Date   

Questions about a Jewish Scribe #germany

dbing <dbing@...>
 

Dear GerSIG:

Since this involves historical questions rather than strict genealogy, I would
appreciate responses to me personally. <dbing@utk.edu>

Aaron LEVI in his 1756 petition for admission to Schutz status at Ihrnigen,
Baden (i.e. permission to reside and work at Ihringen), describes his father,
Abraham LEVI (my 5x great grandfather), as a “Zehngebotschreiber” (literally
“Scribe of Ten Commandments”). In 1757, in describing Abraham LEVI’s
inability to make a living in his old age, he is said to write occasionally
the 10 Commandments (“Er treibt keinen Handel. Er schreibt dann und wann die
10 Gebote.”)

In his three surviviing Ihringen Haggadot, Abraham LEVI described himself as
Sofer SaTeM (books, tefillin, mezuzot). My understanding is that the Ten
Commandments per se were not involved in these writings.

I have a couple of questions:

(1) Was there a market for short texts of the Ten Commandments among Jews in
the middle of the 18th century or could Abraham’s son (Aaron LEVI) be using
“Ten Commandments” as a simplification which the local Christian authorities
would readily understand rather than referring to the scriptural passages
traditionally found in mezuzot or tefillin? In other words, Abraham’s
scribal activities were restricted to sporadic small projects rather than a
major undertaking such as a Haggadah.

(2) Does anyone have information about the locations of Jewish scribal schools
in the regions of Baden, Alsace, and Switzerland in the 18th century. Abraham
LEVI was a highly trained and creative scribe who illustrated and illuminated
his Haggadot, and used Yiddish (or ju(e)dische Deutsch) to describe his
illustrations. He is more likely to have come to Ihringen around 1730 >from
Alsace. Thanks in advance for your [ off list ]responses.

Daniel Bing <dbing@utk.edu> Knoxville, TN, USA [Private replies only. MODERATOR]


German SIG #Germany Questions about a Jewish Scribe #germany

dbing <dbing@...>
 

Dear GerSIG:

Since this involves historical questions rather than strict genealogy, I would
appreciate responses to me personally. <dbing@utk.edu>

Aaron LEVI in his 1756 petition for admission to Schutz status at Ihrnigen,
Baden (i.e. permission to reside and work at Ihringen), describes his father,
Abraham LEVI (my 5x great grandfather), as a “Zehngebotschreiber” (literally
“Scribe of Ten Commandments”). In 1757, in describing Abraham LEVI’s
inability to make a living in his old age, he is said to write occasionally
the 10 Commandments (“Er treibt keinen Handel. Er schreibt dann und wann die
10 Gebote.”)

In his three surviviing Ihringen Haggadot, Abraham LEVI described himself as
Sofer SaTeM (books, tefillin, mezuzot). My understanding is that the Ten
Commandments per se were not involved in these writings.

I have a couple of questions:

(1) Was there a market for short texts of the Ten Commandments among Jews in
the middle of the 18th century or could Abraham’s son (Aaron LEVI) be using
“Ten Commandments” as a simplification which the local Christian authorities
would readily understand rather than referring to the scriptural passages
traditionally found in mezuzot or tefillin? In other words, Abraham’s
scribal activities were restricted to sporadic small projects rather than a
major undertaking such as a Haggadah.

(2) Does anyone have information about the locations of Jewish scribal schools
in the regions of Baden, Alsace, and Switzerland in the 18th century. Abraham
LEVI was a highly trained and creative scribe who illustrated and illuminated
his Haggadot, and used Yiddish (or ju(e)dische Deutsch) to describe his
illustrations. He is more likely to have come to Ihringen around 1730 >from
Alsace. Thanks in advance for your [ off list ]responses.

Daniel Bing <dbing@utk.edu> Knoxville, TN, USA [Private replies only. MODERATOR]


Does any one have a copy of Die Judischen Gefallen 1914-1918, Ein Gedenkbuch"? #germany

Debby Gincig Painter
 

Is there any one with a copy of this book who could help me?

