Date   

Re: Some Basic Questions #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Pat,

There are records in the Hungarian state archives, the archives in
Nyireghaza, and in many other locations that have not been filmed by
the FHL. When JewishGen volunteers and staff come across such records
they attempt to acquire such records and obtain permission for
JewishGen to transcribe them. If you are unable to find the records
you want in the FHL catalog, you need to contact other sources,
including the closest regional and national archives to find out if
such records exist. It's always a good idea to first post your inquiry
to the Hungarian SIG website because many researchers have obtained
records that have not been filmed by the FHL. The next step is to
contact various sources directly to find out if the records you seek
exist. H-SIG members may also be able to direct you to the places that
are most likely to have the records you seek.

The FHL donated a catalog of its Jewish records to JewishGen several
years ago. That database, which you can find on the JewishGen website,
does not include Jewish records that have been filmed during the time
when this catalog was created. You need to go to the FHL website or
your local FHL branch for more current information.

I hope that this answers your question.

Vivian Kahn

Subject: re:Some Basic Questions
From: Patricia J Weisshaus <patjw28@earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 12:16:32 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Dear Vivian,

You mention more records >from Nireghaza. You also say that the FHL
list is
dated. Do you know of these other records >from Nireghaza are being/have
been filed and just not included in the list online, or are the the
numbers
available a the FHC?

Pat

12:58 AM On 10/28/2005, vkahn@kmort.com wrote:
Dear Peter,

You've asked some questions for which others who have recently begun
researching Hungarian Jewish roots may also need answers.

Hungary began civil registration in October 1895. Before then, vital
records were maintained by the Jewish community and turned over to the
authorities. One copy of these records was kept in the place where
the
records were generated and the other was usually sent to the county
(megye). As a result, even though some of the local records were
destroyed during WWII, others that were kept in county, regional, or
national archives may have been preserved. The Mormon Family History
Library (FHL) has filmed many records >from pre-World War I Hungary,
which
included areas that are in present-day Hungary as well as places that
are
now in Slovakia, Romania, Ukraine, Yugoslavia, and other modern
nations
surrounding Hungary. The first step in researching your roots is to
find
out in which current nation your ancestors lived.

Check the FHL on-line catalogue to see if they have filmed Jewish
records
from the places where your relatives lived. You can search a somewhat
dated version of the FHL collection of Jewish records at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/FHLC/
You should also search the surnames and places that you are
researching in
the JewishGen Hungary Database (JHD)
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary >.

If you have family >from areas that are in present-day Hungary or
Slovakia,
you may be able to obtain records by writing to the Hungarian or
Slovak
National Archives. Check the Hungarian SIG message archives and
website
for current addresses. Your research will be more difficult if your
family came >from parts of pre-Trianon Hungary that are now in Romania
or
the Ukraine. The FHL has microfilmed most of the 1848 Jewish Census
records that are held by the Hungarian National
Archives, but we continue to find records in regional archives
(Nyireghaza and Satorjaujhely, for example) and archives in Romania.
We know that there are other census and Jewish vital records in
Romanian
and Ukrainian archives. JewishGen is continuing to try and obtain
these
records and get permission to create indices that we can publish
on-line.

In addition to searching the JewishGen Hungary Database (JHD), you
should
send messages to the Hungarian SIG mailing list to find out if anyone
is
researching your names and/or places or can suggest other resources.
We
have more than 800 members in more than a dozen countries and many of
them
are fluent in Hungarian. Make sure to use a meaningful subject line
(e.g.
Searching KAHAN/Sziget) and include your place of residence with your
full
name. This will help folks to identify resources
that are available close to where you live. Also, make sure to
turn off SPAM blockers to allow H-SIG members to reach you.

Please feel free to contact me off-line or, if your questions might
be of
general interest, through the Hungarian SIG discussion group.

Happy hunting!

