSTEIN, BACH, BASS, BERLIN, COHN, DITTMANN, FLACHFELD,
GUETERMANN, HAHN, HELLMANN, HIRSCHMANN, KOHN, KRAILSHEIMER, LOEWI, MANES,
MARX, MENDEL, MORGENTHAU, MOHR, ROSENWALD, UHLMANN, WEIKERSHEIMER and
ZIRNDORFER - all originally >from Bavaria


Issue 117 of the journal of the French JGS #germany

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

The issue 117, Spring 2014 of Genealo-J, Journal of the Jewish
Genealogical Society of France, has just been published. [A complete
summary of the contents available >from <georges.graner@...> ]

Eliane Roos Schuhl, analyzes all names found in the Bible,
those of Adam, Eva and their children as well as those of
judges, prophets, angels and kings. Each of these names has a
meaning in Hebrew.

French people think that after 1808, when all Jews had to choose a
permanent family name and a fixed first name, genealogical research is
easy. Anne-Marie Fribourg shows that it is not always the case. She
solved a puzzle, a real headache about an Henriette GODECHAU born in
1825 in Saint-Mihiel (Meuse) >from Elisabeth, herself daughter of Salomon
Godechau. In fact, these Godechau should be called Crehange and Godechau
is only the first name of Salomon’s father. When Henriette died in 1872,
she was registered as the daughter of Salomon GOUDECHAUX and Elisabeth
Créhange, obscuring even more the puzzle. Now, thanks to Anne-Marie
Fribourg, everything is clear.

In a scholarly paper, Mathilde Tagger explains the difficulties
encountered in transcribing family names >from Hebrew to French, >from
Judeo-Arabic to French, >from Arabic to French and >from Spanish to Judeo-Arabic.

On January 17, 1670, Raphael Levy was burnt alive at Glatigny (Moselle)
since he was unjustly accused of the ritual murder of a 3 year old
child. On January 19, 2014, a plate was inaugurated in the same village,
telling he was innocent. Pierre-Andre Meyer tells us about the life of
his ancestor Raphael Levy and his family.

Another Jewish victim in this issue is Rabbi Elie Bloch (1909-1943)
whose name has been recently given to a street in Metz and whose life is
sketched by Jacques Bloch. Born in Dambach (Alsace), he became rabbi in
Metz where he took care of all the refugees before the war. Transferred
to Poitiers he was in charge of the interned Jews during German
occupation until he was himself deported to Auschwitz.

Georges Graner JGS of France georges.graner@...


German SIG #Germany Issue 117 of the journal of the French JGS #germany

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

The issue 117, Spring 2014 of Genealo-J, Journal of the Jewish
Genealogical Society of France, has just been published. [A complete
summary of the contents available >from <georges.graner@...> ]

Eliane Roos Schuhl, analyzes all names found in the Bible,
those of Adam, Eva and their children as well as those of
judges, prophets, angels and kings. Each of these names has a
meaning in Hebrew.

French people think that after 1808, when all Jews had to choose a
permanent family name and a fixed first name, genealogical research is
easy. Anne-Marie Fribourg shows that it is not always the case. She
solved a puzzle, a real headache about an Henriette GODECHAU born in
1825 in Saint-Mihiel (Meuse) >from Elisabeth, herself daughter of Salomon
Godechau. In fact, these Godechau should be called Crehange and Godechau
is only the first name of Salomon’s father. When Henriette died in 1872,
she was registered as the daughter of Salomon GOUDECHAUX and Elisabeth
Créhange, obscuring even more the puzzle. Now, thanks to Anne-Marie
Fribourg, everything is clear.

In a scholarly paper, Mathilde Tagger explains the difficulties
encountered in transcribing family names >from Hebrew to French, >from
Judeo-Arabic to French, >from Arabic to French and >from Spanish to Judeo-Arabic.