"Die Judischen Gefallen des Deutschen Heeres, der deutschen Marine und
der Deutschen Schutztruppen 1914-1918, Ein Gedenkbuch". Published by
Reichsbund Judischer Frontsoldaten 1932"

I have a missing relative with no trace of him after December 8, 1914,
and I wonder how I could find out if he might have enlisted in the military.
Thanks for your *** off-list *** replies to:

Debby Painter, [ CITY ???? ]Michigan <gincig@yahoo.com>


German SIG #Germany Does any one have a copy of Die Judischen Gefallen 1914-1918, Ein Gedenkbuch"? #germany

Debby Gincig Painter
 

Is there any one with a copy of this book who could help me?

"Die Judischen Gefallen des Deutschen Heeres, der deutschen Marine und
der Deutschen Schutztruppen 1914-1918, Ein Gedenkbuch". Published by
Reichsbund Judischer Frontsoldaten 1932"

I have a missing relative with no trace of him after December 8, 1914,
and I wonder how I could find out if he might have enlisted in the military.
Thanks for your *** off-list *** replies to:

Debby Painter, [ CITY ???? ]Michigan <gincig@yahoo.com>


Viewmate help needed for Wreschen, Posen, Prussia, records #germany

Susan Buyer <susanbuyer@...>
 

I would appreciate help with Viewmate records 11754 and 11755. These
are the left and right page column headings of the Matrikel of the
Jewish community of Wreschen, Posen, Prussia, 1834-1869, LDS film
1190958 Item 2.

I would appreciate help in translating the German--at least some sense
of what the columns mean.

Direct links to these two images:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=11754

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=11755

My Wreschen families are MICHAEL, ABRAHAMS (ABRAHAMCZYK), BEBARFALD.

Thank you!! [For replies off list.]

Susan Buyer Potomac, MD <susanbuyer@verizon.net>


German SIG #Germany Viewmate help needed for Wreschen, Posen, Prussia, records #germany

Susan Buyer <susanbuyer@...>
 

I would appreciate help with Viewmate records 11754 and 11755. These
are the left and right page column headings of the Matrikel of the
Jewish community of Wreschen, Posen, Prussia, 1834-1869, LDS film
1190958 Item 2.

I would appreciate help in translating the German--at least some sense
of what the columns mean.

Direct links to these two images:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=11754

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=11755

My Wreschen families are MICHAEL, ABRAHAMS (ABRAHAMCZYK), BEBARFALD.

Thank you!! [For replies off list.]

Susan Buyer Potomac, MD <susanbuyer@verizon.net>


Yizkor Book Report for April 2008 #france

Joyce Field
 

For April 2008 the Yizkor Book Project added one new book, two new
entries, and 11 updates. All entries are accessible at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html > and flags have
been appended to make it easier to identify files added during April.

New book:
-Vas Megye, Hungary

New entries:

-Deblin, Poland: translation into Polish:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/deblin/debp000.html>
-Markobel, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, Vol. III

Updates:

-Brzeziny, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html>
-Czestochowa, Poland:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa2/Czestochowa2.html>
-Dembitz, Poland: translation into Polish:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/debica/Demp000.html>
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Jaslo, Poland
-Kamen Kashirsky, Ukraine
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Radzymin, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Vidzy, Belarus

Donations are needed for translation projects listed at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23>.
Funds are used for professional translation services and these books
cannot be translated unless funds are contributed. Please review the
list and consider contributions to the books to honor a relative, an
occasion, or landsleit.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


French SIG #France Yizkor Book Report for April 2008 #france

Joyce Field
 

For April 2008 the Yizkor Book Project added one new book, two new
entries, and 11 updates. All entries are accessible at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html > and flags have
been appended to make it easier to identify files added during April.

