Date   

Kups, Reckendorf and Trunstadt, Bavaria - Seek vital records #germany

SOL2516171@...
 

Does anyone have access to 19th century records for Kups, Reckendorf or
Trunstadt, Bavaria? I am looking for infomation about a BRAND family
from one of those towns. My great great grandmother Fanny BRANDT may
have been born in one of those towns in 1834. Thanks very much.

David Solomon Chevy Chase, MD SOL2516171@aol.com


German SIG #Germany Kups, Reckendorf and Trunstadt, Bavaria - Seek vital records #germany

SOL2516171@...
 

Does anyone have access to 19th century records for Kups, Reckendorf or
Trunstadt, Bavaria? I am looking for infomation about a BRAND family
from one of those towns. My great great grandmother Fanny BRANDT may
have been born in one of those towns in 1834. Thanks very much.

David Solomon Chevy Chase, MD SOL2516171@aol.com


PERLMUTTER family #ukraine

RBWANN@...
 

Looking for members of the PERLMUTTER family Pinchus PERLMUTTER (1850 -?),
his son Rubin PERLMUTTER.

Rubin PERLMUTTER was married to Zelda GRABARSKY (GRABARSKI) her father was
Ozer GRABARSKY and she had two brothers Kalman and Rubin. These families were
either >from Rozishchtze or Ratne.

Rubin had a son Abe PERLMUTTER who married Dora TURNER who was >from Ratne.
Dora TURNER'S mother was a LEVENTHAL.

My fathers mother was Bessie OLDE(R). Her family was >from Odessa. Her
mother was Faga Miriam and her father was Morris OLDER.

My fathers father was Harry BERNSTEIN, he was born in New York in 1885 his
father was Mayer BERNSTEIN and his mother was Anna (Hanna) FINELIEB. I have
no idea where they came >from either Russia or the Ukraine.

Please contact me if you have any information on any of the families
mentioned above.

Ron BERNSTEIN


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine PERLMUTTER family #ukraine

RBWANN@...
 

Looking for members of the PERLMUTTER family Pinchus PERLMUTTER (1850 -?),
his son Rubin PERLMUTTER.

Rubin PERLMUTTER was married to Zelda GRABARSKY (GRABARSKI) her father was
Ozer GRABARSKY and she had two brothers Kalman and Rubin. These families were
either >from Rozishchtze or Ratne.

Rubin had a son Abe PERLMUTTER who married Dora TURNER who was >from Ratne.
Dora TURNER'S mother was a LEVENTHAL.

My fathers mother was Bessie OLDE(R). Her family was >from Odessa. Her
mother was Faga Miriam and her father was Morris OLDER.

My fathers father was Harry BERNSTEIN, he was born in New York in 1885 his
father was Mayer BERNSTEIN and his mother was Anna (Hanna) FINELIEB. I have
no idea where they came >from either Russia or the Ukraine.

Please contact me if you have any information on any of the families
mentioned above.

Ron BERNSTEIN


Short term volunteer needed - VRI Project #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

The Vital Records Indexing (VRI) Project is in need of someone who can
call up a calendar conversion program [Hebrew/Gregorian/Julian] and print
out or save to a file calendars for the years 1837-1930. I know it's a
simple task - I just don't have the time to do it.

If you are interested, please let me know privately.


Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Short term volunteer needed - VRI Project #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

The Vital Records Indexing (VRI) Project is in need of someone who can
call up a calendar conversion program [Hebrew/Gregorian/Julian] and print
out or save to a file calendars for the years 1837-1930. I know it's a
simple task - I just don't have the time to do it.

If you are interested, please let me know privately.


Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group


VRI Project Update - Mikaliskis [Mikhalishok] #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

I am making this announcement regarding Mikaliskis Vital Records Indexing
to encourage more donations. We are one $100 donor short of being able to
start translating these records. This additional donation will provide
us with a total which will facilitate tranlation of about 20% of the
records for this town. If you are interested in Mikhalishok, please
take this opportunity to donate so we can get started.

