Date   

JRI Poland digest: Biecz post by Eden Joachim #poland

Marla Raucher Osborn <osborn@...>
 

Eden Joachim mentioned her records project for Biecz in Poland.

I just wanted to add that in 2012, Samuel Muller in Paris, a radio
personality, author, and active member of the Jewish community there,
created a 30-minute film of the 70th anniversary commemorations in Biecz.

I helped with the English subtitles and two Polish friends did the Polish
subtitles. Here is the link to his film:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LYWCbX1B0lc

I have forwarded Samuel's email address to Eden for those wishing
to contact him. I would add that French is his native language and his
English is limited.

Warm regards,
Marla Raucher Osborn
Member of the Board of Gesher Galicia
Prague, Czech Republic
osborn@nuthatch.org

Researching surnames: HORN, FRUCHTER, LIEBLING >from Rohatyn (Galicia,
today Ukraine); KURZROCK >from Kozova (Galicia, today Ukraine);
TEICHMAN >from Chodorow (Galicia, today Ukraine); SILBER, BAUMANN, and
SCHARF >from Ulanow and Sokolow Malopolska (Galicia, Poland);
RAUCHER/RAUSCHER and KESTENBAUM >from Przemysl (Galicia, Poland);
BLECHER >from Soroka, Bessarabia (Moldova); and BRUNSHTEIN, MOGALNIK,
SARFAS, and FABER >from Mohyliv Podilskyy and Kamyanets Podilskyy (Ukraine)


JRI Poland #Poland JRI Poland digest: Biecz post by Eden Joachim #poland

Marla Raucher Osborn <osborn@...>
 

Eden Joachim mentioned her records project for Biecz in Poland.

I just wanted to add that in 2012, Samuel Muller in Paris, a radio
personality, author, and active member of the Jewish community there,
created a 30-minute film of the 70th anniversary commemorations in Biecz.

I helped with the English subtitles and two Polish friends did the Polish
subtitles. Here is the link to his film:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LYWCbX1B0lc

I have forwarded Samuel's email address to Eden for those wishing
to contact him. I would add that French is his native language and his
English is limited.

Warm regards,
Marla Raucher Osborn
Member of the Board of Gesher Galicia
Prague, Czech Republic
osborn@nuthatch.org

Researching surnames: HORN, FRUCHTER, LIEBLING >from Rohatyn (Galicia,
today Ukraine); KURZROCK >from Kozova (Galicia, today Ukraine);
TEICHMAN >from Chodorow (Galicia, today Ukraine); SILBER, BAUMANN, and
SCHARF >from Ulanow and Sokolow Malopolska (Galicia, Poland);
RAUCHER/RAUSCHER and KESTENBAUM >from Przemysl (Galicia, Poland);
BLECHER >from Soroka, Bessarabia (Moldova); and BRUNSHTEIN, MOGALNIK,
SARFAS, and FABER >from Mohyliv Podilskyy and Kamyanets Podilskyy (Ukraine)


name origin #lithuania

Toby Bird
 

I've been following the surname origin discussion with interest. I
don't have any satisfactory information about the origin of my
mother's maiden name. It was Frutko in Anyksciai, Lithuania. My
grandfather and his brothers used Frutkoff here in the states. Two
brothers who immigrated to South Africa became Frootko.

An 1846 Lithuania Candle Tax list has a record of Itsko and Brayna
Grutki living in Raguva. An 1858 Revision lists records Itsko and
Rocha Brayna Frutko living in Raguva. My instincts tell me they are
the same couple. And then there are many more references to Frutko in
Lithuania records into the 20th century, including a 1896 Taxpayers
list that records a Lev and Sholom Frudko who I assume are part of the
family but I haven't linked them yet. Since I am only reading the
English translation I'm not sure where Frutko and Frudko are written
the same way in the original (Lithuanian? Russian?) language. The same
goes for Grutki/Frutko. I don't know whether perhaps the translator
made a mistake in reading the handwriting?

I'd love to hear if any of our surname scholars have a clue.

Thanks in advance,
Toby Bird
New York
FRUTKO, FRUTKOFF, FRUTKO, MARMOR, KAPLAN, FREEDMAN, FRIEDMAN
Lithuania


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania name origin #lithuania

Toby Bird
 

I've been following the surname origin discussion with interest. I
don't have any satisfactory information about the origin of my
mother's maiden name. It was Frutko in Anyksciai, Lithuania. My
grandfather and his brothers used Frutkoff here in the states. Two
brothers who immigrated to South Africa became Frootko.

An 1846 Lithuania Candle Tax list has a record of Itsko and Brayna
Grutki living in Raguva. An 1858 Revision lists records Itsko and
Rocha Brayna Frutko living in Raguva. My instincts tell me they are
the same couple. And then there are many more references to Frutko in
Lithuania records into the 20th century, including a 1896 Taxpayers
list that records a Lev and Sholom Frudko who I assume are part of the
family but I haven't linked them yet. Since I am only reading the
English translation I'm not sure where Frutko and Frudko are written
the same way in the original (Lithuanian? Russian?) language. The same
goes for Grutki/Frutko. I don't know whether perhaps the translator
made a mistake in reading the handwriting?

I'd love to hear if any of our surname scholars have a clue.

Thanks in advance,
Toby Bird
New York
FRUTKO, FRUTKOFF, FRUTKO, MARMOR, KAPLAN, FREEDMAN, FRIEDMAN
Lithuania


Re: The name Kivel #lithuania

rv Kaplan
 

I would imagine that the name Kivel is a diminutive of Kivie/Keevie,
which is a diminutive of Akivah.

Harvey Kaplan

Glasgow, Scotland

On 4 December 2013 01:16, Peter Cohen <peter.cohen@outlook.com> wrote:
My grandfather had a brother Kivel Kemach. He is listed on his 1894
ship's manifest as Kivel Cohen, and in the 1900 NYC census as Charles
Cohen. Then he disappears. I can find no NYC record of him dying before
1948 or marrying before 1937.

In the course of chasing down clues, I was told by a Rabbi that "there is
no such name as Kivel, perhaps it's a nickname for Akivah." Is that
correct? Would the Hebrew name of someone called Kivel be Akivah?

Anyone heard of a Kivel Kemach / Cohen, born about 1881, the son of Shraga
Sholomo (Faivish) Cohen (AKA Sam Cohen) >from Snipiskis, Vilna?

Peter Cohen
Pleasanton, CA


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: The name Kivel #lithuania

rv Kaplan
 

I would imagine that the name Kivel is a diminutive of Kivie/Keevie,
which is a diminutive of Akivah.

Harvey Kaplan

Glasgow, Scotland

On 4 December 2013 01:16, Peter Cohen <peter.cohen@outlook.com> wrote:
My grandfather had a brother Kivel Kemach. He is listed on his 1894
ship's manifest as Kivel Cohen, and in the 1900 NYC census as Charles
Cohen. Then he disappears. I can find no NYC record of him dying before
1948 or marrying before 1937.

In the course of chasing down clues, I was told by a Rabbi that "there is
no such name as Kivel, perhaps it's a nickname for Akivah." Is that
correct? Would the Hebrew name of someone called Kivel be Akivah?

Anyone heard of a Kivel Kemach / Cohen, born about 1881, the son of Shraga
Sholomo (Faivish) Cohen (AKA Sam Cohen) >from Snipiskis, Vilna?

Peter Cohen
Pleasanton, CA


Re. Abrams, Abramovich, etc. #lithuania

Olga Zabludoff <ozabludoff@...>
 

Re. Abrams, Abramovich, etc.
Don't forget the surname ABRAHAMS also. It is a very prominent name in
Zarasai, and specifically Rakishok.

Olga Zabludoff

-----Original Message-----

Subject: Abrams, Abramovich, etc.
From: "Paul Walman" <paul@walman.ndo.co.uk>
Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2013 21:55:05 -0000
X-Message-Number: 1

Hi
For what it's worth I have my maternal Grandparents listed in the 1901
England and Wales Census were Abramovitch and then by 1911 they had changed
their names to Abrams. Later in the 50's some had changed to Adams.
That said I also have suspicions that the original name wasn't even
Abramovitch so I'm still at a loss at tracing their origins.


Subject: surname variants
From: Herbert Lazerow <lazer@sandiego.edu>
Date: Mon, 2 Dec 2013 21:46:59 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1

<< Would it be possible when going through archives that an Abrams household
is related to an Abramovich or Abramson household? >>

Not only might they be related, they might be the same person.
I have found a person referred to in one record as Novik, and in another as
Novikov, almost as though the names were alternate spellings that made no
difference. And it is true, but confusing to us: every Novik is the son of
a Novik.

So you should examine Abram, Abrams, Abramzon, and Abramovich.

Bert
Herbert Lazerow
Professor of Law and Director,
Summer Law Programs Abroad
University of San Diego
lazer@sandiego.edu


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re. Abrams, Abramovich, etc. #lithuania

Olga Zabludoff <ozabludoff@...>
 

Re. Abrams, Abramovich, etc.
Don't forget the surname ABRAHAMS also. It is a very prominent name in
Zarasai, and specifically Rakishok.

Olga Zabludoff

-----Original Message-----

Subject: Abrams, Abramovich, etc.
From: "Paul Walman" <paul@walman.ndo.co.uk>
Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2013 21:55:05 -0000
X-Message-Number: 1

Hi
For what it's worth I have my maternal Grandparents listed in the 1901
England and Wales Census were Abramovitch and then by 1911 they had changed
their names to Abrams. Later in the 50's some had changed to Adams.
That said I also have suspicions that the original name wasn't even
Abramovitch so I'm still at a loss at tracing their origins.


Subject: surname variants
From: Herbert Lazerow <lazer@sandiego.edu>
Date: Mon, 2 Dec 2013 21:46:59 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1

<< Would it be possible when going through archives that an Abrams household
is related to an Abramovich or Abramson household? >>

Not only might they be related, they might be the same person.
I have found a person referred to in one record as Novik, and in another as
Novikov, almost as though the names were alternate spellings that made no
difference. And it is true, but confusing to us: every Novik is the son of
a Novik.

So you should examine Abram, Abrams, Abramzon, and Abramovich.

Bert
Herbert Lazerow
Professor of Law and Director,
Summer Law Programs Abroad
University of San Diego
lazer@sandiego.edu


Vilnius internal passports - 1919-1940 #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

So far, 11,046 Vilnius internal passports have been translated and are
available on the following web site.

https://vilniusinternalpassports19191940.shutterfly.com

9,079 of those records are included in the LitvakSIG All Lithuania Database
(ALD) which can be accessed at www.litvaksig.org and also in the Jewishgen
Lithuania Database.

By a special arrangement, you can go to the following web site and see a
surname list, >from the 9,079 records, at no charge. The maiden names and
place of birth are also included. You will notice that a large percentage of
those listed were born outside of Vilnius, particularly in other parts of
Lithuania as well as in Belarus and Poland. This may enable you to find that
elusive ancestor you have been looking for.

https://vilniusinternalpassports19191940.shutterfly.com/surnamelist

To access the complete web site, and see all of the 11,046 translated
records, a $100 contribution to Litvak SIG is required. About 32,000 Vilnius
internal passports remain to be translated. Your contribution will enable you
to see all of those records as they are translated. There is an 18 month
delay before they are added to the databases.

To contribute, go to www.litvaksig.org/contribute and scroll down to
Special Projects. Select internal passports and, in the Notes block, key in
Vilnius. Feel free to use your credit card as the site is secure. For US
citizens, you contribution is tax deductible.

