Date   

Question on Grandma's ship registry #general

krippens@...
 

Hello everyone,

On my grandmother's ship manifest, written by hand across the columns
19-24, is something that I need help with. The words look like 'Dis to
Baden'. Many other passengers on this sheet had similar notations, Dis
to Son, Dis to Bro, Dis to Father, Dis to Husb. Can anyone tell me what
these notations mean?

For what it is worth, in column 18 (Whether going to a relative or
friend) it clearly states that she is going to her husband at the
address where they lived for a number of years.

Thank you for all your help

Karen Jo Rippens


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Question on Grandma's ship registry #general

krippens@...
 

Hello everyone,

On my grandmother's ship manifest, written by hand across the columns
19-24, is something that I need help with. The words look like 'Dis to
Baden'. Many other passengers on this sheet had similar notations, Dis
to Son, Dis to Bro, Dis to Father, Dis to Husb. Can anyone tell me what
these notations mean?

For what it is worth, in column 18 (Whether going to a relative or
friend) it clearly states that she is going to her husband at the
address where they lived for a number of years.

Thank you for all your help

Karen Jo Rippens


Gidel SIMON of Neunkirchen near Bad Mergentheim #germany

RalphNBaer@...
 

I am trying to find out any information about Gidel (Gutel) Simon and her
ancestors. She was born in Neunkirchen near Bad Mergentheim in
Wuerttemberg.

(Simon was a most probably a patronymic, so I haven't capitalized it.)

[MOD NOTE: Patronymic or not, we believe it best to type the last
names of research subjects in ALL CAPS.]

She was married to Wolf Jacob (again a patronymic, not a family name) who
was one of the first two Jews to be allowed to settle in Doerzbach in 1753
after a hiatus of many years. He was >from nearby Hohebach. Wolf Jacob had
four known children.
It isn't certain that all were Gidel's. She definitely was the
mother of the first two.

1. Maentle Wolf Jacob 12 February 1752 - 3 May 1817 Hohebach, cattle
trader, married 18 May 1789 to Reichel Joseph Seligmann 1763 Hohebach - 22
December 1812 Hohebach. Descendants adopted the name ROSENFELD.

2. Samuel Wolf STRAUSS 16 June 1755 Doerzbach - 17 January 1828 Doerzbach,
married 18 January 1789 to Haia Baruch 30 January 1761 Doerzbach - 6
October 1837 Doerzbach

3. Nathan Wolf BLUMENTHAL 1765 Doerzbach - 5 June 1845 Buttenhausen,
married 1790 to Hanna NEUBURGER 1775 Fellheim - 21 January 1861
Buttenhausen

4. Jacob-Loew Wolf 1771 Doerzbach - 15 May 1804 Buttenhausen, married 1.
to Regina, married 2. to Gidel Isak 1771 Fellheim - 4 June 1837
Buttenhausen.
Descendants adopted the name HOFHEIMER. (I am a descendant of Jacob and
Gidel.)

If these were all Gidel Simon's children, then Gidel was probably born
about 1730.

Ralph N. BAER Washington, D.C. RalphNBaer@aol.com


German SIG #Germany Gidel SIMON of Neunkirchen near Bad Mergentheim #germany

RalphNBaer@...
 

I am trying to find out any information about Gidel (Gutel) Simon and her
ancestors. She was born in Neunkirchen near Bad Mergentheim in
Wuerttemberg.

(Simon was a most probably a patronymic, so I haven't capitalized it.)

[MOD NOTE: Patronymic or not, we believe it best to type the last
names of research subjects in ALL CAPS.]

She was married to Wolf Jacob (again a patronymic, not a family name) who
was one of the first two Jews to be allowed to settle in Doerzbach in 1753
after a hiatus of many years. He was >from nearby Hohebach. Wolf Jacob had
four known children.
It isn't certain that all were Gidel's. She definitely was the
mother of the first two.

1. Maentle Wolf Jacob 12 February 1752 - 3 May 1817 Hohebach, cattle
trader, married 18 May 1789 to Reichel Joseph Seligmann 1763 Hohebach - 22
December 1812 Hohebach. Descendants adopted the name ROSENFELD.

