Date   

Video: "I Remember Jewish Drohobycz" on the Gesher Galicia website #ukraine

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia has uploaded a new short video to our site:

"I Remember Jewish Drohobycz" with David Einsiedler

http://www.geshergalicia.org/videos/remember-jewish-drohobycz-david-einsiedler/

In this portrait of the vanished world of Eastern European Jewry, the
late David Einsiedler, born in Drohobycz in 1919, recounts the heart
and soul of shtetl life between the two World Wars. Through personal
reminiscences he leads us through the streets and into the homes and
schools of his Galician town. David describes moving to Lvov, then to
the university in Pisa, Italy, and on to America in the late 1930s as
the threat of war looms over his beloved home and the lives of his
loved ones.

David attended the King Wladyslaw Jagiello Gymnasium in Drohobycz. The
artist, poet and author, Bruno Schulz (1892-1942,) was one of his
teachers. The video page also has photos of David's family, the 1934
school photo of his gymnasium classmates (and another photo with
hand-written names) as well as a pencil drawing Schulz made of David's
fiance, Stella Batischan. There is also a link to an article by
David that more fully describes life in Galicia.

This video was shot in 2005 and shown at the Las Vegas IAJGS
conference, but it has never been online until now. Many genealogists
were the beneficiaries of David's research talents over the years when
communication was only done by phone calls and snail mail. His memory
is a blessing to all of us.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
www.geshergalicia.org


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Video: "I Remember Jewish Drohobycz" on the Gesher Galicia website #ukraine

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia has uploaded a new short video to our site:

"I Remember Jewish Drohobycz" with David Einsiedler

http://www.geshergalicia.org/videos/remember-jewish-drohobycz-david-einsiedler/

In this portrait of the vanished world of Eastern European Jewry, the
late David Einsiedler, born in Drohobycz in 1919, recounts the heart
and soul of shtetl life between the two World Wars. Through personal
reminiscences he leads us through the streets and into the homes and
schools of his Galician town. David describes moving to Lvov, then to
the university in Pisa, Italy, and on to America in the late 1930s as
the threat of war looms over his beloved home and the lives of his
loved ones.

David attended the King Wladyslaw Jagiello Gymnasium in Drohobycz. The
artist, poet and author, Bruno Schulz (1892-1942,) was one of his
teachers. The video page also has photos of David's family, the 1934
school photo of his gymnasium classmates (and another photo with
hand-written names) as well as a pencil drawing Schulz made of David's
fiance, Stella Batischan. There is also a link to an article by
David that more fully describes life in Galicia.

This video was shot in 2005 and shown at the Las Vegas IAJGS
conference, but it has never been online until now. Many genealogists
were the beneficiaries of David's research talents over the years when
communication was only done by phone calls and snail mail. His memory
is a blessing to all of us.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
www.geshergalicia.org


Re: Poland - Changing Surnames #general

Martin Davis <dawidowicz@...>
 

Amit Naor wrote: "I have information >from a local Book of Residents implying
a surname change around the early 1800's. The name appears in the shape of
"Name X vel Name Y". My question is whether such name changes were
registered anywhere? Or a person could be registered once in his old name
and next time with a new name? How about later years (such as the end of the
19th century or the early 20th)?"

Amit identifies a real problem for those researching their families in
Congress Poland (different of course in Galicia and Prussian Poland). Prior
to the legislation introduced in 1821, Jewish family names had been 'fluid'
- although there had been attempts by various authorities to get them fixed.
In this earlier period, most often Jews were identified by their given name
and patronymic, sometimes by their given name and trade and sometimes by
their given name and an associated town (perhaps a town where they lived or
that they traded from). In the very early Jewish censuses (1760s etc) one
sees these characteristics. In the synagogue records of a similar period
people are often simply identified by their given name.

