Date   

Correct Spelling of Masha: Thank You #general

Mikekarsen@...
 

Jewish Genners

Thank you all for participating in the discussion. I received the following
different spellings of Masha.

1. Mem, Shin, Heh
2. Mem, aleph, shin, heh or mem-alef-sin-hej
3. Mem, aleph, shin, aleph
4. Mem-shin-aleph
5. Mem-`ayin-shin-aleph
6. Mem-alef-shin-ayin

My original dilemma was that one on the spellings I had been given was #1 above.
It is the same spelling as Moshe and I didn't my g-grandchildren to think her
name was Moshe. My second problem was that my Hebrew name is Moshe and I thought
it would be strange to have Moshe & Moshe as a couple.

When someone suggested I look at our Ketubah, my dilemma was resolved. It
was spelled as #2 above. If it was married to "Mem, aleph, shin, heh" for
almost 38 years who am I to change it now.

Thank you all again

Mike Karsen
Chicago


Kremenets: An important new addition to "Pinkas Kremenets" #yizkorbooks

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

I am pleased to announce that the Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP, in cooperation
with Joyce Field of JewishGen, has completed translation and editing of
a very important historical document relating to Jews of the Kremenets
District. It is "/A 1747 Court Record of a Trial of 14 Kremenets-Area
Jews Accused of Ritual Murder/". The translated document is available at
our /Pinkas Kremenets/ Yizkor Book website:

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets/kre900.html

It is in the Supplementary material at the end of the Yizkor Book
translation. There is a link to the document at the end of the Table of
Contents.

If you go to this site, please be sure to read my "Translation Editor's
Note" at the beginning of the document. And, if gruesome torture details
upset you, it might be best to forego reading this document.

Kremenets is a town in southwestern Ukraine, in the border region near
Poland and Austria. It is one of the oldest Jewish towns in the region.
In Polish and Russian times, the town was a district center. The oldest
gravestone in the Cemetery dates to the 1570s. Before WW2 the town had a
vibrant and active Jewish population of about 8,500. In a matter of days
in 1942, the Nazis and their collaborators murdered about 15,000 Jews in
Kremenets (Jews >from many surrounding villages were jammed into the
ghetto. By the year 2000, no Jews were left in the town. Today, there is
a nascent Jewish community of about 20 people in Kremenets. The
Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP, affiliated with Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
(JRI-Poland) is gathering and translating documents and other materials
relating to Jews of the Kremenets District. All names and town names
appearing in these documents are extracted and entered into our "Indexed
Concordance of Personal Names and Town Names". The Concordance currently
has almost 42,000 entries. If you would like more information about our
CO-OP, please contact me at rondoctor@earthlink.net or contact Sheree
Roth at ssroth@pacbell.net.

JewishGen's assistance in bringing this project to successful conclusion
was invaluable. You can help promote more of this kind of work by
contributing to JewishGen. Just point your browser to
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/ and follow instructions.

Best wishes,

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP / Jewish Records Indexing - Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Correct Spelling of Masha: Thank You #general

Mikekarsen@...
 

Jewish Genners

Thank you all for participating in the discussion. I received the following
different spellings of Masha.

1. Mem, Shin, Heh
2. Mem, aleph, shin, heh or mem-alef-sin-hej
3. Mem, aleph, shin, aleph
4. Mem-shin-aleph
5. Mem-`ayin-shin-aleph
6. Mem-alef-shin-ayin

My original dilemma was that one on the spellings I had been given was #1 above.
It is the same spelling as Moshe and I didn't my g-grandchildren to think her
name was Moshe. My second problem was that my Hebrew name is Moshe and I thought
it would be strange to have Moshe & Moshe as a couple.

When someone suggested I look at our Ketubah, my dilemma was resolved. It
was spelled as #2 above. If it was married to "Mem, aleph, shin, heh" for
almost 38 years who am I to change it now.

Thank you all again

Mike Karsen
Chicago


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Kremenets: An important new addition to "Pinkas Kremenets" #yizkorbooks

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

I am pleased to announce that the Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP, in cooperation
with Joyce Field of JewishGen, has completed translation and editing of
a very important historical document relating to Jews of the Kremenets
District. It is "/A 1747 Court Record of a Trial of 14 Kremenets-Area
Jews Accused of Ritual Murder/". The translated document is available at
our /Pinkas Kremenets/ Yizkor Book website:

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets/kre900.html

It is in the Supplementary material at the end of the Yizkor Book
translation. There is a link to the document at the end of the Table of
Contents.

If you go to this site, please be sure to read my "Translation Editor's
Note" at the beginning of the document. And, if gruesome torture details
upset you, it might be best to forego reading this document.