Even if your family left Lithuania before 1919, everyone did not leave.
Uncles, Aunts, siblings, cousins, etc., probably remained. Beginning in
1919, they had to have an internal passport in order to remain in Lithuania.

Please contact me if you have any questions.

Howard Margol
Coordinator - Vilnius internal passport project


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Vilnius internal passports - 1919-1940 #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

So far, 11,046 Vilnius internal passports have been translated and are
available on the following web site.

https://vilniusinternalpassports19191940.shutterfly.com

9,079 of those records are included in the LitvakSIG All Lithuania Database
(ALD) which can be accessed at www.litvaksig.org and also in the Jewishgen
Lithuania Database.

By a special arrangement, you can go to the following web site and see a
surname list, >from the 9,079 records, at no charge. The maiden names and
place of birth are also included. You will notice that a large percentage of
those listed were born outside of Vilnius, particularly in other parts of
Lithuania as well as in Belarus and Poland. This may enable you to find that
elusive ancestor you have been looking for.

https://vilniusinternalpassports19191940.shutterfly.com/surnamelist

To access the complete web site, and see all of the 11,046 translated
records, a $100 contribution to Litvak SIG is required. About 32,000 Vilnius
internal passports remain to be translated. Your contribution will enable you
to see all of those records as they are translated. There is an 18 month
delay before they are added to the databases.

To contribute, go to www.litvaksig.org/contribute and scroll down to
Special Projects. Select internal passports and, in the Notes block, key in
Vilnius. Feel free to use your credit card as the site is secure. For US
citizens, you contribution is tax deductible.

Even if your family left Lithuania before 1919, everyone did not leave.
Uncles, Aunts, siblings, cousins, etc., probably remained. Beginning in
1919, they had to have an internal passport in order to remain in Lithuania.

Please contact me if you have any questions.

Howard Margol
Coordinator - Vilnius internal passport project


Re: WWI rank of San. Vizefeldwebel #germany

Tobias A. Kemper <kemper@...>
 

MODERATOR REMINDER: This email list system sometimes garbles
text containing accent marks and other not USA English letters.
Please replace vowels with umlaut with vowel+ e and esszet with ss
when you write to this list and others hosted by JewishGen.

The GerSIG moderator will try to edit text with accents if there is time
and if there are not too many words to edit.

Remember to change text that you cut >from Internet and published
sources.

As per the Moderator message yesterday, in the next 2 weeks messages
with accents and major violations of our Format standards will have to be
rejected. Thanks for your cooperation. GerSIGmod

Hello Nancy Korn,

In my grandfather's Gebete der Israeliten that he carried in WWI,
his inscription reads: San. Vizefeldwebel Ludwig KORN Pion. Komp 362.
...
Was this a standard rank or more elevated, and what would it have meant
in terms of responsibilities?
for the rank of a Feldwebel, see
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feldwebel

"The highest ranking Non-Commissioned Officer until 1918, the Feldwebel
acted as Company Sergeant Major."

The Vize-Feldwebel was subordinated to the Feldwebel. There were two
main possibilities to get the rank of a Vizefeldwebel:

a) Professional soldiers after 15 years of duty.
b) So called "Einjaehrig-Freiwillige" (soldiers with higher education who
had passed their first officer's exam to get the rank of an Officer of
Reserve.

Also if anyone can point me to reference materials about the
Pion. Komp. 362 that would be very helpful.
It seems that Pionier-Kompanie 362 was founded in 1916.

Regards, Tobias A. Kemper tobias.kemper@web.de


German SIG #Germany Re: WWI rank of San. Vizefeldwebel #germany

Tobias A. Kemper <kemper@...>
 

MODERATOR REMINDER: This email list system sometimes garbles
text containing accent marks and other not USA English letters.
Please replace vowels with umlaut with vowel+ e and esszet with ss
when you write to this list and others hosted by JewishGen.

