Date   

SITE CITE - www.jgbs.org - Bavarian Schwabia database #germany

Alan Ehrlich
 

I'd like to draw the attention of gersigers to the recently opened "Jewish
Genealogy in Bavarian Swabia" Web site:

www.jgbs.org

As the name indicates, it serves Jewish genealogists with roots in Bavarian
Swabia, and in particular the cities/towns of Altenstadt, Augsburg,
Binswangen, Buttenwiesen, Ederheim, Fellheim, Fischach, Guenzburg,
Hainsfarth, Harburg, Huerben [u umlaut] -Krumbach, Ichenhausen, Kleinerdlingen,
Kriegshaber-Augsburg, Memmingen, Monchsdeggingen [o umlaut],Nordlingen [o umlaut]
Oettingen, Osterberg, Pfersee-Augsburg, Steinhart, Steppach and Wallerstein.

To date - thanks to data generously transcribed by Rolf Hofmann - a growing
interactive online database of 7179 historical Birth, Marriage, Death and/or
Circumcision records is provided for the locations: Ederheim, Hainsfarth,
Huerben-Krumbach, Kleinerdlingen, Moenchsdeggingen, Steinhart and Wallerstein.

Additionally, work by volunteers is continuing and further records/locations
currently or soon will be transcribed and added to the database.

The site also provides an online forum open all who are researching their Jewish
ancestors in these regions, as well as other useful information and links.

The entire "operation" is volunteer based; and access to everything
(databases, forum, etc.) is free of charge.

Finally, registration is required. Although it may now be possible to
register directly at the site, when I first visited there, online
registration was disabled; and a user name/password had to be requested
from: membership@jgbs.org Best regards to all,

Alan Ehrlich Geneva, Switzerland <alan.ehrlich@ehrlich-online.com>

MODERATOR NOTES: Our system does not understand letters in your email that are
not part of the standard USA English computer alphabet. If you include
accent marks such as the "umlaut" your text will probably be garbled when
it is seen by our readers.

It is usual to add the letter "e" after the accented vowel to replace the
accent mark. However, this may make it hard to find the subject word using
the Archive Search engine.

Moderator has changed some of the above town names accordingly.

For best results we ask you to treat important German words including the umlaut
mark this way:

Moenchsdeggingen / Monchsdeggingen [o umlaut]

This will insure that your text is not garbled and also that the word will
be found by anyone searching the archives for either spelling.

You should keep this in mind when searching data bases for names and town names.
If you use an "exact spelling" search, you would not find Moenchsdeggingen
in a search for Monchsdeggingen, and vice versa. In the early days of my own
research I often missed data entries for my Lowenstein [o umlaut] ancestors
because they were alphabetized as Loewenstein. Be careful with printed indexes
also. Especially in German books, you may have to look for both spellings. MOD


Notes about LALLEMAND and SINZHEIM from GenAmi #germany

Micheline GUTMANN
 

In our Belgian file, it is possible to find:

LALLEMAND Joseph
He was in the business of wood for shipbuilding.
He received Letters of naturalisation between 1772 and 1774

In Mannheim, there was Abraham SINZHEIM who was a banker.
He married first Marguerite WEINHEIM then Sara LEVY in Metz in 1729.
I know 3 daughters but not Esther.
Abraham was the uncle of the Chief Rabbi of Alsace Joseph David SINZHEIM
then president of the Grand Sanhedrin of Napoleon in 1807.

Micheline Gutmann, Paris, France Web site GenAmi www.genami.org


German SIG #Germany SITE CITE - www.jgbs.org - Bavarian Schwabia database #germany

Alan Ehrlich
 

I'd like to draw the attention of gersigers to the recently opened "Jewish
Genealogy in Bavarian Swabia" Web site:

www.jgbs.org

As the name indicates, it serves Jewish genealogists with roots in Bavarian
Swabia, and in particular the cities/towns of Altenstadt, Augsburg,
Binswangen, Buttenwiesen, Ederheim, Fellheim, Fischach, Guenzburg,
Hainsfarth, Harburg, Huerben [u umlaut] -Krumbach, Ichenhausen, Kleinerdlingen,
Kriegshaber-Augsburg, Memmingen, Monchsdeggingen [o umlaut],Nordlingen [o umlaut]
Oettingen, Osterberg, Pfersee-Augsburg, Steinhart, Steppach and Wallerstein.