New book:
-Vas Megye, Hungary

New entries:

-Deblin, Poland: translation into Polish:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/deblin/debp000.html>
-Markobel, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, Vol. III

Updates:

-Brzeziny, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html>
-Czestochowa, Poland:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa2/Czestochowa2.html>
-Dembitz, Poland: translation into Polish:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/debica/Demp000.html>
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Jaslo, Poland
-Kamen Kashirsky, Ukraine
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Radzymin, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Vidzy, Belarus

Donations are needed for translation projects listed at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23>.
Funds are used for professional translation services and these books
cannot be translated unless funds are contributed. Please review the
list and consider contributions to the books to honor a relative, an
occasion, or landsleit.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Yizkor Book Report for April 2008 #germany

Joyce Field
 

For April 2008 the Yizkor Book Project added one new book, two new
entries, and 11 updates. All entries are accessible at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html > and flags have
been appended to make it easier to identify files added during April.

New book:
-Vas Megye, Hungary

New entries:

-Deblin, Poland: translation into Polish:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/deblin/debp000.html>
-Markobel, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, Vol. III

Updates:

-Brzeziny, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html>
-Czestochowa, Poland:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa2/Czestochowa2.html>
-Dembitz, Poland: translation into Polish:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/debica/Demp000.html>
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Jaslo, Poland
-Kamen Kashirsky, Ukraine
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Radzymin, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Vidzy, Belarus

Donations are needed for translation projects listed at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23>.
Funds are used for professional translation services and these books
cannot be translated unless funds are contributed. Please review the
list and consider contributions to the books to honor a relative, an
occasion, or landsleit.

Joyce Field JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


German SIG #Germany Yizkor Book Report for April 2008 #germany

Joyce Field
 

For April 2008 the Yizkor Book Project added one new book, two new
entries, and 11 updates. All entries are accessible at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html > and flags have
been appended to make it easier to identify files added during April.

New book:
-Vas Megye, Hungary

New entries:

-Deblin, Poland: translation into Polish:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/deblin/debp000.html>
-Markobel, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, Vol. III

Updates:

-Brzeziny, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html>
-Czestochowa, Poland:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa2/Czestochowa2.html>
-Dembitz, Poland: translation into Polish:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/debica/Demp000.html>
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Jaslo, Poland
-Kamen Kashirsky, Ukraine
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Radzymin, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Vidzy, Belarus

Donations are needed for translation projects listed at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23>.
Funds are used for professional translation services and these books
cannot be translated unless funds are contributed. Please review the
list and consider contributions to the books to honor a relative, an
occasion, or landsleit.

Joyce Field JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


"Unusual" Jewish occupations and institutions. #germany

MBernet@...
 

In searching old records, we often come across terms for Jewish occupations,
practices and institutions that are archaic and obscure.

European Christians often had strange ways of giving names to Jewish trades and
practices. Thus, a Kohen was frequently give the name Munk (monk); a cantor a
Vorsaenger or Schulsinger. A synagogue was a Schule (whence the Yiddish "Shul").
A Yeshiva was a Sprachschule (Speech school). Jews were Israelites or Evrekas
(correct my Russian, please).

Hebrew texts were referred to as "Zehngebote" (Ten Commandments).
Non-Jews had no understanding of Judaism and were ignorant of the fact
that the bulk of the bible in their religion (which they couldn't read because
they knew no Latin), was the Hebrew Torah of the Jews. They knew about
the Ten Commandments and that the seventh-day Sabbath referred to
these strange outsiders' religion. All Hebrew writing was therefore
subsumed by this small detail of Hebrew literature that was familiar to the

public. (There's a term for this in linguistics that I've forgotten, for using a
part to represent a whole e.g. counting "heads" or "hands" and meaning "people.")

Generally, Jews learned their profession under the tutelage of their father or
a close relative. Judaism and general education were studied in elementary
schools known in Germany as Judenschule. >from there, students were
apprenticed to the new trade they sought. A few went on to a high school and
fewer yet continued through college.