2. Samuel Wolf STRAUSS 16 June 1755 Doerzbach - 17 January 1828 Doerzbach,
married 18 January 1789 to Haia Baruch 30 January 1761 Doerzbach - 6
October 1837 Doerzbach

3. Nathan Wolf BLUMENTHAL 1765 Doerzbach - 5 June 1845 Buttenhausen,
married 1790 to Hanna NEUBURGER 1775 Fellheim - 21 January 1861
Buttenhausen

4. Jacob-Loew Wolf 1771 Doerzbach - 15 May 1804 Buttenhausen, married 1.
to Regina, married 2. to Gidel Isak 1771 Fellheim - 4 June 1837
Buttenhausen.
Descendants adopted the name HOFHEIMER. (I am a descendant of Jacob and
Gidel.)

If these were all Gidel Simon's children, then Gidel was probably born
about 1730.

Ralph N. BAER Washington, D.C. RalphNBaer@aol.com


Re: The Jewish Migration to Germany #germany

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 9/24/2002 3:30:34 photonicbandgap@earthlink.net writes:
" So I was wondering if Jews migrated to Germany and Russia
(and many other regions) after the Destruction of the Temple in A.D. 70,
were a large percentage of German Jews of Middle Eastern descent?
Or did many native Germans covert as well to Judaism?"

==Jews first came into Germany with the Romans, perhaps even before the
destruction of the Temple and the subsequent expulsion of Jews >from the
Holy Land in 70CE. The early Jews in Germany came >from what is now Italy.

Before that they lived in the Holy Land. DNA research suggests that the
Jewish men who arrived as slaves, soldiers or traders, took local non-Jewish brides.

The Jewish community in Germany became firmly established (and a world
center for piety and scholarship) with the arrival early in the 10th
century, of the rabbibical Kalonymos family >from Lucca, Italy--reputedly
at the invitation of the HRE emperor. It was not until some centuries
later that Jews expelled >from Germany set up Jewish communities in Eastern
Europe, bringing with them the Judeo-German language later known as
Yiddish.

There was a parallel migration of Jews >from Italy and the Balkans to what
later became Austria and Bohemia, Most of these had been exiled >from the
Holy Land and referred to themselves as "Yerushalmi"-->from Jerusalem. The
Jews who migrated >from Constantinople to what later became Bulgaria,
Romania and the Ukraine also included "Bavli" (Babylonian) Jews.

The major non-Semitic adherents of Judaism in Europe were the nomadic
Khazars, a people of Turkic stock, originally >from east of the Volga-Caucasus region, whose kings, and some of whose people converted to
Judaism around the year 730 CE. They did mingle with the arly Jews in
what later became Russia, but their genetic, linguistic and cultutal
contribution to the Jews of Europe is believed to be quite small.

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@aol.com>

MODERATOR NOTES: Who needs books or our website when MBernet is awake?
Thanks, Michael.

There is still debate on some aspects of the above, the Khazar
factor, for example. Please use private email or GerSig Alternate
for further discussion. MOD 1


German SIG #Germany Re: The Jewish Migration to Germany #germany

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 9/24/2002 3:30:34 photonicbandgap@earthlink.net writes:
" So I was wondering if Jews migrated to Germany and Russia
(and many other regions) after the Destruction of the Temple in A.D. 70,
were a large percentage of German Jews of Middle Eastern descent?
Or did many native Germans covert as well to Judaism?"

==Jews first came into Germany with the Romans, perhaps even before the
destruction of the Temple and the subsequent expulsion of Jews >from the
Holy Land in 70CE. The early Jews in Germany came >from what is now Italy.

Before that they lived in the Holy Land. DNA research suggests that the
Jewish men who arrived as slaves, soldiers or traders, took local non-Jewish brides.

The Jewish community in Germany became firmly established (and a world
center for piety and scholarship) with the arrival early in the 10th
century, of the rabbibical Kalonymos family >from Lucca, Italy--reputedly
at the invitation of the HRE emperor. It was not until some centuries
later that Jews expelled >from Germany set up Jewish communities in Eastern
Europe, bringing with them the Judeo-German language later known as
Yiddish.