To date - thanks to data generously transcribed by Rolf Hofmann - a growing
interactive online database of 7179 historical Birth, Marriage, Death and/or
Circumcision records is provided for the locations: Ederheim, Hainsfarth,
Huerben-Krumbach, Kleinerdlingen, Moenchsdeggingen, Steinhart and Wallerstein.

Additionally, work by volunteers is continuing and further records/locations
currently or soon will be transcribed and added to the database.

The site also provides an online forum open all who are researching their Jewish
ancestors in these regions, as well as other useful information and links.

The entire "operation" is volunteer based; and access to everything
(databases, forum, etc.) is free of charge.

Finally, registration is required. Although it may now be possible to
register directly at the site, when I first visited there, online
registration was disabled; and a user name/password had to be requested
from: membership@jgbs.org Best regards to all,

Alan Ehrlich Geneva, Switzerland <alan.ehrlich@ehrlich-online.com>

MODERATOR NOTES: Our system does not understand letters in your email that are
not part of the standard USA English computer alphabet. If you include
accent marks such as the "umlaut" your text will probably be garbled when
it is seen by our readers.

It is usual to add the letter "e" after the accented vowel to replace the
accent mark. However, this may make it hard to find the subject word using
the Archive Search engine.

Moderator has changed some of the above town names accordingly.

For best results we ask you to treat important German words including the umlaut
mark this way:

Moenchsdeggingen / Monchsdeggingen [o umlaut]

This will insure that your text is not garbled and also that the word will
be found by anyone searching the archives for either spelling.

You should keep this in mind when searching data bases for names and town names.
If you use an "exact spelling" search, you would not find Moenchsdeggingen
in a search for Monchsdeggingen, and vice versa. In the early days of my own
research I often missed data entries for my Lowenstein [o umlaut] ancestors
because they were alphabetized as Loewenstein. Be careful with printed indexes
also. Especially in German books, you may have to look for both spellings. MOD


German SIG #Germany Notes about LALLEMAND and SINZHEIM from GenAmi #germany

Micheline GUTMANN
 

In our Belgian file, it is possible to find:

LALLEMAND Joseph
He was in the business of wood for shipbuilding.
He received Letters of naturalisation between 1772 and 1774

In Mannheim, there was Abraham SINZHEIM who was a banker.
He married first Marguerite WEINHEIM then Sara LEVY in Metz in 1729.
I know 3 daughters but not Esther.
Abraham was the uncle of the Chief Rabbi of Alsace Joseph David SINZHEIM
then president of the Grand Sanhedrin of Napoleon in 1807.

Micheline Gutmann, Paris, France Web site GenAmi www.genami.org


Re: Visiting Theresienstadt #austria-czech

Daniel Kester <djkester@...>
 

The moderator had asked why (in my post >from yesterday) I referred to
Theresienstadt as a "ghetto" rather than as a "concentration camp".
Interesting question. I have seen it referred to in both ways. I
guess that I would classify Theresienstadt in the same category as
the Warsaw Ghetto or the Lodz Ghetto: a place where Jews were forced
to live before being sent to the death camps. A place where the Nazis
could have control of the Jewish population, but where the goal of
the Nazis was neither immediate extermination nor slave labor, but
simply a place to house the Jews separate >from the non-Jewish
population (as were the medieval ghettos).

