Date   

IAJGS Salute! Award to the JOWBR Database Volunteer Corps #general

Bill Israel <wisrael.im56@...>
 

This is an IAJGS Salute! Award

JOWBR Database Volunteer Corps, we Salute! you.

May 2017 - JewishGens JOWBR Project
(http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/) recently passed the 3
million record mark. The popular database includes records >from more
than 125 countries word wide. The success of the database could only
have been achieved with the time and effort of a dedicated group of volunteers.

Eric Feinstein, the lead volunteer helps to find material >from websites,
discussion list postings, newspaper articles, word of mouth and any
other leads. He also coordinates many of the volunteers.

A key group of devoted data entry volunteers, Ann Meddin Hellman, George
Jiri Goldschmied, Hans Nord, Harriet Mayer, and Maurice Kessler, take
material in various forms and then create the standard JOWBR Excel templates.

When we receive photos of headstones that need transliterating >from
Hebrew to English, Gilberto Jugend does the transliteration and prepares
the template.

And last but not least, Max Heffler htmls all the non-headstone photos
and descriptive material that accentuates the cemetery descriptions.

On behalf of all the genealogists and researchers that have made use of
JewishGens JOWBR database and found key burial information for their
family history, the IAJGS salutes you!

Nominated by Nolan Altman

Submitted by Bill Israel, Chair IAJGS Salutes! Committee
with Nolan Altman and Doris Nabel

About IAJGS Salute! Awards:
- A Salute! award is a way to recognize anyone or any organization at
any time for any noteworthy projects, activities or accomplishments
relating to Jewish genealogy.
- A Salute! nomination may be proposed and submitted by any IAJGS
member organization.
- There is no limit on the number of worthy efforts or activities that
may be recognized.
- IAJGS Salute! Award nominations may be submitted at any time, and
recognition will be ongoing throughout the year.
- Upon the endorsement of the president, the nominated organization or
individual will be recognized on the IAJGS website.
- To submit a Salute! Award Nomination, go to
http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/iajgs-salutes/

Bill Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen IAJGS Salute! Award to the JOWBR Database Volunteer Corps #general

Bill Israel <wisrael.im56@...>
 

This is an IAJGS Salute! Award

JOWBR Database Volunteer Corps, we Salute! you.

May 2017 - JewishGens JOWBR Project
(http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/) recently passed the 3
million record mark. The popular database includes records >from more
than 125 countries word wide. The success of the database could only
have been achieved with the time and effort of a dedicated group of volunteers.

Eric Feinstein, the lead volunteer helps to find material >from websites,
discussion list postings, newspaper articles, word of mouth and any
other leads. He also coordinates many of the volunteers.

A key group of devoted data entry volunteers, Ann Meddin Hellman, George
Jiri Goldschmied, Hans Nord, Harriet Mayer, and Maurice Kessler, take
material in various forms and then create the standard JOWBR Excel templates.

When we receive photos of headstones that need transliterating >from
Hebrew to English, Gilberto Jugend does the transliteration and prepares
the template.

And last but not least, Max Heffler htmls all the non-headstone photos
and descriptive material that accentuates the cemetery descriptions.

On behalf of all the genealogists and researchers that have made use of
JewishGens JOWBR database and found key burial information for their
family history, the IAJGS salutes you!

Nominated by Nolan Altman

Submitted by Bill Israel, Chair IAJGS Salutes! Committee
with Nolan Altman and Doris Nabel

About IAJGS Salute! Awards:
- A Salute! award is a way to recognize anyone or any organization at
any time for any noteworthy projects, activities or accomplishments
relating to Jewish genealogy.
- A Salute! nomination may be proposed and submitted by any IAJGS
member organization.
- There is no limit on the number of worthy efforts or activities that
may be recognized.
- IAJGS Salute! Award nominations may be submitted at any time, and
recognition will be ongoing throughout the year.
- Upon the endorsement of the president, the nominated organization or
individual will be recognized on the IAJGS website.
- To submit a Salute! Award Nomination, go to
http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/iajgs-salutes/

Bill Israel


Re: new york research #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Phyllis Kramer offered some suggestions on things to research and how to maximize
time if you are visiting NYC. I am going to elaborate a bit base on experience to
help everyone maximize their time.