There was a parallel migration of Jews >from Italy and the Balkans to what
later became Austria and Bohemia, Most of these had been exiled >from the
Holy Land and referred to themselves as "Yerushalmi"-->from Jerusalem. The
Jews who migrated >from Constantinople to what later became Bulgaria,
Romania and the Ukraine also included "Bavli" (Babylonian) Jews.

The major non-Semitic adherents of Judaism in Europe were the nomadic
Khazars, a people of Turkic stock, originally >from east of the Volga-Caucasus region, whose kings, and some of whose people converted to
Judaism around the year 730 CE. They did mingle with the arly Jews in
what later became Russia, but their genetic, linguistic and cultutal
contribution to the Jews of Europe is believed to be quite small.

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@aol.com>

MODERATOR NOTES: Who needs books or our website when MBernet is awake?
Thanks, Michael.

There is still debate on some aspects of the above, the Khazar
factor, for example. Please use private email or GerSig Alternate
for further discussion. MOD 1


Berega #belarus

DHenkin@...
 

I do not read all the postings on this list, so I don't know if this has
been discussed, but there is an interesting monthly Newspaper/Journal,
published in Russian in Minsk called "Berega" which contains articles of
interest to Belarus Jewry, often including features on particular towns
and interviews and stories. I got one copy while visiting this Summer,
and another by mail later on. I am working on getting to be a subscriber,
but it hasn't fallen into place yet. Beyond that, I wonder if there is
way for this group to share access to those articles that are of interest
here.

Doron Henkin
DHenkin@aol.com
Philadelphia

MODERATOR NOTE: SIG Archives are searchable at
www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~sigspop


Belarus SIG #Belarus Berega #belarus

DHenkin@...
 

I do not read all the postings on this list, so I don't know if this has
been discussed, but there is an interesting monthly Newspaper/Journal,
published in Russian in Minsk called "Berega" which contains articles of
interest to Belarus Jewry, often including features on particular towns
and interviews and stories. I got one copy while visiting this Summer,
and another by mail later on. I am working on getting to be a subscriber,
but it hasn't fallen into place yet. Beyond that, I wonder if there is
way for this group to share access to those articles that are of interest
here.

Doron Henkin
DHenkin@aol.com
Philadelphia

MODERATOR NOTE: SIG Archives are searchable at
www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~sigspop


kwartler,kwart,aushesman,zander #poland

OZZYKW@...
 

--part1_11b.1709e955.2ac22b21_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

My father Chaim Arye or Leo was born Jan 1901in Vorochta,Vorokhta. Grew up
in Jaremce,Yaremcha. His father's name was Yitschak Isaac.
Leo lived in Vienna and came to USA in 1923.
Yitchak Isaac and his father were >from Nadworna.
I have found no lists of those town so far. Thanks for any help.
Ozzy Kwartler NJ


--part1_11b.1709e955.2ac22b21_boundary
Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">My father Chaim Arye or Leo&nbsp; was born Jan 1901in Vorochta,Vorokhta. Grew up in Jaremce,Yaremcha. His father's name was Yitschak Isaac. <BR>
Leo lived in Vienna and came to USA in 1923. <BR>
Yitchak Isaac and his father were >from Nadworna.<BR>
I have found no lists of those town so far. Thanks&nbsp; for any help.<BR>
Ozzy Kwartler NJ<BR>
<BR>
</FONT></HTML>
--part1_11b.1709e955.2ac22b21_boundary--


JRI Poland #Poland kwartler,kwart,aushesman,zander #poland

OZZYKW@...
 