Kremenets is a town in southwestern Ukraine, in the border region near
Poland and Austria. It is one of the oldest Jewish towns in the region.
In Polish and Russian times, the town was a district center. The oldest
gravestone in the Cemetery dates to the 1570s. Before WW2 the town had a
vibrant and active Jewish population of about 8,500. In a matter of days
in 1942, the Nazis and their collaborators murdered about 15,000 Jews in
Kremenets (Jews >from many surrounding villages were jammed into the
ghetto. By the year 2000, no Jews were left in the town. Today, there is
a nascent Jewish community of about 20 people in Kremenets. The
Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP, affiliated with Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
(JRI-Poland) is gathering and translating documents and other materials
relating to Jews of the Kremenets District. All names and town names
appearing in these documents are extracted and entered into our "Indexed
Concordance of Personal Names and Town Names". The Concordance currently
has almost 42,000 entries. If you would like more information about our
CO-OP, please contact me at rondoctor@earthlink.net or contact Sheree
Roth at ssroth@pacbell.net.

JewishGen's assistance in bringing this project to successful conclusion
was invaluable. You can help promote more of this kind of work by
contributing to JewishGen. Just point your browser to
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/ and follow instructions.

Best wishes,

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP / Jewish Records Indexing - Poland


Wahring cemetery #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

On the Australian website about the Wahring cemetery TV programme I read this:
"For Tina, is deeply personal endeavour, because some of her ancestors are
buried there, although she has yet to find their graves. For most of the people
buried in the cemetery, however, there are no descendants to remember them or
fight on their behalf, they perished in the Nazi concentration camps or were
forced to leave Austria, never to return."

see: www.abc.net.au/foreign

This sounds to me a bit like the Swiss Bank Accounts story - I am sure it would
not be that hard to find *links* to very many people buried in this cemetery.

Because some burials were so long ago, there could be many thousands of very
distant descendants still alive. Whether they wished to contribute to Wahring's
upkeep [graves of their gtgtgt grandfathers/uncles etc] is another matter.

My great-great grandfather [born 1802] and his brother [born 1806] and their
wives are buried there - the descendants now amount to many 100s, if not
thousands. Restoring the huge collapsed grave of my gtgt grandfather would cost
a fortune. However, my grandfather's little brother {Wilhelm KOHN 22 July 1865-
25 Jan 1872] is also buried in Wahring. His simpler tombstone was literally
unearthed after some research on its possible location and is lying covered by
a small amount of earth. I would be happy to reerect it - he is my great-uncle,
so not that distant!

I have been to the cemetery and I am sure many other descendants who have
studied their Viennese Jewish genealogy carefully would love to go to.

It behoves the Viennese city authorities to make the cemetery a site we can
freely visit and admire - for it is a wondrous place. And surprsingly some of
the tombstones are in a reasonable state, however they will deteriorate rapidly
if no action is taken soon.

Celia Male [U.K.]


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Wahring cemetery #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

On the Australian website about the Wahring cemetery TV programme I read this:
"For Tina, is deeply personal endeavour, because some of her ancestors are
buried there, although she has yet to find their graves. For most of the people
buried in the cemetery, however, there are no descendants to remember them or
fight on their behalf, they perished in the Nazi concentration camps or were
forced to leave Austria, never to return."

see: www.abc.net.au/foreign

This sounds to me a bit like the Swiss Bank Accounts story - I am sure it would
not be that hard to find *links* to very many people buried in this cemetery.

Because some burials were so long ago, there could be many thousands of very
distant descendants still alive. Whether they wished to contribute to Wahring's
upkeep [graves of their gtgtgt grandfathers/uncles etc] is another matter.

My great-great grandfather [born 1802] and his brother [born 1806] and their
wives are buried there - the descendants now amount to many 100s, if not
thousands. Restoring the huge collapsed grave of my gtgt grandfather would cost
a fortune. However, my grandfather's little brother {Wilhelm KOHN 22 July 1865-
25 Jan 1872] is also buried in Wahring. His simpler tombstone was literally
unearthed after some research on its possible location and is lying covered by
a small amount of earth. I would be happy to reerect it - he is my great-uncle,
so not that distant!

I have been to the cemetery and I am sure many other descendants who have
studied their Viennese Jewish genealogy carefully would love to go to.

It behoves the Viennese city authorities to make the cemetery a site we can
freely visit and admire - for it is a wondrous place. And surprsingly some of
the tombstones are in a reasonable state, however they will deteriorate rapidly
if no action is taken soon.

Celia Male [U.K.]


GerSIG success story published in Israel JGS Journal #germany

JewishGen German Research Division Coordinator
 

Periodically (pun intended) we carry the table of contents from
"Sharsheret Hadorot", the journal of the Israel Jewish
Genealogical Society (IGS).

I've received notice of a GerSIG success story reported in the current
issue (May 21, 2007 - V.21 N.2) in an article by GerSIG member Uriel Nissel.
The author credits our memorial book consultant Fritz Neubauer
at Bielefeld University in Northern Germany with providing
the solution to a 64-year-old mystery.