I cannot answer Amit's question re late 19th and early 20 century but circa
1821 - in Congress Poland - Jewish surnames were fixed and yet in later
official records it is clear that there was at least a recognition that some
people had former, as well as current, family names and that these were part
of their official identity. In that context the family name changes might be
registered in an official death record - one for an ancestor of mine who
died in 1848 identified him as Moziek Skorupa vel Huberman - but others I
have come across do not identify name changes (or dual names) in official
records; just simply as a name by which the person is known. So - in those
frustrating circumstances - only the most careful analysis of extant records
will reveal who is related to whom!

Martin Davis
London (UK)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Poland - Changing Surnames #general

Martin Davis <dawidowicz@...>
 

Amit Naor wrote: "I have information >from a local Book of Residents implying
a surname change around the early 1800's. The name appears in the shape of
"Name X vel Name Y". My question is whether such name changes were
registered anywhere? Or a person could be registered once in his old name
and next time with a new name? How about later years (such as the end of the
19th century or the early 20th)?"

Amit identifies a real problem for those researching their families in
Congress Poland (different of course in Galicia and Prussian Poland). Prior
to the legislation introduced in 1821, Jewish family names had been 'fluid'
- although there had been attempts by various authorities to get them fixed.
In this earlier period, most often Jews were identified by their given name
and patronymic, sometimes by their given name and trade and sometimes by
their given name and an associated town (perhaps a town where they lived or
that they traded from). In the very early Jewish censuses (1760s etc) one
sees these characteristics. In the synagogue records of a similar period
people are often simply identified by their given name.

I cannot answer Amit's question re late 19th and early 20 century but circa
1821 - in Congress Poland - Jewish surnames were fixed and yet in later
official records it is clear that there was at least a recognition that some
people had former, as well as current, family names and that these were part
of their official identity. In that context the family name changes might be
registered in an official death record - one for an ancestor of mine who
died in 1848 identified him as Moziek Skorupa vel Huberman - but others I
have come across do not identify name changes (or dual names) in official
records; just simply as a name by which the person is known. So - in those
frustrating circumstances - only the most careful analysis of extant records
will reveal who is related to whom!

Martin Davis
London (UK)


Re: Maps of Jewish Communities and their Populations in Europe: 1750 - 1950 #general

Vivian Kahn
 

Todd,

The best source for information about Jewish population in small
Hungarian places in latter part of 19th century is the 1877
Hungarian Gazetteer (Magyarorszag helysegnevtara), published by
Janos Dvorzsak, which is available on-line at
http://www.radixhub.com/radixhub/gazetteers/1877 and other sites.
Given the very large number of very small places would, however,
be very difficult to map this data as this project has done for
larger population centers.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, California
Hungarian SIG Coordinator

On Jul 17, 2014, Todd Edelman <edelman@...> wrote:

So is the data available to create a map that includes much smaller
settlements and proportions? In regards to the gross numbers and bias
towards everything >from medium-sized towns and up, these maps if used
without context end up under-representing the Jews who lived in those
(much) smaller towns, who are likely more religious and lower on the
economic scale.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Maps of Jewish Communities and their Populations in Europe: 1750 - 1950 #general

Vivian Kahn
 

Todd,

The best source for information about Jewish population in small
Hungarian places in latter part of 19th century is the 1877
Hungarian Gazetteer (Magyarorszag helysegnevtara), published by
Janos Dvorzsak, which is available on-line at
http://www.radixhub.com/radixhub/gazetteers/1877 and other sites.
Given the very large number of very small places would, however,
be very difficult to map this data as this project has done for
larger population centers.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, California
Hungarian SIG Coordinator

On Jul 17, 2014, Todd Edelman <edelman@...> wrote:

So is the data available to create a map that includes much smaller
settlements and proportions? In regards to the gross numbers and bias
towards everything >from medium-sized towns and up, these maps if used
without context end up under-representing the Jews who lived in those
(much) smaller towns, who are likely more religious and lower on the
economic scale.


My family is jewish ? #general

Dan Cohen <dcohen@...>
 

Hello,

I research if my familly is Jewish or not ? That is my history with
all names.

