Date   

Yizkor Book Project, April 2014 #belarus

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

It is sometimes quite amazing what can be done with the days
and hours in a month and quite a few dedicated volunteers.
The results of their labor within the Yizkor Book Project
is listed below, and continues as we "speak".

Although I frequently note our volunteers (well, at least try to),
I should really point out that a great deal of translations are
carried out by our very professional paid translators. Whilst
I prefer not to list them here for fear of forgetting someone,
you'll see their names appear frequently in the translations
appearing in the Yizkor Book site and I for one, am very
grateful for the excellent work they do within our project.

As you may be aware, their payment comes >from the kind donations
of people wishing to make sure that the contents of the Yizkor
books are made readily available to those of us who don't read
Yiddish and/or Hebrew, and will be available for the present
and generations to come. If this way of immortalizing our lost
communities is important to you, we welcome your donations to
one of our many projects which can be found at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/PL.asp?c=23

If the Yizkor book for the community of your interest
has yet to be set up as a project, please contact me
and we'll see how we can get such a project moving.

Now to facts and figures for April.

During this last month we have added in 2 new projects:

- Jaunjelgava, Latvia
(Jaunjelgava Jewish Citizens Fascist Victims List, 1941)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jaunjelgava/Jaunjelgava.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

Added in 3 new entries:

- Luze, Czech Republic
(The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh394.html

- Pabrade, Lithuania
(Svintzian region: memorial book of 23 communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Svencionys/sve1371.html

- Protivin, Czech Republic
(The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh512.html

We have continued to update 32 of our existing projects:

- Babruysk, Belarus (Memorial book of the community of Bobruisk and its
surroundings) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bobruisk/bysktoc1.html

- Bessarabia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania - Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00299.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Brest, Belarus (Brest Lit(owsk) Volume II: The Encyclopaedia of the Jewish
Diaspora) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brest2/brest2.html

- Bukovina (Region) (History of the Jews in the Bukovina)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dubasari, Moldova (Dubossary Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dubossary/Dubossary.html

- Dynow, Poland (The Memorial Book of Jewish Dinov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dynow1/dynow1.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Jewish Music in Poland between the World Wars
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/musicians/musicians.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Kozienice, Poland (The book of Kozienice; The birth and the destruction of
a Jewish community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kozienice/kozienice.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Kurenets, Belarus (The scroll of Kurzeniac)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurenets/kurenets.html

- Latvia (The Jews in Latvia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/latvia1/latvia1.html

- Lithuania (Lite) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Molchad, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Radzivilov, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Radzivilov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Radzivilov/Radzivilov.html

- Sosnove (Ludvipol), Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ludvipol/Ludvipol.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23 communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tlumach, Ukraine (Memorial book of Tlumacz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tlumacz/tlumacz.html

- Wasilkow, Poland (The Wasilkower memorial book; memories of our town
Wasilkow which has been annihilated by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wasilkow/Wasilkow.html

- Wolomin, Poland (Volomin; a memorial to the Jewish community of Volomin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolomin/wolomin.html

- Zolochiv, Ukraine (The Destruction of Zloczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zolochiv/Zolochiv.html

Some important links to note:

* This month's additions and updates are flagged at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
to make it easy to find them.
* All you would like to know about JewishGen's
"Yizkor Books in Print Project":
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
* Yizkor Book Translation Funds:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/PL.asp?c=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing
more translations go online.

Happy Israeli Independence Day,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@...


Belarus SIG #Belarus Yizkor Book Project, April 2014 #belarus

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

It is sometimes quite amazing what can be done with the days
and hours in a month and quite a few dedicated volunteers.
The results of their labor within the Yizkor Book Project
is listed below, and continues as we "speak".

Although I frequently note our volunteers (well, at least try to),
I should really point out that a great deal of translations are
carried out by our very professional paid translators. Whilst
I prefer not to list them here for fear of forgetting someone,
you'll see their names appear frequently in the translations
appearing in the Yizkor Book site and I for one, am very
grateful for the excellent work they do within our project.