My suggestion to anyone like the person who asked the original question, I make a
wish list of what you really want to learn and then maybe work with someone to help
prioritize it based on what you want and what is available where in New York City.
The first caveat is that research takes longer and travel takes longer than you
think it will. Add in the idiosyncrasies of some of the NYC institutions and it
will take twice as long as you expect.

Phyllis suggested probate which is a very good idea but in a lot of cases it can
not be done in a single visit. All of the depends on borough and time frame.

For probate you need to know where the person's last legal residence was because
probate is by borough and where the person lived, not died. So if they died in a
hospital in Manhattan but lived in Brooklyn the probate is in Brooklyn not
Manhattan. (And that is a good thing for your research.) Also knowing at least
the year of death is critical.

Each New York City probate court works differently. In Manhattan they index is
now mostly computerized but only on site. Probates >from the 1930s, 1940s, 1950s
and even 1960s are off site so all you can do is look up the file number in the
index and place a request. If it is a small file they will scan and email it to
you if they are not too busy but if it is big you need to come back a few weeks
later when they get it out of storage. Or if you get lucky the file is still at
the court (mostly only newer ones) or it has been put on to the computer and then
you can read it and take digital pictures or print it but it is 25 cents a page.
Manhattan's probate records are in the same building as the Municipal Archives on
the 4th floor -- that's convenient. (Also New York County naturalization is on the
7th floor.)

In Brooklyn probate is all on site (that's why I said it is a good thing) but the
record room has been having staffing problems and the older files are in the
basement. If there is only one clerk in the room they can not go to the basement
for the older files. So you wait or come back or give up. Never files are in the
room or on the computers. The index up to the 1970s is on Family Search or in
cards in the room and the newer one is on a computer in the room.

Queens is the best because everything is on site and can be accessed in a single
visit. The Bronx the newer files are in the room and the older ones in the
basement but they only go to the basement once a week so you go, put in your
request, and if it is in the basement have to come back the following week.

For all probates check FamilySearch and Ancestry first. Both have bits and pieces
from New York City which might save you a visit. Also remember probates only exist
when there were enough assets to prompt it either in land, buildings, cash, stocks,
jewelry, etc.

On marriage records anything older than 50 years is public record. The City
Clerk's Marriage Bureau files through 1949 are now at the Municipal Archives and
the later ones can be gotten if you go to the marriage bureau and put in a
request. It takes 30 to 60 minutes generally, but you can see all the happy
couples getting married.

Don't bother going to the Health Department ... it is just a waste of time and will
aggravate you. Nothing is available in person and you can not view any of their
files or indexes if you go.

Cemeteries are a very good idea but they require travel outside Manhattan. A few
of them (Bayside in particular) are not in very nice areas and if you do not have
a car some of them are difficult to get to.

NARA has a lot but a lot of it is online these days. If you need something they
have to retrieve they do that every 30 or 60 minutes and you have to wait. The NY
State indexes to marriage, birth and death are there but none of the vital records
so if you find them in the index you still have to deal with the local authority or
NY State.

The New York Public Library is another place to consider. The Genealogy Room is at
the 42nd Street Main Library on 5th Avenue in Manhattan. They have New York City
newspapers, directories, phone books, address directories, maps and more plus a
separate Jewish room. Most everything is in closed stacks, including now most of
the microfilm. and it takes 30 to 60 minutes to retrieve plus you need to have a
library. You can get one if you are an out of towner -- read the website for
information. Unfortunately they closed the main microfilm reading room so
everything is slower now, and the new room is smaller and more crowded. Even if
you do not do research it is a great building to see.