Last Week, I left in Israel for research more informations about my
great great grandmother ( about Mazur ), and i found that the name
MAZUR exists in Israel ( for examples : Eliayu Mazur, Moran Mazur,
Veronica Mazur, David Mazur...), and they are jewish.

But now, i make more research, and i found my great grand father who
call Sander PULLMAN born in Slovakia in the 1900's and my great
grandmother who call Josephin SZKLENAR born in Slovakia in the 1900's
too.

My great grandfather was in the concentration camps of Compiegne and
Cherbourg in France in 1944. Afterwards, he survived the death camps
and returned to live in Slovakia.

I know that every year my grand mother Josephin SZKLENAR pilgrim
someone in a Jewish cemetery in Bratislava but I was unfortunately not
the name of this person.

So I think it's either Josephin PULLMAN or Sander PULLMAN, or maybe
one of these brothers and sisters.

Could you check if you have buried in your cemetery in Bratislava:

- Sander PULLMAN
- Josephin PULLMAN

- or if you have people with the name PULLMAN who are buried in your
cemetery (may be his brothers or sisters)

I need to know if the name of MAZUR or SZKLENAR is Jewish or not ?

This story is very complicated for me, it's been months that I am on
the subject. I do not lose hope, and I really count on you to help me
find traces of my grandparents. I really need your help!!!

Thank you in advance.

Dan Cohen


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen My family is jewish ? #general

Dan Cohen <dcohen@...>
 

Hello,

I research if my familly is Jewish or not ? That is my history with
all names.

Last Week, I left in Israel for research more informations about my
great great grandmother ( about Mazur ), and i found that the name
MAZUR exists in Israel ( for examples : Eliayu Mazur, Moran Mazur,
Veronica Mazur, David Mazur...), and they are jewish.

But now, i make more research, and i found my great grand father who
call Sander PULLMAN born in Slovakia in the 1900's and my great
grandmother who call Josephin SZKLENAR born in Slovakia in the 1900's
too.

My great grandfather was in the concentration camps of Compiegne and
Cherbourg in France in 1944. Afterwards, he survived the death camps
and returned to live in Slovakia.

I know that every year my grand mother Josephin SZKLENAR pilgrim
someone in a Jewish cemetery in Bratislava but I was unfortunately not
the name of this person.

So I think it's either Josephin PULLMAN or Sander PULLMAN, or maybe
one of these brothers and sisters.

Could you check if you have buried in your cemetery in Bratislava:

- Sander PULLMAN
- Josephin PULLMAN

- or if you have people with the name PULLMAN who are buried in your
cemetery (may be his brothers or sisters)

I need to know if the name of MAZUR or SZKLENAR is Jewish or not ?

This story is very complicated for me, it's been months that I am on
the subject. I do not lose hope, and I really count on you to help me
find traces of my grandparents. I really need your help!!!

Thank you in advance.

Dan Cohen


B.Franklin HS yearbook #general

Natalie Tannenbaum
 

I have a copy of the Benjamin Franklin HS yearbook, Vol 1 Number 1
dated Jan. 1937. The school was located at 309 East 108th St.,  New
York City. If anyone out there would like to have it please contact
me.

Natalie Tannenbaum,
Brooklyn, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen B.Franklin HS yearbook #general

Natalie Tannenbaum
 

I have a copy of the Benjamin Franklin HS yearbook, Vol 1 Number 1
dated Jan. 1937. The school was located at 309 East 108th St.,  New
York City. If anyone out there would like to have it please contact
me.

Natalie Tannenbaum,
Brooklyn, NY


Video: "I Remember Jewish Drohobycz" on the Gesher Galicia website #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia has uploaded a new short video to our site:

"I Remember Jewish Drohobycz" with David EINSIEDLER

http://www.geshergalicia.org/videos/remember-jewish-drohobycz-david-einsiedler/
[http://tinyurl.com/nd8p27s - MODERATOR]

In this portrait of the vanished world of Eastern European Jewry, the
late David Einsiedler, born in Drohobycz in 1919, recounts the heart
and soul of shtetl life between the two World Wars. Through personal
reminiscences he leads us through the streets and into the homes and
schools of his Galician town. David describes moving to Lvov, then to
the university in Pisa, Italy, and on to America in the late 1930s as
the threat of war looms over his beloved home and the lives of his
loved ones.