As you may be aware, their payment comes >from the kind donations
of people wishing to make sure that the contents of the Yizkor
books are made readily available to those of us who don't read
Yiddish and/or Hebrew, and will be available for the present
and generations to come. If this way of immortalizing our lost
communities is important to you, we welcome your donations to
one of our many projects which can be found at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/PL.asp?c=23

If the Yizkor book for the community of your interest
has yet to be set up as a project, please contact me
and we'll see how we can get such a project moving.

Now to facts and figures for April.

During this last month we have added in 2 new projects:

- Jaunjelgava, Latvia
(Jaunjelgava Jewish Citizens Fascist Victims List, 1941)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jaunjelgava/Jaunjelgava.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

Added in 3 new entries:

- Luze, Czech Republic
(The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh394.html

- Pabrade, Lithuania
(Svintzian region: memorial book of 23 communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Svencionys/sve1371.html

- Protivin, Czech Republic
(The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh512.html

We have continued to update 32 of our existing projects:

- Babruysk, Belarus (Memorial book of the community of Bobruisk and its
surroundings) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bobruisk/bysktoc1.html

- Bessarabia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania - Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00299.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Brest, Belarus (Brest Lit(owsk) Volume II: The Encyclopaedia of the Jewish
Diaspora) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brest2/brest2.html

- Bukovina (Region) (History of the Jews in the Bukovina)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dubasari, Moldova (Dubossary Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dubossary/Dubossary.html

- Dynow, Poland (The Memorial Book of Jewish Dinov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dynow1/dynow1.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Jewish Music in Poland between the World Wars
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/musicians/musicians.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Kozienice, Poland (The book of Kozienice; The birth and the destruction of
a Jewish community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kozienice/kozienice.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Kurenets, Belarus (The scroll of Kurzeniac)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurenets/kurenets.html

- Latvia (The Jews in Latvia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/latvia1/latvia1.html

- Lithuania (Lite) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Molchad, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Radzivilov, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Radzivilov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Radzivilov/Radzivilov.html

- Sosnove (Ludvipol), Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ludvipol/Ludvipol.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23 communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tlumach, Ukraine (Memorial book of Tlumacz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tlumacz/tlumacz.html

- Wasilkow, Poland (The Wasilkower memorial book; memories of our town
Wasilkow which has been annihilated by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wasilkow/Wasilkow.html

- Wolomin, Poland (Volomin; a memorial to the Jewish community of Volomin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolomin/wolomin.html

- Zolochiv, Ukraine (The Destruction of Zloczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zolochiv/Zolochiv.html

Some important links to note:

* This month's additions and updates are flagged at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
to make it easy to find them.
* All you would like to know about JewishGen's
"Yizkor Books in Print Project":
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
* Yizkor Book Translation Funds:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/PL.asp?c=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing
more translations go online.

Happy Israeli Independence Day,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@...


IAJGS Conference Program is Now Available #belarus

Hal Bookbinder
 

The 34th IAJGS Conference in Salt Lake City this summer will offer
over 250 sessions, including many new sessions for all levels and
interests. The full conference program is now available for you to
review at http://conference.iajgs.org/2014/program.cfm.

You can now register to attend the conference in person, participate
across the Internet via IAJGS LIVE!, or to do both. Early registration
fees will be available until May 31st.

When you register you will be able to reserve a seat for various
additional fee items, such as Breakfasts with the experts, computer
labs, SIG luncheons, the Gala Awards Banquet and a bus tour to
Ancestry's headquarters in Provo. If you have already registered, you
can now update your registration with these items.

Consider signing up for the Conference blog and digest for ongoing
information about the conference. Additionally the home page of the
conference website, www.iajgs2014.org contains the latest conference
news.

