Date   

ViewMate translation request: Yiddish letters from World War I #romania

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I have a trove of letters >from two soldiers, both Russian Jews who
recently emigrated to the US, written to their friends in a cap making
factory on the Lower East Side of New York in 1917-1919. These five
pages just posted on ViewMate are part of an eight-page letter sent by
Sam Yurik, who writes as he is training with the Jewish Legion in Canada
before being sent to the UK to join the Royal Fusiliers for action in
the war. On his 1917 draft card Sam, born in 1895, gives no town or
city for his place of birth, only "Russia." He is in the US alone,
which may explain, in part, how close he feels to his fellow cap makers.
He trained at Camp Upton on Long Island at the same time as Irving
Berlin, who wrote "Oh How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning" for a
review to raise money for the camp. Sam addressed many of his letters
to Lina (whose daughter gave me the letters). He is a colorful and
inventive writer, so I hope you will enjoy working on these.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM31742

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM31743

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM31744

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM31745

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM31746

Thank you,

Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina;
and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza,
and their related names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile,
Canada, and the US. SCHOCHETMAN of Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the
US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev & Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN of Orgeyev,
Kishinev, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti,
Uruguay, becoming COHEN in the US. BELINKSY of Odessa and Philadelphia.
KALIK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.


Romania SIG #Romania ViewMate translation request: Yiddish letters from World War I #romania

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I have a trove of letters >from two soldiers, both Russian Jews who
recently emigrated to the US, written to their friends in a cap making
factory on the Lower East Side of New York in 1917-1919. These five
pages just posted on ViewMate are part of an eight-page letter sent by
Sam Yurik, who writes as he is training with the Jewish Legion in Canada
before being sent to the UK to join the Royal Fusiliers for action in
the war. On his 1917 draft card Sam, born in 1895, gives no town or
city for his place of birth, only "Russia." He is in the US alone,
which may explain, in part, how close he feels to his fellow cap makers.
He trained at Camp Upton on Long Island at the same time as Irving
Berlin, who wrote "Oh How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning" for a
review to raise money for the camp. Sam addressed many of his letters
to Lina (whose daughter gave me the letters). He is a colorful and
inventive writer, so I hope you will enjoy working on these.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM31742

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM31743

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM31744

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM31745

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM31746

Thank you,

Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina;
and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza,
and their related names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile,
Canada, and the US. SCHOCHETMAN of Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the
US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev & Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN of Orgeyev,
Kishinev, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti,
Uruguay, becoming COHEN in the US. BELINKSY of Odessa and Philadelphia.
KALIK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.


Romanian Military Documents #romania

Marcel Glaskie <marcelg@...>
 

Romanian Military Documents.

I thank the many readers who have kindly sent me copies of
Romanian Army Logbooks of their family members.

I would like to know if anyone ever received any military
material or correspondence >from the Romanian Military Archives?

If so please contact me.

The material is only for use in a lecture to be given to the Jewish
Genealogy Society in Manchester UK & not for publication.

Marcel Glaskie
Ra'anana Israel
marcelg@netvision.net.il


Romania SIG #Romania Romanian Military Documents #romania

Marcel Glaskie <marcelg@...>
 

Romanian Military Documents.

I thank the many readers who have kindly sent me copies of
Romanian Army Logbooks of their family members.

I would like to know if anyone ever received any military
material or correspondence >from the Romanian Military Archives?

If so please contact me.

The material is only for use in a lecture to be given to the Jewish
Genealogy Society in Manchester UK & not for publication.

Marcel Glaskie
Ra'anana Israel
marcelg@netvision.net.il


Re: Obtaining Romanian records? #romania

Bob Wascou
 

ROM-SIG purchased the records for Suceava >from a researcher who
photographed the records. We have photographers in Iasi and in
Bucharest who are photographing the Jewish civil records (births,
marriages and deaths) for us. At the present time we are not getting
any of the records because we have rum out of money.

We depend on your donations to get these records. Please donate at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=20

Because we do not get financial reports for up to two months after
the close of a month please let us know what you donated after you
make the donation at http://tinyurl.com/R-S-Donations_That way we can
resume getting the pictures of the images.

We are also looking for people in Romania who can photograph other
records for us. If you know of anyone who might be able to do this for
us please contact me.

