Date   

Re: German first name question #germany

David & Diana Laufer
 

Roger,
You wrote:
Resele: that's >from Rose, so Rosa, Rosalie, etc. The Hebrew-letters part
of the gravestone might say Reizl (with a zayin) or something similar.

I suggest that Resele and Reizl could also be diminutive forms of Therese.

David Laufer, Sydney, Australia dlaufer@tpg.com.a


German SIG #Germany RE: German first name question #germany

David & Diana Laufer
 

Roger,
You wrote:
Resele: that's >from Rose, so Rosa, Rosalie, etc. The Hebrew-letters part
of the gravestone might say Reizl (with a zayin) or something similar.

I suggest that Resele and Reizl could also be diminutive forms of Therese.

David Laufer, Sydney, Australia dlaufer@tpg.com.a


JGS (NY) Meeting April 27 #general

Harriet Mayer
 

JGS (NY) Meeting Sunday, April 27, at 2 PM
at the Bialystoker Synagogue, 7-11 Willet St., New York

JGS members and guests will take a field trip to the Lower East Side for a
private lecture and tour of the historic Bialystoker Synagogue. Founded in
1878, the congregation moved in 1905 to its landmark building on Willet St.,
recently renamed Bialystoker Place.

The synagogue is housed in an 1826 late Federal style building, originally
the home of the Willet St. Methodist Episcopal Church. Among its noteworthy
features is a small break in the wall of the women's gallery that leads to
a ladder in an attic; legend has it that the building was a stop on the
Underground Railroad and that runaway slaves found sanctuary there.

Listed as a NYC landmark in 1966, it is one of only four early-19th century
fieldstone religious buildings surviving >from the late Federal period in
Lower Manhattan. During the Great Depression, a decision was made to beautify
the main sanctuary, to provide a sense of hope and inspiration to the community.

Our guide for this visit will be the synagogue's Rabbi Zvi Romm.
Note: The synagogue is not wheelchair-accessible.

After the synagogue visit, we will proceed to the neighboring Visitor Center
of the Lower East Side Jewish Conservancy where we can view photographs,
memorabilia and artifacts of Jewish immigrant life. Michael Pertain, JGS
Executive Council member and the sponsor of the Visitor Center, will
introduce us to the exhibits which illuminate the world of New York's
Jewish immigrants in the early 20th century.

See our website, www.jgsny.org , or the synagogue's website,
www.bialystoker.org , for more information and travel directions.

Free for member; guests $5.

Submitted by
Harriet Mayer
JGSNY VP Communications
New York, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS (NY) Meeting April 27 #general

Harriet Mayer
 

JGS (NY) Meeting Sunday, April 27, at 2 PM
at the Bialystoker Synagogue, 7-11 Willet St., New York

JGS members and guests will take a field trip to the Lower East Side for a
private lecture and tour of the historic Bialystoker Synagogue. Founded in
1878, the congregation moved in 1905 to its landmark building on Willet St.,
recently renamed Bialystoker Place.

The synagogue is housed in an 1826 late Federal style building, originally
the home of the Willet St. Methodist Episcopal Church. Among its noteworthy
features is a small break in the wall of the women's gallery that leads to
a ladder in an attic; legend has it that the building was a stop on the
Underground Railroad and that runaway slaves found sanctuary there.

Listed as a NYC landmark in 1966, it is one of only four early-19th century
fieldstone religious buildings surviving >from the late Federal period in
Lower Manhattan. During the Great Depression, a decision was made to beautify
the main sanctuary, to provide a sense of hope and inspiration to the community.

Our guide for this visit will be the synagogue's Rabbi Zvi Romm.
Note: The synagogue is not wheelchair-accessible.

After the synagogue visit, we will proceed to the neighboring Visitor Center
of the Lower East Side Jewish Conservancy where we can view photographs,
memorabilia and artifacts of Jewish immigrant life. Michael Pertain, JGS
Executive Council member and the sponsor of the Visitor Center, will
introduce us to the exhibits which illuminate the world of New York's
Jewish immigrants in the early 20th century.

See our website, www.jgsny.org , or the synagogue's website,
www.bialystoker.org , for more information and travel directions.

Free for member; guests $5.