The GerSIG moderator will try to edit text with accents if there is time
and if there are not too many words to edit.

Remember to change text that you cut >from Internet and published
sources.

As per the Moderator message yesterday, in the next 2 weeks messages
with accents and major violations of our Format standards will have to be
rejected. Thanks for your cooperation. GerSIGmod

Hello Nancy Korn,

In my grandfather's Gebete der Israeliten that he carried in WWI,
his inscription reads: San. Vizefeldwebel Ludwig KORN Pion. Komp 362.
...
Was this a standard rank or more elevated, and what would it have meant
in terms of responsibilities?
for the rank of a Feldwebel, see
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feldwebel

"The highest ranking Non-Commissioned Officer until 1918, the Feldwebel
acted as Company Sergeant Major."

The Vize-Feldwebel was subordinated to the Feldwebel. There were two
main possibilities to get the rank of a Vizefeldwebel:

a) Professional soldiers after 15 years of duty.
b) So called "Einjaehrig-Freiwillige" (soldiers with higher education who
had passed their first officer's exam to get the rank of an Officer of
Reserve.

Also if anyone can point me to reference materials about the
Pion. Komp. 362 that would be very helpful.
It seems that Pionier-Kompanie 362 was founded in 1916.

Regards, Tobias A. Kemper tobias.kemper@web.de


my Neumanns in Glogow #galicia

Highman Heather
 

Dear fellow Genners,

I have found out >from my Grandparents' marriage certificate, that my
Grandfather Adolf/Abraham Hirsch Neumann, was born in Glogow. His
parents were Shimon and Bluma Sara / Gita Neumann, nee Spienadel.
I would like to know more about the family and the Jewish community
in Glogow.

Please reply privately to my e-mail address, unless of general interest,
as usual.

Thank you in advance,

Heather Highman
researching
NEUMANN Budapest, Israel, England, USA
STEMPEL Kracow, Zolinya, Israel, England USA
YARMALINSKI Kiev, England, USA


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia my Neumanns in Glogow #galicia

Highman Heather
 

Dear fellow Genners,

I have found out >from my Grandparents' marriage certificate, that my
Grandfather Adolf/Abraham Hirsch Neumann, was born in Glogow. His
parents were Shimon and Bluma Sara / Gita Neumann, nee Spienadel.
I would like to know more about the family and the Jewish community
in Glogow.

Please reply privately to my e-mail address, unless of general interest,
as usual.

Thank you in advance,

Heather Highman
researching
NEUMANN Budapest, Israel, England, USA
STEMPEL Kracow, Zolinya, Israel, England USA
YARMALINSKI Kiev, England, USA


Early surnamed families DNA project (including families from Bohemia, Moravia, etc.) #austria-czech

rachelunkefer@...
 

Dear Austria-Czech siggers,

In 2009 we founded the Frankfurt DNA project to document the Y-DNA signatures of the major families of
Europe who had surnames prior to the 17th century. Our theory was that there would be many researchers
who would be DNA matches with one of these well-known families and could jump their pedigrees back by
hundreds of years by virtue of these matches. There would likely be missing generations in the paper trail,
but ultimately the deep pedigrees would be revealed.

We are now actively researching the Austria-Czech area because most of the old Frankfurt families had ties
to Prague and Vienna, as well as villages throughout Bohemia, Moravia, and Hungary. We have found descendants of the Bacharach rabbinic family in Kolin with a different surname, and Wertheimers who are the same genetic family as the Bacharachs. We expect there are many others who are descended >from these old Frankfurt families and don't yet know it.


If you have any of the surnames listed on our website, (e.g. Bachrach, Wertheimer, Spira, Weil, Rothschild,
Oppenheim(er), Guggenheim(er), Brill(in) and more), please get in touch.