Another thing to consider is visit to the Tenement Museum or the Museum of Jewish
Heritage. If you go to the Tenement museum you can also walk the Lower East Side
but parts of it are a lot more upscale than your ancestors experienced.

YIVO also has an extensive library and research center available. There are also
other court files to consider including naturalization, name changes, business
records, ta and property records, property photos ...... the list is long.

... and that's just the core of the opportunities in New York City. I think you
can see why I say make a wish list first and review it possibly with someone who
has experience to determine what will work and what is going to lead to
frustration. Also check institution's websites because hours change. The
Municipal Archives for example currently is offering evening hours for the first
time on Thursdays.

Sorry it is a long message but I wanted to add some information/considerations not
just for Elena who asked about this but for everyone considering a NYC research
trip.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: new york research #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Phyllis Kramer offered some suggestions on things to research and how to maximize
time if you are visiting NYC. I am going to elaborate a bit base on experience to
help everyone maximize their time.

My suggestion to anyone like the person who asked the original question, I make a
wish list of what you really want to learn and then maybe work with someone to help
prioritize it based on what you want and what is available where in New York City.
The first caveat is that research takes longer and travel takes longer than you
think it will. Add in the idiosyncrasies of some of the NYC institutions and it
will take twice as long as you expect.

Phyllis suggested probate which is a very good idea but in a lot of cases it can
not be done in a single visit. All of the depends on borough and time frame.

For probate you need to know where the person's last legal residence was because
probate is by borough and where the person lived, not died. So if they died in a
hospital in Manhattan but lived in Brooklyn the probate is in Brooklyn not
Manhattan. (And that is a good thing for your research.) Also knowing at least
the year of death is critical.

Each New York City probate court works differently. In Manhattan they index is
now mostly computerized but only on site. Probates >from the 1930s, 1940s, 1950s
and even 1960s are off site so all you can do is look up the file number in the
index and place a request. If it is a small file they will scan and email it to
you if they are not too busy but if it is big you need to come back a few weeks
later when they get it out of storage. Or if you get lucky the file is still at
the court (mostly only newer ones) or it has been put on to the computer and then
you can read it and take digital pictures or print it but it is 25 cents a page.
Manhattan's probate records are in the same building as the Municipal Archives on
the 4th floor -- that's convenient. (Also New York County naturalization is on the
7th floor.)

In Brooklyn probate is all on site (that's why I said it is a good thing) but the
record room has been having staffing problems and the older files are in the
basement. If there is only one clerk in the room they can not go to the basement
for the older files. So you wait or come back or give up. Never files are in the
room or on the computers. The index up to the 1970s is on Family Search or in
cards in the room and the newer one is on a computer in the room.

Queens is the best because everything is on site and can be accessed in a single
visit. The Bronx the newer files are in the room and the older ones in the
basement but they only go to the basement once a week so you go, put in your
request, and if it is in the basement have to come back the following week.

For all probates check FamilySearch and Ancestry first. Both have bits and pieces
from New York City which might save you a visit. Also remember probates only exist
when there were enough assets to prompt it either in land, buildings, cash, stocks,
jewelry, etc.

On marriage records anything older than 50 years is public record. The City
Clerk's Marriage Bureau files through 1949 are now at the Municipal Archives and
the later ones can be gotten if you go to the marriage bureau and put in a
request. It takes 30 to 60 minutes generally, but you can see all the happy
couples getting married.

Don't bother going to the Health Department ... it is just a waste of time and will
aggravate you. Nothing is available in person and you can not view any of their
files or indexes if you go.

Cemeteries are a very good idea but they require travel outside Manhattan. A few
of them (Bayside in particular) are not in very nice areas and if you do not have
a car some of them are difficult to get to.

NARA has a lot but a lot of it is online these days. If you need something they
have to retrieve they do that every 30 or 60 minutes and you have to wait. The NY
State indexes to marriage, birth and death are there but none of the vital records
so if you find them in the index you still have to deal with the local authority or
NY State.