If you would like a copy of the donor form, please contact me and I will
send it out promptly. [This applies for all towns that are part of the
VRI project].


Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania VRI Project Update - Mikaliskis [Mikhalishok] #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

I am making this announcement regarding Mikaliskis Vital Records Indexing
to encourage more donations. We are one $100 donor short of being able to
start translating these records. This additional donation will provide
us with a total which will facilitate tranlation of about 20% of the
records for this town. If you are interested in Mikhalishok, please
take this opportunity to donate so we can get started.

If you would like a copy of the donor form, please contact me and I will
send it out promptly. [This applies for all towns that are part of the
VRI project].


Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group


Tykocin and Bialystok #poland

Jerry Levit <jerlevit@...>
 

Second installment of journey to Bialystok region

Tykocin & Bialystok

September 15, 2005

Though the day started with an inauspicious beginning consisting of my
missing the last step on the staircase leading to the lobby of the
Hotel Branicki and, thereby, performing a beautifully executed
somersault, it was one to remember. Chris, Lucy and I went directly to
the Bialystok Museum were, of course, we went right up to the
director's office and were greeted with great familiarity. Lucy's
friend, the deputy director, sat down with us, and Chris inquired into
any Sidra connections that might be known. There didn't seem to be
any. We were then led to the famous model of the city, a most
intricate and detailed affair, and were given a lengthy presentation
by a staff member. She spoke in halting English, but was most
informative. I could have stayed there for hours.

from there we took off to Tykocin, the most complete rural synagogue
in Poland. The scruffiness of Bialystok was left behind as the ground
unfolded into gently rolling cropland. The corn was just beginning to
brown and potatoes were being harvested by hand.

Tykocin is on a national historic registry of some sort and it shows.
The church, town square and the synagogue absolutely sparkle. The
red-tiled roofs on most buildings are most striking.

We went into the town museum, which if I remember correctly had been a
cheder. As usual, Lucy knew the director very well. She's super! and we
were escorted into her private office, which besides a large table also
had two small beds. She commutes the hour plus >from Bialystok every day
via bus and some nights, especially in winter, she overnights in her
office in Tykocin. She had recently hosted two archaeologists who are
involved in a dig nearby. Over coffee, tea and cigarettes we had a
general discussion of Tykocin and how the director, whose name I failed
to record, had come into the position.

She described it in the usual Polish self-deprecating manner. 'Oh, I
just sort of fell into it,' she said with a shrug. I suspect that
others on this list know much more about this matter than I.

In any event, it was a most informative tour. The museum charts the
course of human habitation in the area since Neolithic times and, of
course, has a substantial section on Jewish life there. As the son of
a pharmacist, I marveled at the reconstructed turn-of-the-twentieth
century pharmacy.

The synagogue is awe-inspiring and deeply saddening. It has been
restored to its fully architectural and artistic beauty. The walls are
covered with prayers. This was not only an architectural conceit, but
also provided those who lacked prayer books with a way to participate
fully in the services. There are quite complete accounts of this
remarkable place elsewhere, so I will not burden you with my attempts
at description. The idea that this place stood and heard the prayers
of so many for several hundred years and now stands as silent witness,
brought me to tears.

Lucy, Chris and I had lunch at the nearby restaurant, Tejsza, which
serves traditional Polish and Jewish foods. We all sampled each other's
plates and I can say that I have not tasted kreplach as good as those
since Grandma Levit passed away over forty years ago. Again, I felt
quite emotional.

Our taste buds must have a direct connection to the heart. The place
is owned by a woman who had worked for a Jewish family in Florida,
where she learned the finer points of Jewish cuisine. Don't miss the
blueberry pierogis.

