Date   

Re: Finding US naturalization information from notations on a ship manifest #general

gilah@...
 

Martha (Schecter) Forsyth <theforsyths@...> wrote regarding
information written on her aunt's manifest page:
The notation says: Dec 23 1940 229893 (515 Phila 3x37903) Natzn The
dates is stamped, the rest is hand-written. The manifest must have been
checked to verify Ettie's arrival information. I'm guessing that the
naturalization took place on Dec 23, 1940 (but was that the final, or the
filing of intent, or...?), the certificate number is 229892, and it took
place in Philadelphia; I can't guess what 3x37903 might refer to.
Does someone know, or know where I can find out?

Martha should check Marian L. Smith' 'Guide to Interpreting Manifest Markings'
on JewishGen.
http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Manifests/
There is no better guide for checking the meaning of all those markings on
manifests!

Clicking on the Occupation Column, will lead you to the answer to most
of your questions. The number 3 indicates that the Declaration of
Intention was filed in the Philadelphia area. The date shown should indicate
the date that the information provided on the Declaration was checked against
the information found on this manifest by immigration officials. The
certificate number you see is the number of the Certificate of Arrival
(not the Certificate of Naturalization) issued as a result of confirmation
of the information provided in the Declaration and shown the manifest.

Unfortunately, the number on the Certificate of Arrival will probably not
help you much in finding the original Declaration or subsequent Petition
for Naturalization. You should check within several years after the date the
Cert. of Arrival for the Petition of Naturalization (assuming she finished
the process of naturalization).

Check Ancestry.com and Family Search https://www.familysearch.org/#form=historical_records
for Philadelphia naturalization records. If that fails, you may be able to
find what you're interested in by going through the file search process with
the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service
http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/
Click on Genealogy located under Services in the column on the left side
of the page.

For an initial $20, they will do an Index Search and try to locate the file.
If successful, they will come back to you for an additional (optional) $20-35
to copy and provide the information. It may take a few months to complete the
process.

Emily Garber
Phoenix, AZ
http://www.extrayad.blogspot.com
http://www.kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/yurovshchina/index.html


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Finding US naturalization information from notations on a ship manifest #general

gilah@...
 

Martha (Schecter) Forsyth <theforsyths@...> wrote regarding
information written on her aunt's manifest page:
The notation says: Dec 23 1940 229893 (515 Phila 3x37903) Natzn The
dates is stamped, the rest is hand-written. The manifest must have been
checked to verify Ettie's arrival information. I'm guessing that the
naturalization took place on Dec 23, 1940 (but was that the final, or the
filing of intent, or...?), the certificate number is 229892, and it took
place in Philadelphia; I can't guess what 3x37903 might refer to.
Does someone know, or know where I can find out?

Martha should check Marian L. Smith' 'Guide to Interpreting Manifest Markings'
on JewishGen.
http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Manifests/
There is no better guide for checking the meaning of all those markings on
manifests!

Clicking on the Occupation Column, will lead you to the answer to most
of your questions. The number 3 indicates that the Declaration of
Intention was filed in the Philadelphia area. The date shown should indicate
the date that the information provided on the Declaration was checked against
the information found on this manifest by immigration officials. The
certificate number you see is the number of the Certificate of Arrival
(not the Certificate of Naturalization) issued as a result of confirmation
of the information provided in the Declaration and shown the manifest.

Unfortunately, the number on the Certificate of Arrival will probably not
help you much in finding the original Declaration or subsequent Petition
for Naturalization. You should check within several years after the date the
Cert. of Arrival for the Petition of Naturalization (assuming she finished
the process of naturalization).

Check Ancestry.com and Family Search https://www.familysearch.org/#form=historical_records
for Philadelphia naturalization records. If that fails, you may be able to
find what you're interested in by going through the file search process with
the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service
http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/
Click on Genealogy located under Services in the column on the left side
of the page.

For an initial $20, they will do an Index Search and try to locate the file.
If successful, they will come back to you for an additional (optional) $20-35
to copy and provide the information. It may take a few months to complete the
process.