Vivian Kahn, Hungarian SIG Coordinator


*RE: Nyirmada Cemetery #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

You will find death records for Mada at FHL, film number 642914. Periods covered are 1880 through 1895.
Tom

At 00:00 -0500 03.11.2005, Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com wrote:
Subject: RE: Nyirmada Cemetery
From: "Katz, Itzik" <Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Oct 2005 09:00:48 +0200
X-Message-Number: 4

I am looking for lists, photos or any other information concerning the
people buried in Nyirmada (aka Kismada or Nagymada or Mada) in Szabolcs
County.
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Some Basic Questions #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Pat,

There are records in the Hungarian state archives, the archives in
Nyireghaza, and in many other locations that have not been filmed by
the FHL. When JewishGen volunteers and staff come across such records
they attempt to acquire such records and obtain permission for
JewishGen to transcribe them. If you are unable to find the records
you want in the FHL catalog, you need to contact other sources,
including the closest regional and national archives to find out if
such records exist. It's always a good idea to first post your inquiry
to the Hungarian SIG website because many researchers have obtained
records that have not been filmed by the FHL. The next step is to
contact various sources directly to find out if the records you seek
exist. H-SIG members may also be able to direct you to the places that
are most likely to have the records you seek.

The FHL donated a catalog of its Jewish records to JewishGen several
years ago. That database, which you can find on the JewishGen website,
does not include Jewish records that have been filmed during the time
when this catalog was created. You need to go to the FHL website or
your local FHL branch for more current information.

I hope that this answers your question.

Vivian Kahn

Subject: re:Some Basic Questions
From: Patricia J Weisshaus <patjw28@earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 12:16:32 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Dear Vivian,

You mention more records >from Nireghaza. You also say that the FHL
list is
dated. Do you know of these other records >from Nireghaza are being/have
been filed and just not included in the list online, or are the the
numbers
available a the FHC?

Pat

12:58 AM On 10/28/2005, vkahn@kmort.com wrote:
Dear Peter,

You've asked some questions for which others who have recently begun
researching Hungarian Jewish roots may also need answers.

Hungary began civil registration in October 1895. Before then, vital
records were maintained by the Jewish community and turned over to the
authorities. One copy of these records was kept in the place where
the
records were generated and the other was usually sent to the county
(megye). As a result, even though some of the local records were
destroyed during WWII, others that were kept in county, regional, or
national archives may have been preserved. The Mormon Family History
Library (FHL) has filmed many records >from pre-World War I Hungary,
which
included areas that are in present-day Hungary as well as places that
are
now in Slovakia, Romania, Ukraine, Yugoslavia, and other modern
nations
surrounding Hungary. The first step in researching your roots is to
find
out in which current nation your ancestors lived.

Check the FHL on-line catalogue to see if they have filmed Jewish
records
from the places where your relatives lived. You can search a somewhat
dated version of the FHL collection of Jewish records at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/FHLC/
You should also search the surnames and places that you are
researching in
the JewishGen Hungary Database (JHD)
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary >.

If you have family >from areas that are in present-day Hungary or
Slovakia,
you may be able to obtain records by writing to the Hungarian or
Slovak
National Archives. Check the Hungarian SIG message archives and
website
for current addresses. Your research will be more difficult if your
family came >from parts of pre-Trianon Hungary that are now in Romania
or
the Ukraine. The FHL has microfilmed most of the 1848 Jewish Census
records that are held by the Hungarian National
Archives, but we continue to find records in regional archives
(Nyireghaza and Satorjaujhely, for example) and archives in Romania.
We know that there are other census and Jewish vital records in
Romanian
and Ukrainian archives. JewishGen is continuing to try and obtain
these
records and get permission to create indices that we can publish
on-line.

In addition to searching the JewishGen Hungary Database (JHD), you
should
send messages to the Hungarian SIG mailing list to find out if anyone
is
researching your names and/or places or can suggest other resources.
We
have more than 800 members in more than a dozen countries and many of
them
are fluent in Hungarian. Make sure to use a meaningful subject line
(e.g.
Searching KAHAN/Sziget) and include your place of residence with your
full
name. This will help folks to identify resources
that are available close to where you live. Also, make sure to
turn off SPAM blockers to allow H-SIG members to reach you.

Please feel free to contact me off-line or, if your questions might
be of
general interest, through the Hungarian SIG discussion group.

Happy hunting!

Vivian Kahn, Hungarian SIG Coordinator


Hungary SIG #Hungary *RE: Nyirmada Cemetery #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

You will find death records for Mada at FHL, film number 642914. Periods covered are 1880 through 1895.
Tom

At 00:00 -0500 03.11.2005, Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com wrote:
Subject: RE: Nyirmada Cemetery
From: "Katz, Itzik" <Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Oct 2005 09:00:48 +0200
X-Message-Number: 4

I am looking for lists, photos or any other information concerning the
people buried in Nyirmada (aka Kismada or Nagymada or Mada) in Szabolcs
County.
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Re: The Origins of Katz Surname #hungary

Robert Neu
 

Hi.
Meaning of Katz straight >from Ancestry.com
Jewish (Ashkenazic): acronym >from the Hebrew phrase
kohen tsedek ‘priest of righteousness’ (see Cohen).