David attended the King Wladyslaw Jagiello Gymnasium in Drohobycz. The
artist, poet and author, Bruno SCHULZ (1892-1942), was one of his
teachers. The video page also has photos of David's family, the 1934
school photo of his gymnasium classmates (and another photo with
hand-written names) as well as a pencil drawing Schulz made of David's
fiance, Stella BATISCHAN. There is also a link to an article by
David that more fully describes life in Galicia.

This video was shot in 2005 and shown at the Las Vegas IAJGS
conference, but it has never been online until now. Many genealogists
were the beneficiaries of David's research talents over the years when
communication was only done by phone calls and snail mail. His memory
is a blessing to all of us.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
www.geshergalicia.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Video: "I Remember Jewish Drohobycz" on the Gesher Galicia website #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia has uploaded a new short video to our site:

"I Remember Jewish Drohobycz" with David EINSIEDLER

http://www.geshergalicia.org/videos/remember-jewish-drohobycz-david-einsiedler/
[http://tinyurl.com/nd8p27s - MODERATOR]

In this portrait of the vanished world of Eastern European Jewry, the
late David Einsiedler, born in Drohobycz in 1919, recounts the heart
and soul of shtetl life between the two World Wars. Through personal
reminiscences he leads us through the streets and into the homes and
schools of his Galician town. David describes moving to Lvov, then to
the university in Pisa, Italy, and on to America in the late 1930s as
the threat of war looms over his beloved home and the lives of his
loved ones.

David attended the King Wladyslaw Jagiello Gymnasium in Drohobycz. The
artist, poet and author, Bruno SCHULZ (1892-1942), was one of his
teachers. The video page also has photos of David's family, the 1934
school photo of his gymnasium classmates (and another photo with
hand-written names) as well as a pencil drawing Schulz made of David's
fiance, Stella BATISCHAN. There is also a link to an article by
David that more fully describes life in Galicia.

This video was shot in 2005 and shown at the Las Vegas IAJGS
conference, but it has never been online until now. Many genealogists
were the beneficiaries of David's research talents over the years when
communication was only done by phone calls and snail mail. His memory
is a blessing to all of us.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
www.geshergalicia.org


Reich Law Gazette #germany

Peter Straus
 

GerSIGgers:

As many of you know, beginning in 1933 the Reich Law Gazette
("Reichsgesetzblatt") published names of Jews and others whose German
citizenship was being revoked. Does anyone know if these lists of names,
or an index to them, are readily available anywhere and particularly in
searchable, digital form?

Peter Straus, San Francisco pstrausSF@...

Moderator note: Please reply on list to this question of general
interest. Citations of web pages on the topic of the Reich Laws
will be appreciated.


German SIG #Germany Reich Law Gazette #germany

Peter Straus
 

GerSIGgers:

As many of you know, beginning in 1933 the Reich Law Gazette
("Reichsgesetzblatt") published names of Jews and others whose German
citizenship was being revoked. Does anyone know if these lists of names,
or an index to them, are readily available anywhere and particularly in
searchable, digital form?

Peter Straus, San Francisco pstrausSF@...

Moderator note: Please reply on list to this question of general
interest. Citations of web pages on the topic of the Reich Laws
will be appreciated.


Video: "I Remember Jewish Drohobycz" on the Gesher Galicia website #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia has uploaded a new short video to our site:

"I Remember Jewish Drohobycz" with David Einsiedler

< http://www.geshergalicia.org/videos/remember-jewish-drohobycz-david-einsiedler/ >

In this portrait of the vanished world of Eastern European Jewry, the
late David Einsiedler, born in Drohobycz in 1919, recounts the heart
and soul of shtetl life between the two World Wars. Through personal
reminiscences he leads us through the streets and into the homes
and schools of his Galician town. David describes moving to Lvov,
then to the university in Pisa, Italy, and on to America in the late
1930s as the threat of war looms over his beloved home and the
lives of his loved ones.