The fact that Theresienstadt was an existing town with existing buildings
into which the Jews were put (like Warsaw and Lodz) rather than an
artifically created camp of barracks, differentiates it >from other
concentration camps. However, if a concentration camp is defined as
a place where large groups of people are imprisoned due to who they
are (rather than for what they have done), Theresienstadt is
definitely a concentration camp. But then Warsaw and Lodz would also
be concentration camps (although I have never seen them referred to
that way). A difference is that in Warsaw and Lodz a large part of
the population came >from Warsaw or Lodz. But later, both of those
ghettos also received a large amount of people >from surrounding towns
and villages, as the Polish countryside was cleared of Jews. I guess
that the characteristics of Theresienstadt fall somewhere between the
characteristics of the "Ghettos" (Warsaw, Lodz, etc.) and the
"concentration camps" such as Dachau, Buchenwald, etc., leading to
both terms being used to describe it.

How the different camps are referred to is of more than just
linguistic interest. The general population doesn't realize that out
of the hundreds of Nazi concentration camps, only 6-8 were death
camps (extermination camps) with the specific purpose of killing the
prisoners soon after their arrival. This confusion is put to use by
Holocaust deniers. They point to the non-death camps like Dachau or
Buchenwald, show that Jews were not systematically murdered there,
but rather died >from disease, hunger, and hard labor, and conclude
that the mass extermination did not happen.

Daniel Kester Buffalo, NY, USA <djkester@adelphia.net>


German SIG #Germany Re: Visiting Theresienstadt #germany

Daniel Kester <djkester@...>
 

The moderator had asked why (in my post >from yesterday) I referred to
Theresienstadt as a "ghetto" rather than as a "concentration camp".
Interesting question. I have seen it referred to in both ways. I
guess that I would classify Theresienstadt in the same category as
the Warsaw Ghetto or the Lodz Ghetto: a place where Jews were forced
to live before being sent to the death camps. A place where the Nazis
could have control of the Jewish population, but where the goal of
the Nazis was neither immediate extermination nor slave labor, but
simply a place to house the Jews separate >from the non-Jewish
population (as were the medieval ghettos).

The fact that Theresienstadt was an existing town with existing buildings
into which the Jews were put (like Warsaw and Lodz) rather than an
artifically created camp of barracks, differentiates it >from other
concentration camps. However, if a concentration camp is defined as
a place where large groups of people are imprisoned due to who they
are (rather than for what they have done), Theresienstadt is
definitely a concentration camp. But then Warsaw and Lodz would also
be concentration camps (although I have never seen them referred to
that way). A difference is that in Warsaw and Lodz a large part of
the population came >from Warsaw or Lodz. But later, both of those
ghettos also received a large amount of people >from surrounding towns
and villages, as the Polish countryside was cleared of Jews. I guess
that the characteristics of Theresienstadt fall somewhere between the
characteristics of the "Ghettos" (Warsaw, Lodz, etc.) and the
"concentration camps" such as Dachau, Buchenwald, etc., leading to
both terms being used to describe it.

How the different camps are referred to is of more than just
linguistic interest. The general population doesn't realize that out
of the hundreds of Nazi concentration camps, only 6-8 were death
camps (extermination camps) with the specific purpose of killing the
prisoners soon after their arrival. This confusion is put to use by
Holocaust deniers. They point to the non-death camps like Dachau or
Buchenwald, show that Jews were not systematically murdered there,
but rather died >from disease, hunger, and hard labor, and conclude
that the mass extermination did not happen.

Daniel Kester Buffalo, NY, USA <djkester@adelphia.net>


Re: Visiting Theresienstadt #austria-czech

Sally Goodman <sbgoody@...>
 

Daniel Kester's essay on his visit to Terezin could not have come at a
better time. In less than 3 weeks we leave for Berlin, Prague (and Terezin),
Mikulov, Brno, Lednice and Vienna, Hollabrunn, Kittsee and Mistelbach.

Thank you, Daniel, for your brilliant, informative, well-organized,
easy-to-follow summary of your trip to Terezin. I have printed it and shall
take it with me.