Submitted by
Harriet Mayer
JGSNY VP Communications
New York, NY


Re: German first name question #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear Lin:

You're not the first to have to work back >from information that everyone
could understand when it was written down long ago.

-le or -ele is a diminutive found in southern Germany, Austria, etc. In
northern Germany, -chen would be the equivalent, so Gretchen might be
Gretle (both short for Margarete). Yiddish uses the same diminutive
suffix: bubbele, shtickele, etc.

Resele: that's >from Rose, so Rosa, Rosalie, etc. The Hebrew-letters part
of the gravestone might say Reizl (with a zayin) or something similar.

Manele: possibly Emanuel, but more likely Manasse in Hebrew, Manus or
something like that in German.

Wolf: a very common name, equivalent to Benjamin/Ze'ev (see Genesis 49).
Any of those--possibly two forms--might show up on the gravestone. The
quote marks might refer to the "Onkle" part--perhaps he wasn't
technically an uncle to all who called him that. Note that "Onkle" is a
diminutive of "Onkel", the standard term for "uncle." People named Wolf
were often Wilhelm to the outside world.

Zilli: less obvious, but my first guess would be Caecilie. Both Cs in
that name and the Z in Zilli are pronounced like an English -ts-.

Good luck to you and your friend in Markt Berolzheim!

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 4/21/2014, Lin wrote:
My grandfather, Max LEVI, wrote a list of the relatives buried in the
cemetery in Treuchtlingen. Unfortunately he wrote it in German , and did
not use people's actual names. He wrote things like Uncle Leser and
Tante Zilli, cousin Wolf with no last names. People like "my dear mother
gone to her reward" we know who that is. Almost no one on the list is
written with a last name (even ones I'm sure had last names) So it's a
bit difficult figuring out who some of these people are. He did write
the row and "stone" number, which I assume is the grave number on the
row. A gentleman who lives in the town where my mom, grandfather and his
mother were born, Markt Berolzheim, has graciously offered to go the
Treuchtlingen and try to find some of the headstones. I wish I knew
everyone's real names, the names that would be on the headstones. There
are some names that sound like they might be nicknames, so I wondered if
you could give me some ideas of names he might look for. I have read
some of the gravestones are no longer there, so someone might not be
stone 5 in row 4 anymore.
Here are the ones I need help with:
My ggg grandmother's name was Resele. SCHOENWALTER HERZ. Resele sounds
like a nickname for something. Was it an actual name that might be on a
headstone. What could it be a nickname for.
My ggg grandfather was Manele (HERZ). Is Manele a nickname for Emanuel?
Is Wolf a nickname? He has marks around the name. Onkle Wolf,
Also is Zilli a nickname?


German SIG #Germany Re: German first name question #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear Lin:

You're not the first to have to work back >from information that everyone
could understand when it was written down long ago.

-le or -ele is a diminutive found in southern Germany, Austria, etc. In
northern Germany, -chen would be the equivalent, so Gretchen might be
Gretle (both short for Margarete). Yiddish uses the same diminutive
suffix: bubbele, shtickele, etc.

Resele: that's >from Rose, so Rosa, Rosalie, etc. The Hebrew-letters part
of the gravestone might say Reizl (with a zayin) or something similar.

Manele: possibly Emanuel, but more likely Manasse in Hebrew, Manus or
something like that in German.

Wolf: a very common name, equivalent to Benjamin/Ze'ev (see Genesis 49).
Any of those--possibly two forms--might show up on the gravestone. The
quote marks might refer to the "Onkle" part--perhaps he wasn't
technically an uncle to all who called him that. Note that "Onkle" is a
diminutive of "Onkel", the standard term for "uncle." People named Wolf
were often Wilhelm to the outside world.

Zilli: less obvious, but my first guess would be Caecilie. Both Cs in
that name and the Z in Zilli are pronounced like an English -ts-.

Good luck to you and your friend in Markt Berolzheim!