Robert Neu

--- "Katz, Itzik" <Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com> wrote:

Dear Siggers,

My cousin had taken the FTDNA Y37 test and the
results that came back
matched several people, one of which is an exact
match with us. The DNA
matching indicate that we are all relatives and that
our common ancestor
(depending on the level of DNA matchin) lived
between 200 to 600 years
ago.
The ancestors of these people are known to have come
from Ukraine and
Poland. My family is the only one >from Hungary.

All the people we match with (exact or partial
match) are known to be
Kohanim as the Katz surname would suggest. However,
only one of them
carry
the surname Katz. All the others have different
surnames like Kahan,
Bloom,
Kaplansky, Feinberg, etc. Most of these people have
indications that
thier
surname was changed >from Kahan or Kohen but not from
Katz.

I always believed that Katz was one of those ancient
surnames since it
has a
meaning in Hebrew and that it was carried over the
generations.

Is it possible that Katz is a germanized name to
comply with the 1786
Empiral naming Order?

I have seen in other places that Katz was also used
as a title and not
as a
surname. For examply, Rabby Shimshon Eliezer Katz
Gottdiener who was a
"Av-Beit Din (head of Jewish court)" in Tiszalok (in
the book "Shem
Ha'Gdolim" by Pinhas Zelig Schwartz) who is known to
have been a Kohen.
Gottdiener is a greminazed name of the Hebrew
surnmae Ovadia (server of
God).

Thank you,
Itzik Katz
Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE:The Origins of Katz Surname #hungary

Robert Neu
 

Hi.
Meaning of Katz straight >from Ancestry.com
Jewish (Ashkenazic): acronym >from the Hebrew phrase
kohen tsedek ‘priest of righteousness’ (see Cohen).

Robert Neu

--- "Katz, Itzik" <Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com> wrote:

Dear Siggers,

My cousin had taken the FTDNA Y37 test and the
results that came back
matched several people, one of which is an exact
match with us. The DNA
matching indicate that we are all relatives and that
our common ancestor
(depending on the level of DNA matchin) lived
between 200 to 600 years
ago.
The ancestors of these people are known to have come
from Ukraine and
Poland. My family is the only one >from Hungary.

All the people we match with (exact or partial
match) are known to be
Kohanim as the Katz surname would suggest. However,
only one of them
carry
the surname Katz. All the others have different
surnames like Kahan,
Bloom,
Kaplansky, Feinberg, etc. Most of these people have
indications that
thier
surname was changed >from Kahan or Kohen but not from
Katz.

I always believed that Katz was one of those ancient
surnames since it
has a
meaning in Hebrew and that it was carried over the
generations.

Is it possible that Katz is a germanized name to
comply with the 1786
Empiral naming Order?

I have seen in other places that Katz was also used
as a title and not
as a
surname. For examply, Rabby Shimshon Eliezer Katz
Gottdiener who was a
"Av-Beit Din (head of Jewish court)" in Tiszalok (in
the book "Shem
Ha'Gdolim" by Pinhas Zelig Schwartz) who is known to
have been a Kohen.
Gottdiener is a greminazed name of the Hebrew
surnmae Ovadia (server of
God).

Thank you,
Itzik Katz
Israel


Re: Some Basic Questions #hungary

Patricia J Weisshaus <patjw28@...>
 

In my last message, I meant to thank Vivian for her response. Please don't
jump on the bandwagon to tell me what records are available. I will have a
further message directed to H-SIG about the specific problem and
approximate dates I am looking for you. Thanks to all of you for the help
that everyone has offered.

Pat

At 02:54 AM 11/3/2005, vkahn@kmort.com wrote:
Pat,

There are records in the Hungarian state archives, the archives in
Nyireghaza, and in many other locations that have not been filmed by the
FHL. When JewishGen volunteers and staff come across such records they
attempt to acquire such records and obtain permission for JewishGen to
transcribe them. If you are unable to find the records you want in the
FHL catalog, you need to contact other sources, including the closest
regional and national archives to find out if such records exist. It's
always a good idea to first post your inquiry to the Hungarian SIG website
because many researchers have obtained records that have not been filmed
by the FHL. The next step is to contact various sources directly to find
out if the records you seek exist. H-SIG members may also be able to
direct you to the places that are most likely to have the records you seek.