I would like to suggest you also send your posting to the Austria-Czech SIG
<austriaczech@lyris.jewishgen.org> [Only SIG members can post messages to
a SIG list. Mr. Kester would have to be an Austriaczech SIG subscriber to post
his essay. I agree that it should be posted to that list. MODERATOR]

The purpose of our trip is to visit the cities and towns where my ancestors
came from, to walk the streets they lived on, to pray in the (remaining)
synagogues they worshipped in, to pay our respects at their graves (those
still standing) and to meet the descendants of my gggg grandfather I never
knew existed until I "found" them six months ago.

When we return, I hope I can be as eloquent as Daniel in summarizing the
interesting aspects of our trip that might benefit our SIG.

Sally Goodman Palm Springs (Los Angeles) Cal. sbgoody@usa.net


German SIG #Germany Re: Visiting Theresienstadt #germany

Sally Goodman <sbgoody@...>
 

Daniel Kester's essay on his visit to Terezin could not have come at a
better time. In less than 3 weeks we leave for Berlin, Prague (and Terezin),
Mikulov, Brno, Lednice and Vienna, Hollabrunn, Kittsee and Mistelbach.

Thank you, Daniel, for your brilliant, informative, well-organized,
easy-to-follow summary of your trip to Terezin. I have printed it and shall
take it with me.

I would like to suggest you also send your posting to the Austria-Czech SIG
<austriaczech@lyris.jewishgen.org> [Only SIG members can post messages to
a SIG list. Mr. Kester would have to be an Austriaczech SIG subscriber to post
his essay. I agree that it should be posted to that list. MODERATOR]

The purpose of our trip is to visit the cities and towns where my ancestors
came from, to walk the streets they lived on, to pray in the (remaining)
synagogues they worshipped in, to pay our respects at their graves (those
still standing) and to meet the descendants of my gggg grandfather I never
knew existed until I "found" them six months ago.

When we return, I hope I can be as eloquent as Daniel in summarizing the
interesting aspects of our trip that might benefit our SIG.

Sally Goodman Palm Springs (Los Angeles) Cal. sbgoody@usa.net


Sinzheim #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

What do you think is the relationship between

Mirjam Sara GUGGENHEIM (1694-15 Dec 1739 Vienna) married Loeb Jehuda Efraim
ha-LEVI Sinzheim (d. 4 Jun 1744 Vienna).
at http://www.loebtree.com/oppsam.html and

And my ggggg-grandmother Regina SINZHEIM b. Vienna 1766, d. 28 July 1800
Vienna m. Abraham GOLDSTEIN, whose daughters married the BIEDERMANNs (ML
and David) at
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~randols/WC02/WC02_231.HTM

My SINZHEIM tree could use some work. Any suggestions?

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Sinzheim #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

What do you think is the relationship between

Mirjam Sara GUGGENHEIM (1694-15 Dec 1739 Vienna) married Loeb Jehuda Efraim
ha-LEVI Sinzheim (d. 4 Jun 1744 Vienna).
at http://www.loebtree.com/oppsam.html and

And my ggggg-grandmother Regina SINZHEIM b. Vienna 1766, d. 28 July 1800
Vienna m. Abraham GOLDSTEIN, whose daughters married the BIEDERMANNs (ML
and David) at
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~randols/WC02/WC02_231.HTM

My SINZHEIM tree could use some work. Any suggestions?

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


looking for child of Yitzhak ILMAN #general

alicebg@...
 

My first cousin Yitzhak Ilman was buried alive with his wife Brachah (or Chanah)
in David Horodok (David Gorodok) in August l941. In the Yizkor book they list
him and his wife. They had a very young child. The child is not listed. I
always assumed that was a listing error and that the child died with them. Now
I realize there is a possibility that the child may have been given away to save
its life. If this was the case there is a chance that child has survived. Does
anyone have a clue how I might be able to locate this child if he or she is
still alive. The Red Cross tells me that if I can find a birth record with a
first name for the child that would help very much. I would appreciate any
help with regard to how to find the birth records - the child was born around
l939 + or -. I am also interested in birth records for the rest of my family
in David Horodok as well - all of whom are listed in the Yizkor book as
having definitely been killed. Thank you so much.

alicebg (Devorah Bregman) New York City


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen looking for child of Yitzhak ILMAN #general

alicebg@...
 