--part1_11b.1709e955.2ac22b21_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

My father Chaim Arye or Leo was born Jan 1901in Vorochta,Vorokhta. Grew up
in Jaremce,Yaremcha. His father's name was Yitschak Isaac.
Leo lived in Vienna and came to USA in 1923.
Yitchak Isaac and his father were >from Nadworna.
I have found no lists of those town so far. Thanks for any help.
Ozzy Kwartler NJ


--part1_11b.1709e955.2ac22b21_boundary
Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">My father Chaim Arye or Leo&nbsp; was born Jan 1901in Vorochta,Vorokhta. Grew up in Jaremce,Yaremcha. His father's name was Yitschak Isaac. <BR>
Leo lived in Vienna and came to USA in 1923. <BR>
Yitchak Isaac and his father were >from Nadworna.<BR>
I have found no lists of those town so far. Thanks&nbsp; for any help.<BR>
Ozzy Kwartler NJ<BR>
<BR>
</FONT></HTML>
--part1_11b.1709e955.2ac22b21_boundary--


Re: Yomtov Lipman Roots #rabbinic

MBernet@...
 

On 2002.09.24, Nancy Dolin <nuttal@pacbell.net> writes:

I have determined that the original surname for the family I
descended >from is an acronym for Yomtov Lipman. Would I definitely
be related to one of the three famous rabbis or are there many lines
of Yomtov Lipmans with no connection to these rabbis at all?

I've narrowed down my ancestors to a couple whose surnames are
LIPMAN and DEVRA living in Kaunas likely to be born in the late
1700s to early 1800s with children Meyer, Yankel, Joseph, and
Benjamin; however I suspect that they may have originally come from
Germany and possibly began to abbreviate the name there. Has anyone
traced their Yomtov Lipman roots to Germany?
Lipman (or Liebman) is a common kinnuy for YomTov, i.e., like Hersch
Zvi or Issachar Ber, it's a common double-name; it is not a surname.
The name originated in Germany.

YomTov Lipman Halevi HELLER, author of the the authoritative Mishna
commentary, Tosfot YomTov, was born in 1579 in Wallerstein, Bavaria. The
family earlier lived in Schwaebisch Hall, in Swabia, as is reflected in the
HELLER name.

I am curious to know whether, Like the famed YomTov, your family are
Levites. I have the impression that YomTov in Bavaria was often
correlated to being a Levite and I'm seeking more info on that,

Michael Bernet, New York
mailto:mBernet@aol.com

WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: Yomtov Lipman Roots #rabbinic

MBernet@...
 

On 2002.09.24, Nancy Dolin <nuttal@pacbell.net> writes:

I have determined that the original surname for the family I
descended >from is an acronym for Yomtov Lipman. Would I definitely
be related to one of the three famous rabbis or are there many lines
of Yomtov Lipmans with no connection to these rabbis at all?

I've narrowed down my ancestors to a couple whose surnames are
LIPMAN and DEVRA living in Kaunas likely to be born in the late
1700s to early 1800s with children Meyer, Yankel, Joseph, and
Benjamin; however I suspect that they may have originally come from
Germany and possibly began to abbreviate the name there. Has anyone
traced their Yomtov Lipman roots to Germany?
Lipman (or Liebman) is a common kinnuy for YomTov, i.e., like Hersch
Zvi or Issachar Ber, it's a common double-name; it is not a surname.
The name originated in Germany.

YomTov Lipman Halevi HELLER, author of the the authoritative Mishna
commentary, Tosfot YomTov, was born in 1579 in Wallerstein, Bavaria. The
family earlier lived in Schwaebisch Hall, in Swabia, as is reflected in the
HELLER name.

I am curious to know whether, Like the famed YomTov, your family are
Levites. I have the impression that YomTov in Bavaria was often
correlated to being a Levite and I'm seeking more info on that,

Michael Bernet, New York
mailto:mBernet@aol.com

WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


Re: Czestochowa--Holocaust document (German) #poland

ilse mozga <mozga@...>
 

Hi. I would say "list" rather than "listing." As for the debate, i
literally says, "came" (though this does not preclude the possibility that
they were brought). An acceptable alternative would be to say "arrived,"
which is just as correct, but perhaps does not suggest as strongly that
they came of their own volition (which they presumably did not).