The FHL donated a catalog of its Jewish records to JewishGen several years
ago. That database, which you can find on the JewishGen website, does not
include Jewish records that have been filmed during the time when this
catalog was created. You need to go to the FHL website or your local FHL
branch for more current information.

I hope that this answers your question.

Vivian Kahn

Subject: re:Some Basic Questions
From: Patricia J Weisshaus <patjw28@earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 12:16:32 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Dear Vivian,

You mention more records >from Nireghaza. You also say that the FHL list is
dated. Do you know of these other records >from Nireghaza are being/have
been filed and just not included in the list online, or are the the numbers
available a the FHC?

Pat

12:58 AM On 10/28/2005, vkahn@kmort.com wrote:
Dear Peter,

You've asked some questions for which others who have recently begun
researching Hungarian Jewish roots may also need answers.

Hungary began civil registration in October 1895. Before then, vital
records were maintained by the Jewish community and turned over to the
authorities. One copy of these records was kept in the place where the
records were generated and the other was usually sent to the county
(megye). As a result, even though some of the local records were
destroyed during WWII, others that were kept in county, regional, or
national archives may have been preserved. The Mormon Family History
Library (FHL) has filmed many records >from pre-World War I Hungary, which
included areas that are in present-day Hungary as well as places that are
now in Slovakia, Romania, Ukraine, Yugoslavia, and other modern nations
surrounding Hungary. The first step in researching your roots is to find
out in which current nation your ancestors lived.

Check the FHL on-line catalogue to see if they have filmed Jewish records
from the places where your relatives lived. You can search a somewhat
dated version of the FHL collection of Jewish records at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/FHLC/
You should also search the surnames and places that you are researching in
the JewishGen Hungary Database (JHD)
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary >.

If you have family >from areas that are in present-day Hungary or Slovakia,
you may be able to obtain records by writing to the Hungarian or Slovak
National Archives. Check the Hungarian SIG message archives and website
for current addresses. Your research will be more difficult if your
family came >from parts of pre-Trianon Hungary that are now in Romania or
the Ukraine. The FHL has microfilmed most of the 1848 Jewish Census
records that are held by the Hungarian National
Archives, but we continue to find records in regional archives
(Nyireghaza and Satorjaujhely, for example) and archives in Romania.
We know that there are other census and Jewish vital records in Romanian
and Ukrainian archives. JewishGen is continuing to try and obtain these
records and get permission to create indices that we can publish on-line.

In addition to searching the JewishGen Hungary Database (JHD), you should
send messages to the Hungarian SIG mailing list to find out if anyone is
researching your names and/or places or can suggest other resources.
We
have more than 800 members in more than a dozen countries and many of them
are fluent in Hungarian. Make sure to use a meaningful subject line (e.g.
Searching KAHAN/Sziget) and include your place of residence with your full
name. This will help folks to identify resources
that are available close to where you live. Also, make sure to
turn off SPAM blockers to allow H-SIG members to reach you.

Please feel free to contact me off-line or, if your questions might be of
general interest, through the Hungarian SIG discussion group.

Happy hunting!

Vivian Kahn, Hungarian SIG Coordinator


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Some Basic Questions #hungary

Patricia J Weisshaus <patjw28@...>
 

In my last message, I meant to thank Vivian for her response. Please don't
jump on the bandwagon to tell me what records are available. I will have a
further message directed to H-SIG about the specific problem and
approximate dates I am looking for you. Thanks to all of you for the help
that everyone has offered.

Pat

At 02:54 AM 11/3/2005, vkahn@kmort.com wrote:
Pat,

There are records in the Hungarian state archives, the archives in
Nyireghaza, and in many other locations that have not been filmed by the
FHL. When JewishGen volunteers and staff come across such records they
attempt to acquire such records and obtain permission for JewishGen to
transcribe them. If you are unable to find the records you want in the
FHL catalog, you need to contact other sources, including the closest
regional and national archives to find out if such records exist. It's
always a good idea to first post your inquiry to the Hungarian SIG website
because many researchers have obtained records that have not been filmed
by the FHL. The next step is to contact various sources directly to find
out if the records you seek exist. H-SIG members may also be able to
direct you to the places that are most likely to have the records you seek.