Emily Garber
Phoenix, AZ
http://www.extrayad.blogspot.com
http://www.kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/yurovshchina/index.html


(USA): WDYTYA: Rashida Jones #general

Ittai Hershman
 

The current episode is moving, informative and well-told. It will be of
special interest to any Jewish genealogist with family >from Aizpute
(Hasenpoth) and Riga. Having the benefit of watching it on DVR last night,
we were able to freeze frame on some of the records which are nicely
readable (e.g. the 1872 death record in Hebrew >from Hasenpoth).

It can be viewed online at
http://www.hulu.com/watch/358123/who-do-you-think-you-are-rashida-jones
(at least within the USA).

Ittai Hershman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (USA): WDYTYA: Rashida Jones #general

Ittai Hershman
 

The current episode is moving, informative and well-told. It will be of
special interest to any Jewish genealogist with family >from Aizpute
(Hasenpoth) and Riga. Having the benefit of watching it on DVR last night,
we were able to freeze frame on some of the records which are nicely
readable (e.g. the 1872 death record in Hebrew >from Hasenpoth).

It can be viewed online at
http://www.hulu.com/watch/358123/who-do-you-think-you-are-rashida-jones
(at least within the USA).

Ittai Hershman


Need 5 Russian to English Translations of Documents from Lodz & Aleksandrow Lodski -Surname EDYGER #general

Mady Land <madyland@...>
 

Hello Genners,

I've posted 5 documents on Viewmate for translation-- >from Russian into
English, to help develop the family tree of my paternal grandmother's family
in the towns of Lodz, and Aleksandrow Lodski, Poland.

The surname of interest is Edyger/Ediger.

Please note that I've already gotten the basics translated such as parents'
names, but I would appreciate a full translation with all details such as
ages, all parents' names (maiden names of mothers), where born or living,
occupations, etc. In addition, the relationship of witnesses, if they are
relatives, etc.

Also important are the dates of registration plus date and time of the
actual event, as some may be late registrations.

I am presenting the information to newly-discovered family members who will
be fascinated by seeing the original documents and their full translations.

The links for each are:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=22755 - 1881 - Birth
akt#17 of Szlama EDYGER - Aleksandrow Lodski
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=22756 - 1883 - Birth
akt#31 Dawid EDYGER - Aleksandrow Lodski
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=22757 - 1890 - Birth
Akt#164 of Josif Chune EDYGER - Lodz
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=22758 - 1894 - Death
akt#1787 of Icek EDYGER - Lodz
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=22759 - 1879 - Birth
akt#48 of Estera Fajga Edyger - Aleksandrow

Thank you in advance for your help.

Mady Land
New York, NY
Madyland04@...

Researching:
LANDSZNEJDER/LANDSCHNEIDER/KLAMRA/ZAROSLA/Plock, Bodzanow, Gabin, Zychlin,
New York;
ZYLBER Dobrzyn nad Wisla;
GEDEGER/EIIDEGER/KELMAN/KIELMAN/Nowe Miasto nad Pilica, New York;
FOGEL/FOGIEL/FOJGEL/Hrubieszow, Ratno, Lublin, Poland; New York;
LADZINSKI/LADYSINSKA/LADIZINSKY/Myastowka/Gorodkivka Ukraine, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need 5 Russian to English Translations of Documents from Lodz & Aleksandrow Lodski -Surname EDYGER #general

Mady Land <madyland@...>
 

Hello Genners,

I've posted 5 documents on Viewmate for translation-- >from Russian into
English, to help develop the family tree of my paternal grandmother's family
in the towns of Lodz, and Aleksandrow Lodski, Poland.

The surname of interest is Edyger/Ediger.

Please note that I've already gotten the basics translated such as parents'
names, but I would appreciate a full translation with all details such as
ages, all parents' names (maiden names of mothers), where born or living,
occupations, etc. In addition, the relationship of witnesses, if they are
relatives, etc.

Also important are the dates of registration plus date and time of the
actual event, as some may be late registrations.

I am presenting the information to newly-discovered family members who will
be fascinated by seeing the original documents and their full translations.

The links for each are:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=22755 - 1881 - Birth
akt#17 of Szlama EDYGER - Aleksandrow Lodski
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=22756 - 1883 - Birth
akt#31 Dawid EDYGER - Aleksandrow Lodski
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=22757 - 1890 - Birth
Akt#164 of Josif Chune EDYGER - Lodz
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=22758 - 1894 - Death
akt#1787 of Icek EDYGER - Lodz
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=22759 - 1879 - Birth
akt#48 of Estera Fajga Edyger - Aleksandrow

Thank you in advance for your help.