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 4/21/2014, Lin wrote:
My grandfather, Max LEVI, wrote a list of the relatives buried in the
cemetery in Treuchtlingen. Unfortunately he wrote it in German , and did
not use people's actual names. He wrote things like Uncle Leser and
Tante Zilli, cousin Wolf with no last names. People like "my dear mother
gone to her reward" we know who that is. Almost no one on the list is
written with a last name (even ones I'm sure had last names) So it's a
bit difficult figuring out who some of these people are. He did write
the row and "stone" number, which I assume is the grave number on the
row. A gentleman who lives in the town where my mom, grandfather and his
mother were born, Markt Berolzheim, has graciously offered to go the
Treuchtlingen and try to find some of the headstones. I wish I knew
everyone's real names, the names that would be on the headstones. There
are some names that sound like they might be nicknames, so I wondered if
you could give me some ideas of names he might look for. I have read
some of the gravestones are no longer there, so someone might not be
stone 5 in row 4 anymore.
Here are the ones I need help with:
My ggg grandmother's name was Resele. SCHOENWALTER HERZ. Resele sounds
like a nickname for something. Was it an actual name that might be on a
headstone. What could it be a nickname for.
My ggg grandfather was Manele (HERZ). Is Manele a nickname for Emanuel?
Is Wolf a nickname? He has marks around the name. Onkle Wolf,
Also is Zilli a nickname?


I need help finding my dad's family Surname MISZTA #general

snoozebuttons@...
 

I have been looking for my Grandfathers side for over 20 yrs! I found my
dad thru my dreams/visions he was killed in 2001, it was covered up to look
like suicide, only met him 1 time. All I had was my dad's super faded birth
certificate and adoption papers both >from France. I can find other people
easily but just not my relatives!

I don't know if my grandfather was Jewish, but he either died in France or
Germany and I don't know if he was military or not. I have posted on many
boards/forums over the years but too many dead ends.

Over the years someone in France sent me my Grandfathers death certificate
along with pic of my dad in Germany, but the dates don't add up. I don't
know if it's legit or not. I have been told many lies in my search. My
dreams I use to write down and a French research community asked me many
times when did I leave France? They helped me a lot, by putting my dreams
together in a place I have never been to!

I am looking for Richard Georges MISZTA his father was Joseph MISZTA and
his mother was Caroline OKEKSIAK both deceased according to the French
death certificate. Richard Miszta's death certificate is >from Montargis
(Loiret) France - April 13 1956 died at 25, rue Jean Jaures. He was born at
Zawiercie Poland, July 20, 1921. I have a picture of Richard and his wife
Gisele with his 3 kids in 1954 or 1955 in France.

I have heard stories about him being in Poland Army, he changed his name
so he wouldn't get caught being Jewish, he died in Germany and his plane was
shot down, all his relatives perished in the katyn fire.

I don't speak French or Polish, but over the years I have been able to figure
some out! I have searched for MISZTA and MISTA. I have a friend who translated
many letters to many MISZTA's in Poland thru Facebook, but most tell me not to
look at the past and no one can help me they never heard of those names before.

My dad's name was Dominique Philippe MISZTA born in Paris France died in
Corvallis, OR.

Erin (Miszta)Cruz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen I need help finding my dad's family Surname MISZTA #general

snoozebuttons@...
 

I have been looking for my Grandfathers side for over 20 yrs! I found my
dad thru my dreams/visions he was killed in 2001, it was covered up to look
like suicide, only met him 1 time. All I had was my dad's super faded birth
certificate and adoption papers both >from France. I can find other people
easily but just not my relatives!

I don't know if my grandfather was Jewish, but he either died in France or
Germany and I don't know if he was military or not. I have posted on many
boards/forums over the years but too many dead ends.

Over the years someone in France sent me my Grandfathers death certificate
along with pic of my dad in Germany, but the dates don't add up. I don't
know if it's legit or not. I have been told many lies in my search. My
dreams I use to write down and a French research community asked me many
times when did I leave France? They helped me a lot, by putting my dreams
together in a place I have never been to!

I am looking for Richard Georges MISZTA his father was Joseph MISZTA and
his mother was Caroline OKEKSIAK both deceased according to the French
death certificate. Richard Miszta's death certificate is >from Montargis
(Loiret) France - April 13 1956 died at 25, rue Jean Jaures. He was born at
Zawiercie Poland, July 20, 1921. I have a picture of Richard and his wife
Gisele with his 3 kids in 1954 or 1955 in France.