My first cousin Yitzhak Ilman was buried alive with his wife Brachah (or Chanah)
in David Horodok (David Gorodok) in August l941. In the Yizkor book they list
him and his wife. They had a very young child. The child is not listed. I
always assumed that was a listing error and that the child died with them. Now
I realize there is a possibility that the child may have been given away to save
its life. If this was the case there is a chance that child has survived. Does
anyone have a clue how I might be able to locate this child if he or she is
still alive. The Red Cross tells me that if I can find a birth record with a
first name for the child that would help very much. I would appreciate any
help with regard to how to find the birth records - the child was born around
l939 + or -. I am also interested in birth records for the rest of my family
in David Horodok as well - all of whom are listed in the Yizkor book as
having definitely been killed. Thank you so much.

alicebg (Devorah Bregman) New York City


Cemetery Records --and how to get help #general

MBernet@...
 

a genner wrote:

<< I have the death certificates of two relatives that died in London. Is
there a way to find out in which cemetery they might have been buried? . . . .
One death took place in the district of Mile End Old Town, sub-district of
Mile End Old Town Western? The residence was 34 Yalford Street. >>

==Large cities usually have many Jewish congregations. Each congregation has
its own preferred cemetery, a preference that may change anytime. Cemeteries
fill up and new ones created. Families move away >from one area of town to
another, or to a distant suburb. Some people elect to be buried next to
relatives in a distant city where they once resided, others near where their
children have since moved.

==When looking for a likely place of burial, the address at time of death is
important, much more important, though, is the date. My guess is that the
Yalford Street address is at least 100 years old.

==Of course, the problem is even greater in the USA where cemeteries are
often privately owned and funerals are conducted by private undertakers (often
owned by huge inter-faith conglomerates) and many retired folks live a thousand
miles or more >from their original homes.

==So, when asking for locations of burial, please indicate date of death and
if you can, allegiance to synagogues, Landsmanschaften, associations, etc.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Cemetery Records --and how to get help #general

MBernet@...
 

a genner wrote:

<< I have the death certificates of two relatives that died in London. Is
there a way to find out in which cemetery they might have been buried? . . . .
One death took place in the district of Mile End Old Town, sub-district of
Mile End Old Town Western? The residence was 34 Yalford Street. >>

==Large cities usually have many Jewish congregations. Each congregation has
its own preferred cemetery, a preference that may change anytime. Cemeteries
fill up and new ones created. Families move away >from one area of town to
another, or to a distant suburb. Some people elect to be buried next to
relatives in a distant city where they once resided, others near where their
children have since moved.

==When looking for a likely place of burial, the address at time of death is
important, much more important, though, is the date. My guess is that the
Yalford Street address is at least 100 years old.

==Of course, the problem is even greater in the USA where cemeteries are
often privately owned and funerals are conducted by private undertakers (often
owned by huge inter-faith conglomerates) and many retired folks live a thousand
miles or more >from their original homes.

==So, when asking for locations of burial, please indicate date of death and
if you can, allegiance to synagogues, Landsmanschaften, associations, etc.

Michael Bernet, New York


Polish Archives policy - free searches & extracts? #general

Yossi Mund <pymund@...>
 

Would someone with experience in dealing with the Polish Archives
please help me?

I have seen their website, and this page
(http://www.archiwa.gov.pl/?CIDA=183) seems to imply that while
photocopies and the like are charged, searches and extracts are not. I
quote: "State archives also conduct research (inquires) on commission
from institutions and private persons. The majority of such services is
free of charge or require a revenue stamp."