Hope this does not make things more confusing.

ilse mozga
toronto
======

Poland (Pultusk): KALINA

----- Original Message -----
From: Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>

I am working on a list of (I think) Holocaust survivors. I see this
text in German:

Liste der 195 judischen Haftlinge aus
Tschenstochau (Ankunft 18.01.1945), die
am 30.01.1945 nach Laura kamen:

I am trying to translate this. Here is what a fellow reader has come up
with:

Listing of the 195 Jewish prisoners from
Tschenstochau (arrival date: 18 Jan 1945)
who came [were brought?] to Laura on 30 Jan 1945"

Can someone help with the debate between "who came" and "were brought?

Daniel Kazez
........................................................
Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Professor of Music / Wittenberg University / Springfield, Ohio USA
Poland: TALMAN, ENGLANDER, JURKIEWICZ, STRAUSBERG, KIFER, CZAPNIK, BRODA,
SZEWCZYK, LEWKOWICZ, SZPALTYN, OFMAN, ZYLBERBERG, KRZEPICKI, LUKS,
MOSZKOWICZ, STROZ, SZWIMER, GUTMAN, PESACH
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/englander/


Box and Candle Taxes #poland

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

Does anyone know of source material like a history box about the subject?
I know there is a short explanation on the Litvak site. I am looking for
additional material.
I have a xerox of a microfilm of a document >from 1883 >from the Podolia
Region.
It gives the list of communities in each district and the amounts - no
family names.

Rose Feldman
rosef@post.tau.ac.il
EPSTEIN/BOYARSKY Amstiveva, Mstibov or Mstibovo or Mscibow (Belarus);
Ruzhany or maybe Rozhno; Petach Tikvah, Chicago, Argentine
GITNER/LULKIN/REZNIK Litin (Lityn) Ukraine,Kalinovka Ukraine, Israel,
Chicago
ILEWICKI/ILIWITSKY/ELEVITSKY Kusava Grodno Belarus
TREPMAN/SOJCHER/SLOVIK Warsaw, Israel
FELDMAN/LICHT Warsaw, Israel

Litin www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Littin
Kalinovka www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kalinovka
Mscibow www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Mscibow
Ruzhany www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Ruzhany
The Israel Genealogical Society


Radomsko (1918) #poland

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

Thanks to the efforts of Nancy Brodzki, and the assistance of Jacob
Slabiak, Merav Schejtman, Susan Herrmann, Abraham Stavsky, Solomon
Rabinowitz, Barry Seltzer, and Oren Roman, here is a list of 1160
persons who were eligible to vote in Radomsko, Poland as of 15 May
1918:

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/Czesto-Rad/tovdar.html

I was very pleased to find listed my great great uncle and his son:

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/Czesto-Rad/tovdar.jpg

This project might well be of interest only to people (like me) with
roots in Radomsko. (And I think that I have already shared this list
with most of them!) But if you find family members on this list, or
want any further information, please contact me:

dkazez@wittenberg.edu

Dan
........................................................
Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Professor of Music / Wittenberg University / Springfield, Ohio USA
Poland: TALMAN, ENGLANDER, JURKIEWICZ, STRAUSBERG, KIFER, CZAPNIK, BRODA,
SZEWCZYK, LEWKOWICZ, SZPALTYN, OFMAN, ZYLBERBERG, KRZEPICKI, LUKS,
MOSZKOWICZ, STROZ, SZWIMER, GUTMAN, PESACH
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/talman/
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/englander/


Translation of "kamen" in the context of the 195 Jewish prisoners from Czestochowa #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Daniel Kazez asks for an translation/interpretation of the word "kamen" in
the paragraph below.


Liste der 195 judischen Haftlinge aus Tschenstochau (Ankunft 18.01.1945),
die
am 30.01.1945 nach Laura kamen

I think the best word is "arrived" - this avoids the interpretation of
whether they came willingly or were brought forcibly.


Celia Male [UK]

:


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Czestochowa--Holocaust document (German) #poland

ilse mozga <mozga@...>
 

Hi. I would say "list" rather than "listing." As for the debate, i
literally says, "came" (though this does not preclude the possibility that
they were brought). An acceptable alternative would be to say "arrived,"
which is just as correct, but perhaps does not suggest as strongly that
they came of their own volition (which they presumably did not).