Hope to see you in SLC!
Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein and Ken Bravo, Conference co-chairs
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Salt Lake City, Utah
July 27 - August 1, 2014


Belarus SIG #Belarus IAJGS Conference Program is Now Available #belarus

Hal Bookbinder
 

The 34th IAJGS Conference in Salt Lake City this summer will offer
over 250 sessions, including many new sessions for all levels and
interests. The full conference program is now available for you to
review at http://conference.iajgs.org/2014/program.cfm.

You can now register to attend the conference in person, participate
across the Internet via IAJGS LIVE!, or to do both. Early registration
fees will be available until May 31st.

When you register you will be able to reserve a seat for various
additional fee items, such as Breakfasts with the experts, computer
labs, SIG luncheons, the Gala Awards Banquet and a bus tour to
Ancestry's headquarters in Provo. If you have already registered, you
can now update your registration with these items.

Consider signing up for the Conference blog and digest for ongoing
information about the conference. Additionally the home page of the
conference website, www.iajgs2014.org contains the latest conference
news.

Hope to see you in SLC!
Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein and Ken Bravo, Conference co-chairs
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Salt Lake City, Utah
July 27 - August 1, 2014


New Agreement between JRI-Poland and the Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw #belarus

Stanley Diamond
 

We are proud to announce the signing of a new 8-year agreement
on promoting research and education between Jewish Records
Indexing - Poland. and the Museum of the History of Polish Jews
in Warsaw.

The new agreement expands the relationship of the two
organizations to promote research and to educate those interested
in their family history and the rich and historic culture of Polish
Jewry, which dates back almost 1000 years.

Under the new agreement, the Resource Center at the Museum
will have special access to the JRI-Poland database and website.
Museum staff will educate visitors and respond to their questions
regarding the database and provide guidance to Museum visitors
on the next steps they can take in their research of family roots in
Poland.

In 2010, the two organizations signed a cooperation agreement
linking their websites. The Museum's "Virtual shtetl" portal
commemorates and includes research resources for more than
1,800 Polish towns.

JRI-Poland has Jewish record indices >from the birth, marriage,
death and census records for the Jewish families that lived in
many of these same towns. By using the two websites together,
researchers are able not only to obtain names, dates and sources
of family records >from JRI-Poland, but are also able to learn
about town histories >from the Museum's web pages.

The Museum of the History of Polish Jews documents Jewish
experience in Poland - >from the early settlements ten centuries
ago, to the modern revival of the Jewish community.

Stanley Diamond, Executive Director
For the Board of Jewish Records Indexing - Poland


Belarus SIG #Belarus New Agreement between JRI-Poland and the Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw #belarus

Stanley Diamond
 

We are proud to announce the signing of a new 8-year agreement
on promoting research and education between Jewish Records
Indexing - Poland. and the Museum of the History of Polish Jews
in Warsaw.

The new agreement expands the relationship of the two
organizations to promote research and to educate those interested
in their family history and the rich and historic culture of Polish
Jewry, which dates back almost 1000 years.

Under the new agreement, the Resource Center at the Museum
will have special access to the JRI-Poland database and website.
Museum staff will educate visitors and respond to their questions
regarding the database and provide guidance to Museum visitors
on the next steps they can take in their research of family roots in
Poland.

In 2010, the two organizations signed a cooperation agreement
linking their websites. The Museum's "Virtual shtetl" portal
commemorates and includes research resources for more than
1,800 Polish towns.

JRI-Poland has Jewish record indices >from the birth, marriage,
death and census records for the Jewish families that lived in
many of these same towns. By using the two websites together,
researchers are able not only to obtain names, dates and sources
of family records >from JRI-Poland, but are also able to learn
about town histories >from the Museum's web pages.

The Museum of the History of Polish Jews documents Jewish
experience in Poland - >from the early settlements ten centuries
ago, to the modern revival of the Jewish community.

Stanley Diamond, Executive Director
For the Board of Jewish Records Indexing - Poland


Question on Szydlowicz registry of Bodzentyn jews #general

Yaron Pedhazur
 

Dear fellow researchers,

I have an interesting phenomena in my WAJNGOLD family research, living in
Bodzentyn. For the years prior to 1869 (approximately), B/M/D events have been
registered in Szydlowiec. The record clearly state that the events took place in
Bodzentyn.