The FHL donated a catalog of its Jewish records to JewishGen several years
ago. That database, which you can find on the JewishGen website, does not
include Jewish records that have been filmed during the time when this
catalog was created. You need to go to the FHL website or your local FHL
branch for more current information.

I hope that this answers your question.

Vivian Kahn

Subject: re:Some Basic Questions
From: Patricia J Weisshaus <patjw28@earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2005 12:16:32 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Dear Vivian,

You mention more records >from Nireghaza. You also say that the FHL list is
dated. Do you know of these other records >from Nireghaza are being/have
been filed and just not included in the list online, or are the the numbers
available a the FHC?

Pat

12:58 AM On 10/28/2005, vkahn@kmort.com wrote:
Dear Peter,

You've asked some questions for which others who have recently begun
researching Hungarian Jewish roots may also need answers.

Hungary began civil registration in October 1895. Before then, vital
records were maintained by the Jewish community and turned over to the
authorities. One copy of these records was kept in the place where the
records were generated and the other was usually sent to the county
(megye). As a result, even though some of the local records were
destroyed during WWII, others that were kept in county, regional, or
national archives may have been preserved. The Mormon Family History
Library (FHL) has filmed many records >from pre-World War I Hungary, which
included areas that are in present-day Hungary as well as places that are
now in Slovakia, Romania, Ukraine, Yugoslavia, and other modern nations
surrounding Hungary. The first step in researching your roots is to find
out in which current nation your ancestors lived.

Check the FHL on-line catalogue to see if they have filmed Jewish records
from the places where your relatives lived. You can search a somewhat
dated version of the FHL collection of Jewish records at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/FHLC/
You should also search the surnames and places that you are researching in
the JewishGen Hungary Database (JHD)
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary >.

If you have family >from areas that are in present-day Hungary or Slovakia,
you may be able to obtain records by writing to the Hungarian or Slovak
National Archives. Check the Hungarian SIG message archives and website
for current addresses. Your research will be more difficult if your
family came >from parts of pre-Trianon Hungary that are now in Romania or
the Ukraine. The FHL has microfilmed most of the 1848 Jewish Census
records that are held by the Hungarian National
Archives, but we continue to find records in regional archives
(Nyireghaza and Satorjaujhely, for example) and archives in Romania.
We know that there are other census and Jewish vital records in Romanian
and Ukrainian archives. JewishGen is continuing to try and obtain these
records and get permission to create indices that we can publish on-line.

In addition to searching the JewishGen Hungary Database (JHD), you should
send messages to the Hungarian SIG mailing list to find out if anyone is
researching your names and/or places or can suggest other resources.
We
have more than 800 members in more than a dozen countries and many of them
are fluent in Hungarian. Make sure to use a meaningful subject line (e.g.
Searching KAHAN/Sziget) and include your place of residence with your full
name. This will help folks to identify resources
that are available close to where you live. Also, make sure to
turn off SPAM blockers to allow H-SIG members to reach you.

Please feel free to contact me off-line or, if your questions might be of
general interest, through the Hungarian SIG discussion group.

Happy hunting!

Vivian Kahn, Hungarian SIG Coordinator


Re: Looking for Honig #hungary

Robert Neu
 

The more likely translation of Istvan/Pista in French
is Etienne.

Robert Neu

--- Catherine Adam <cia@interlog.com> wrote:

Re: Looking for Honig

Pista is diminutive for Istva'n. In English it's
often translated as Steven
and in French as Ste'phane.So depending on where the
son ended up, you may
be looking for Steven/Stephane Honig.

Catherine Adam
Toronto,Canada

----- Original Message -----
Subject: Re: Looking for Armin HONIG or piszta
HONIG
From: Robert Neu <roneu1@yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Oct 2005 23:55:42 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

Same general idea as for Joseph Weisz, though
Armin
Honig is less common. If they met in Paris, where
did
they live, why and when did they meet.
Robert

--- Ruben Weiser <weiser@ar.inter.net> wrote:

Hi to all.

I am looking for Armin HONIG (ha cohen) or a
decendent.
He is my grandmother's cousin and lived in
Debrecen before the war.
The last time she met him was just after the
war
in Paris.
He has at least a son named Piszta.
He may be now aprox 85 years old

Anybody know anything about him?