If you have not had your Y-DNA tested, regardless of your surname, now is a good time to order the 37
marker test, as it is on sale at FTDNA.com through year-end. If you match with a well-documented family,
it's like winning the genealogy lottery.

Please visit our brand new website, with DNA information, family charts, and more.
http://jewsoffrankfurt.com

Rachel Unkefer and Janet Akaha, co-administrators
Virginia and California, respectively, United States


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Early surnamed families DNA project (including families from Bohemia, Moravia, etc.) #austria-czech

rachelunkefer@...
 

Dear Austria-Czech siggers,

In 2009 we founded the Frankfurt DNA project to document the Y-DNA signatures of the major families of
Europe who had surnames prior to the 17th century. Our theory was that there would be many researchers
who would be DNA matches with one of these well-known families and could jump their pedigrees back by
hundreds of years by virtue of these matches. There would likely be missing generations in the paper trail,
but ultimately the deep pedigrees would be revealed.

We are now actively researching the Austria-Czech area because most of the old Frankfurt families had ties
to Prague and Vienna, as well as villages throughout Bohemia, Moravia, and Hungary. We have found descendants of the Bacharach rabbinic family in Kolin with a different surname, and Wertheimers who are the same genetic family as the Bacharachs. We expect there are many others who are descended >from these old Frankfurt families and don't yet know it.


If you have any of the surnames listed on our website, (e.g. Bachrach, Wertheimer, Spira, Weil, Rothschild,
Oppenheim(er), Guggenheim(er), Brill(in) and more), please get in touch.

If you have not had your Y-DNA tested, regardless of your surname, now is a good time to order the 37
marker test, as it is on sale at FTDNA.com through year-end. If you match with a well-documented family,
it's like winning the genealogy lottery.

Please visit our brand new website, with DNA information, family charts, and more.
http://jewsoffrankfurt.com

Rachel Unkefer and Janet Akaha, co-administrators
Virginia and California, respectively, United States


Re: Familianten search #austria-czech

Bob Lenk
 

The Familianten records for this town appear to be under IV. BYDZOVSKY (
Novy Bydzov / Neu Bidschow), also known as Bidschover Kreis, in Volume
I. An index of surnames can be found at

http://www.toledot.org/ihbf28.htm

Note that it is near the border of VI. HRADECKY ( Hradec Kralove /
Koniggratz ) and appears >from the map at
http://www.toledot.org/kraje.html to be in that region/kraj.

Best of luck,
Bob Lenk
Greeley, CO USA


WWI - Jewish Soldiers from Vienna #austria-czech

Robert Fraser
 

leah9knud@activ8.net.au said:
snip...........

Coming up to the commemoration of the beginning of WWI next
year, I have been wondering about what to do with much of
our extended families documents, etc.
Snip...

Dear Lorraine - whatever you decide to do, don't discard
any of your priceless documents. Even if you can't read them
now. File them in appropriate protective holders. In due
course, you may put them together and write a book, like I
did. It took 45 years, but it all came together and the old
documents were of inestimable value.

Cheers -

Robert Fraser
Perth, Western Australia


Birth records in Bratislava #austria-czech

gluckpast@...
 

Can anyone suggest where any surviving records >from 1940 of hospital
births in Bratislava might be found? The key date is July 1st.

John Berkeley (previously Berkovic)
Warwick, UK

GLUCK (Khust, Velyka Kopania), BERKOVIC (Sokirnitsa)


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Familianten search #austria-czech

Bob Lenk
 

The Familianten records for this town appear to be under IV. BYDZOVSKY (
Novy Bydzov / Neu Bidschow), also known as Bidschover Kreis, in Volume
I. An index of surnames can be found at

http://www.toledot.org/ihbf28.htm

Note that it is near the border of VI. HRADECKY ( Hradec Kralove /
Koniggratz ) and appears >from the map at
http://www.toledot.org/kraje.html to be in that region/kraj.

Best of luck,
Bob Lenk
Greeley, CO USA

126461 - 126480 of 662084