I believe that in that period, there was no official registry of jewish people in
Bodzentyn. However, question remained, why the registry took place in Szydlowiec ?
is it because Szydlowiec had some kind of central role for vital records registry,
or, can I infer, that my family lived in Szydlowiec before coming to Bodzentyn. By
the way, it is said that the first Jews settled in Bodzentyn during the 1820's.

Any ideas or information would be appreciated.

Yaron Pedhazur
Tel Aviv, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Question on Szydlowicz registry of Bodzentyn jews #general

Yaron Pedhazur
 

Dear fellow researchers,

I have an interesting phenomena in my WAJNGOLD family research, living in
Bodzentyn. For the years prior to 1869 (approximately), B/M/D events have been
registered in Szydlowiec. The record clearly state that the events took place in
Bodzentyn.

I believe that in that period, there was no official registry of jewish people in
Bodzentyn. However, question remained, why the registry took place in Szydlowiec ?
is it because Szydlowiec had some kind of central role for vital records registry,
or, can I infer, that my family lived in Szydlowiec before coming to Bodzentyn. By
the way, it is said that the first Jews settled in Bodzentyn during the 1820's.

Any ideas or information would be appreciated.

Yaron Pedhazur
Tel Aviv, Israel


Re: How to get detail on a NYC Murder from 1938 #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

Moishe Miller asks:
"Can anyone offer guidance on obtaining newspaper and police reports for the murder
of Herman (Hersh Mylech) HECHT in Brooklyn, NY on April20th, 1938 at 8pm?"

The ProQuest newspaper databases are always the best place to start looking and
they are available for free at most public libraries and university libraries. I
found several articles on this tragic murder (74 year-old Herman Hecht was robbed
and beaten in his apartment which was above the mikvah that he operated for the
Jewish community.) The killers were captured a year later in the south and plead
guilty right before a trial was to start.) I'll send these to you separately.

If you have a home delivery subscription to the New York Times you can search their
historical newspaper archive for free. You just need to get a log in and password.
It's a great resource.

You can also search the NY Times archives online with keywords and view the first
few lines >from articles converted to text. If you think you have the right one,
you can purchase the single article for $3.95. Here is a link to the search
results when I entered "Herman Hecht" on the Times search engine as an example.
It brings up many "Herman Hechts" but the first and third articles are the ones you
seek:
http://query.nytimes.com/search/sitesearch/#/%22Herman+Hecht%22/

I'm not sure if the police files going back to the 1930s have survived and/or are
accessible. The municipal archives has some selected old crime scene photos. In Los
Angeles there only seem to be the police logs going back that far, but you should
inquire directly with the police department to find out the status of their case
archives.

Other free newspaper websites to check out include "Old Fulton Postcards," which
are historical NY State newspapers (http://www.fultonhistory.com/fulton.html) and
the Brooklyn Eagle (http://newsstand.bklynpubliclibrary.org/) since they might have
covered the story. There are also paid newspaper search engines/

Pamela Weisberger
pweisberger@...
Santa Monica, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: How to get detail on a NYC Murder from 1938 #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

Moishe Miller asks:
"Can anyone offer guidance on obtaining newspaper and police reports for the murder
of Herman (Hersh Mylech) HECHT in Brooklyn, NY on April20th, 1938 at 8pm?"

The ProQuest newspaper databases are always the best place to start looking and
they are available for free at most public libraries and university libraries. I
found several articles on this tragic murder (74 year-old Herman Hecht was robbed
and beaten in his apartment which was above the mikvah that he operated for the
Jewish community.) The killers were captured a year later in the south and plead
guilty right before a trial was to start.) I'll send these to you separately.

If you have a home delivery subscription to the New York Times you can search their
historical newspaper archive for free. You just need to get a log in and password.
It's a great resource.