David attended the King Wladyslaw Jagiello Gymnasium in Drohobycz.
The artist, poet and author Bruno Schulz (1892-1942) was one of his
teachers. The video page also has photos of David's family, the 1934
school photo of his gymnasium classmates (and another photo with
handwritten names) as well as a pencil drawing Schulz made of David's
fiance, Stella Batischan. There is also a link to an article by David that
more fully describes life in Galicia.

This video was shot in 2005 and shown at the Las Vegas IAJGS
conference, but it has never been online until now. Many genealogists
were the beneficiaries of David's research talents over the years when
communication was only done by phone calls and snail mail. His
memory is a blessing to all of us.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
www.geshergalicia.org


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Video: "I Remember Jewish Drohobycz" on the Gesher Galicia website #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia has uploaded a new short video to our site:

"I Remember Jewish Drohobycz" with David Einsiedler

< http://www.geshergalicia.org/videos/remember-jewish-drohobycz-david-einsiedler/ >

In this portrait of the vanished world of Eastern European Jewry, the
late David Einsiedler, born in Drohobycz in 1919, recounts the heart
and soul of shtetl life between the two World Wars. Through personal
reminiscences he leads us through the streets and into the homes
and schools of his Galician town. David describes moving to Lvov,
then to the university in Pisa, Italy, and on to America in the late
1930s as the threat of war looms over his beloved home and the
lives of his loved ones.

David attended the King Wladyslaw Jagiello Gymnasium in Drohobycz.
The artist, poet and author Bruno Schulz (1892-1942) was one of his
teachers. The video page also has photos of David's family, the 1934
school photo of his gymnasium classmates (and another photo with
handwritten names) as well as a pencil drawing Schulz made of David's
fiance, Stella Batischan. There is also a link to an article by David that
more fully describes life in Galicia.

This video was shot in 2005 and shown at the Las Vegas IAJGS
conference, but it has never been online until now. Many genealogists
were the beneficiaries of David's research talents over the years when
communication was only done by phone calls and snail mail. His
memory is a blessing to all of us.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
www.geshergalicia.org


Re: Yiddish or Hebrew? #general

Sharon Korn <s.r.korn@...>
 

Although I have tried to thank all of them individually, I would like to
publicly thank all the people who reached out to help with my question about
my ancestor (actually, my great-grandfather) with multiple names: Beni,
Bendet, Berel, and Benjamin. I appreciate the emails >from David, Chuck,
Sally, Irene, Janette, Yehudh, and Rashi, and I hope I haven't omitted
anyone.

I am still puzzled by the situation. According to the records at Mt. Zion
Cemetery, where three of his children were buried, Beni is listed as the
father's Hebrew name for one and Bendet for two. Beni is apparently a
nickname and not a Hebrew name, and I have been told by members of this
group that Bendet wasn't really Hebrew but was related to the Latin Benedict
and Hebrew Baruch.

This raises further questions regarding the naming of Bendet's grandson, my
father. Why would the name Benjamin have been forbidden, so that his
parents quickly changed it after initially giving him that name? Was there
an Ashkenazic or Litvak prohibition against giving a child a name similar to
that of a living ancestor, even though it was not really the same name?
Could the Hebrew name actually have been Benyamin, even though it was not a
direct translation of Bendet? My children have Hebrew and American names
that do not correspond, but I can't assume that would have been the case
with immigrants more than a hundred years ago.

Thanks again for your thoughts.

Sharon Korn
San Diego, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish or Hebrew? #general

Sharon Korn <s.r.korn@...>
 

Although I have tried to thank all of them individually, I would like to
publicly thank all the people who reached out to help with my question about
my ancestor (actually, my great-grandfather) with multiple names: Beni,
Bendet, Berel, and Benjamin. I appreciate the emails >from David, Chuck,
Sally, Irene, Janette, Yehudh, and Rashi, and I hope I haven't omitted
anyone.