Those who sought to work in the Jewish field as rabbi, cantor, shochet,
sofer (scribe) or teacher would spend some years at a Yeshiva, the duration of
their studies depending on what they needed to learn to qualify. And of course,
they kept advancing through apprenticeships, mentoring and internships.

A sofer (scribe) had to know the rules for writing and witnessing documents but
the common texts (for marriage, divorce, wills, contracts, etc. were available in
standard rule books. An illustrator would likely study at a general school
for artists.

The highly skilled writer of ritual texts was known as Sofer Stam, Stam being an
acronym for Sefer-Torah, Tefilin, Mezuzah. In most cases, a Sofer Stam would be
occupied with correcting and repairing damaged Torahs etc.

Coincidentally, the New York Times ran a fascinating story on April 30, 2008,
about Rabbi Menachem Youlus and the Save a Torah foundation that has
restored over a thousand Torah scrolls saved >from the holocaust.
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/30/nyregion/30torah.html?th&emc=th

Michael Bernet, New York mbernet@aol.com


German SIG #Germany "Unusual" Jewish occupations and institutions. #germany

MBernet@...
 

In searching old records, we often come across terms for Jewish occupations,
practices and institutions that are archaic and obscure.

European Christians often had strange ways of giving names to Jewish trades and
practices. Thus, a Kohen was frequently give the name Munk (monk); a cantor a
Vorsaenger or Schulsinger. A synagogue was a Schule (whence the Yiddish "Shul").
A Yeshiva was a Sprachschule (Speech school). Jews were Israelites or Evrekas
(correct my Russian, please).

Hebrew texts were referred to as "Zehngebote" (Ten Commandments).
Non-Jews had no understanding of Judaism and were ignorant of the fact
that the bulk of the bible in their religion (which they couldn't read because
they knew no Latin), was the Hebrew Torah of the Jews. They knew about
the Ten Commandments and that the seventh-day Sabbath referred to
these strange outsiders' religion. All Hebrew writing was therefore
subsumed by this small detail of Hebrew literature that was familiar to the

public. (There's a term for this in linguistics that I've forgotten, for using a
part to represent a whole e.g. counting "heads" or "hands" and meaning "people.")

Generally, Jews learned their profession under the tutelage of their father or
a close relative. Judaism and general education were studied in elementary
schools known in Germany as Judenschule. >from there, students were
apprenticed to the new trade they sought. A few went on to a high school and
fewer yet continued through college.

Those who sought to work in the Jewish field as rabbi, cantor, shochet,
sofer (scribe) or teacher would spend some years at a Yeshiva, the duration of
their studies depending on what they needed to learn to qualify. And of course,
they kept advancing through apprenticeships, mentoring and internships.

A sofer (scribe) had to know the rules for writing and witnessing documents but
the common texts (for marriage, divorce, wills, contracts, etc. were available in
standard rule books. An illustrator would likely study at a general school
for artists.

The highly skilled writer of ritual texts was known as Sofer Stam, Stam being an
acronym for Sefer-Torah, Tefilin, Mezuzah. In most cases, a Sofer Stam would be
occupied with correcting and repairing damaged Torahs etc.

Coincidentally, the New York Times ran a fascinating story on April 30, 2008,
about Rabbi Menachem Youlus and the Save a Torah foundation that has
restored over a thousand Torah scrolls saved >from the holocaust.
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/30/nyregion/30torah.html?th&emc=th

Michael Bernet, New York mbernet@aol.com


Re: FLEISHMAN vs FLEISCHMANN {was: Is this a German name?} #general

Evertjan Hannivoort <e.j.w.hannivoort@...>
 

On 1 May 2008 at 4:16, Celia Male wrote:

Anita Arkin of Tarzana, Ca. wrote: .... "Is the name FLEISHMAN German or
could this family come >from another country?"