Regular GerSIG readers know that Mr. Neubauer frequently helps members
seeking relatives who "vanished' during the Shoah. At the NY 2006
Conference, Mr. Neubauer gave an extensively illustrated lecture about
using "memorial books" containing data on Holocaust victims. Once
again I send thanks to Fritz for his generous assistance to our GerSIG
community. Thanks also to Uriel Nissel for giving credit to GerSIG
in his article.

I was happy to recognize the names of at least 2 other GerSIG members
in the list of authors for the current "Sharsheret Hadorot". They
are Meriam Haringman and Esther Ramon.

"Sharsheret Hadorot" articles, like those in "Gen Ami" and some other
foreign JGS journals, are printed in English translation as well as
the original language.

John Paul Lowens, Suburban NYC, GerSIG Coordinator


German SIG #Germany GerSIG success story published in Israel JGS Journal #germany

JewishGen German Research Division Coordinator
 

Periodically (pun intended) we carry the table of contents from
"Sharsheret Hadorot", the journal of the Israel Jewish
Genealogical Society (IGS).

I've received notice of a GerSIG success story reported in the current
issue (May 21, 2007 - V.21 N.2) in an article by GerSIG member Uriel Nissel.
The author credits our memorial book consultant Fritz Neubauer
at Bielefeld University in Northern Germany with providing
the solution to a 64-year-old mystery.

Regular GerSIG readers know that Mr. Neubauer frequently helps members
seeking relatives who "vanished' during the Shoah. At the NY 2006
Conference, Mr. Neubauer gave an extensively illustrated lecture about
using "memorial books" containing data on Holocaust victims. Once
again I send thanks to Fritz for his generous assistance to our GerSIG
community. Thanks also to Uriel Nissel for giving credit to GerSIG
in his article.

I was happy to recognize the names of at least 2 other GerSIG members
in the list of authors for the current "Sharsheret Hadorot". They
are Meriam Haringman and Esther Ramon.

"Sharsheret Hadorot" articles, like those in "Gen Ami" and some other
foreign JGS journals, are printed in English translation as well as
the original language.

John Paul Lowens, Suburban NYC, GerSIG Coordinator


searching for relatives in South Africa #germany

Ethan Starr <edstarr@...>
 

According to family trees compiled by my cousin Ted TOBIAS, the following
relatives of ours are or were in South Africa. If anyone has information
on them, I would appreciate hearing >from you.

from the BAER family >from Hamm an der Sieg:
Moritz BAER (born about 1860) & Thekla Unknown Frankfurt
Lilli BAER & Gustav NASSAU South Africa
Ruth NASSAU
Heinz NASSAU
Reinhardt NASSAU
Irma BAER & Otto BONWITT (d. 1933) (>from Frankfurt)
South Africa
Erika BONWITT & Unknown WOLF
Ralph BONWITT
Lina BONWITT

also >from the BAER family >from Hamm an der Sieg:

Sofie LEOPOLD & Jakob LEVY (Urbach) Honnef
1875-1916 1875-1942
Erna LEVY (d. 1987) & Theo Simon (Karlstadt) S. Africa
Hilde LEVY (1908 - ???) & Unknown KELLY S. Africa
Sonja KELLY & David STEIN
Hedwig LEVY (1909-1985) & Kurt SCHWARZ S. Africa

from the ABRAHAM family >from Hamm an der Sieg:
Hertha HORN & Willi MEYER
1902-1963
Walter MEYER & Rosa - S. Africa
Jeanette MEYER
Hannelore MEYER & Arthur WOlF S. Africa
Paula WOLF
Maureen WOLF
Susan WOLF

from the Hirsch family >from Hamm an der Sieg:
Albert LEVY & Fraenze BUCKY Altenburg
1886-KZ -KZ
Lotte LEVY S. Africa
(Lotte had four other siblings not shown here)

Thank you very much for your assistance,

Ethan Starr Washington, DC <edstarr@earthlink.net>

MODERATOR NOTE: There is a "South Africa SIG" that operates exactly as GerSIG
does.


German SIG #Germany searching for relatives in South Africa #germany

Ethan Starr <edstarr@...>
 

According to family trees compiled by my cousin Ted TOBIAS, the following
relatives of ours are or were in South Africa. If anyone has information
on them, I would appreciate hearing >from you.

from the BAER family >from Hamm an der Sieg:
Moritz BAER (born about 1860) & Thekla Unknown Frankfurt
Lilli BAER & Gustav NASSAU South Africa
Ruth NASSAU
Heinz NASSAU
Reinhardt NASSAU
Irma BAER & Otto BONWITT (d. 1933) (>from Frankfurt)
South Africa
Erika BONWITT & Unknown WOLF
Ralph BONWITT
Lina BONWITT

also >from the BAER family >from Hamm an der Sieg:

Sofie LEOPOLD & Jakob LEVY (Urbach) Honnef
1875-1916 1875-1942
Erna LEVY (d. 1987) & Theo Simon (Karlstadt) S. Africa
Hilde LEVY (1908 - ???) & Unknown KELLY S. Africa
Sonja KELLY & David STEIN
Hedwig LEVY (1909-1985) & Kurt SCHWARZ S. Africa

from the ABRAHAM family >from Hamm an der Sieg:
Hertha HORN & Willi MEYER
1902-1963
Walter MEYER & Rosa - S. Africa
Jeanette MEYER
Hannelore MEYER & Arthur WOlF S. Africa
Paula WOLF
Maureen WOLF
Susan WOLF

from the Hirsch family >from Hamm an der Sieg:
Albert LEVY & Fraenze BUCKY Altenburg
1886-KZ -KZ
Lotte LEVY S. Africa
(Lotte had four other siblings not shown here)

Thank you very much for your assistance,

Ethan Starr Washington, DC <edstarr@earthlink.net>

MODERATOR NOTE: There is a "South Africa SIG" that operates exactly as GerSIG
does.


Hungary Research Report #hungary

Adam Smith <ajsmith98@...>
 

Hi Everyone,

I thought that I would share my experience researching in the various
archives in Budapest. I spent 2 weeks in Hungary and Ukraine just after
Passover and did plenty of research along the way!

All in all, it was very interesting. Here is a report on my findings:

Trip Goals in Hungary: To examine documents of Jewish genealogical use in
the Budapest Archives

1. Hungarian National Archives in Castle Hill
2. Hungarian National Archives in Obuda
3. Hungarian Military Archives
4. Hungarian City Archives:

Results:
Findings in Castle Hill:
Records of the Government Organs: Section K492: Material of the
KEOKH. The KEOKH was called the Central Alien Control Office. In the
1930's, they required some Jews to send documentation that their
ancestors lived in Hungary back to 1849, and they were also behind the
deportation of Jews in Transcarpathia to Korosmezo in 1941, where were
ultimately killed near Kamenets-Podolsk. Gabi Bar Shaked had sought
to find the 'hidden' records of this collection. Some of the material
is public in the Hungarian National Archives.

The documents of the KEOKH are under K 490–492.
K490: documents of the chairman - not much remained (0.2meter)
K491: reserved documents - not much remained (0.42m)
K492: general documents - this is the majority of the papers. (2.83m!)

I requested material on Miskolc, and was given a small folder which
contained lists of Jews deported >from Miskolc due to lack of
citizenship. The list contained names, place and year of birth, and
address. All of the names appeared to be Jews, and most of the
deported Jews came >from Carpathian Ruthenia or Kassa region. It was
dated November 25, 1938. I requested photocopies of this list but was
ultimately not allowed to obtain the copies because they contained lists of
names for people I was not related to!

Below I have listed other towns available in this collection.

Kirendeltsegek iratai
Balassagyarmat
Csikszereda
Esztergom
Gyula
Kassa
Mako
Miskolc
Satoraljaujhely
Szombathey
Ujvidek


Findings in Obuda:
1. 1848 census material:
This material had been investigated with the assistance of Andras Koltai.
He graciously examined the following:
Census Returns of the Jews in 1848: In connection with Poszony
Comitat. Microfilm collection: box 43504

Andras also reported that film 43508 also contains Jewish material.
Records for Poszony and Csongrad were obtained in August 2006. These
counties appear to be part of box 43504, but the question is whether we have
all of box 43504 or if
there is more on that particular film. Unfortunately, film 43504 was not
available during my visit, and 43508 was restricted due to an unknown
reason.

2. Census returns of the Jews 1827-1853. Original place of
Preservation: Hungarian Jewish Archives. Budapest. (Microfilm box
45851)
The microfilm has three segments, and the title page for each town is
not legible in each case! I wrote down the town names as best I
could.
First part: 1838 'town illegible'—heads of houseolds listed
Second partL 1817- 'Jahocs'? This census is written in Hebrew—and
says Teregen Shtadt—it gives full lists of names, children, ages.
Last Part: 1853 'Jahre' : Alphabetized heads of household in Latin
alphabet
The only way to proceed with this would be to determine >from the Hungarian
Jewish archives what exactly was transcribed. (Perhaps there is more)

3. Microfilm 17946: Part of collection of microfilms originating in
Ukrainian archives. The title indicated that it includes vital
records for Munkacs >from 1860's for various religions, including Jews!
However, in fact this microfilm contained other material but no vital
records. It did however include multiple lists of individuals
arrested for civil disturbance during 1940 in Mukachevo. Each
individual name included the age, place of birth, and parents names.
Almost all individuals listed were Jewish.

4. Jewish Tax Censii >from early 19th Century, listed as C55 in
Hungarian National Archives.

I spent quite a bit of time trying to get these records, and finally I
figured them out. It appears that this collection is divided in two
parts. One part is on microfilm, and this appears to be an index of
names organized by year that correlate to events of legal affairs.
This is organized by year, and is available on films numbered
20650-20657 at the microfilm archive. I looked through this material
and think that it likely has no genealogical use.