We stopped by Chris' friend, who runs a small bed-and-breakfast right
on the river. It is adjacent to a major wildlife sanctuary. Next time
I come I'll try to tie it into the wildfowl migration seasons. It
really is a lovely place. It is not hard to imagine what drew our
ancestors to this place.

from Tykocin, we went back to Bialystok and went to the major
memorials in town. The first is the steel structure modeled after all
that remained of the Bialystok synagogue after the Nazis burned it
with a thousand of our brethren inside. >from there we went to a park
that has memorials to the heroes of the Bialystok ghetto uprising and
to the destruction of the Bialystok Jewish community. I left feeling
sad, but mostly angry. And, in awe of organizations, like JewishGen,
JRI-Poland, FODZ and people like Lucy and Chris, who are doing so much
to ensure that the memory of those who went before is not lost. As
Baal Shem Tov said, 'Forgetting is Exile; Remembering is Redemption'.

Respectfully submitted,

Jerry Levit

Chapel Hill, NC, USA

Researching WEKSLER, WEXLER, GLADSTEIN, GLADSTAJN, NOWINSKI


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Tykocin and Bialystok #poland

Jerry Levit <jerlevit@...>
 

Second installment of journey to Bialystok region

Tykocin & Bialystok

September 15, 2005

Though the day started with an inauspicious beginning consisting of my
missing the last step on the staircase leading to the lobby of the
Hotel Branicki and, thereby, performing a beautifully executed
somersault, it was one to remember. Chris, Lucy and I went directly to
the Bialystok Museum were, of course, we went right up to the
director's office and were greeted with great familiarity. Lucy's
friend, the deputy director, sat down with us, and Chris inquired into
any Sidra connections that might be known. There didn't seem to be
any. We were then led to the famous model of the city, a most
intricate and detailed affair, and were given a lengthy presentation
by a staff member. She spoke in halting English, but was most
informative. I could have stayed there for hours.

from there we took off to Tykocin, the most complete rural synagogue
in Poland. The scruffiness of Bialystok was left behind as the ground
unfolded into gently rolling cropland. The corn was just beginning to
brown and potatoes were being harvested by hand.

Tykocin is on a national historic registry of some sort and it shows.
The church, town square and the synagogue absolutely sparkle. The
red-tiled roofs on most buildings are most striking.

We went into the town museum, which if I remember correctly had been a
cheder. As usual, Lucy knew the director very well. She's super! and we
were escorted into her private office, which besides a large table also
had two small beds. She commutes the hour plus >from Bialystok every day
via bus and some nights, especially in winter, she overnights in her
office in Tykocin. She had recently hosted two archaeologists who are
involved in a dig nearby. Over coffee, tea and cigarettes we had a
general discussion of Tykocin and how the director, whose name I failed
to record, had come into the position.

She described it in the usual Polish self-deprecating manner. 'Oh, I
just sort of fell into it,' she said with a shrug. I suspect that
others on this list know much more about this matter than I.

In any event, it was a most informative tour. The museum charts the
course of human habitation in the area since Neolithic times and, of
course, has a substantial section on Jewish life there. As the son of
a pharmacist, I marveled at the reconstructed turn-of-the-twentieth
century pharmacy.

The synagogue is awe-inspiring and deeply saddening. It has been
restored to its fully architectural and artistic beauty. The walls are
covered with prayers. This was not only an architectural conceit, but
also provided those who lacked prayer books with a way to participate
fully in the services. There are quite complete accounts of this
remarkable place elsewhere, so I will not burden you with my attempts
at description. The idea that this place stood and heard the prayers
of so many for several hundred years and now stands as silent witness,
brought me to tears.

Lucy, Chris and I had lunch at the nearby restaurant, Tejsza, which
serves traditional Polish and Jewish foods. We all sampled each other's
plates and I can say that I have not tasted kreplach as good as those
since Grandma Levit passed away over forty years ago. Again, I felt
quite emotional.

Our taste buds must have a direct connection to the heart. The place
is owned by a woman who had worked for a Jewish family in Florida,
where she learned the finer points of Jewish cuisine. Don't miss the
blueberry pierogis.