Mady Land
New York, NY
Madyland04@...

Researching:
LANDSZNEJDER/LANDSCHNEIDER/KLAMRA/ZAROSLA/Plock, Bodzanow, Gabin, Zychlin,
New York;
ZYLBER Dobrzyn nad Wisla;
GEDEGER/EIIDEGER/KELMAN/KIELMAN/Nowe Miasto nad Pilica, New York;
FOGEL/FOGIEL/FOJGEL/Hrubieszow, Ratno, Lublin, Poland; New York;
LADZINSKI/LADYSINSKA/LADIZINSKY/Myastowka/Gorodkivka Ukraine, New York


Re: Baluty #poland #lodz

Fay Bussgang
 

While I don't know where the Baluty B,M,D records are located, I do
know that the Lodz archives has Books of Residents (Ksiegi Ludnosci)
from Baluty, and these books show the birth date and birthplace of
the people included in the book.

Fay Bussgang
Dedham, MA

BURSZTAJN: Brzeziny, Poland
TORONCZYK: Wloclawek, Poland
NACHMANOVITZ: Kiliya, Ukraine
WEXLER: Ismail, Ukraine

PHILIPP: Lviv, Ukraine
SPIRO: Dzialoszyce, Poland
BUSSGANG: Rogatin, Ukraine
WILLIG: Knyaginichi, Ukraine

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Records >from Baluty
From: <jeffwexler@...>
Date: Sat, 5 May 2012 20:29:27 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1

I received several responses to my inquiry as to Jewish records
from Baluty.
I was told that birth, marriage, and deaths for Baluty appear in
Zgierz
records >from the 1820s, and that at least some Baluty deaths appear in
Lodz records >from the early 1900s.

I was informed that Baluty events would have been recorded in Lodz
because
Baluty was (1) a neighborhood of Lodz and (2) part of the Lodz
kehilla.

I was also told that according to the Encyclopedia of Jewish
Communities,
Poland (available on JewishGen.org), until World War I Baluty was
"administratively subordinate" to Radogoszcz and the Russian
authorities
refused to incorporate Baluty into Lodz. (No separate BMD records for
Radogoszcz are identified on JRI-Poland or the websites for the FHL,
the Polish State Archive, or the Routes to Roots Foundation.)

Finally, I learned that: (1) it was not uncommon for Jewish
marriages in
the Lodz area to have been performed religiously but not recorded
civilly;
and (2) there appear to be missing civil records in a number of
towns for
marriages that took place in the period >from 1874 to 1877.

I did a spot check of the FHL microfilms for Zgierz for a year in
the 1850s
without finding any records for events occurring in Baluty.
Similarly, I
did a spot check of the FHL microfilms for Lodz for a year in the
1850s
and a year in the 1860s, but I saw no reference to Baluty (either
in the
left-hand column, where the location of events was stated, nor in
the body
of the marriage records, where the hometowns of the bride and groom
were
identified).

Based upon the responses to my e-mail and my review of documents, I am
unable to determine whether: (1) Baluty events were recorded
somewhere other
than Lodz (perhaps in Radogoszcz or Baluty itself); (2) Baluty
events were
recorded in Lodz without identifying the location as Baluty; or (3)
Baluty
events were recorded in Lodz as having taken place in Baluty (but I
failed
to find records for Baluty because my Polish skills are limited or
I didn't
check enough records).

Interestingly, searches on JRI-Poland for the towns Baluty and
Radogoszcz
yield 18 results and 10 results, respectively. All of the records
are death
records >from 1903 or 1904. All of the records showing the ages of the
deceased (23 of the 28 records provide that information) refer to a
miscarriage, a stillbirth, or an infant aged two weeks or less. (The
indices on JRI-Poland for 1903 and 1904 apparently include ages and
hometowns
only for the deaths of infants, not for the deaths of older people
or for
births and marriages.) During the same period, the Lodz records
also include
death records for miscarriages, stillbirths, and deaths of infants
whose
towns are reported as, e.g., Brzezinky, Strykow, and Zgierz (towns
that
maintained their own vital records), so the fact that Lodz records
show
infant deaths reported for Baluty and Radogoszcz does not mean that
all
vital records relating to residents of those towns were recorded
there.

I suspect that these deaths were recorded in Lodz because they
occurred at
a hospital in Lodz, presumably a maternity ward. (A large Jewish
hospital
opened in Lodz in 1883.) This suggests that, at least as of the
early 20th
century, many births to residents of towns near Lodz - and many of
the
the deaths of older residents of towns near Lodz -- were recorded
in Lodz
- not in the hometowns of the newborns or the decedents.

I welcome any additional insight or information that anyone may be
able to
provide. It would be especially useful to confirm the existence of
birth
and death records >from Lodz identifying newborns or decedents as
residents
of towns other than Lodz.

Jeff Wexler
Los Angeles


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Re: Baluty #lodz #poland

Fay Bussgang
 

While I don't know where the Baluty B,M,D records are located, I do
know that the Lodz archives has Books of Residents (Ksiegi Ludnosci)
from Baluty, and these books show the birth date and birthplace of
the people included in the book.

Fay Bussgang
Dedham, MA

BURSZTAJN: Brzeziny, Poland
TORONCZYK: Wloclawek, Poland
NACHMANOVITZ: Kiliya, Ukraine
WEXLER: Ismail, Ukraine

PHILIPP: Lviv, Ukraine
SPIRO: Dzialoszyce, Poland
BUSSGANG: Rogatin, Ukraine
WILLIG: Knyaginichi, Ukraine

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Records >from Baluty
From: <jeffwexler@...>
Date: Sat, 5 May 2012 20:29:27 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1

I received several responses to my inquiry as to Jewish records
from Baluty.
I was told that birth, marriage, and deaths for Baluty appear in
Zgierz
records >from the 1820s, and that at least some Baluty deaths appear in
Lodz records >from the early 1900s.

I was informed that Baluty events would have been recorded in Lodz
because
Baluty was (1) a neighborhood of Lodz and (2) part of the Lodz
kehilla.

I was also told that according to the Encyclopedia of Jewish
Communities,
Poland (available on JewishGen.org), until World War I Baluty was
"administratively subordinate" to Radogoszcz and the Russian
authorities
refused to incorporate Baluty into Lodz. (No separate BMD records for
Radogoszcz are identified on JRI-Poland or the websites for the FHL,
the Polish State Archive, or the Routes to Roots Foundation.)

Finally, I learned that: (1) it was not uncommon for Jewish
marriages in
the Lodz area to have been performed religiously but not recorded
civilly;
and (2) there appear to be missing civil records in a number of
towns for
marriages that took place in the period >from 1874 to 1877.

I did a spot check of the FHL microfilms for Zgierz for a year in
the 1850s
without finding any records for events occurring in Baluty.
Similarly, I
did a spot check of the FHL microfilms for Lodz for a year in the
1850s
and a year in the 1860s, but I saw no reference to Baluty (either
in the
left-hand column, where the location of events was stated, nor in
the body
of the marriage records, where the hometowns of the bride and groom
were
identified).

Based upon the responses to my e-mail and my review of documents, I am
unable to determine whether: (1) Baluty events were recorded
somewhere other
than Lodz (perhaps in Radogoszcz or Baluty itself); (2) Baluty
events were
recorded in Lodz without identifying the location as Baluty; or (3)
Baluty
events were recorded in Lodz as having taken place in Baluty (but I
failed
to find records for Baluty because my Polish skills are limited or
I didn't
check enough records).

Interestingly, searches on JRI-Poland for the towns Baluty and
Radogoszcz
yield 18 results and 10 results, respectively. All of the records
are death
records >from 1903 or 1904. All of the records showing the ages of the
deceased (23 of the 28 records provide that information) refer to a
miscarriage, a stillbirth, or an infant aged two weeks or less. (The
indices on JRI-Poland for 1903 and 1904 apparently include ages and
hometowns
only for the deaths of infants, not for the deaths of older people
or for
births and marriages.) During the same period, the Lodz records
also include
death records for miscarriages, stillbirths, and deaths of infants
whose
towns are reported as, e.g., Brzezinky, Strykow, and Zgierz (towns
that
maintained their own vital records), so the fact that Lodz records
show
infant deaths reported for Baluty and Radogoszcz does not mean that
all
vital records relating to residents of those towns were recorded
there.

I suspect that these deaths were recorded in Lodz because they
occurred at
a hospital in Lodz, presumably a maternity ward. (A large Jewish
hospital
opened in Lodz in 1883.) This suggests that, at least as of the
early 20th
century, many births to residents of towns near Lodz - and many of
the
the deaths of older residents of towns near Lodz -- were recorded
in Lodz
- not in the hometowns of the newborns or the decedents.

I welcome any additional insight or information that anyone may be
able to
provide. It would be especially useful to confirm the existence of
birth
and death records >from Lodz identifying newborns or decedents as
residents
of towns other than Lodz.

Jeff Wexler
Los Angeles


Re: "Staatsexamen Berlin" certification on London death record #germany

Renee Steinig
 

Many thanks to Gabriel Moeller, Irene Peters, and Ruth Rolle for
responding to my inquiry about the notation "Certified by A.P. Wolken
Staatsexamen Berlin" on a London death certificate.

Irene discovered in British medical directories on Google Books, that
"A. P. Wolken" was probably Alfred Peter Wolken. Dr. Wolken, a
physician who practiced in London, passed his licensing exam --
Staatsexamen -- in Berlin.

Renee Stern Steinig, Dix Hills, New York, USA genmaven@...


German SIG #Germany Re: "Staatsexamen Berlin" certification on London death record #germany

Renee Steinig
 

Many thanks to Gabriel Moeller, Irene Peters, and Ruth Rolle for
responding to my inquiry about the notation "Certified by A.P. Wolken
Staatsexamen Berlin" on a London death certificate.

Irene discovered in British medical directories on Google Books, that
"A. P. Wolken" was probably Alfred Peter Wolken. Dr. Wolken, a
physician who practiced in London, passed his licensing exam --
Staatsexamen -- in Berlin.

Renee Stern Steinig, Dix Hills, New York, USA genmaven@...


Re: Uehlfeld: A Word of Thanks #germany

Lande
 

"Never underestimate the power of ..." may have been applied to a different
subject but I just wanted both to thank all who responded to my request for
information regarding Uehlfeld and to acknowledge the helpfulness of all who
replied.

I was dazzled by the flood of offers to help. I received all the
information I needed and now simply wanted to thank everyone.

Peter Lande Washington, D.C, <pdlande@...>


German SIG #Germany Re: Uehlfeld: A Word of Thanks #germany

Lande
 

"Never underestimate the power of ..." may have been applied to a different
subject but I just wanted both to thank all who responded to my request for
information regarding Uehlfeld and to acknowledge the helpfulness of all who
replied.

I was dazzled by the flood of offers to help. I received all the
information I needed and now simply wanted to thank everyone.

Peter Lande Washington, D.C, <pdlande@...>


Re: Lodz Getto Chronicle 1943/44 Online #lodz #poland

Orit Lavi
 

Dear friends

Fritz Neubauer wrote:
The publishers and authors of the five-volume Chronicle of the Lodz
Ghetto in German...
...have now put the complete text of the Ghetto's last year from
August 1943 to July 1944 online under the address
http://www.getto-chronik.de/de/ ...etc.

In continuation to Fritz Neubauer's important post, I would like to
remind you that the complete Chronicle of the Lodz Ghetto
was published in Hebrew in 1986 (Yad Vashem edition, translated and
annotated by Arie Ben Menachem and Joseph Rab).

The Hebrew editors clarify that the composers of the chronicle were
employed by the Judenrat, and possibly,
their work was accessible to the Germans.
Therefore, they censored their reports and omitted some horrible facts
from their description.
They also disregarded important activities which took place in the
Ghetto , but were not related to the official Ghetto administration.

Orit Lavi
Tsukey Yam, Israel


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Re: Lodz Getto Chronicle 1943/44 Online #lodz #poland

Orit Lavi
 

Dear friends

Fritz Neubauer wrote:
The publishers and authors of the five-volume Chronicle of the Lodz
Ghetto in German...
...have now put the complete text of the Ghetto's last year from
August 1943 to July 1944 online under the address
http://www.getto-chronik.de/de/ ...etc.