The second part of the C55 collection is names lists. These are the records
currently being transcribed by the H-SIG project led by Eric Bloch. The
people in the microfilm archives knew nothing about these records! This
material appears to only be available in the original
documents at the main archives in Buda Castle. Apparently, even
though I received one microfilm of this collection 3-4 years ago, the
archives may still be in the process of microfilming this collection.
I have been communicating with an archivist, and he is hopefully going
to look into finding out what has already been filmed. So, we still
have a ways to go here.

5. I-Series: Dokumentumok a magyarorszagi szidosag tortenetehez.
This material is located at the microfilm archive. Its use is only
allowed by special permission, and is otherwise restricted. I was
allowed to see the index, and noted that the microfilms are numbered
1-180. There is no additional information provided. This collection
is available at YIVO, USHMM, and Yad Vashem.


War History Archives
Hadtörténelmi Levéltár
Cím: 1014 Bp., Kapisztrán tér 2-4.
Tel.: 325-1676
Fax: 325-1677
E-mail: HIM.leveltar@hm-him.hu
Hungarian War Archives
www.militaria.hu/hadt.php3?page=500
They reported that they had no records regarding soldiers prior to the
year 1900. They did have a database of officers available to search
on site. Additionally, they showed a book relating to minorities,
most of which related to Jews. This ranged >from approximately
1938-1943. They said that most records were maintained in Vienna.
The archives are the Kriegsarchiv-Ungarische Kriegsarchivdelegation
1030 Wien, Nottendorfergasse 2. Email is ekadel@freemail.hu.

Budapest City Archives
You may have noticed on the Yad Vashem Hall of Names, they have
recently added a collection called Victims >from Hungary. This is a
database created by the new Holocaust Documentation Center in
Budapest. It is a list of victims derived >from the Hungarian
Newspaper/Journal called Magyar Kozlony. I learned that these names
originated >from official declarations of death in courts in Hungary.
I was told most of the declarations were made in Budapest.

I spoke with Sipos Andras, who works at the Budapest City Archives.
He would allow his remarks published on the fate of the original
records. He reported that the original court declarations in Budapest
were destroyed, but could not comment on the fate of records in
regional courts. Currently, the records in the Yad Vashem database is
flawed, such that the places of birth are all completely wrong. The search
database on the Holocaust Documentation Center is not yet functional.

Other Significant Findings:


Miskolc Jewish Community Records:
Vital Records:
Miskolc births: April 1922-1930, January 25,1946-1951, and some data till
now.
Miskolc Marriage Reports: June 22, 1930-September 4 1934 and January
10, 1943-Junly 1948. (Includes both of Orthodox and Safardi.)
Miskolc death records >from January 25 1946 till now.
Index for pre-1895 birth and for 1836-1895 marriage records.
There are some pre-1895 record books too
The post-1904 cemetery list is a handwritten book, and made in present
years by the community.
Minutes of Miskolc Orthodox Jewish community.
Onod Jewish Community marriages, 1886-1930
Szerencs Jewish Community 1877-1886
(Information obtained with the help of Sandor Bacskai)

Nyiregyhaza Jewish Community:
They posses no community or vital records

Final Thoughts:
I think it would be a nice idea to significantly expand the 'Methods'
section of the H-SIG website. Individuals who take trips could report their
findings like I have just done. This could certainly enhance our
researching ability.

Besides that, research in Hungary is quite difficult and not very
conducive to going for a short research trip. The process is
generally quite slow. For example, in the main archive, material must
be requested three days in advance. If material has already been
microfilmed, one is not allowed to research the originals, and must
instead go to the microfilm archive which is 40 minutes outside the
center of the city. In the microfilm archive, one is generally
allowed to order 5 microfilms at a time, and microfilms ordered in the
morning will be ready by afternoon, and films ordered in the afternoon
will be ready by the following morning. Individuals are allowed to
keep microfilms in their private locker for up to one month! So if someone
has your microfilm, tough luck! Also, no one really speaks much English, so
I was accompanied by my generous
friend who lives there.

Anyway, hope this is helpful!

Sincerely,

Adam Smith

New York, NY


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungary Research Report #hungary

Adam Smith <ajsmith98@...>
 

Hi Everyone,

I thought that I would share my experience researching in the various
archives in Budapest. I spent 2 weeks in Hungary and Ukraine just after
Passover and did plenty of research along the way!

All in all, it was very interesting. Here is a report on my findings:

Trip Goals in Hungary: To examine documents of Jewish genealogical use in
the Budapest Archives

1. Hungarian National Archives in Castle Hill
2. Hungarian National Archives in Obuda
3. Hungarian Military Archives
4. Hungarian City Archives:

Results:
Findings in Castle Hill:
Records of the Government Organs: Section K492: Material of the
KEOKH. The KEOKH was called the Central Alien Control Office. In the
1930's, they required some Jews to send documentation that their
ancestors lived in Hungary back to 1849, and they were also behind the
deportation of Jews in Transcarpathia to Korosmezo in 1941, where were
ultimately killed near Kamenets-Podolsk. Gabi Bar Shaked had sought
to find the 'hidden' records of this collection. Some of the material
is public in the Hungarian National Archives.