On January 17, 1670, Raphael Levy was burnt alive at Glatigny (Moselle)
since he was unjustly accused of the ritual murder of a 3 year old
child. On January 19, 2014, a plate was inaugurated in the same village,
telling he was innocent. Pierre-Andre Meyer tells us about the life of
his ancestor Raphael Levy and his family.

Another Jewish victim in this issue is Rabbi Elie Bloch (1909-1943)
whose name has been recently given to a street in Metz and whose life is
sketched by Jacques Bloch. Born in Dambach (Alsace), he became rabbi in
Metz where he took care of all the refugees before the war. Transferred
to Poitiers he was in charge of the interned Jews during German
occupation until he was himself deported to Auschwitz.

Georges Graner JGS of France georges.graner@...


Researching Delareyville, Barberspan, Geysdorp, Migdol, Rostrataville #southafrica

Saul Issroff
 

The Country Communities Project of SA Friends of Beth Hatefutsoth is
looking for information on Jewish families who came >from the
following towns or villages in the Western Transvaal:

Delareyville, Barberspan, Geysdorp, Migdol, Rostrataville

If you have any information please contact them at museum@... or
+27( 0)11=645-2598

Saul Issroff


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Researching Delareyville, Barberspan, Geysdorp, Migdol, Rostrataville #southafrica

Saul Issroff
 

The Country Communities Project of SA Friends of Beth Hatefutsoth is
looking for information on Jewish families who came >from the
following towns or villages in the Western Transvaal:

Delareyville, Barberspan, Geysdorp, Migdol, Rostrataville

If you have any information please contact them at museum@... or
+27( 0)11=645-2598

Saul Issroff


The Jews of Cornwall - A History - Tradition and Settlement to 1913 by Keith Pearce #southafrica

Saul Issroff
 

The Jews of Cornwall - A History - Tradition and Settlement to 1913.
This is a comprehensive history of Cornish Jewry, their place in
relation to other communities, their role in the tin industry, Rabbis
( including some to South Africa and other colonies) .

To order now: http://www.halsgrove.com/proddetail.php?prod=9780857042224

Full details are on the Halsgrove.com website

Saul Issroff

(no commercial interest etc)


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica The Jews of Cornwall - A History - Tradition and Settlement to 1913 by Keith Pearce #southafrica

Saul Issroff
 

The Jews of Cornwall - A History - Tradition and Settlement to 1913.
This is a comprehensive history of Cornish Jewry, their place in
relation to other communities, their role in the tin industry, Rabbis
( including some to South Africa and other colonies) .

To order now: http://www.halsgrove.com/proddetail.php?prod=9780857042224

Full details are on the Halsgrove.com website

Saul Issroff

(no commercial interest etc)


Online Portals #general

Lande
 

A Museum librarian recently drew my attention to the following useful
online portals for Polish and French information.

1. Polona.pl http://www.polona.pl/

250,000+ items >from the National Library in Warsaw.
Very "librarian" with tons of search options and tons of metadata
Diacritics-sensitive!

Requires a free login to download as PDF
Allows item level deep linking
Integrated for sharing materials on social media and email.

Check out this Haszomer Hadati item >from Krakow

2. State Archives of Poland Online http://www.szukajwarchiwach.pl/
combines several existing catalogs, databases and guides

includes 10 million pages of scanned documents
diacritics sensitive
has easy post-search filters to limit results

clunky to browse between pages
includes their logo as a watermark behind every image downloaded
(kinda neat!)

Allows you to deeplink to a single scan (frame of microfilm or page of
book)--see my great-grandparents' 1896 wedding register

3. Archives National du Department de Loire
http://www.archivesdepartementales.lenord.fr/?id=etat_civil

Their "search" is only a browse with some clunky limits (boo!)
Even the same browse gets different results each time (bad metadata?)

allows printing but not downloading
very fast and easy to navigate between pages of the film (arrow keys are an
option!)
great zoom and click-and-drag features
requires users to "agree" to terms in order to proceed

linking goes to start of item, not the page
scanning quality is super clear, look at Abancourt 1838

Peter Lande
Washington, D.C.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Online Portals #general

Lande
 

A Museum librarian recently drew my attention to the following useful
online portals for Polish and French information.

1. Polona.pl http://www.polona.pl/

250,000+ items >from the National Library in Warsaw.
Very "librarian" with tons of search options and tons of metadata
Diacritics-sensitive!

Requires a free login to download as PDF
Allows item level deep linking
Integrated for sharing materials on social media and email.

Check out this Haszomer Hadati item >from Krakow

2. State Archives of Poland Online http://www.szukajwarchiwach.pl/
combines several existing catalogs, databases and guides

includes 10 million pages of scanned documents
diacritics sensitive
has easy post-search filters to limit results

clunky to browse between pages
includes their logo as a watermark behind every image downloaded
(kinda neat!)

Allows you to deeplink to a single scan (frame of microfilm or page of
book)--see my great-grandparents' 1896 wedding register

3. Archives National du Department de Loire
http://www.archivesdepartementales.lenord.fr/?id=etat_civil

Their "search" is only a browse with some clunky limits (boo!)
Even the same browse gets different results each time (bad metadata?)

allows printing but not downloading
very fast and easy to navigate between pages of the film (arrow keys are an
option!)
great zoom and click-and-drag features
requires users to "agree" to terms in order to proceed

linking goes to start of item, not the page
scanning quality is super clear, look at Abancourt 1838

Peter Lande
Washington, D.C.


Zas family, Vilkomir (Ukmerge) #general

Charles Sachs
 

I have not yet been able to find documentation for my paternal
grandfather, or his siblings and parents, or ancestors, prior to their
immigration to the US (New York City) >from Vilkomir (Ukmerge), via
Antwerp on Red Star liners, between 1902 and 1911. I am a skilled
historical researcher with US and English-language sources, but am
having a great deal of difficulty penetrating the old world. The family
all adopted the surname SACHS on arrival in the US, but the name used
on the ship passenger manifests is: SASS or ZASS. I have 2 pre-immigration
documents >from my grandfather, his 1903 Vilkomir school
certificates/diplomas (in Russian), which show the surname (as would be
transliterated): ZAS. I have been a member of the Litvak SIG and
Ukmerge Research Group, and I have not been able to find any references
to family members in the 1897 Russian census or any other Lithuania
databases or LitvakSIG or UmergeRG spreadsheets or indexes.

My grandfather, Joseph Sachs, originally Yosel (Jossel) Zas (1888-1970),
immigrated in 1905, the second in his family, following his older brother
Eugene Sachs (Yudel Sass/Zass) (1884-1967), who left Vilkomir and then
Antwerp via the SS Vaderland to New York, November 8-18, 1902. Then,
after my grandfather, came the oldest sister, Ida (Chaja Sass)(1887-1963)
on SS Vaderland, September 8-18, 1906. Then younger sister, Rachel
(Rochel Sass)[1891-1952] on the SS Zeeland, January 29-February 9, 1910.
Then a younger brother, Samuel, also known as Simon (Schmier Sass)
(1892-1971) on SS Vaderland, June 25-July 6, 1910. And finally the parents --
Jacob Sachs (Yankel Zass) (1861-1926) and Bessie Sachs (Basche Zass) (ca.
1863-1938)-- with the two youngest children, Benjamin (Buruch Zass)
(1897-1967) and Dorothy (Dwore Zass) (1906-1982) on SS Kroonland,
September 2-12, 1911. All passenger lists cite Vilkomir (Wilkomir)as prior
residence. I remember my grandfather speaking of Vilkomir as his
pre-immigration home. My great-grandfather Jacob Sachs (Yankel Zass)'s
death certificate records his father as Lazar; the 1911 ship passenger
manifest cites "Leiser Zass", and his gravestone as Elijah.

I would appreciate any or all suggestions. Thank you for you assistance.