In continuation to Fritz Neubauer's important post, I would like to
remind you that the complete Chronicle of the Lodz Ghetto
was published in Hebrew in 1986 (Yad Vashem edition, translated and
annotated by Arie Ben Menachem and Joseph Rab).

The Hebrew editors clarify that the composers of the chronicle were
employed by the Judenrat, and possibly,
their work was accessible to the Germans.
Therefore, they censored their reports and omitted some horrible facts
from their description.
They also disregarded important activities which took place in the
Ghetto , but were not related to the official Ghetto administration.

Orit Lavi
Tsukey Yam, Israel


Meaning of "cutter" - unanimity! #lithuania

Stephen Katz
 

Ever hear the old saw, "ask 3 lawyers and you'll get 3 different
opinions"? (Being a lawyer myself, I'm allowed to say that.) "Jewish
genealogists" can sometimes be substituted for "lawyers". But not this
time. Thus far, I've received over 20 personal responses to my post of
yesterday asking about the meaning of "cutter". There has been effective
unanimity that it most likely refers to a cutter of fabric in garment
making; one responder suggested that it might be an awkward translation
of the Yiddish word "schneider", which means "tailor" and is therefore
in the same ball park, and one or two others added some alternative
interpretations. So a sincere thank you to all who responded (I believe
I've replied personally to all), and to others who responded via the
LitvakSIG discussion group list, which I won't receive until tomorrow
morning.
Stephen Katz
New York City

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please send any additional responses privately.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Meaning of "cutter" - unanimity! #lithuania

Stephen Katz
 

Ever hear the old saw, "ask 3 lawyers and you'll get 3 different
opinions"? (Being a lawyer myself, I'm allowed to say that.) "Jewish
genealogists" can sometimes be substituted for "lawyers". But not this
time. Thus far, I've received over 20 personal responses to my post of
yesterday asking about the meaning of "cutter". There has been effective
unanimity that it most likely refers to a cutter of fabric in garment
making; one responder suggested that it might be an awkward translation
of the Yiddish word "schneider", which means "tailor" and is therefore
in the same ball park, and one or two others added some alternative
interpretations. So a sincere thank you to all who responded (I believe
I've replied personally to all), and to others who responded via the
LitvakSIG discussion group list, which I won't receive until tomorrow
morning.
Stephen Katz
New York City

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please send any additional responses privately.


Re: Cutter #lithuania

Linda Kelley
 

Here is an article about Stakliskes/Stoklishok, which mentions the
occupations of the Jewish men in the 1800s
included timber, so it's possible your ancestor was a wood cutter.

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/stoklishok/stoklishok1.html

..."Jews apparently settled in Stoklishok at the beginning of the 18th
century. In the middle of the 19th century there were already about
500 Jews, with a Beth Midrash. They made their living >from small
commerce, fishing, agriculture, timber, and in 1890 the Rabinovitz
family established a beer brewery..."

Linda Wolfe Kelley
California


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Cutter #lithuania

Linda Kelley
 

Here is an article about Stakliskes/Stoklishok, which mentions the
occupations of the Jewish men in the 1800s
included timber, so it's possible your ancestor was a wood cutter.

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/stoklishok/stoklishok1.html

..."Jews apparently settled in Stoklishok at the beginning of the 18th
century. In the middle of the 19th century there were already about
500 Jews, with a Beth Midrash. They made their living >from small
commerce, fishing, agriculture, timber, and in 1890 the Rabinovitz
family established a beer brewery..."

Linda Wolfe Kelley
California


Meaning of "cutter" as occupation in 1855 #lithuania

mary benedict <mbenedict51@...>
 

Do you have any occupation information for others in the family? If
there are tailors, it could easily be a cloth-cutter, for example.
Mary Benedict
SW Herts, UK


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Meaning of "cutter" as occupation in 1855 #lithuania

mary benedict <mbenedict51@...>
 

Do you have any occupation information for others in the family? If
there are tailors, it could easily be a cloth-cutter, for example.
Mary Benedict
SW Herts, UK

170581 - 170600 of 669661