The documents of the KEOKH are under K 490–492.
K490: documents of the chairman - not much remained (0.2meter)
K491: reserved documents - not much remained (0.42m)
K492: general documents - this is the majority of the papers. (2.83m!)

I requested material on Miskolc, and was given a small folder which
contained lists of Jews deported >from Miskolc due to lack of
citizenship. The list contained names, place and year of birth, and
address. All of the names appeared to be Jews, and most of the
deported Jews came >from Carpathian Ruthenia or Kassa region. It was
dated November 25, 1938. I requested photocopies of this list but was
ultimately not allowed to obtain the copies because they contained lists of
names for people I was not related to!

Below I have listed other towns available in this collection.

Kirendeltsegek iratai
Balassagyarmat
Csikszereda
Esztergom
Gyula
Kassa
Mako
Miskolc
Satoraljaujhely
Szombathey
Ujvidek


Findings in Obuda:
1. 1848 census material:
This material had been investigated with the assistance of Andras Koltai.
He graciously examined the following:
Census Returns of the Jews in 1848: In connection with Poszony
Comitat. Microfilm collection: box 43504

Andras also reported that film 43508 also contains Jewish material.
Records for Poszony and Csongrad were obtained in August 2006. These
counties appear to be part of box 43504, but the question is whether we have
all of box 43504 or if
there is more on that particular film. Unfortunately, film 43504 was not
available during my visit, and 43508 was restricted due to an unknown
reason.

2. Census returns of the Jews 1827-1853. Original place of
Preservation: Hungarian Jewish Archives. Budapest. (Microfilm box
45851)
The microfilm has three segments, and the title page for each town is
not legible in each case! I wrote down the town names as best I
could.
First part: 1838 'town illegible'—heads of houseolds listed
Second partL 1817- 'Jahocs'? This census is written in Hebrew—and
says Teregen Shtadt—it gives full lists of names, children, ages.
Last Part: 1853 'Jahre' : Alphabetized heads of household in Latin
alphabet
The only way to proceed with this would be to determine >from the Hungarian
Jewish archives what exactly was transcribed. (Perhaps there is more)

3. Microfilm 17946: Part of collection of microfilms originating in
Ukrainian archives. The title indicated that it includes vital
records for Munkacs >from 1860's for various religions, including Jews!
However, in fact this microfilm contained other material but no vital
records. It did however include multiple lists of individuals
arrested for civil disturbance during 1940 in Mukachevo. Each
individual name included the age, place of birth, and parents names.
Almost all individuals listed were Jewish.

4. Jewish Tax Censii >from early 19th Century, listed as C55 in
Hungarian National Archives.

I spent quite a bit of time trying to get these records, and finally I
figured them out. It appears that this collection is divided in two
parts. One part is on microfilm, and this appears to be an index of
names organized by year that correlate to events of legal affairs.
This is organized by year, and is available on films numbered
20650-20657 at the microfilm archive. I looked through this material
and think that it likely has no genealogical use.

The second part of the C55 collection is names lists. These are the records
currently being transcribed by the H-SIG project led by Eric Bloch. The
people in the microfilm archives knew nothing about these records! This
material appears to only be available in the original
documents at the main archives in Buda Castle. Apparently, even
though I received one microfilm of this collection 3-4 years ago, the
archives may still be in the process of microfilming this collection.
I have been communicating with an archivist, and he is hopefully going
to look into finding out what has already been filmed. So, we still
have a ways to go here.

5. I-Series: Dokumentumok a magyarorszagi szidosag tortenetehez.
This material is located at the microfilm archive. Its use is only
allowed by special permission, and is otherwise restricted. I was
allowed to see the index, and noted that the microfilms are numbered
1-180. There is no additional information provided. This collection
is available at YIVO, USHMM, and Yad Vashem.


War History Archives
Hadtörténelmi Levéltár
Cím: 1014 Bp., Kapisztrán tér 2-4.
Tel.: 325-1676
Fax: 325-1677
E-mail: HIM.leveltar@hm-him.hu
Hungarian War Archives
www.militaria.hu/hadt.php3?page=500
They reported that they had no records regarding soldiers prior to the
year 1900. They did have a database of officers available to search
on site. Additionally, they showed a book relating to minorities,
most of which related to Jews. This ranged >from approximately
1938-1943. They said that most records were maintained in Vienna.
The archives are the Kriegsarchiv-Ungarische Kriegsarchivdelegation
1030 Wien, Nottendorfergasse 2. Email is ekadel@freemail.hu.

Budapest City Archives
You may have noticed on the Yad Vashem Hall of Names, they have
recently added a collection called Victims >from Hungary. This is a
database created by the new Holocaust Documentation Center in
Budapest. It is a list of victims derived >from the Hungarian
Newspaper/Journal called Magyar Kozlony. I learned that these names
originated >from official declarations of death in courts in Hungary.
I was told most of the declarations were made in Budapest.

I spoke with Sipos Andras, who works at the Budapest City Archives.
He would allow his remarks published on the fate of the original
records. He reported that the original court declarations in Budapest
were destroyed, but could not comment on the fate of records in
regional courts. Currently, the records in the Yad Vashem database is
flawed, such that the places of birth are all completely wrong. The search
database on the Holocaust Documentation Center is not yet functional.

Other Significant Findings:


Miskolc Jewish Community Records:
Vital Records:
Miskolc births: April 1922-1930, January 25,1946-1951, and some data till
now.
Miskolc Marriage Reports: June 22, 1930-September 4 1934 and January
10, 1943-Junly 1948. (Includes both of Orthodox and Safardi.)
Miskolc death records >from January 25 1946 till now.
Index for pre-1895 birth and for 1836-1895 marriage records.
There are some pre-1895 record books too
The post-1904 cemetery list is a handwritten book, and made in present
years by the community.
Minutes of Miskolc Orthodox Jewish community.
Onod Jewish Community marriages, 1886-1930
Szerencs Jewish Community 1877-1886
(Information obtained with the help of Sandor Bacskai)

Nyiregyhaza Jewish Community:
They posses no community or vital records

Final Thoughts:
I think it would be a nice idea to significantly expand the 'Methods'
section of the H-SIG website. Individuals who take trips could report their
findings like I have just done. This could certainly enhance our
researching ability.

Besides that, research in Hungary is quite difficult and not very
conducive to going for a short research trip. The process is
generally quite slow. For example, in the main archive, material must
be requested three days in advance. If material has already been
microfilmed, one is not allowed to research the originals, and must
instead go to the microfilm archive which is 40 minutes outside the
center of the city. In the microfilm archive, one is generally
allowed to order 5 microfilms at a time, and microfilms ordered in the
morning will be ready by afternoon, and films ordered in the afternoon
will be ready by the following morning. Individuals are allowed to
keep microfilms in their private locker for up to one month! So if someone
has your microfilm, tough luck! Also, no one really speaks much English, so
I was accompanied by my generous
friend who lives there.

Anyway, hope this is helpful!

Sincerely,

Adam Smith

New York, NY


SCHERMAN from Frankfurt #germany

M&MSchejtman <mmschejtman@...>
 

Dear SIGers,
The Israeli radio has a daily segment called "The department for
searching lost relatives".
This program was originally aired after the 2nd World War to help Israelis
who survived, find lost relatives.

It has now been reinstated and has over 150 daily requests for searches. only
4-5 are aired every day.
You can listen to this program live on the Israeli radio website for Reshet Bet

http://bet.iba.org.il/

click top left "bet live".

The program is aired Sun-Thurs at 2:45 PM Israel time in Hebrew.

An example of its content follows:
On today's program Ori is looking for information about his grandfather Herbert
SCHERMAN. Herbert was born on Jan 16th 1914 to Julius and Selma nee STERN
in Frankfurt Germany. He attended the Philantropin school. Herbert and Julius
moved to Paris and established a small factory (haberdashery I think).
In Paris Herbert met and married Helen BEITCH in 1933. They had one son.
Herbert was drafted to the French army in 1939. He was relesed shortly
thereafter because of an illness.
On 20/08/1941 he was caught by the gestapo and sent to Drancy. On 19/07/1942 he
was sent to Auchwitz on train #7.

Ori, the grandson, has a picture of his grandfather's class at the Philantropin
school >from 1925. He is looking for anyone who might know his grandfather
from that era and can identify him in the picture.
Anyone who can tell Ori about Herbert SCHERMAN and family can do so via the radio
program snail mail:

Finding Lost Relatives
POB 33069 Jerusalem Israel

For other contact information for Israeli radio's Reshet Bet ask me.

Merav Schejtman Jerusalem Israel <mmschejtman@socialjustice.org.il>

MODERATOR NOTE: Any of this radio program's listeners and producers who are
fluent in English can join this and other SIG discussion groups.


German SIG #Germany SCHERMAN from Frankfurt #germany

M&MSchejtman <mmschejtman@...>
 

Dear SIGers,
The Israeli radio has a daily segment called "The department for
searching lost relatives".
This program was originally aired after the 2nd World War to help Israelis
who survived, find lost relatives.

It has now been reinstated and has over 150 daily requests for searches. only
4-5 are aired every day.
You can listen to this program live on the Israeli radio website for Reshet Bet

http://bet.iba.org.il/

click top left "bet live".

The program is aired Sun-Thurs at 2:45 PM Israel time in Hebrew.

An example of its content follows:
On today's program Ori is looking for information about his grandfather Herbert
SCHERMAN. Herbert was born on Jan 16th 1914 to Julius and Selma nee STERN
in Frankfurt Germany. He attended the Philantropin school. Herbert and Julius
moved to Paris and established a small factory (haberdashery I think).
In Paris Herbert met and married Helen BEITCH in 1933. They had one son.
Herbert was drafted to the French army in 1939. He was relesed shortly
thereafter because of an illness.
On 20/08/1941 he was caught by the gestapo and sent to Drancy. On 19/07/1942 he
was sent to Auchwitz on train #7.