Charles Sachs
clsachs2000@...
Staten Island, NY

searching: SACHS/SASS/ZASS/ZAS (Vilkomir/Ukmerge), GLICENSTEIN (Lodz)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Zas family, Vilkomir (Ukmerge) #general

Charles Sachs
 

I have not yet been able to find documentation for my paternal
grandfather, or his siblings and parents, or ancestors, prior to their
immigration to the US (New York City) >from Vilkomir (Ukmerge), via
Antwerp on Red Star liners, between 1902 and 1911. I am a skilled
historical researcher with US and English-language sources, but am
having a great deal of difficulty penetrating the old world. The family
all adopted the surname SACHS on arrival in the US, but the name used
on the ship passenger manifests is: SASS or ZASS. I have 2 pre-immigration
documents >from my grandfather, his 1903 Vilkomir school
certificates/diplomas (in Russian), which show the surname (as would be
transliterated): ZAS. I have been a member of the Litvak SIG and
Ukmerge Research Group, and I have not been able to find any references
to family members in the 1897 Russian census or any other Lithuania
databases or LitvakSIG or UmergeRG spreadsheets or indexes.

My grandfather, Joseph Sachs, originally Yosel (Jossel) Zas (1888-1970),
immigrated in 1905, the second in his family, following his older brother
Eugene Sachs (Yudel Sass/Zass) (1884-1967), who left Vilkomir and then
Antwerp via the SS Vaderland to New York, November 8-18, 1902. Then,
after my grandfather, came the oldest sister, Ida (Chaja Sass)(1887-1963)
on SS Vaderland, September 8-18, 1906. Then younger sister, Rachel
(Rochel Sass)[1891-1952] on the SS Zeeland, January 29-February 9, 1910.
Then a younger brother, Samuel, also known as Simon (Schmier Sass)
(1892-1971) on SS Vaderland, June 25-July 6, 1910. And finally the parents --
Jacob Sachs (Yankel Zass) (1861-1926) and Bessie Sachs (Basche Zass) (ca.
1863-1938)-- with the two youngest children, Benjamin (Buruch Zass)
(1897-1967) and Dorothy (Dwore Zass) (1906-1982) on SS Kroonland,
September 2-12, 1911. All passenger lists cite Vilkomir (Wilkomir)as prior
residence. I remember my grandfather speaking of Vilkomir as his
pre-immigration home. My great-grandfather Jacob Sachs (Yankel Zass)'s
death certificate records his father as Lazar; the 1911 ship passenger
manifest cites "Leiser Zass", and his gravestone as Elijah.

I would appreciate any or all suggestions. Thank you for you assistance.

Charles Sachs
clsachs2000@...
Staten Island, NY

searching: SACHS/SASS/ZASS/ZAS (Vilkomir/Ukmerge), GLICENSTEIN (Lodz)