I am still puzzled by the situation. According to the records at Mt. Zion
Cemetery, where three of his children were buried, Beni is listed as the
father's Hebrew name for one and Bendet for two. Beni is apparently a
nickname and not a Hebrew name, and I have been told by members of this
group that Bendet wasn't really Hebrew but was related to the Latin Benedict
and Hebrew Baruch.

This raises further questions regarding the naming of Bendet's grandson, my
father. Why would the name Benjamin have been forbidden, so that his
parents quickly changed it after initially giving him that name? Was there
an Ashkenazic or Litvak prohibition against giving a child a name similar to
that of a living ancestor, even though it was not really the same name?
Could the Hebrew name actually have been Benyamin, even though it was not a
direct translation of Bendet? My children have Hebrew and American names
that do not correspond, but I can't assume that would have been the case
with immigrants more than a hundred years ago.

Thanks again for your thoughts.

Sharon Korn
San Diego, CA


Ancestor risen from the dead? #poland

Adam Goodheart
 

One of my ancestral families is WAYSMAN (also sometimes WAJSMAN or
WAYS), which I've traced to the tiny farming village of Chutcze
(halfway between Wlodawa and Chelm) in the early 19th century. This
was a remarkable family, because, if the documents can be believed,
one of its members apparently came back >from the dead:

August 14, 1833: Chelm birth records note the birth of Moszko Waysman
(and his twin sister, Gitla) in the village of Chutcze, the son of
Zysia Waysman, tenant farmer, age 49, and his wife, Fayga, age 40.

August 23, 1833: Chelm death records note the death of Moszko Waysman,
age 9 days, in the village of Chutcze, son of Zysia Waysman, tenant
farmer, and his wife, Feyga.

August 21, 1851: Wlodawa marriage records note the wedding of Moszko
Wajsman, age 18 years, born in the village of Chutcze in the Chelm
district, son of Zusia Wajsman, cattle farmer, and his wife, Feyga, to
Resla Orenszteyn, age 19.

Maybe the true story can never be known, but I'd be interested in any
suggestions. The village of Chutcze was so small that it's pretty much
impossible there were two different families with the same names. And
of course the bridegroom's age matches up exactly to the original
"dead" Moszko.

My first thought was that maybe the Waysmans had a subsequent son they
named Moszko (and later lost track of his age), but wasn't this
against traditional Jewish practice?

Adam Goodheart
Washington, D.C.


JRI Poland #Poland Ancestor risen from the dead? #poland

Adam Goodheart
 

One of my ancestral families is WAYSMAN (also sometimes WAJSMAN or
WAYS), which I've traced to the tiny farming village of Chutcze
(halfway between Wlodawa and Chelm) in the early 19th century. This
was a remarkable family, because, if the documents can be believed,
one of its members apparently came back >from the dead:

August 14, 1833: Chelm birth records note the birth of Moszko Waysman
(and his twin sister, Gitla) in the village of Chutcze, the son of
Zysia Waysman, tenant farmer, age 49, and his wife, Fayga, age 40.

August 23, 1833: Chelm death records note the death of Moszko Waysman,
age 9 days, in the village of Chutcze, son of Zysia Waysman, tenant
farmer, and his wife, Feyga.

August 21, 1851: Wlodawa marriage records note the wedding of Moszko
Wajsman, age 18 years, born in the village of Chutcze in the Chelm
district, son of Zusia Wajsman, cattle farmer, and his wife, Feyga, to
Resla Orenszteyn, age 19.

Maybe the true story can never be known, but I'd be interested in any
suggestions. The village of Chutcze was so small that it's pretty much
impossible there were two different families with the same names. And
of course the bridegroom's age matches up exactly to the original
"dead" Moszko.

My first thought was that maybe the Waysmans had a subsequent son they
named Moszko (and later lost track of his age), but wasn't this
against traditional Jewish practice?

Adam Goodheart
Washington, D.C.