Ori, the grandson, has a picture of his grandfather's class at the Philantropin
school >from 1925. He is looking for anyone who might know his grandfather
from that era and can identify him in the picture.
Anyone who can tell Ori about Herbert SCHERMAN and family can do so via the radio
program snail mail:

Finding Lost Relatives
POB 33069 Jerusalem Israel

For other contact information for Israeli radio's Reshet Bet ask me.

Merav Schejtman Jerusalem Israel <mmschejtman@socialjustice.org.il>

MODERATOR NOTE: Any of this radio program's listeners and producers who are
fluent in English can join this and other SIG discussion groups.


Miskolc Deportations #hungary

John J Kovacs <j.kovacs@...>
 

Steve Lasky inquired about the exact date of
deportations >from Miskolc.

According to the Memorial Plaque that is in the
Miskolc Synagogue the deportation trains left on June
11, 12, 13 and 14 in 1944 and arrived in Auschwitz on
June 13, 14, 15, and 16 of 1944.

The Jewish population of Miskolc was approximately
14,000 and I believe that Jews of surrounding towns
were also deported >from Miskolc. The final ghetto in
Miskolc was a brick factory that was located next to
railroad tracks. I was there.

John (Janos) Kovacs, Michigan


how to correct database? #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

i was looking up EPSTEINs in the "hungarian births database", and i
found a group of entries that were quite obviously in need of
correction (5 children of david and mari EPSTEIN: 2 different
spellings of david, and 2 different spellings of mari!).

how do i submit corrections? (the description of the database doesn't
seem to include contact or procedure information for this.)



....... tom klein, toronto


Hungary SIG #Hungary Miskolc Deportations #hungary

John J Kovacs <j.kovacs@...>
 

Steve Lasky inquired about the exact date of
deportations >from Miskolc.

According to the Memorial Plaque that is in the
Miskolc Synagogue the deportation trains left on June
11, 12, 13 and 14 in 1944 and arrived in Auschwitz on
June 13, 14, 15, and 16 of 1944.

The Jewish population of Miskolc was approximately
14,000 and I believe that Jews of surrounding towns
were also deported >from Miskolc. The final ghetto in
Miskolc was a brick factory that was located next to
railroad tracks. I was there.

John (Janos) Kovacs, Michigan


Hungary SIG #Hungary how to correct database? #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

i was looking up EPSTEINs in the "hungarian births database", and i
found a group of entries that were quite obviously in need of
correction (5 children of david and mari EPSTEIN: 2 different
spellings of david, and 2 different spellings of mari!).

how do i submit corrections? (the description of the database doesn't
seem to include contact or procedure information for this.)



....... tom klein, toronto


Transcription of census records, 1781-1850 #hungary

rodihan@...
 

I would like to thank Eric Bloch and his team of volunteers for their diligent work in transcribing this latest round of early census records. This has been an enormous undertaking and I'm certain that many, many hours were required by each person who was involved. But the benefits to all of us are significant. Several years ago, none of us thought that any Jewish Hungarian records existed with family surnames prior to the 1828 census. Now, with the transcription of these previously unknown Jewish census records, we have surnames -- and related family demographics -- of Jewish families in various Hungarian counties back to the mid-1790s. In some cases, these census records have stretched as far back as the early 1780s.

I have searched the database early this morning and already, new information >from Moson megye is surfacing on my KNOPFMACHER [also known as KNOPFELMACHER] family. Again, many thanks to Eric and his team!

Robert Hanscom
Andover, Massachusetts

Researching (Trencin megye): TESCHNER, KOHN, FRANKL, WILHELM, POPPER, TAUBER, ZERKOWITZ, KNOPFELMACHER, LAZAR


Miskolc Jews #hungary

kirsh@...
 

Miskolc Jews left in four transports on June 11, 12, 13, 14, 1944.

Julie Strauss Kirsh
researching: POLLAK, REICH in Tolcsva, Hungary
STRAUSZ in Miskolc, Hungary and Brno, Czech.
ROSENBAUM, ADLER in Miskolc, Hungary
FRENKEL, KELLER in Nagyecsed, Hungary
KATZ, MEZEI in Sarretudvari, Hungary

Subject: Transport of Miskolc Jews to Auschwitz
From: Steven Lasky <steve@museumoffamilyhistory.com>
Date: Sun, 27 May 2007 08:50:02 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

Greetings,

Does anyone know the exact date in 1944 that the Jews of Miskolc, Hungary
were transported to Auschwitz? I think the transport took place somewhere
between June 11-14, but would like to know the exact day if possible.
Thank you.

Regards,
Steven Lasky
New York
steve@museumoffamilyhistory.com





---

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