We stopped by Chris' friend, who runs a small bed-and-breakfast right
on the river. It is adjacent to a major wildlife sanctuary. Next time
I come I'll try to tie it into the wildfowl migration seasons. It
really is a lovely place. It is not hard to imagine what drew our
ancestors to this place.

from Tykocin, we went back to Bialystok and went to the major
memorials in town. The first is the steel structure modeled after all
that remained of the Bialystok synagogue after the Nazis burned it
with a thousand of our brethren inside. >from there we went to a park
that has memorials to the heroes of the Bialystok ghetto uprising and
to the destruction of the Bialystok Jewish community. I left feeling
sad, but mostly angry. And, in awe of organizations, like JewishGen,
JRI-Poland, FODZ and people like Lucy and Chris, who are doing so much
to ensure that the memory of those who went before is not lost. As
Baal Shem Tov said, 'Forgetting is Exile; Remembering is Redemption'.

Respectfully submitted,

Jerry Levit

Chapel Hill, NC, USA

Researching WEKSLER, WEXLER, GLADSTEIN, GLADSTAJN, NOWINSKI


sana tova! #poland

yael halamchi <m44w33@...>
 

Dear bialy sigers:

Thx to mark!
i wish you all the best year that can be!

yours
yeal halacmi
israel
resarch:strenfeld,boyarski and finstion >from bialystok


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland sana tova! #poland

yael halamchi <m44w33@...>
 

Dear bialy sigers:

Thx to mark!
i wish you all the best year that can be!

yours
yeal halacmi
israel
resarch:strenfeld,boyarski and finstion >from bialystok


Kol Ha Kovod #poland

JReing2528@...
 

Kol Ha Kovod to Jerry Levit and to Stanley Diamond and to Mark Halpern for
this wonderful, rich description of Jerry's visit

With high regard for all of you,
Estelle Reingold


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Kol Ha Kovod #poland

JReing2528@...
 

Kol Ha Kovod to Jerry Levit and to Stanley Diamond and to Mark Halpern for
this wonderful, rich description of Jerry's visit

With high regard for all of you,
Estelle Reingold


*re: Trip to Slovakia and Hungary #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear Samuel,

The region of Huncovce and Kezmarok is a goldmine for Jewish researchers. In the 18th and 19th century, both places were the center of a very large and vibrant Jewish community. Kezmarok's Jewish cemetery is fully preserved, unfortunately the two Huncovce cemeteries are not, only a few graves survived a flood and vandalism. To visit them you must contact a person I will identify in a private message.

The best place to stay is in Poprad, a larger town at the foot of the Tatra mountains where Huncovce and Kezmarok are located. By train, they are 10-15 minutes distant >from Poprad.

Bon voyage ;-)
Tom

At 01:00 -0500 07.10.2005, jnskraus@earthlink.net wrote:
Subject: Trip to Slovakia and Hungary
From: Joan Kraus <jnskraus@earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 1 Jan 1970 17:21:44 -0800
X-Message-Number: 3

My son, Edward Kraus, and I will be flying to Budapest on October 18th.
Edward has rented a car. He will drive us to Nyiregyhaza, Hungary and
to Huncovce (Hunfalu, Hunsdorf), Slovakia. We plan to spend three days
in the Spis (Szepes) area and two in the Szabolcs area.

We may stop, briefly!, in Bonyhad, Kesmarok, Nyestudlo, Kosice, Levoca,
Szolnok, if not too far off our path
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


New Holocaust Databases #hungary

Joyce Field
 

I have been asked by Warren Blatt to post the following important
message on his behalf regarding new databases.

JewishGen is pleased to announce the addition of 37,000 new records
to the JewishGen Holocaust Database <
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

There are 13 new datasets, and two updated datasets. The 13 new datasets are:

* "Lodz Transports to the Chelmno Extermination Camp":
Names of 7,168 individuals >from Lodz who were transferred to the
death camp at Chelmno, June-August 1944.