Hope this does not make things more confusing.

ilse mozga
toronto
======

Poland (Pultusk): KALINA

----- Original Message -----
From: Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>

I am working on a list of (I think) Holocaust survivors. I see this
text in German:

Liste der 195 judischen Haftlinge aus
Tschenstochau (Ankunft 18.01.1945), die
am 30.01.1945 nach Laura kamen:

I am trying to translate this. Here is what a fellow reader has come up
with:

Listing of the 195 Jewish prisoners from
Tschenstochau (arrival date: 18 Jan 1945)
who came [were brought?] to Laura on 30 Jan 1945"

Can someone help with the debate between "who came" and "were brought?

Daniel Kazez
........................................................
Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Professor of Music / Wittenberg University / Springfield, Ohio USA
Poland: TALMAN, ENGLANDER, JURKIEWICZ, STRAUSBERG, KIFER, CZAPNIK, BRODA,
SZEWCZYK, LEWKOWICZ, SZPALTYN, OFMAN, ZYLBERBERG, KRZEPICKI, LUKS,
MOSZKOWICZ, STROZ, SZWIMER, GUTMAN, PESACH
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/englander/


JRI Poland #Poland Box and Candle Taxes #poland

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

Does anyone know of source material like a history box about the subject?
I know there is a short explanation on the Litvak site. I am looking for
additional material.
I have a xerox of a microfilm of a document >from 1883 >from the Podolia
Region.
It gives the list of communities in each district and the amounts - no
family names.

Rose Feldman
rosef@post.tau.ac.il
EPSTEIN/BOYARSKY Amstiveva, Mstibov or Mstibovo or Mscibow (Belarus);
Ruzhany or maybe Rozhno; Petach Tikvah, Chicago, Argentine
GITNER/LULKIN/REZNIK Litin (Lityn) Ukraine,Kalinovka Ukraine, Israel,
Chicago
ILEWICKI/ILIWITSKY/ELEVITSKY Kusava Grodno Belarus
TREPMAN/SOJCHER/SLOVIK Warsaw, Israel
FELDMAN/LICHT Warsaw, Israel

Litin www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Littin
Kalinovka www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kalinovka
Mscibow www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Mscibow
Ruzhany www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Ruzhany
The Israel Genealogical Society


JRI Poland #Poland Radomsko (1918) #poland

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

Thanks to the efforts of Nancy Brodzki, and the assistance of Jacob
Slabiak, Merav Schejtman, Susan Herrmann, Abraham Stavsky, Solomon
Rabinowitz, Barry Seltzer, and Oren Roman, here is a list of 1160
persons who were eligible to vote in Radomsko, Poland as of 15 May
1918:

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/Czesto-Rad/tovdar.html

I was very pleased to find listed my great great uncle and his son:

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/Czesto-Rad/tovdar.jpg

This project might well be of interest only to people (like me) with
roots in Radomsko. (And I think that I have already shared this list
with most of them!) But if you find family members on this list, or
want any further information, please contact me:

dkazez@wittenberg.edu

Dan
........................................................
Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Professor of Music / Wittenberg University / Springfield, Ohio USA
Poland: TALMAN, ENGLANDER, JURKIEWICZ, STRAUSBERG, KIFER, CZAPNIK, BRODA,
SZEWCZYK, LEWKOWICZ, SZPALTYN, OFMAN, ZYLBERBERG, KRZEPICKI, LUKS,
MOSZKOWICZ, STROZ, SZWIMER, GUTMAN, PESACH
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/talman/
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/englander/


JRI Poland #Poland Translation of "kamen" in the context of the 195 Jewish prisoners from Czestochowa #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Daniel Kazez asks for an translation/interpretation of the word "kamen" in
the paragraph below.


Liste der 195 judischen Haftlinge aus Tschenstochau (Ankunft 18.01.1945),
die
am 30.01.1945 nach Laura kamen

I think the best word is "arrived" - this avoids the interpretation of
whether they came willingly or were brought forcibly.


Celia Male [UK]

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