You can also search the NY Times archives online with keywords and view the first
few lines >from articles converted to text. If you think you have the right one,
you can purchase the single article for $3.95. Here is a link to the search
results when I entered "Herman Hecht" on the Times search engine as an example.
It brings up many "Herman Hechts" but the first and third articles are the ones you
seek:
http://query.nytimes.com/search/sitesearch/#/%22Herman+Hecht%22/

I'm not sure if the police files going back to the 1930s have survived and/or are
accessible. The municipal archives has some selected old crime scene photos. In Los
Angeles there only seem to be the police logs going back that far, but you should
inquire directly with the police department to find out the status of their case
archives.

Other free newspaper websites to check out include "Old Fulton Postcards," which
are historical NY State newspapers (http://www.fultonhistory.com/fulton.html) and
the Brooklyn Eagle (http://newsstand.bklynpubliclibrary.org/) since they might have
covered the story. There are also paid newspaper search engines/

Pamela Weisberger
pweisberger@...
Santa Monica, CA


Re: How to get detail on a NYC Murder from 1938 #general

Ron Arons
 

Moishe,

Here's how to get more information:

1. The easiest fruit to pick is the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, which is now online and
searchable for the years around the time of this murder. Go to
http://newsstand.bklynpubliclibrary.org/ . Click on 'Search' and type in the name
'Herman Hecht'. Narrow down the search time period to 1938 to 1939. I found an
article dated 15 March, 1939 which describes the event.

2. Look for other newspapers available in the same time frame, most notably, the
Brooklyn Citizen. The New York State Newspaper Project
(http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/nysnp/all/424.htm) tells where you can find various
historical newspapers (probably not online). The Brooklyn Citizen, for example, is
available at several places, including: the Brooklyn Public Library and the New
York Public Library (42nd St).

3. Look for a criminal court case at the NYC Archives (31 Chambers St). See:
http://www.nyc.gov/html/records/html/archives/collections_courtrecords.shtml

Happy hunting and collecting.

Ron Arons

Moishe Miller wrote:
Can anyone offer guidance on obtaining newspaper and police reports for the murder
of Herman (Hersh Mylech) HECHT in Brooklyn, NY on April 20th, 1938 at 8pm?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: How to get detail on a NYC Murder from 1938 #general

Ron Arons
 

Moishe,

Here's how to get more information:

1. The easiest fruit to pick is the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, which is now online and
searchable for the years around the time of this murder. Go to
http://newsstand.bklynpubliclibrary.org/ . Click on 'Search' and type in the name
'Herman Hecht'. Narrow down the search time period to 1938 to 1939. I found an
article dated 15 March, 1939 which describes the event.

2. Look for other newspapers available in the same time frame, most notably, the
Brooklyn Citizen. The New York State Newspaper Project
(http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/nysnp/all/424.htm) tells where you can find various
historical newspapers (probably not online). The Brooklyn Citizen, for example, is
available at several places, including: the Brooklyn Public Library and the New
York Public Library (42nd St).

3. Look for a criminal court case at the NYC Archives (31 Chambers St). See:
http://www.nyc.gov/html/records/html/archives/collections_courtrecords.shtml

Happy hunting and collecting.

Ron Arons

Moishe Miller wrote:
Can anyone offer guidance on obtaining newspaper and police reports for the murder
of Herman (Hersh Mylech) HECHT in Brooklyn, NY on April 20th, 1938 at 8pm?


Searching for descendants of Salomon BRY - born about 1805 in Schrimm (Srem), Posen #germany

Judith Elam
 

I am assisting a great-great grandson of Salomon BRY (born about 1805 in
Schrimm) and Rikel FUCHS or FUHS, to find more BRY descendants >from Schrimm.
We already have a number of branches, but it is a huge family. If you are a
BRY descendant, or a descendant related through marriage to a BRY, please
contact me.

Judith Elam, Kihei, HI elamj@...