I have heard stories about him being in Poland Army, he changed his name
so he wouldn't get caught being Jewish, he died in Germany and his plane was
shot down, all his relatives perished in the katyn fire.

I don't speak French or Polish, but over the years I have been able to figure
some out! I have searched for MISZTA and MISTA. I have a friend who translated
many letters to many MISZTA's in Poland thru Facebook, but most tell me not to
look at the past and no one can help me they never heard of those names before.

My dad's name was Dominique Philippe MISZTA born in Paris France died in
Corvallis, OR.

Erin (Miszta)Cruz


Re: Family Names / Tombstone pictures #general

Martha Forsyth
 

Try FindAGrave.com - if there's no page there for the person but you
have info that they're buried there, simply start a page for them
(you'll need to become a [free] member), and "request a photo". These
requests are very spotty though - sometimes they come through, sometimes
not - the good thing is that your request **stays there**, and if years >from
now someone takes a picture, you get notified. (Of course, you want
these quickly, and this won't solve that - but...my advice is still
good: making a page on FaG is always a good thing to do when you find
out where someone is buried. Even if you don't have a lot to put there.)

....Is it possible that anyone that lives in the area and has the time, can
you take a trip to the cemeteries and take pictures of their tombstones for
me....
Martha Schecter Forsyth
Newton, MA
researching SHEKHTER and TELISHEVSKY in Homel/Mohilyov region of
Belarus, and Ekaterinoslav


Gloria golden #ukraine

bgdr529@...
 

I need a local researcher in Poltava, Dnipropretrovsk . . . One living
in the areas. I can' pay fees for traveling and hotels.

Thanks.
Gloria Golden
Bgdr529@aol.com

Moderator Comment: Please respond privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Family Names / Tombstone pictures #general

Martha Forsyth
 

Try FindAGrave.com - if there's no page there for the person but you
have info that they're buried there, simply start a page for them
(you'll need to become a [free] member), and "request a photo". These
requests are very spotty though - sometimes they come through, sometimes
not - the good thing is that your request **stays there**, and if years >from
now someone takes a picture, you get notified. (Of course, you want
these quickly, and this won't solve that - but...my advice is still
good: making a page on FaG is always a good thing to do when you find
out where someone is buried. Even if you don't have a lot to put there.)

....Is it possible that anyone that lives in the area and has the time, can
you take a trip to the cemeteries and take pictures of their tombstones for
me....
Martha Schecter Forsyth
Newton, MA
researching SHEKHTER and TELISHEVSKY in Homel/Mohilyov region of
Belarus, and Ekaterinoslav


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Gloria golden #ukraine

bgdr529@...
 

I need a local researcher in Poltava, Dnipropretrovsk . . . One living
in the areas. I can' pay fees for traveling and hotels.

Thanks.
Gloria Golden
Bgdr529@aol.com

Moderator Comment: Please respond privately


Passenger List #general

lenard
 

Can anyone of you suggest to me how I might be able to access particular
passeger lists? I am particularly interested about the last
few Naples (Italy) to United States transatlantic sails just before the
coming of World War II in 1939?

You may reply privately, and I will be grateful.

Andrew Lenard, >from Bloomington, Indiana.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Passenger List #general

lenard
 

Can anyone of you suggest to me how I might be able to access particular
passeger lists? I am particularly interested about the last
few Naples (Italy) to United States transatlantic sails just before the
coming of World War II in 1939?

You may reply privately, and I will be grateful.

Andrew Lenard, >from Bloomington, Indiana.


Re: Information about deportation to Kazakhstan #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Mikael Kanski wrote:

On the Lutsk (Luck) city page on Wikipedia you can read that in 1939
"[a]pproximately 7,000 of the city's inhabitants (mostly Poles) were
deported in cattle trucks to Kazakhstan[...]".

Is there any kind of documentation of this mass deportation to
Kazakhstan? I know that my grandmother (born RYWIEC/RIWEC) and
grandfather (born KON) went to Kazakhstan and lived there until the
war ended but I have very little information about how they got there
and back.
Deportation of Polish citizens to the East by Soviets took place during
1939 to 1941 in four stages with the following estimated numbers of deportees:

February 1940, 200 to 250 thousand
April 13/14, 1940, 240 to 320 thousand
May-July,1940, 220 to 400 thousand
May-June,1941, 200 to 300 thousand

Polish historiography has obviously overestimated number of the deportees
since following the opening of Russian archives it has been revealed that
320 000 have been deported.