* "Gyor Victims at Auschwitz":
Names of over 3,000 victims >from Gyor, Hungary, deported to
Auschwitz, made by a Jewish communal organization.

* "Jewish Physicians >from Czechoslovakia":
Names of 1,668 Czechoslovakian physicians who died during the
Holocaust, >from an unpublished yizkor book manuscript.

* "Hannover-Ahlem Prisoners":
Names of 257 prisoners, mostly Polish Jews, who perished in a subcamp
of Neuengamme, located in Ahlem/Hannover.

* "Jews of Des (Dej) in the Ghettoization of May, 1944":
List of 3,250 Jewish residents in Des, Hungary (now Dej, Romania),
just prior to their deportation, May 3-10, 1944.

* "Kisvarda, Hungary - Records Before Deportation, 1944":
3,516 residents >from Kisvarda (Kleinwardein), Hungary ghetto prior to
their deportation, April 10-13, 1944.

* "Jews >from Iasi (Jassy) Who Survived the Transports":
List of over 1,600 Jews who survived two transports by train >from
Iasi (Jassy) Romania.

* "Kozienice Ghetto Census (Lista), 1939 - 1942":
4,023 inhabitants >from the census of Jews in the Kozienice ghetto,
made by the Jewish Council of Kozienice.

* "Holocaust Survivors Claiming American Citizenship":
Applications of 621 individuals claiming American citizenship,
processed in Zurich by the U.S. State Department.

* "Subotica Jews, Victims of the Fascist Occupation, 1941-45":
1,993 names of victims >from Subotica, now in Serbia (formerly
Szabadka, Hungary, before WWI).

* "Balta Ghetto":
2,817 Jews >from the Balta Ghetto, Transnistria, as of 1941.

* "Balta Orphans":
List of 220 orphaned children in the Balta Ghetto.

* "Balta Batallion":
List of 507 Jewish men in Batallion 120 - Romanian forced laborers in
Transnitria, 1941-1944.


We've also updated the following two datasets:

* Dachau Indexing Project:
Over 7,000 records added, for a total of over 135,000 records.

* North Bavarian Jews:
1,200 records added; now over 7,400 records total.


Thanks to all the volunteers who have made these possible, especially
project coordinators Nolan Altman and Mike Kalt.


The JewishGen Holocaust Database is a collection of nearly 100
different datasets, containing over one million entries about
Holocaust victims and survivors.

This database can be searched at <
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

Warren

Warren Blatt
JewishGen Editor-in-Chief
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


Hungary SIG #Hungary *re: Trip to Slovakia and Hungary #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear Samuel,

The region of Huncovce and Kezmarok is a goldmine for Jewish researchers. In the 18th and 19th century, both places were the center of a very large and vibrant Jewish community. Kezmarok's Jewish cemetery is fully preserved, unfortunately the two Huncovce cemeteries are not, only a few graves survived a flood and vandalism. To visit them you must contact a person I will identify in a private message.

The best place to stay is in Poprad, a larger town at the foot of the Tatra mountains where Huncovce and Kezmarok are located. By train, they are 10-15 minutes distant >from Poprad.

Bon voyage ;-)
Tom

At 01:00 -0500 07.10.2005, jnskraus@earthlink.net wrote:
Subject: Trip to Slovakia and Hungary
From: Joan Kraus <jnskraus@earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 1 Jan 1970 17:21:44 -0800
X-Message-Number: 3

My son, Edward Kraus, and I will be flying to Budapest on October 18th.
Edward has rented a car. He will drive us to Nyiregyhaza, Hungary and
to Huncovce (Hunfalu, Hunsdorf), Slovakia. We plan to spend three days
in the Spis (Szepes) area and two in the Szabolcs area.

We may stop, briefly!, in Bonyhad, Kesmarok, Nyestudlo, Kosice, Levoca,
Szolnok, if not too far off our path
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Hungary SIG #Hungary New Holocaust Databases #hungary

Joyce Field
 

I have been asked by Warren Blatt to post the following important
message on his behalf regarding new databases.