German SIG #Germany Searching for descendants of Salomon BRY - born about 1805 in Schrimm (Srem), Posen #germany

Judith Elam
 

I am assisting a great-great grandson of Salomon BRY (born about 1805 in
Schrimm) and Rikel FUCHS or FUHS, to find more BRY descendants >from Schrimm.
We already have a number of branches, but it is a huge family. If you are a
BRY descendant, or a descendant related through marriage to a BRY, please
contact me.

Judith Elam, Kihei, HI elamj@...


need help with translation of great-grandfather's WWI notes 11 pages, typed #germany

Michael Moritz
 

My grandfather just discovered notes >from his father who fought for
Germany in WWI. The notes were transcribed and are typewritten.
It is 11 pages long. I'm hoping someone will be willing to translate
these documents for me, as I'm fascinated to see where my
great-grandfather fought and what his experience was like.
Thanks a lot.

Michael Moritz, Durham, NC michael.d.moritz@...


German SIG #Germany need help with translation of great-grandfather's WWI notes 11 pages, typed #germany

Michael Moritz
 

My grandfather just discovered notes >from his father who fought for
Germany in WWI. The notes were transcribed and are typewritten.
It is 11 pages long. I'm hoping someone will be willing to translate
these documents for me, as I'm fascinated to see where my
great-grandfather fought and what his experience was like.
Thanks a lot.

Michael Moritz, Durham, NC michael.d.moritz@...


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine New project - Immigration to South America #ukraine

Yoni Kupchik
 

Dear friends,

I'm happy to announce a new project - Indexing census records and passengers lists of Jews that left Europe with the aid of the Jewish Colonization Association (JCA). Around the beginning of the 20th century the JCA helped thousands of Jews flee >from Europe (including many >from Ukraine) and sent them to agricultural colonies mainly in Argentina, but also in Uruguay, Brazil, Canada, USA, and Palestine. The JCA kept the passengers lists and census records >from those colonies and those records are now stored in the Central Archives of the History of the Jewish People in Jerusalem, Israel.

During the project we will acquire copies of those records and generate a database of all the names. The amount of information in the Archives is enormous, surely consisting of more than 100,000 names. We need your help to make this happen. Help can be offered in three ways:

1) We need volunteers that can go to the archives in Jerusalem with a digital camera and take pictures of the documents. This is the main bottleneck of the project so if you think you might be able to help please contact me.

2) We need donations to cover the expenses of taking the pictures. In order to donate money please go to the JewishGen-erosity page (http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/), choose the Latin America SIG on the right, and then donate money to the first project on the list. Any donation is greatly appreciated!

3) We need transliterators. The records are in classical Latin alphabet and mostly easy to read. No knowledge in Spanish is required.

For more detailed information about the project please go here: http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/projectdesc/LA_Immigrants.html.

Please contact me directly to yonikupchik@....

All the best,

Yoni Kupchik
Charleston, SC

KUPCHIK - Orgeyev (Bessarabia); GORODETSKY - Teleneshty (Bessarabia)
OKS - Sudilkov, Odessa (Ukraine) SITNITSKY - Kanev area, Ekaterinoslav area, and other regions in Ukraine;
SHABADASH - Kharkov and other regions (Ukraine)DORIN - Odessa (Ukraine), Bessarabia;
SHKODNIK - Khoshchevatoye, Odessa, and other towns between Odessa and Uman (Ukraine)
GLUZMAN - Odessa, Krivoye Ozero (Ukraine)KOSOY - Dobroye and Kherson area, Chigirin and Kiev area (Ukraine)
RABINOVICH - Novi Bug? (Ukraine)
And all of the above in Argentina


New project - Immigration to South America #ukraine

Yoni Kupchik
 

Dear friends,

I'm happy to announce a new project - Indexing census records and passengers lists of Jews that left Europe with the aid of the Jewish Colonization Association (JCA). Around the beginning of the 20th century the JCA helped thousands of Jews flee >from Europe (including many >from Ukraine) and sent them to agricultural colonies mainly in Argentina, but also in Uruguay, Brazil, Canada, USA, and Palestine. The JCA kept the passengers lists and census records >from those colonies and those records are now stored in the Central Archives of the History of the Jewish People in Jerusalem, Israel.