We also need translators to transcribe the records that we have. We
especially need people who can translate Romanian and Old German.
Volunteer at http://tinyurl.com/vol-transcriber

In the Romanian databases at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/ there are results for both
BARAD and FELLER. Do not always use exact spelling because the names
might be slightly different >from the way that you spell the name. For
example there is a result for FELER in the Moldavia databases which
includes Iasi records. Check all of the results and not just for your
town because our ancestors moved around quite a lot.

The results in the database are by REGION. Iasi is in Moldavia Region
and Suceava is in the Bucovina Region. For the Geographical Regions
for the JewishGen Romania Database see
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/RomaniaRegions.htm

Good luck with your research,

Bob Wascou
ROM-SIG Research Coordinator

On Tue, Jan 14, 2014 at 8:36 AM, Naomi Feller <naomifeller@aim.com> wrote:

Re: Romanian Records obtained
Please tell me how you went about getting records >from Romania. I am
trying to research 2 different families, one in my family and one in my
husband's family. Mine is BARAD with variant spellings in US and in
several cities in Romania. My husband's is :FELLER >from Iasi & Suchavia
spelling? [Mod.: Suceava]


Romania SIG #Romania Re: Obtaining Romanian records? #romania

Bob Wascou
 

ROM-SIG purchased the records for Suceava >from a researcher who
photographed the records. We have photographers in Iasi and in
Bucharest who are photographing the Jewish civil records (births,
marriages and deaths) for us. At the present time we are not getting
any of the records because we have rum out of money.

We depend on your donations to get these records. Please donate at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=20

Because we do not get financial reports for up to two months after
the close of a month please let us know what you donated after you
make the donation at http://tinyurl.com/R-S-Donations_That way we can
resume getting the pictures of the images.

We are also looking for people in Romania who can photograph other
records for us. If you know of anyone who might be able to do this for
us please contact me.

We also need translators to transcribe the records that we have. We
especially need people who can translate Romanian and Old German.
Volunteer at http://tinyurl.com/vol-transcriber

In the Romanian databases at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/ there are results for both
BARAD and FELLER. Do not always use exact spelling because the names
might be slightly different >from the way that you spell the name. For
example there is a result for FELER in the Moldavia databases which
includes Iasi records. Check all of the results and not just for your
town because our ancestors moved around quite a lot.

The results in the database are by REGION. Iasi is in Moldavia Region
and Suceava is in the Bucovina Region. For the Geographical Regions
for the JewishGen Romania Database see
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/RomaniaRegions.htm

Good luck with your research,

Bob Wascou
ROM-SIG Research Coordinator

On Tue, Jan 14, 2014 at 8:36 AM, Naomi Feller <naomifeller@aim.com> wrote:

Re: Romanian Records obtained
Please tell me how you went about getting records >from Romania. I am
trying to research 2 different families, one in my family and one in my
husband's family. Mine is BARAD with variant spellings in US and in
several cities in Romania. My husband's is :FELLER >from Iasi & Suchavia
spelling? [Mod.: Suceava]


CAHEN family Alsace-Lorraine #germany

Ben Forman
 

Hi RavSig and GerSig Researchers

Is anyone familiar with the genealogy of a Rabbinical family named
CAHEN who lived in Ribeauville, which included an Isaac CAHEN who's
descendants became established in Sultzburg (Baden). I am
investigating if there is a link to my Cahen family who came >from the
Alsace-Lorraine Region and may be related to the brothers Isaac and
Bernard CAHEN who came to Lechenich in 1608 and may have been related
to my ancestor Baruch ben Jacob Cahen who was buried in Lechenich in 1692.
Thanks as always, Ben <ben.r.forman@gmail.com>

Ben Forman, Manchester UK,(currently exiled in London)

searching: BENSON: Hasenpoth/Courland; SAWADY: Zavadi,Posen;
GEVER: Daugavpils/Dvinsk; BERNSTEIN/WEINER: Ylakai; FURMAN: Kaluszyn;
CAHN/CAHEN/WOLF: Zuendorf/Bruhl/Lechenich/Ahrweiler;


German SIG #Germany CAHEN family Alsace-Lorraine #germany

Ben Forman
 

Hi RavSig and GerSig Researchers

Is anyone familiar with the genealogy of a Rabbinical family named
CAHEN who lived in Ribeauville, which included an Isaac CAHEN who's
descendants became established in Sultzburg (Baden). I am
investigating if there is a link to my Cahen family who came >from the
Alsace-Lorraine Region and may be related to the brothers Isaac and
Bernard CAHEN who came to Lechenich in 1608 and may have been related
to my ancestor Baruch ben Jacob Cahen who was buried in Lechenich in 1692.
Thanks as always, Ben <ben.r.forman@gmail.com>