We have had several replies to this already confirming the German roots to this
name - I would like to inform Anita that although there are 400 Jewish
FLEISCHMANN buried in Vienna, there is not a single FLEISHMAN - there are many
early Bohemian and Moravian Jewish FLEISCHMANN families too and no FLEISHMAN.
I am sure you will find the same in Germany.
I would think that:

While the loss of the double "nn" could have happened in Netherlands,
UK, US or elsewhere, even in Germany,
the "sh" is only practiced in English speaking countries.

Dutch, [and I believe Slavian/Polish], would be "sj".

Fleischmann brothers are a famous model railway factory,
nearly as famous as Maerklin, the latter being my game in the '50s.

<http://www.fleischmann.de/?pid=1746>

120+ years would be 1888-.

Were they Jewish?

Evertjan.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: FLEISHMAN vs FLEISCHMANN {was: Is this a German name?} #general

Evertjan Hannivoort <e.j.w.hannivoort@...>
 

On 1 May 2008 at 4:16, Celia Male wrote:

Anita Arkin of Tarzana, Ca. wrote: .... "Is the name FLEISHMAN German or
could this family come >from another country?"

We have had several replies to this already confirming the German roots to this
name - I would like to inform Anita that although there are 400 Jewish
FLEISCHMANN buried in Vienna, there is not a single FLEISHMAN - there are many
early Bohemian and Moravian Jewish FLEISCHMANN families too and no FLEISHMAN.
I am sure you will find the same in Germany.
I would think that:

While the loss of the double "nn" could have happened in Netherlands,
UK, US or elsewhere, even in Germany,
the "sh" is only practiced in English speaking countries.

Dutch, [and I believe Slavian/Polish], would be "sj".

Fleischmann brothers are a famous model railway factory,
nearly as famous as Maerklin, the latter being my game in the '50s.

<http://www.fleischmann.de/?pid=1746>

120+ years would be 1888-.

Were they Jewish?

Evertjan.


online directories help find Galizianers in Berlin #galicia

Renee Steinig
 

Those whose Galitzianer relatives moved to Berlin will want to
explore the digitized copies of the Berlin Adressbuecher, 1799 to
1943, at http://adressbuch.zlb.de/

To find an individual listing click on
"Suche in den Berliner Adressbuchern,"
then a year range,
then on the folder icon for a specific year
(not on the notepad icon below it),
then on "Einwohnerverzeichnis" (English: listing of inhabitants),
then on a letter of the alphabet
and finally, on the appropriate page

Other sections contain business and government listings, street
listings, and more.

The text is in Gothic characters, which take some getting used to.

The site was described in fall 2004 on the JewishGen Discussion
Group and the GerSIG list and there's been discussion about it on
GerSIG since. According to a message >from Roger Lustig in Jan. 2007,
the site had recently been revamped, so some of the earlier advice
about navigating the site is no longer relevant.

I will soon travel to Berlin and thanks to these directories, I
will be able to visit the streets there where some of my Galitzianer
cousins lived and worked before they perished.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills, New York, USA
genmaven@gmail.com

Researching (and remembering)

DILLER >from Przeworsk and Sieniawa, then Berlin
HONIG >from Zglobice (near Tarnow), then Berlin
REIFER >from Lezajsk and Sieniawa, then Berlin
SCHNEEBAUM >from Moszczany (near Radymno), then Berlin


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia online directories help find Galizianers in Berlin #galicia

Renee Steinig
 

Those whose Galitzianer relatives moved to Berlin will want to
explore the digitized copies of the Berlin Adressbuecher, 1799 to
1943, at http://adressbuch.zlb.de/

To find an individual listing click on
"Suche in den Berliner Adressbuchern,"
then a year range,
then on the folder icon for a specific year
(not on the notepad icon below it),
then on "Einwohnerverzeichnis" (English: listing of inhabitants),
then on a letter of the alphabet
and finally, on the appropriate page

Other sections contain business and government listings, street
listings, and more.