JewishGen is pleased to announce the addition of 37,000 new records
to the JewishGen Holocaust Database <
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

There are 13 new datasets, and two updated datasets. The 13 new datasets are:

* "Lodz Transports to the Chelmno Extermination Camp":
Names of 7,168 individuals >from Lodz who were transferred to the
death camp at Chelmno, June-August 1944.

* "Gyor Victims at Auschwitz":
Names of over 3,000 victims >from Gyor, Hungary, deported to
Auschwitz, made by a Jewish communal organization.

* "Jewish Physicians >from Czechoslovakia":
Names of 1,668 Czechoslovakian physicians who died during the
Holocaust, >from an unpublished yizkor book manuscript.

* "Hannover-Ahlem Prisoners":
Names of 257 prisoners, mostly Polish Jews, who perished in a subcamp
of Neuengamme, located in Ahlem/Hannover.

* "Jews of Des (Dej) in the Ghettoization of May, 1944":
List of 3,250 Jewish residents in Des, Hungary (now Dej, Romania),
just prior to their deportation, May 3-10, 1944.

* "Kisvarda, Hungary - Records Before Deportation, 1944":
3,516 residents >from Kisvarda (Kleinwardein), Hungary ghetto prior to
their deportation, April 10-13, 1944.

* "Jews >from Iasi (Jassy) Who Survived the Transports":
List of over 1,600 Jews who survived two transports by train >from
Iasi (Jassy) Romania.

* "Kozienice Ghetto Census (Lista), 1939 - 1942":
4,023 inhabitants >from the census of Jews in the Kozienice ghetto,
made by the Jewish Council of Kozienice.

* "Holocaust Survivors Claiming American Citizenship":
Applications of 621 individuals claiming American citizenship,
processed in Zurich by the U.S. State Department.

* "Subotica Jews, Victims of the Fascist Occupation, 1941-45":
1,993 names of victims >from Subotica, now in Serbia (formerly
Szabadka, Hungary, before WWI).

* "Balta Ghetto":
2,817 Jews >from the Balta Ghetto, Transnistria, as of 1941.

* "Balta Orphans":
List of 220 orphaned children in the Balta Ghetto.

* "Balta Batallion":
List of 507 Jewish men in Batallion 120 - Romanian forced laborers in
Transnitria, 1941-1944.


We've also updated the following two datasets:

* Dachau Indexing Project:
Over 7,000 records added, for a total of over 135,000 records.

* North Bavarian Jews:
1,200 records added; now over 7,400 records total.


Thanks to all the volunteers who have made these possible, especially
project coordinators Nolan Altman and Mike Kalt.


The JewishGen Holocaust Database is a collection of nearly 100
different datasets, containing over one million entries about
Holocaust victims and survivors.

This database can be searched at <
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

Warren

Warren Blatt
JewishGen Editor-in-Chief
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


Re: zrenjanin #hungary

Ted Grossman <tgrossman@...>
 

Thank you very much. My father and grandparents were in Nagy Becskerek
during World War I, where my grandparents ran a kosher kitchen for the
Jewish soliders who fought for Austria-Hungary. I intend to follow up
on your information so I can learn more about what life was like there.
Ted Grossman
Eastsound, Washington

On Oct 5, 2005, at 1:48 AM, peter bakos wrote:

Hello fellow Siggers.

Leslie Eloed asks about the Voivodina.

In 1941 this area was split in two, with the Germans occupying the
eastern half, called Banat and the Hungarians the western half, called
Bacska.

WHile everything is relative, the Jewish community in Bacska had a
less horrible time of it than their cousins in the Banat. The German
commander decreed that Zrenjanin (Nagy Becskerek) would be the first
"Juden-Frei" place in the area and he was fairly successful. Most of
the Jewish community were murdered (including two of my Podvinecz
cousins), the Synagogue was burned and the ruins searched for hidden
gold, and the cemetery wrecked. All of the Jewish registers were
destroyed.