Ben Forman, Manchester UK,(currently exiled in London)

searching: BENSON: Hasenpoth/Courland; SAWADY: Zavadi,Posen;
GEVER: Daugavpils/Dvinsk; BERNSTEIN/WEINER: Ylakai; FURMAN: Kaluszyn;
CAHN/CAHEN/WOLF: Zuendorf/Bruhl/Lechenich/Ahrweiler;


Site Cite for OPPENHEIMER #germany

Alan Ehrlich
 

Linda Shefler wrote: "I just learned about some previously unknown members
of my family and am wondering if anyone is familiar with them:
Herz OPPENHEIMER [...]"

A "go to" site for OPPENHEIMER is Daniel Loeb's www.loebtree.com

You also can pre-search this site via Google using search string:

[your last name] +site:www.loebtree.com

...where, for example, you'd replace [your last name] with the term HERZ or
the term STERN.

Kind regards, Alan Ehrlich, Geneva, Switzerland alan.ehrlich@ehrlich-online.com


German SIG #Germany Site Cite for OPPENHEIMER #germany

Alan Ehrlich
 

Linda Shefler wrote: "I just learned about some previously unknown members
of my family and am wondering if anyone is familiar with them:
Herz OPPENHEIMER [...]"

A "go to" site for OPPENHEIMER is Daniel Loeb's www.loebtree.com

You also can pre-search this site via Google using search string:

[your last name] +site:www.loebtree.com

...where, for example, you'd replace [your last name] with the term HERZ or
the term STERN.

Kind regards, Alan Ehrlich, Geneva, Switzerland alan.ehrlich@ehrlich-online.com


Meaning of "Cutter" as a job in 1888 NYC / I. Friedman Leather #general

Todd Edelman <edelman@...>
 

Hello,

My cousin Ignatz Friedman's job listed on his naturalization papers in
1888 was "cutter". I know only that at least later the family owned a
leather business, "I. Friedman" in NYC.

Would "cutter" only have meant "meat cutter"?

Thanks,

Todd Edelman
Los Angeles
edelman@greenidea.eu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Meaning of "Cutter" as a job in 1888 NYC / I. Friedman Leather #general

Todd Edelman <edelman@...>
 

Hello,

My cousin Ignatz Friedman's job listed on his naturalization papers in
1888 was "cutter". I know only that at least later the family owned a
leather business, "I. Friedman" in NYC.

Would "cutter" only have meant "meat cutter"?

Thanks,

Todd Edelman
Los Angeles
edelman@greenidea.eu


[UK] World War I Diaries- Assistance Requested- Operation War Diaries #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

On January 12 I posted to this forum a list of countries that are
commemorating the centenary of the beginning of World War I. Included in
that list was the UK's National Archive where they have a new portal for
their WWI records. http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/first-world-war/
One of the many archives for the centenary is the Unit War Diaries of which
the WWI is the first to be digitized
[http://nationalarchives.gov.uk/first-world-war/centenary-programme.htm ]

Thus far they have digitized 1.5 million records and hope to have the entire
collection completed by the centenary of the end of WWI in 1919.

To help the UK's National Archives with their digitization process they have
launched a crowd-sourcing program, "Operation War Diaries" along with the
Imperial War Museum and Zooniverse with citizen historians. To make "sense"
of the documents the "citizen historians" can click on data items such as
date, place and name which will be indexed to facilitate researching a
particular soldier. To become a "citizen historian" click on
http://www.operationwardiary.org , a window opens and then click on "get
started" where a new window opens with a 10 minute tutorial and then begin.

There is a brief video on the crowd-sourcing for this collection. You will
have to put up with a short advertisement before the 1.25 minute video Go
to: http://tinyurl.com/kofryto

Original url:
http://news.msn.com/world/video?videoid=c7ed12f6-2857-e555-8de4-7be84800a478&ap=False

Thank you to Shelley Stillman, past president, JGS Toronto for alerting us
to the video and the request for worldwide assistance on Operation War Diaries.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen [UK] World War I Diaries- Assistance Requested- Operation War Diaries #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

On January 12 I posted to this forum a list of countries that are
commemorating the centenary of the beginning of World War I. Included in
that list was the UK's National Archive where they have a new portal for
their WWI records. http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/first-world-war/
One of the many archives for the centenary is the Unit War Diaries of which
the WWI is the first to be digitized
[http://nationalarchives.gov.uk/first-world-war/centenary-programme.htm ]

Thus far they have digitized 1.5 million records and hope to have the entire
collection completed by the centenary of the end of WWI in 1919.