What is important to realize is that Jewish Polish deportees were the bulk
of Polish Jewry that have survived Holocaust in addition to a smaller number
of our people that have managed to survived Holocaust in occupied Poland.

Deportees have been released >from the labour camps following the August 1941
amnesty (Sikorski - Maiski Pact. Some of ex deportees have been accepted to
join Polish pro-British Anders Army and have escaped with their families
to Palestine, some have joined pro-Soviet Polish Kosciuszko Army and fought
alongside Red Army way through Poland.

Rest of the deportees have repatriated to Poland in two stages, first just
after the war in 1945-6, and again in 1955 to 1959.

Best,

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Information about deportation to Kazakhstan #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Mikael Kanski wrote:

On the Lutsk (Luck) city page on Wikipedia you can read that in 1939
"[a]pproximately 7,000 of the city's inhabitants (mostly Poles) were
deported in cattle trucks to Kazakhstan[...]".

Is there any kind of documentation of this mass deportation to
Kazakhstan? I know that my grandmother (born RYWIEC/RIWEC) and
grandfather (born KON) went to Kazakhstan and lived there until the
war ended but I have very little information about how they got there
and back.
Deportation of Polish citizens to the East by Soviets took place during
1939 to 1941 in four stages with the following estimated numbers of deportees:

February 1940, 200 to 250 thousand
April 13/14, 1940, 240 to 320 thousand
May-July,1940, 220 to 400 thousand
May-June,1941, 200 to 300 thousand

Polish historiography has obviously overestimated number of the deportees
since following the opening of Russian archives it has been revealed that
320 000 have been deported.

What is important to realize is that Jewish Polish deportees were the bulk
of Polish Jewry that have survived Holocaust in addition to a smaller number
of our people that have managed to survived Holocaust in occupied Poland.

Deportees have been released >from the labour camps following the August 1941
amnesty (Sikorski - Maiski Pact. Some of ex deportees have been accepted to
join Polish pro-British Anders Army and have escaped with their families
to Palestine, some have joined pro-Soviet Polish Kosciuszko Army and fought
alongside Red Army way through Poland.

Rest of the deportees have repatriated to Poland in two stages, first just
after the war in 1945-6, and again in 1955 to 1959.

Best,

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


Yizkor book on Tarnow #austria-czech

Joyce Field
 

Sue Siegal asked if there was a translated yizkor book on Tarnow. See
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html>. Book is only
partially translated, however.


Joyce Field
West Lafayette, IN


Looking for new records on Badatelna #austria-czech

Roger Adler
 

Dear Siggers:

Daniella Torsch posted a few days ago that there were new records in Badatelna.eu. I could not find them.

If any of you were able to find them. Please let me and the rest of the sig know.

Roger Adler San Antonio, Texas Baldreal@Sbcglobal.net


Moravian family #austria-czech

esmelori@...
 

I am trying to trace my husband's family.
Both parents were Austrian by birth.
Seeking info regarding mother Hildur (maybe Hilda/Herta/Ursl) BOGUTH
Born 1902 in Hohenstadt, Moravia [today Zabreh, CZ]
Any ideas welcomed.
Thank you
Esme Lori
Reading
England


DNA, trees, and COHEN/NEWMAN connections #general

Scott Ehrlich <scott@...>
 

In a more specific attempt to isolate my COHEN/NEWMAN line, I know my
Cohen great grandfather had several children, my grandfather being one
of them, and my family has not been in contact with families of the
other siblings of my grandfather.

I have an open family tree on ancestry.com and am happy to send an
invite to anyone who requests one - scott@ehrlichtronics.com or
srehrlich on Ancestry.

If anyone there looks familiar and you can convince them to take a DNA
test, please let them know I exist and have a look at my tree as well.

Thanks so much.

Scott Ehrlich

MODERATOR NOTE: Reminders to all. Please sign posts with one's full name.
Please place surnames being researched in upper case letters. It's a good idea
to include your place of residence with your signature.

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