Is this correct?

Thank you.

P. Y. Mund
pymund@yahoo.ca


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Polish Archives policy - free searches & extracts? #general

Yossi Mund <pymund@...>
 

Would someone with experience in dealing with the Polish Archives
please help me?

I have seen their website, and this page
(http://www.archiwa.gov.pl/?CIDA=183) seems to imply that while
photocopies and the like are charged, searches and extracts are not. I
quote: "State archives also conduct research (inquires) on commission
from institutions and private persons. The majority of such services is
free of charge or require a revenue stamp."

Is this correct?

Thank you.

P. Y. Mund
pymund@yahoo.ca


Re: Cause of death on New York City death certificate #general

Sharon R. Korn <s.r.korn@...>
 

The law changed some time between 1944, when my first grandfather died in
NYC and the cause of death was listed on his death certificate, and 1955,
when my second grandfather died in NYC, and the cause was not listed. The
only information normally listed is that the death was or was not due to
natural causes.

Sharon Block Korn
San Diego, CA


Nursing home resident needs look-up at NYC Municipal Archives #general

Deborah Dworski <ddworski@...>
 

Hello,
I volunteer at a Jewish nursing home outside Washington, D.C. where I help
residents write about their family history. One of the class participants,
Theodora, who is 87 years old, would very much like to know where her
grandmother is buried in New York. I'd appreciate if someone who will be
visiting the NYC Municipal Archives could take a look at the death
certificate (>from 1919) to determine the name of the cemetery. I have an
exact name, date and death certificate number (>from Steve Morse's website)
so this is a very straightforward, easy search.

Theodora and I would both be grateful for your assistance. If you can help
us, please contact me privately.

Deborah Dworski
Arlington, Virginia USA


Correction on Massachusetts Death Index Years of Coverage #general

jan meisels allen <janmallen@...>
 

I made a typo when I posted the notice yesterday on the Massachusetts Death
Index. The only years covered are 1841-1910.
http://www.sec.state.ma.us/vitalrecordssearch/VitalRecordsSearch.aspx
I apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused.

Jan Meisels Allen, director IAJGS and
Chairperson, Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Re: SINZHEIM or SINSHEIMER--a treasure for understanding German Jewish history #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 9/15/2006 10:06:09 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
celiamale@yahoo.com writes:

<< 1. This is an interesting account of the SINSHEIMER family of Burstadt
and USA:

<< _http://metsun1.met.sjsu.edu/~sinton/andy/sinsheim.doc_
(http://metsun1.met.sjsu.edu/~sinton/andy/sinsheim.doc) >>

Wow, what a treasure! This is a full-length book recording the history,
culture, custom, religion, tribulation and success of Jews in Germany, and of
the successes, allegiances and links of their successors as they reached the
USA and made their way to the West and financial well-being.

I got this link >from Celia Male after I had seen a mention on this List by
Celia of a SINZHEIMER family in Vienna and responded with the little I knew of
a Minna SINSHEIMER who had (at Temple Emanu-El oin NYC of all places)
married into my pgm's WOLFF family (Pfungstadt/Hessen) and then returned with
her husband to Hessen.

My first glance through the posted family history allows me to trace the
bride's father, Anschel (Adolph) who opened a thriving cigar manufacturing
store in NYC--not a surprise, since the groom's family (like the majority of
the Jews in Pfungstadt) were involved in the tobacco-growing, curing and
cigar-rolling industry. Both the SINSHEIMERs and the WOLFFs were parnassim (
presidents) of there respective Jewish communities.

I also found, so far, after only a few minutes of scrolling, reference to
the Koschland family with which I'm acquainted, >from Fuerth/Nurnberg--200 miles
to the east.

This is definitely a site worth looking at, a model for writing a family
history, a source for understanding the history of Jews in German--and anywhere
in Europe--a history of Jewish settlement in the USA in the 19th century . . .
and a possible source for links to your family.

Michael Bernet, New York