Last week I spent three days here searching for traces and had the joy
to visit the Jewish Community in Zrenjanin. Their address is
JOZRENJANIN@NEOBEE.NET. I am sure you will find Lydia and her members
to be kind and helpful to you.

When I arrived they sat me down and had me tell the story of my
family. The next day one member went with me to the City Hall where
the regional Archives are also located. There we wnet through the one
remaining register, which is a partial register of marriage >from 1896
to 1941. Many pages are torn out.

We then went to the Registrar's office to look at the civil
registration books. You must be aware that civil registration began
in Hungary in September 1895, and these books generally survived. To
see these books in Serbia requires making an application to the local
authority if you are a foreigner. To get this part accomplished
requires a local guide, or political connections. Once this was
accomplished I was able to find the deaths of three members of the
family.

Finally, we went to the cemetery. While the graves have been
destroyed, many of the stones have been saved. (Recording these could
be a good project for a day or two). Some are turned around so only
the Hebrew inscription is seen, but you just walk around back. The
cemetery is next to the Reformed cemetery in the yard of the Refromed
Church outside of the city center.

I also went to Yas Tomic (Modos) where my relatives lived on arrival.
There was no one here to help me that day (I arrived announced only by
the clerk of the neighboring village which I had mistaken for Yasa
Tomic, who kindly tried to ask his colleague to help me). But a local
man took me to the place where he says is the old Jewish Cemetery. We
had no language in common but he made the word Jungle quite clear and
it certainly is. As soon as I can confirm the ownership and the fact
that it is indeed the Jewish cemetery I intend to return with some
tools and pay some persons to help me to clear the land. Perhaps a
fence would then be needed. Actually in its current state the
cemetery is ideally protected for no one knows it is there.

In Novi Sad the Jewish community is run by Anika Frenkel a formidable
personality who is most welcoming and helpful to visitors. There are
a number of nice and helpful people working there. They run a soup
kitchen for the benefit of the poor of the community as well as for
poor Jews.

They have a number of their registers and will make information
available. There is a small fee for researches.

The Synagogue has been preserved and it is quite special. The
community is not large enough to justify the expense of keeping the
large Synagogue operating but it is used for concerts and so has life.

The cemetery here has a guide for it (though none of us could figure
out the layout for the most recent burials >from the 60's and 70's).
While there is an attendant family, they do not maintain the cemetery
as there is no money for this. I found the resting place of a couple
of my cousins and managed to clear it, though the very nice lady did
most of the dirty work. Obviously I made a gift to her which she
refused only relenting when I suggested she use ti to buy something
for her little boy.

There are city archives in Novi Sad as well but when I went there it
proved to be a nightmare of Kafkasque proportions with all signs in
Cyrillic and lines of hopeless looking people searching for documents
of various sorts. It will be necessary to go back with a "guide".
(It will also be necessary to get "permission" >from the local
government).

The Voivodina Archives are behind the Voivodina Museum on Dunavska
Street. Here too is the problem of permission though very kind
younger people who seem to understand the philosophy of "open
socieities" proved helpful to me. I was able to see the remnanats of
the registers for Palanka. They are in a large box confused with the
Protestant registers and there are very few of the Jewish Registers
surviving. For after 1895 the civil register is in the town.

I hope this has been helpful.

Peter Bakos
Paris/Budapest


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: zrenjanin #hungary

Ted Grossman <tgrossman@...>
 

Thank you very much. My father and grandparents were in Nagy Becskerek
during World War I, where my grandparents ran a kosher kitchen for the
Jewish soliders who fought for Austria-Hungary. I intend to follow up
on your information so I can learn more about what life was like there.
Ted Grossman
Eastsound, Washington

On Oct 5, 2005, at 1:48 AM, peter bakos wrote:

Hello fellow Siggers.

Leslie Eloed asks about the Voivodina.

In 1941 this area was split in two, with the Germans occupying the
eastern half, called Banat and the Hungarians the western half, called
Bacska.

WHile everything is relative, the Jewish community in Bacska had a
less horrible time of it than their cousins in the Banat. The German
commander decreed that Zrenjanin (Nagy Becskerek) would be the first
"Juden-Frei" place in the area and he was fairly successful. Most of
the Jewish community were murdered (including two of my Podvinecz
cousins), the Synagogue was burned and the ruins searched for hidden
gold, and the cemetery wrecked. All of the Jewish registers were
destroyed.

Last week I spent three days here searching for traces and had the joy
to visit the Jewish Community in Zrenjanin. Their address is
JOZRENJANIN@NEOBEE.NET. I am sure you will find Lydia and her members
to be kind and helpful to you.

When I arrived they sat me down and had me tell the story of my
family. The next day one member went with me to the City Hall where
the regional Archives are also located. There we wnet through the one
remaining register, which is a partial register of marriage >from 1896
to 1941. Many pages are torn out.

We then went to the Registrar's office to look at the civil
registration books. You must be aware that civil registration began
in Hungary in September 1895, and these books generally survived. To
see these books in Serbia requires making an application to the local
authority if you are a foreigner. To get this part accomplished
requires a local guide, or political connections. Once this was
accomplished I was able to find the deaths of three members of the
family.

Finally, we went to the cemetery. While the graves have been
destroyed, many of the stones have been saved. (Recording these could
be a good project for a day or two). Some are turned around so only
the Hebrew inscription is seen, but you just walk around back. The
cemetery is next to the Reformed cemetery in the yard of the Refromed
Church outside of the city center.

I also went to Yas Tomic (Modos) where my relatives lived on arrival.
There was no one here to help me that day (I arrived announced only by
the clerk of the neighboring village which I had mistaken for Yasa
Tomic, who kindly tried to ask his colleague to help me). But a local
man took me to the place where he says is the old Jewish Cemetery. We
had no language in common but he made the word Jungle quite clear and
it certainly is. As soon as I can confirm the ownership and the fact
that it is indeed the Jewish cemetery I intend to return with some
tools and pay some persons to help me to clear the land. Perhaps a
fence would then be needed. Actually in its current state the
cemetery is ideally protected for no one knows it is there.

In Novi Sad the Jewish community is run by Anika Frenkel a formidable
personality who is most welcoming and helpful to visitors. There are
a number of nice and helpful people working there. They run a soup
kitchen for the benefit of the poor of the community as well as for
poor Jews.

They have a number of their registers and will make information
available. There is a small fee for researches.

The Synagogue has been preserved and it is quite special. The
community is not large enough to justify the expense of keeping the
large Synagogue operating but it is used for concerts and so has life.

The cemetery here has a guide for it (though none of us could figure
out the layout for the most recent burials >from the 60's and 70's).
While there is an attendant family, they do not maintain the cemetery
as there is no money for this. I found the resting place of a couple
of my cousins and managed to clear it, though the very nice lady did
most of the dirty work. Obviously I made a gift to her which she
refused only relenting when I suggested she use ti to buy something
for her little boy.

There are city archives in Novi Sad as well but when I went there it
proved to be a nightmare of Kafkasque proportions with all signs in
Cyrillic and lines of hopeless looking people searching for documents
of various sorts. It will be necessary to go back with a "guide".
(It will also be necessary to get "permission" >from the local
government).

The Voivodina Archives are behind the Voivodina Museum on Dunavska
Street. Here too is the problem of permission though very kind
younger people who seem to understand the philosophy of "open
socieities" proved helpful to me. I was able to see the remnanats of
the registers for Palanka. They are in a large box confused with the
Protestant registers and there are very few of the Jewish Registers
surviving. For after 1895 the civil register is in the town.

I hope this has been helpful.

Peter Bakos
Paris/Budapest