Thanks

Ruben WEISER
Buenos Aires
ARGENTINA


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re:Looking for Honig #hungary

Robert Neu
 

The more likely translation of Istvan/Pista in French
is Etienne.

Robert Neu

--- Catherine Adam <cia@interlog.com> wrote:

Re: Looking for Honig

Pista is diminutive for Istva'n. In English it's
often translated as Steven
and in French as Ste'phane.So depending on where the
son ended up, you may
be looking for Steven/Stephane Honig.

Catherine Adam
Toronto,Canada

----- Original Message -----
Subject: Re: Looking for Armin HONIG or piszta
HONIG
From: Robert Neu <roneu1@yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Oct 2005 23:55:42 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

Same general idea as for Joseph Weisz, though
Armin
Honig is less common. If they met in Paris, where
did
they live, why and when did they meet.
Robert

--- Ruben Weiser <weiser@ar.inter.net> wrote:

Hi to all.

I am looking for Armin HONIG (ha cohen) or a
decendent.
He is my grandmother's cousin and lived in
Debrecen before the war.
The last time she met him was just after the
war
in Paris.
He has at least a son named Piszta.
He may be now aprox 85 years old

Anybody know anything about him?

Thanks

Ruben WEISER
Buenos Aires
ARGENTINA


Re: The Origins of Katz Surname #hungary

Bernard Weill
 

Perhaps I am mentioning something already known to you
however, the Katz name simply is based on the Hebrew
"kof" and "tzedek" which means pious priest. Hope this
helps. The origin of the name Katz is not German, but
rather its Hebrew transliteration

--- "Katz, Itzik" <Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com> wrote:

Dear Siggers,

My cousin had taken the FTDNA Y37 test and the
results that came back
matched several people, one of which is an exact
match with us. The DNA
matching indicate that we are all relatives and that
our common ancestor
(depending on the level of DNA matchin) lived
between 200 to 600 years
ago.
The ancestors of these people are known to have come
from Ukraine and
Poland. My family is the only one >from Hungary.

All the people we match with (exact or partial
match) are known to be
Kohanim as the Katz surname would suggest. However,
only one of them
carry
the surname Katz. All the others have different
surnames like Kahan,
Bloom,
Kaplansky, Feinberg, etc. Most of these people have
indications that
thier
surname was changed >from Kahan or Kohen but not from
Katz.

I always believed that Katz was one of those ancient
surnames since it
has a
meaning in Hebrew and that it was carried over the
generations.

Is it possible that Katz is a germanized name to
comply wuth the 1786
Empiral naming Order?

I have seen in other places that Katz was also used
as a title and not
as a
surname. For examply, Rabby Shimshon Eliezer Katz
Gottdiener who was a
"Av-Beit Din (head of Jewish court)" in Tiszalok (in
the book "Shem
Ha'Gdolim" by Pinhas Zelig Schwartz) who is known to
have been a Kohen.
Gottdiener is a greminazed name of the Hebrew
surnmae Ovadia (server of
God).

Thank you,
Itzik Katz
Israel


Re: The Origins of Katz Surname #hungary

AttilaRona@...
 

Katz is an acronym for "Kohen tzedek", indicating lineage >from family of
priests. It means, "priest of righteousness". It is based on Psalm 132.9, which
says, "Your priests will be clothed in righteousness".

Attila Rona


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE:The Origins of Katz Surname #hungary

Bernard Weill
 

Perhaps I am mentioning something already known to you
however, the Katz name simply is based on the Hebrew
"kof" and "tzedek" which means pious priest. Hope this
helps. The origin of the name Katz is not German, but
rather its Hebrew transliteration

--- "Katz, Itzik" <Itzik.Katz@KLA-Tencor.com> wrote:

Dear Siggers,

My cousin had taken the FTDNA Y37 test and the
results that came back
matched several people, one of which is an exact
match with us. The DNA
matching indicate that we are all relatives and that
our common ancestor
(depending on the level of DNA matchin) lived
between 200 to 600 years
ago.
The ancestors of these people are known to have come
from Ukraine and
Poland. My family is the only one >from Hungary.

All the people we match with (exact or partial
match) are known to be
Kohanim as the Katz surname would suggest. However,
only one of them
carry
the surname Katz. All the others have different
surnames like Kahan,
Bloom,
Kaplansky, Feinberg, etc. Most of these people have
indications that
thier
surname was changed >from Kahan or Kohen but not from
Katz.