During the project we will acquire copies of those records and generate a database of all the names. The amount of information in the Archives is enormous, surely consisting of more than 100,000 names. We need your help to make this happen. Help can be offered in three ways:

1) We need volunteers that can go to the archives in Jerusalem with a digital camera and take pictures of the documents. This is the main bottleneck of the project so if you think you might be able to help please contact me.

2) We need donations to cover the expenses of taking the pictures. In order to donate money please go to the JewishGen-erosity page (http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/), choose the Latin America SIG on the right, and then donate money to the first project on the list. Any donation is greatly appreciated!

3) We need transliterators. The records are in classical Latin alphabet and mostly easy to read. No knowledge in Spanish is required.

For more detailed information about the project please go here: http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/projectdesc/LA_Immigrants.html.

Please contact me directly to yonikupchik@....

All the best,

Yoni Kupchik
Charleston, SC

KUPCHIK - Orgeyev (Bessarabia); GORODETSKY - Teleneshty (Bessarabia)
OKS - Sudilkov, Odessa (Ukraine) SITNITSKY - Kanev area, Ekaterinoslav area, and other regions in Ukraine;
SHABADASH - Kharkov and other regions (Ukraine)DORIN - Odessa (Ukraine), Bessarabia;
SHKODNIK - Khoshchevatoye, Odessa, and other towns between Odessa and Uman (Ukraine)
GLUZMAN - Odessa, Krivoye Ozero (Ukraine)KOSOY - Dobroye and Kherson area, Chigirin and Kiev area (Ukraine)
RABINOVICH - Novi Bug? (Ukraine)
And all of the above in Argentina


Research family Friedlander in Stryi #galicia

Van Prooyen Keyzer <am275035@...>
 

Research:

Stryi
Friedlander Rifka
Friedlander Taube Lea

As a new member, I want some help for genealogical research.

My name is JP Nebenzahl and my mother was Selma Nebenzahl, born in San
Remo (Italy) the 07/12/1913; she died in Auschwitz the 20/05/1944 (?).

Max Meyer Nebenzahl (my grandfather) was married to Taube Lea (Toni)
Friedlander. She was born 09/09/1869 in Stryi and had a address in Wien
III, Lowengasse 35

Her father was Abraham Friedlander and her mother Ciwje. (In Italy, they
spoke about Abramo and Cecilia.)

Taube Lea Friedlander had a sister: Rifka Friedlander was born on
10/08/1874 in Stryi and has the same address in Wien III, Lowengasse, 35.

Can you help me to find the extract of birth in the city of Stryi in Galicia ?

Many thanks for your help

Kind Regards

JP Nebenzahl
Name of adoption: van Prooyen Keyzer

e-mail: nejpvpk@...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Research family Friedlander in Stryi #galicia

Van Prooyen Keyzer <am275035@...>
 

Research:

Stryi
Friedlander Rifka
Friedlander Taube Lea

As a new member, I want some help for genealogical research.

My name is JP Nebenzahl and my mother was Selma Nebenzahl, born in San
Remo (Italy) the 07/12/1913; she died in Auschwitz the 20/05/1944 (?).

Max Meyer Nebenzahl (my grandfather) was married to Taube Lea (Toni)
Friedlander. She was born 09/09/1869 in Stryi and had a address in Wien
III, Lowengasse 35

Her father was Abraham Friedlander and her mother Ciwje. (In Italy, they
spoke about Abramo and Cecilia.)

Taube Lea Friedlander had a sister: Rifka Friedlander was born on
10/08/1874 in Stryi and has the same address in Wien III, Lowengasse, 35.

Can you help me to find the extract of birth in the city of Stryi in Galicia ?

Many thanks for your help

Kind Regards

JP Nebenzahl
Name of adoption: van Prooyen Keyzer

e-mail: nejpvpk@...

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