Re: Dates of birth in the Book of residents of Radom #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins, Patrick Atlas wrote that in the book of residents of
Radom, there are sometimes two dates for the date of birth, and asked if
the first date is the birthdate and the second the date of a circumcision
for a boy, or naming for a girl. I answer that there are several possibilities.
The date of circumcision, or bris milah, is almost always on the eighth day
of life, and has to be done during the daytime, although it can be postponed
for the baby's health. The naming date for a girl is usually the next day
that the Torah is read in the synagogue, usually the Monday, Thursday, or
Saturday, after the birth, even if it's only a few hours later, although
it can be on other days of the week for a Jewish holiday.
If the dates are consistently 12 days apart in the 19th or early 20th
century, then the explanation is that one date is for the Julian calendar
and the other is for the Gregorian calendar. Since it's a book of
residents, my guess is that it's not a primary source, so I think it's
also possible that the first date was the date of birth and the second
was the date that it was recorded in the primary source metrical book.
A birth that occurred in a main town, where it also had to be recorded in
the town hall, could have been reported the same day, although I think that
it was unusual to say a name aloud before the religious naming ceremony.
However, there could be a delay of several days (or even weeks?) for a
birth that occurred in an outlying village or hamlet, because of difficulty
traveling to the town where the birth was required to be recorded.
Alternatively,the information may have been copied >from another sources
such as metrical books, and either the second date - whatever it
represented - was inconsistently copied or wasn't recorded in the metrical
book.
Ira Leviton, New York, N.Y.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Dates of birth in the Book of residents of Radom #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins, Patrick Atlas wrote that in the book of residents of
Radom, there are sometimes two dates for the date of birth, and asked if
the first date is the birthdate and the second the date of a circumcision
for a boy, or naming for a girl. I answer that there are several possibilities.
The date of circumcision, or bris milah, is almost always on the eighth day
of life, and has to be done during the daytime, although it can be postponed
for the baby's health. The naming date for a girl is usually the next day
that the Torah is read in the synagogue, usually the Monday, Thursday, or
Saturday, after the birth, even if it's only a few hours later, although
it can be on other days of the week for a Jewish holiday.
If the dates are consistently 12 days apart in the 19th or early 20th
century, then the explanation is that one date is for the Julian calendar
and the other is for the Gregorian calendar. Since it's a book of
residents, my guess is that it's not a primary source, so I think it's
also possible that the first date was the date of birth and the second
was the date that it was recorded in the primary source metrical book.
A birth that occurred in a main town, where it also had to be recorded in
the town hall, could have been reported the same day, although I think that
it was unusual to say a name aloud before the religious naming ceremony.
However, there could be a delay of several days (or even weeks?) for a
birth that occurred in an outlying village or hamlet, because of difficulty
traveling to the town where the birth was required to be recorded.
Alternatively,the information may have been copied >from another sources
such as metrical books, and either the second date - whatever it
represented - was inconsistently copied or wasn't recorded in the metrical
book.
Ira Leviton, New York, N.Y.


Re: Use of maiden vs married name on a YadVashem record? #general

tom
 

Yad Vashem's records are based mostly on survivors' testimonies,
rather than documentation and research. (researching millions of
victims individually would be an impossibly large task.) and the few
survivors >from some communities felt an obligation to record as many
of those who perished and whatever shreds of information that they
could. They didn't have the opportunity to share life histories in
the camps, nor did they have the facilities to make notes. so
sometimes the details are a little off. (and yad vashem's processing
is not foolproof, either, as they work across many languages, and
transcribe and translate the data. And my experience has been that
they're not quick to accept corrections, either.)

In this case, one additional detail seems to match: "hershovna" is a
patronymic meaning daughter of hersh. So both records are of feyge,
daughter of hersh SHEKHTER. I would say it's probably the same
person, unless you find proof otherwise.

....... tom klein, toronto


Dick & Martha Forsyth <theforsyths@...> wrote:
snip....>My question is, would a list like the one on Yad Vashem list a married
woman by her maiden name, or by her married name? Put another way, how
likely or unlikely is it that these two Feyga Shekhters are the same
person? Is this a question that's impossible to answer?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Use of maiden vs married name on a YadVashem record? #general

tom
 

Yad Vashem's records are based mostly on survivors' testimonies,
rather than documentation and research. (researching millions of
victims individually would be an impossibly large task.) and the few
survivors >from some communities felt an obligation to record as many
of those who perished and whatever shreds of information that they
could. They didn't have the opportunity to share life histories in
the camps, nor did they have the facilities to make notes. so
sometimes the details are a little off. (and yad vashem's processing
is not foolproof, either, as they work across many languages, and
transcribe and translate the data. And my experience has been that
they're not quick to accept corrections, either.)

In this case, one additional detail seems to match: "hershovna" is a
patronymic meaning daughter of hersh. So both records are of feyge,
daughter of hersh SHEKHTER. I would say it's probably the same
person, unless you find proof otherwise.

....... tom klein, toronto


Dick & Martha Forsyth <theforsyths@...> wrote:
snip....>My question is, would a list like the one on Yad Vashem list a married
woman by her maiden name, or by her married name? Put another way, how
likely or unlikely is it that these two Feyga Shekhters are the same
person? Is this a question that's impossible to answer?

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