I always believed that Katz was one of those ancient
surnames since it
has a
meaning in Hebrew and that it was carried over the
generations.

Is it possible that Katz is a germanized name to
comply wuth the 1786
Empiral naming Order?

I have seen in other places that Katz was also used
as a title and not
as a
surname. For examply, Rabby Shimshon Eliezer Katz
Gottdiener who was a
"Av-Beit Din (head of Jewish court)" in Tiszalok (in
the book "Shem
Ha'Gdolim" by Pinhas Zelig Schwartz) who is known to
have been a Kohen.
Gottdiener is a greminazed name of the Hebrew
surnmae Ovadia (server of
God).

Thank you,
Itzik Katz
Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: The Origins of Katz Surname #hungary

AttilaRona@...
 

Katz is an acronym for "Kohen tzedek", indicating lineage >from family of
priests. It means, "priest of righteousness". It is based on Psalm 132.9, which
says, "Your priests will be clothed in righteousness".

Attila Rona


Re: Jewish Scouts Dinard and Beaulieu/Dordogne World War II #france

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

The name ALTSCHUL is not common in France : only
9 of them are listed in the current telephone
directory, among whom is a Charlotte A. I'm going
to send you her address privately.

Concerning the other children who were sent with
your mother to Dinard and Beaulieu until June
1940, you can send your question to the French
Association "Enfants Caches" - 17 rue
Geoffroy-l'Asnier - F 75004 PARIS They publish a
quarterly bulletin each year, with a special part
with such questions and answers. You can write in
English and they will translate.

You can send your question also to ALOUMIM in
Jerusalem (Association of Hidden Children during
the Holocaust). They have a bulletin too with a
special part for such questions : ALOUMIM - 9 rue
Alcalay - Jerusalem (Israel)
Tel. : 02 561 22 07 - Fax : 02 642 46 06

You can write also to OSE < ose@ose-france.org >
This association has archives concerning hidden
children during WWII.

--
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


French SIG #France Re: Jewish Scouts Dinard and Beaulieu/Dordogne World War II #france

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

The name ALTSCHUL is not common in France : only
9 of them are listed in the current telephone
directory, among whom is a Charlotte A. I'm going
to send you her address privately.

Concerning the other children who were sent with
your mother to Dinard and Beaulieu until June
1940, you can send your question to the French
Association "Enfants Caches" - 17 rue
Geoffroy-l'Asnier - F 75004 PARIS They publish a
quarterly bulletin each year, with a special part
with such questions and answers. You can write in
English and they will translate.

You can send your question also to ALOUMIM in
Jerusalem (Association of Hidden Children during
the Holocaust). They have a bulletin too with a
special part for such questions : ALOUMIM - 9 rue
Alcalay - Jerusalem (Israel)
Tel. : 02 561 22 07 - Fax : 02 642 46 06

You can write also to OSE < ose@ose-france.org >
This association has archives concerning hidden
children during WWII.

--
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


Trying to locate Ellen Stepak #ukraine

Harriett <hbquinn@...>
 

Hello all, I have lost contact with a relative in Israel and I know she
reads this newsgroup. If you have her e-mail address, please send it to
Harriett in Whitefish, Montana USA. Thanks, hbquinn@aboutmontana.net


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Trying to locate Ellen Stepak #ukraine

Harriett <hbquinn@...>
 

Hello all, I have lost contact with a relative in Israel and I know she
reads this newsgroup. If you have her e-mail address, please send it to
Harriett in Whitefish, Montana USA. Thanks, hbquinn@aboutmontana.net


Re: Sofa,Palestine #general

John Smith <someone@...>
 

I believe that would be Suba, and I doubt any Jews lived there before 1948.

Benzy Shani


KLEIN and FRANK Families of Minsk Gubernia #general

SOL2516171@...
 

I am looking for information about the family of my wife's great great
grandparents Nathan KLEIN and Frieda FRANK of Minsk Gubernia (Belarus).
They had four children, all of whom settled in Brooklyn -- Basha,
Balya (Bella) Lapidus (1859-1941), Rhoda (Dora) Blitstein (1865- ca
1945), and Louis FRANK (he took his mother's maiden name as his
surname) (1866-1959). I don't know whether the KLEIN and FRANK
families lived in Minsk itself or some other town in the province.

David Solomon
Chevy Chase, Maryland
SOL2516171@aol.com