The text is in Gothic characters, which take some getting used to.

The site was described in fall 2004 on the JewishGen Discussion
Group and the GerSIG list and there's been discussion about it on
GerSIG since. According to a message >from Roger Lustig in Jan. 2007,
the site had recently been revamped, so some of the earlier advice
about navigating the site is no longer relevant.

I will soon travel to Berlin and thanks to these directories, I
will be able to visit the streets there where some of my Galitzianer
cousins lived and worked before they perished.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills, New York, USA
genmaven@gmail.com

Researching (and remembering)

DILLER >from Przeworsk and Sieniawa, then Berlin
HONIG >from Zglobice (near Tarnow), then Berlin
REIFER >from Lezajsk and Sieniawa, then Berlin
SCHNEEBAUM >from Moszczany (near Radymno), then Berlin


Yizkor Book Report for April 2008 #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

For April 2008 the Yizkor Book Project added one new book, two new
entries, and 11 updates. All entries are accessible at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html > and flags have
been appended to make it easier to identify files added during April.

New book:
-Vas Megye, Hungary

New entries:

-Deblin, Poland: translation into Polish:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/deblin/debp000.html>
-Markobel, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, Vol. III

Updates:

-Brzeziny, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html>
-Czestochowa, Poland:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa2/Czestochowa2.html>
-Dembitz, Poland: translation into Polish:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/debica/Demp000.html>
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Jaslo, Poland
-Kamen Kashirsky, Ukraine
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Radzymin, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Vidzy, Belarus

Donations are needed for translation projects listed at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23>.
Funds are used for professional translation services and these books
cannot be translated unless funds are contributed. Please review the
list and consider contributions to the books to honor a relative, an
occasion, or landsleit.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Yizkor Book Report for April 2008 #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

For April 2008 the Yizkor Book Project added one new book, two new
entries, and 11 updates. All entries are accessible at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html > and flags have
been appended to make it easier to identify files added during April.

New book:
-Vas Megye, Hungary

New entries:

-Deblin, Poland: translation into Polish:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/deblin/debp000.html>
-Markobel, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, Vol. III

Updates:

-Brzeziny, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html>
-Czestochowa, Poland:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa2/Czestochowa2.html>
-Dembitz, Poland: translation into Polish:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/debica/Demp000.html>
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Jaslo, Poland
-Kamen Kashirsky, Ukraine
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Radzymin, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Vidzy, Belarus

Donations are needed for translation projects listed at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23>.
Funds are used for professional translation services and these books
cannot be translated unless funds are contributed. Please review the
list and consider contributions to the books to honor a relative, an
occasion, or landsleit.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Translation request German to English #germany

Errol Schneegurt
 

Dear mambers,

I recently found a letter I had received >from the Austrian Army Archives in
2003 that lost its way among my many papers.
I would appreciate it if someone could translate it for me.

ViewMate number 11751

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=11751

Please answer me direct at ESLVIV@AOL.COM Thanks

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Yizkor Book Report for April 2008 #latvia

Joyce Field
 

For April 2008 the Yizkor Book Project added one new book, two new
entries, and 11 updates. All entries are accessible at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html > and flags have
been appended to make it easier to identify files added during April.

New book:
-Vas Megye, Hungary

New entries:

-Deblin, Poland: translation into Polish:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/deblin/debp000.html>
-Markobel, Germany: Pinkas HaKehillot Germany, Vol. III

Updates:

-Brzeziny, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html>
-Czestochowa, Poland:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa2/Czestochowa2.html>
-Dembitz, Poland: translation into Polish:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/debica/Demp000.html>
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Jaslo, Poland
-Kamen Kashirsky, Ukraine
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Radzymin, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Vidzy, Belarus

Donations are needed for translation projects listed at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23>.
Funds are used for professional translation services and these books
cannot be translated unless funds are contributed. Please review the
list and consider contributions to the books to honor a relative, an
occasion, or landsleit.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition