Date   

Translations needed #belarus

aiginsburg
 

I have recently posted two items on viewmate in need of translation
from Russian.
The first is a the back of a picture of a young woman >from Dokshitz,
Belarus. It is at http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7708

The second is the plaque >from a Soviet era memorial at the site of
the Holocaust in Dokshitz.
It is at http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7696

Thanks for your help.

Please reply privately.

Aaron Ginsburg
Searching:Kusinitz(Dokshitz, Belarus): Ginzburg, Cirlin(Parafynove,
Belarus;Pokross(Gorodishche, Ukraine)

aaron.ginsburg@gmail.com
Sharon, Ma


Belarus SIG #Belarus Translations needed #belarus

aiginsburg
 

I have recently posted two items on viewmate in need of translation
from Russian.
The first is a the back of a picture of a young woman >from Dokshitz,
Belarus. It is at http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7708

The second is the plaque >from a Soviet era memorial at the site of
the Holocaust in Dokshitz.
It is at http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7696

Thanks for your help.

Please reply privately.

Aaron Ginsburg
Searching:Kusinitz(Dokshitz, Belarus): Ginzburg, Cirlin(Parafynove,
Belarus;Pokross(Gorodishche, Ukraine)

aaron.ginsburg@gmail.com
Sharon, Ma


Re: Widowers with children remarrying in mid 19th century #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 4/2/2006 5:32:09 AM Eastern Standard Time,
IsraelP@pikholz.org writes:

< Has anyone ever seen any statistics on how often in the mid-late
1800's women died leaving a husband and young children? I inquire
more specifically about Jewish families in Galicia. >

==Sorry, I have no specific data and none specifically for Galicia,
but the incidence was not rare. Most of the deaths were postpartum.
My great grandfather (3rd child) lost his mother in ca 1843 when his
younger brother was born; his father, a well-respected and presumaby
not impoverished village school teacher and cantor in Germany took a
second wife who bore him no children but lived to the age of 95.

==A generation later, the great grandfather, a rabbi in a prosperous
German city, lost his own first wife at the birth of his own first child;
he remarried almost immediately, had another child that died shortly
after birth, then went on to have 14 more children by his second wife,
all but one of whom survived into adulthood.

==I have many wives on my trees who died postpartum. If there was
a living infant, or older children, the community would try to find the
widower a second wife as soon as possible. Since marriages generally
required that the husband was in possession of a Letter of Protection,
marrying a widower was quite attractive in that it offered marriage to a
woman who miht not otherwise have found a spouse.

==The most common arrangement was that the husband married the
sister or cousin of the deceased wife. After all, the families knew each
other, had shown their compatability, and most commonly a second
dowry was not demanded.

==My guess is that something between ten and twentyfive percent of
families experienced the death of a mother when children were still
young, say under 12.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Widowers with children remarrying in mid 19th century #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 4/2/2006 5:32:09 AM Eastern Standard Time,
IsraelP@pikholz.org writes:

< Has anyone ever seen any statistics on how often in the mid-late
1800's women died leaving a husband and young children? I inquire
more specifically about Jewish families in Galicia. >

==Sorry, I have no specific data and none specifically for Galicia,
but the incidence was not rare. Most of the deaths were postpartum.
My great grandfather (3rd child) lost his mother in ca 1843 when his
younger brother was born; his father, a well-respected and presumaby
not impoverished village school teacher and cantor in Germany took a
second wife who bore him no children but lived to the age of 95.

==A generation later, the great grandfather, a rabbi in a prosperous
German city, lost his own first wife at the birth of his own first child;
he remarried almost immediately, had another child that died shortly
after birth, then went on to have 14 more children by his second wife,
all but one of whom survived into adulthood.

==I have many wives on my trees who died postpartum. If there was
a living infant, or older children, the community would try to find the
widower a second wife as soon as possible. Since marriages generally
required that the husband was in possession of a Letter of Protection,
marrying a widower was quite attractive in that it offered marriage to a
woman who miht not otherwise have found a spouse.

==The most common arrangement was that the husband married the
sister or cousin of the deceased wife. After all, the families knew each
other, had shown their compatability, and most commonly a second
dowry was not demanded.

==My guess is that something between ten and twentyfive percent of
families experienced the death of a mother when children were still
young, say under 12.

Michael Bernet, New York


April Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia #general

JGLois@...
 

April Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia

Date: Monday, April 10, 2006
Time: 7:45 PM
Place: The Newman Building at Gratz College
Old York Road & Melrose Avenue
Melrose Park, PA 19027

Speaker: Megan Smolenyak,
Topic: A Layman's Guide to Using DNA to Advance Your Genealogy

Megan Smolenyak is author of Trace Your Roots with DNA: Using
Genetic Tests to Explore Your Family Tree

DNA testing has recently become a topic in genealogy circles
because it affords us another technique by which we can determine
if a blood relationship exists with previously unknown and potential
relatives. Megan Smolenyak's latest book is an easy-to-follow, yet
comprehensive guide to using DNA tests for genealogical purposes.
Packed with real world examples, it will show you how to solve your
own history mysteries.

Recipient of International Society of Family History Writers and Editors
awards in 2003, 2004 and 2005, Smolenyak has appeared on the Today
Show, Fox & Friends, Ancestors, NPR, and a number of local television
and radio shows.

She is also the author of Honoring Our Ancestors: Inspiring Stories of
the Quest for Our Roots, In Search of Our Ancestors: 101 Inspiring
Stories of Serendipity and Connection in Rediscovering Our Family
History, and They Came to America: Finding Your Immigrant Ancestors.

As lead researcher for the PBS award-winning Ancestors series,
Smolenyak delved into over 5,000 genealogical stories and developed
much of the content for the companion website. She has subsequently
consulted for other television programs, including PBS's award-winning
They Came to America. If you're interested in learning more about the
ascinating topic of genetic genealogy, please visit Smolenyak's sister site,
www.genetealogy.com.

****
Q and A *Sessions*: There will be a 30 minute Question and Answer
session preceding all general meetings.
****
For all who are researching Philadelphia roots and need information
on local resources; cemeteries, funeral directors, repositories (and
much more) please visit the JGSGP website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp
****
Interested friends are always welcome!
There is a $2.00 admission charge for non-members.
Refreshments will be served following the meeting
****
Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
< JGLois@aol.com >


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen April Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia #general

JGLois@...
 

April Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia

Date: Monday, April 10, 2006
Time: 7:45 PM
Place: The Newman Building at Gratz College
Old York Road & Melrose Avenue
Melrose Park, PA 19027

Speaker: Megan Smolenyak,
Topic: A Layman's Guide to Using DNA to Advance Your Genealogy

Megan Smolenyak is author of Trace Your Roots with DNA: Using
Genetic Tests to Explore Your Family Tree

DNA testing has recently become a topic in genealogy circles
because it affords us another technique by which we can determine
if a blood relationship exists with previously unknown and potential
relatives. Megan Smolenyak's latest book is an easy-to-follow, yet
comprehensive guide to using DNA tests for genealogical purposes.
Packed with real world examples, it will show you how to solve your
own history mysteries.

Recipient of International Society of Family History Writers and Editors
awards in 2003, 2004 and 2005, Smolenyak has appeared on the Today
Show, Fox & Friends, Ancestors, NPR, and a number of local television
and radio shows.

She is also the author of Honoring Our Ancestors: Inspiring Stories of
the Quest for Our Roots, In Search of Our Ancestors: 101 Inspiring
Stories of Serendipity and Connection in Rediscovering Our Family
History, and They Came to America: Finding Your Immigrant Ancestors.

As lead researcher for the PBS award-winning Ancestors series,
Smolenyak delved into over 5,000 genealogical stories and developed
much of the content for the companion website. She has subsequently
consulted for other television programs, including PBS's award-winning
They Came to America. If you're interested in learning more about the
ascinating topic of genetic genealogy, please visit Smolenyak's sister site,
www.genetealogy.com.

****
Q and A *Sessions*: There will be a 30 minute Question and Answer
session preceding all general meetings.
****
For all who are researching Philadelphia roots and need information
on local resources; cemeteries, funeral directors, repositories (and
much more) please visit the JGSGP website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp
****
Interested friends are always welcome!
There is a $2.00 admission charge for non-members.
Refreshments will be served following the meeting
****
Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
< JGLois@aol.com >


JGS of Cleveland -- April meeting #general

proprius@...
 

We invite you to attend the April meeting of the Jewish Genealogy Society of
Cleveland.
The program this month is:

Amy Wachs Fellner
"My Travels in Eastern Europe"

April 5, 2006

Meetings are held at 7:30 p.m the first Wednesday of each month at:
Menorah Park
2nd Floor Miller Auditorium
27100 Cedar Road
Beachwood, Ohio 44124
Phone: (216)831-6500

Cynthia Spikell


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Cleveland -- April meeting #general

proprius@...
 

We invite you to attend the April meeting of the Jewish Genealogy Society of
Cleveland.
The program this month is:

Amy Wachs Fellner
"My Travels in Eastern Europe"

April 5, 2006

Meetings are held at 7:30 p.m the first Wednesday of each month at:
Menorah Park
2nd Floor Miller Auditorium
27100 Cedar Road
Beachwood, Ohio 44124
Phone: (216)831-6500

Cynthia Spikell


INTRO #germany

Stephen G. Esrati <steve@...>
 

My name is Stephen G. Esrati, but I was born Stefan Hermann Hirsch in
Berlin in 1927. My father, Dr. Med et Phil Arnold Hirsch had a
practice at 9 Karmer Strasse, just off Savigny Platz.
My father left for Palestine in 1933, arriving in Jaffa on June 29
aboard the Champoleon. My mother and I followed.

We lived in Tel Aviv until 1937, where we changed our family name to
Esrati when we naturalized as Palestinian citizens.

I have been able to trace my father's family on his mother's side.
She was called Clara and was born in Orsoy (Kreis Moers), Helping me
with my search for the GOTTSCHALKs were my cousin Shlomo Melchior of
Israel and Willem Voorink of Holland. I know almost nothing of Alwin
HIRSCH, my paternal grandfather.
My grandmother was starved to death in Theresienstadt at age 61. I
will gladly send you my article about her. Ask for Clara at
steve@esrati.com.

Stephen G. Esrati Shaker Heights, Ohio

MODERATOR NOTE: Please be more exact about how GerSIG members can help
your family research and give more details about the family origins.


German SIG #Germany INTRO #germany

Stephen G. Esrati <steve@...>
 

My name is Stephen G. Esrati, but I was born Stefan Hermann Hirsch in
Berlin in 1927. My father, Dr. Med et Phil Arnold Hirsch had a
practice at 9 Karmer Strasse, just off Savigny Platz.
My father left for Palestine in 1933, arriving in Jaffa on June 29
aboard the Champoleon. My mother and I followed.

We lived in Tel Aviv until 1937, where we changed our family name to
Esrati when we naturalized as Palestinian citizens.

I have been able to trace my father's family on his mother's side.
She was called Clara and was born in Orsoy (Kreis Moers), Helping me
with my search for the GOTTSCHALKs were my cousin Shlomo Melchior of
Israel and Willem Voorink of Holland. I know almost nothing of Alwin
HIRSCH, my paternal grandfather.
My grandmother was starved to death in Theresienstadt at age 61. I
will gladly send you my article about her. Ask for Clara at
steve@esrati.com.

Stephen G. Esrati Shaker Heights, Ohio

MODERATOR NOTE: Please be more exact about how GerSIG members can help
your family research and give more details about the family origins.


Re: Given Name "Sepp" #germany

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 4/3/2006 Professor Esterson, jerry@vms.huji.ac.il
writes of "a German secular name Jozef" used by Jews.

This must be a typo. The letter "z" is always pronounced as "ts" in German
which has no equivalent for the z-as-in-zero sound. And the German Josef, or
Joseph, both pronounced (just like the original Hebrew name) as Yosef in
English transliteration, is a Biblical name, a fully Hebrew name, a fully Jewish
name, that *happens* to have been correctly transmitted into German through
the Vulgate and German versions and used by German Christians (not the other
way around)..

I checked the text index of the Encyclopedia Judaica CD for the name Jozef.
With the exception of one in Hungary and one in Holland, all the many, many
references were to Slavic countries, with Catholic cardinals and Soviet
secret police chiefs predominating.

Michael Bernet, New York


German SIG #Germany Re: Given Name "Sepp" #germany

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 4/3/2006 Professor Esterson, jerry@vms.huji.ac.il
writes of "a German secular name Jozef" used by Jews.

This must be a typo. The letter "z" is always pronounced as "ts" in German
which has no equivalent for the z-as-in-zero sound. And the German Josef, or
Joseph, both pronounced (just like the original Hebrew name) as Yosef in
English transliteration, is a Biblical name, a fully Hebrew name, a fully Jewish
name, that *happens* to have been correctly transmitted into German through
the Vulgate and German versions and used by German Christians (not the other
way around)..

I checked the text index of the Encyclopedia Judaica CD for the name Jozef.
With the exception of one in Hungary and one in Holland, all the many, many
references were to Slavic countries, with Catholic cardinals and Soviet
secret police chiefs predominating.

Michael Bernet, New York


Searching info on Rulikovski Cemetery #general

Leslie Weinberg <artsoul@...>
 

A researcher has found what my be the burial record of my
great-grandmother. He says she is buried in Rulikovski Cemetery in
Oradea. I have never heard of this cemetery before. Does anyone have
any information on it? Thanks, Leslie Weinberg


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching info on Rulikovski Cemetery #general

Leslie Weinberg <artsoul@...>
 

A researcher has found what my be the burial record of my
great-grandmother. He says she is buried in Rulikovski Cemetery in
Oradea. I have never heard of this cemetery before. Does anyone have
any information on it? Thanks, Leslie Weinberg


Re: Article About BONDI Born Vienna, Austria 1833 #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 4/3/2006 1:12:31 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
linsilv@nc.rr.com writes:

< The Wichita Eagle has an interesting article about BONDI; a Jewish
freedom fighter and abolitionist who fought alongside John Brown during
Kansas' territorial years. For those who are researching the BONDI family
(who emigrated >from Vienna to the US about 1848), and those who are just
plain interested, here is the link: >

BONDI is a medieval romance-language translation of the Hebrew personal
name, Yom Tov (Good Day). The name was relatively common among Jews in
Germany. The Encyclopedia Judaica lists the Bondi and the Bondia family,
plus four individuals named Bondi and four named Bondy.

The abolitionist was August, 1833-1907. His autobiography was published in
1910.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Article About BONDI Born Vienna, Austria 1833 #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 4/3/2006 1:12:31 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
linsilv@nc.rr.com writes:

< The Wichita Eagle has an interesting article about BONDI; a Jewish
freedom fighter and abolitionist who fought alongside John Brown during
Kansas' territorial years. For those who are researching the BONDI family
(who emigrated >from Vienna to the US about 1848), and those who are just
plain interested, here is the link: >

BONDI is a medieval romance-language translation of the Hebrew personal
name, Yom Tov (Good Day). The name was relatively common among Jews in
Germany. The Encyclopedia Judaica lists the Bondi and the Bondia family,
plus four individuals named Bondi and four named Bondy.

The abolitionist was August, 1833-1907. His autobiography was published in
1910.

Michael Bernet, New York


Viewmates 7704-7707 #general

roetenberg aaron <aaronr@...>
 


Town of Lisbon Falls, Maine - 1882 #general

Harry D. Boonin <hdboonin@...>
 

Early Russian immigrants who landed in New York were sent to Lisbon Falls,
ME to work in the factories. I have some information about Lisbon Falls
between 1882 and 1884. I would be interested in hearing >from anyone who has
information or would like to exchange information.
Reply privately,
Harry D. Boonin
hdboonin@erols.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmates 7704-7707 #general

roetenberg aaron <aaronr@...>
 


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Town of Lisbon Falls, Maine - 1882 #general

Harry D. Boonin <hdboonin@...>
 

Early Russian immigrants who landed in New York were sent to Lisbon Falls,
ME to work in the factories. I have some information about Lisbon Falls
between 1882 and 1884. I would be interested in hearing >from anyone who has
information or would like to exchange information.
Reply privately,
Harry D. Boonin
hdboonin@erols.com