To help the UK's National Archives with their digitization process they have
launched a crowd-sourcing program, "Operation War Diaries" along with the
Imperial War Museum and Zooniverse with citizen historians. To make "sense"
of the documents the "citizen historians" can click on data items such as
date, place and name which will be indexed to facilitate researching a
particular soldier. To become a "citizen historian" click on
http://www.operationwardiary.org , a window opens and then click on "get
started" where a new window opens with a 10 minute tutorial and then begin.

There is a brief video on the crowd-sourcing for this collection. You will
have to put up with a short advertisement before the 1.25 minute video Go
to: http://tinyurl.com/kofryto

Original url:
http://news.msn.com/world/video?videoid=c7ed12f6-2857-e555-8de4-7be84800a478&ap=False

Thank you to Shelley Stillman, past president, JGS Toronto for alerting us
to the video and the request for worldwide assistance on Operation War Diaries.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Re: More ADLER name changes: SRULOVICI to STROLOWITZ to ADLER #general

Don Solomon
 

Amy,

This does not apply to the original post, but your reply refers to the
surnames ADLER and SRULOVICI, on which I might have some insight.

My paternal relatives are >from Iasi as well, and in the late 19th
century there appeared to be the same sort of interchange of names that
you describe. In my case, >from about 1890 to 1910 my great-grandfather
seemingly went >from Josel sin SLOIM to Josel CAHANE and back again; and
my other great-grandfather went >from Bercu sin IOSIP to Bercu SEGAL and
perhaps back again.

In both my cases, as in yours, one surname was a patronymic; SRULOVICI
means "son of Srul (Israel)" and "sin" in Romanian means the same
thing. (You'd have to know more Romanian than I do to know why one form
is chosen rather than the other.) I surmise that the Jews of Iasi used
patronymics >from ancient times until the wave of modernization
initiated by Napoleon finally hit Moldavia and people were encouraged
to take permanent surnames. In my case, they picked surnames that
indicated priestly status; in others, an occupation or locality might
have been chosen. In your case, perhaps someone had heard the name
ADLER and thought it sounded distinguished.

Romania inherited something else >from Napoleon -- an obsession with
record keeping. The result of this was that once someone "got into the
system" under one name, it was difficult to use a different name. This
might explain why some of your family members used ADLER and others
STRULOVICI.

Don Solomon
<dsolomon@post.harvard.edu>

On Tue, 14 Jan 2014 00:04:10 -0700, Amy B Cohen wrote:
I am interested in the question raised by Jack Freeman about a change
in names involving the name ADLER, and I just read the 2006 post by Ann
Rabinowitz suggested by Barbara Mannlein about name changes.

Interestingly, my issue also involves the name ADLER. I have
relatives originally >from Iasi, Romania, and on the 1910 census some of
the children used the surname Adler and others used the name their mother
was using, Strolowitz.
At first I assumed the Adler children had had a different father. However,
as my research continued, eventually all the children adopted Adler, as
did their mother.

Now I am wondering whether they all had the same father, as one of the
younger children who came as Pincus Strolowitz was named Pincus Adler
on his death certificate, with his father's name being listed Jacob Adler.

On a ship manifest dated 1907, the names of the mother (Tilla) and three
of the younger children (Pincus, Leah, and Rivke) are listed along with the
father Itic Yankel Srulovici, clearly the husband (and presumably the
father of these three children). I am assuming that Itic Yankel is
equivalent to Issac Jacob and that therefore this is also Jacob Adler and
that he was the father of all the children, even those using Adler in 1910
while their mother and siblings were using Strolowitz.

Is there something about the name ADLER that would have made it more
susceptible to being an alternative name? I thought perhaps it was Itic's
mother's name and more American sounding to the family than Srulovici or
its phonetic equivalents. Does this seem reasonable?

I am ordering more records to confirm this, e.g., death certificates
for Tilla and the children and for the one Jacob Adler who might be Itic
Yankel Srulowitz.
I am going to search for Romanian records for tic and his family as well.
I'd be interested in this group's thoughts.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: More ADLER name changes: SRULOVICI to STROLOWITZ to ADLER #general

Don Solomon
 

Amy,

This does not apply to the original post, but your reply refers to the
surnames ADLER and SRULOVICI, on which I might have some insight.

My paternal relatives are >from Iasi as well, and in the late 19th
century there appeared to be the same sort of interchange of names that
you describe. In my case, >from about 1890 to 1910 my great-grandfather
seemingly went >from Josel sin SLOIM to Josel CAHANE and back again; and
my other great-grandfather went >from Bercu sin IOSIP to Bercu SEGAL and
perhaps back again.

In both my cases, as in yours, one surname was a patronymic; SRULOVICI
means "son of Srul (Israel)" and "sin" in Romanian means the same
thing. (You'd have to know more Romanian than I do to know why one form
is chosen rather than the other.) I surmise that the Jews of Iasi used
patronymics >from ancient times until the wave of modernization
initiated by Napoleon finally hit Moldavia and people were encouraged
to take permanent surnames. In my case, they picked surnames that
indicated priestly status; in others, an occupation or locality might
have been chosen. In your case, perhaps someone had heard the name
ADLER and thought it sounded distinguished.

Romania inherited something else >from Napoleon -- an obsession with
record keeping. The result of this was that once someone "got into the
system" under one name, it was difficult to use a different name. This
might explain why some of your family members used ADLER and others
STRULOVICI.

Don Solomon
<dsolomon@post.harvard.edu>

On Tue, 14 Jan 2014 00:04:10 -0700, Amy B Cohen wrote:
I am interested in the question raised by Jack Freeman about a change
in names involving the name ADLER, and I just read the 2006 post by Ann
Rabinowitz suggested by Barbara Mannlein about name changes.

Interestingly, my issue also involves the name ADLER. I have
relatives originally >from Iasi, Romania, and on the 1910 census some of
the children used the surname Adler and others used the name their mother
was using, Strolowitz.
At first I assumed the Adler children had had a different father. However,
as my research continued, eventually all the children adopted Adler, as
did their mother.

Now I am wondering whether they all had the same father, as one of the
younger children who came as Pincus Strolowitz was named Pincus Adler
on his death certificate, with his father's name being listed Jacob Adler.

On a ship manifest dated 1907, the names of the mother (Tilla) and three
of the younger children (Pincus, Leah, and Rivke) are listed along with the
father Itic Yankel Srulovici, clearly the husband (and presumably the
father of these three children). I am assuming that Itic Yankel is
equivalent to Issac Jacob and that therefore this is also Jacob Adler and
that he was the father of all the children, even those using Adler in 1910
while their mother and siblings were using Strolowitz.

Is there something about the name ADLER that would have made it more
susceptible to being an alternative name? I thought perhaps it was Itic's
mother's name and more American sounding to the family than Srulovici or
its phonetic equivalents. Does this seem reasonable?

I am ordering more records to confirm this, e.g., death certificates
for Tilla and the children and for the one Jacob Adler who might be Itic
Yankel Srulowitz.
I am going to search for Romanian records for tic and his family as well.
I'd be interested in this group's thoughts.


Bukovina & Transylvania Jewish Archives #ukraine

Robert J.Friedman <rjfriedman@...>
 

The Leo Baeck Institute (LBI) at the Center for Jewish History in NYC
just launched a new online guide to the Jewish archives of southern
Bukovina and southern Transylvania, jbat.lbi.org.

The current website and database are products of an archival survey
conducted during the past year with financial support >from the
Rothschild Foundation. Currently the database includes 10 cities in
southern Bukovina (Burdujeni, Chernivtsi, Campulung Moldovenesc, Gura
Homorului, Itcani, Radauti, Siret, Solca, Suceava, and Vatara Dornei)
plus Medias and Sibiu in southern Transylvania. Some of the original
documents (such as the Medias Jewish Birth Register, 1857-1885) were
digitally photographed and may now be viewed online.

At the web site launch on Monday, LBI announced that the grant was
extended for an additional three years so that the survey can be
expanded to more locations. Work in Brasov is scheduled to begin in
March.

The repositories that are the subject of this project not part of the
State (national) Archives. They may be local county or municipal
archives, or private, non-governmental archives scattered among former
Jewish communities in Romania. The materials may be located in
synagogues, community centers, private homes, or who knows where else.
Some lack inventories, catalogs, or finding aids; when such guides do
exist, they are typically in hard copy and not digitally searchable.
In the worst cases, they are in complete disarray and subject to
environmental hazards, theft, or other threats.

In the meantime, it is wonderful to see the resources that have just
become accessible through this project.

Bob Friedman
Brooklyn, NY


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Bukovina & Transylvania Jewish Archives #ukraine

Robert J.Friedman <rjfriedman@...>
 

The Leo Baeck Institute (LBI) at the Center for Jewish History in NYC
just launched a new online guide to the Jewish archives of southern
Bukovina and southern Transylvania, jbat.lbi.org.

The current website and database are products of an archival survey
conducted during the past year with financial support >from the
Rothschild Foundation. Currently the database includes 10 cities in
southern Bukovina (Burdujeni, Chernivtsi, Campulung Moldovenesc, Gura
Homorului, Itcani, Radauti, Siret, Solca, Suceava, and Vatara Dornei)
plus Medias and Sibiu in southern Transylvania. Some of the original
documents (such as the Medias Jewish Birth Register, 1857-1885) were
digitally photographed and may now be viewed online.

At the web site launch on Monday, LBI announced that the grant was
extended for an additional three years so that the survey can be
expanded to more locations. Work in Brasov is scheduled to begin in
March.

The repositories that are the subject of this project not part of the
State (national) Archives. They may be local county or municipal
archives, or private, non-governmental archives scattered among former
Jewish communities in Romania. The materials may be located in
synagogues, community centers, private homes, or who knows where else.
Some lack inventories, catalogs, or finding aids; when such guides do
exist, they are typically in hard copy and not digitally searchable.
In the worst cases, they are in complete disarray and subject to
environmental hazards, theft, or other threats.

In the meantime, it is wonderful to see the resources that have just
become accessible through this project.

Bob Friedman
Brooklyn, NY


Re: Leipzig, Germany - New Israelite Cemetery #general

Roger Lustig
 

Contact information here:

http://www.bestattungshaushaensel.de/Friedhof/Leipzig/Neuer_Israelischer_Friedhof/neuer_israelischer_friedhof.html
[MODERATOR NOTE: shortened URL - http://goo.gl/sdVkGi ]

The page says that during a bombing raid 1100 gravestones were destroyed
or damaged.

http://www.alemannia-judaica.de/sachsen_friedhoefe.htm#Leipzig (L)
<http://www.alemannia-judaica.de/sachsen_friedhoefe.htm#Leipzig%20%28L%29>

has a description (plus pictures >from the Old Cemetery) and a link to

http://www.juden-in-mittelsachsen.de/shalom/friedhof_leipzig.html

which says the cemetery is still in use.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 1/15/2014 5:31 AM, Michael Scott wrote:
There seems to be very little information on the web concerning the New
Israelite Cemetery in Leipzig, opened in the 1920s.

Have any members visited? I am very interested in the condition of it. Are
any graves still there or was everything destroyed?

Any tips on visiting ?

I am looking for a person buried there with the name of Mrs Resel DYMENT
(born: LYMONER)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Leipzig, Germany - New Israelite Cemetery #general

Roger Lustig
 

Contact information here:

http://www.bestattungshaushaensel.de/Friedhof/Leipzig/Neuer_Israelischer_Friedhof/neuer_israelischer_friedhof.html
[MODERATOR NOTE: shortened URL - http://goo.gl/sdVkGi ]

The page says that during a bombing raid 1100 gravestones were destroyed
or damaged.

http://www.alemannia-judaica.de/sachsen_friedhoefe.htm#Leipzig (L)
<http://www.alemannia-judaica.de/sachsen_friedhoefe.htm#Leipzig%20%28L%29>

has a description (plus pictures >from the Old Cemetery) and a link to

http://www.juden-in-mittelsachsen.de/shalom/friedhof_leipzig.html

which says the cemetery is still in use.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 1/15/2014 5:31 AM, Michael Scott wrote:
There seems to be very little information on the web concerning the New
Israelite Cemetery in Leipzig, opened in the 1920s.

Have any members visited? I am very interested in the condition of it. Are
any graves still there or was everything destroyed?

Any tips on visiting ?

I am looking for a person buried there with the name of Mrs Resel DYMENT
(born: LYMONER)

130081 - 130100 of 668755