The New York Public Library is another place to consider. The Genealogy Room is at
the 42nd Street Main Library on 5th Avenue in Manhattan. They have New York City
newspapers, directories, phone books, address directories, maps and more plus a
separate Jewish room. Most everything is in closed stacks, including now most of
the microfilm. and it takes 30 to 60 minutes to retrieve plus you need to have a
library. You can get one if you are an out of towner -- read the website for
information. Unfortunately they closed the main microfilm reading room so
everything is slower now, and the new room is smaller and more crowded. Even if
you do not do research it is a great building to see.

Another thing to consider is visit to the Tenement Museum or the Museum of Jewish
Heritage. If you go to the Tenement museum you can also walk the Lower East Side
but parts of it are a lot more upscale than your ancestors experienced.

YIVO also has an extensive library and research center available. There are also
other court files to consider including naturalization, name changes, business
records, ta and property records, property photos ...... the list is long.

... and that's just the core of the opportunities in New York City. I think you
can see why I say make a wish list first and review it possibly with someone who
has experience to determine what will work and what is going to lead to
frustration. Also check institution's websites because hours change. The
Municipal Archives for example currently is offering evening hours for the first
time on Thursdays.

Sorry it is a long message but I wanted to add some information/considerations not
just for Elena who asked about this but for everyone considering a NYC research
trip.

Allan Jordan


(US) Free Access to ALL Pennsylvania Resources on American Ancestors Through May 23, 2017 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

American Ancestors by the New England Historic Genealogical Society is
offering free access to their entire Pennsylvania resources >from May 16-2,
2017. You are required to register-name, address, phone number, email,
password-and it's free. To sign up go to: http://tinyurl.com/l7lv6sd
Original url:

https://www.americanancestors.org/join/?reg-type=free&return-url=features/pennsylvania-research

Pennsylvania played an important role in American history. Tor read how to
conduct research on Pennsylvania and access free educational resources go
to: https://www.americanancestors.org/pennsylvania
While on that page look at the various Pennsylvania Genealogy guides.

Also search the Jewish Heritage's Center archives for Pennsylvania resources
at:
http://digitalcollections.americanancestors.org/cdm/ajhs/

On Thursday May 18 at 1:00 PM EDT American Ancestors is holding a webinar on
resources for Pennsylvania Genealogy. To sign-up for the webinar go to:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8843237164247086338?source=website

To search their Pennsylvania digital collections, go to:
http://tinyurl.com/mccz4de
Original url:
http://digitalcollections.americanancestors.org/cdm/search/collection/p15869coll16!p15869coll20!p15869coll22!p15869coll23!p15869coll24!p15869coll14!p15869coll32/searchterm/Pennsylvania/order/nosort
If you search other than the Pennsylvania records you may be invited to subscribe.

I have no affiliation with American Ancestors.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (US) Free Access to ALL Pennsylvania Resources on American Ancestors Through May 23, 2017 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

American Ancestors by the New England Historic Genealogical Society is
offering free access to their entire Pennsylvania resources >from May 16-2,
2017. You are required to register-name, address, phone number, email,
password-and it's free. To sign up go to: http://tinyurl.com/l7lv6sd
Original url:

https://www.americanancestors.org/join/?reg-type=free&return-url=features/pennsylvania-research

Pennsylvania played an important role in American history. Tor read how to
conduct research on Pennsylvania and access free educational resources go
to: https://www.americanancestors.org/pennsylvania
While on that page look at the various Pennsylvania Genealogy guides.

Also search the Jewish Heritage's Center archives for Pennsylvania resources
at:
http://digitalcollections.americanancestors.org/cdm/ajhs/

On Thursday May 18 at 1:00 PM EDT American Ancestors is holding a webinar on
resources for Pennsylvania Genealogy. To sign-up for the webinar go to:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8843237164247086338?source=website

To search their Pennsylvania digital collections, go to:
http://tinyurl.com/mccz4de
Original url:
http://digitalcollections.americanancestors.org/cdm/search/collection/p15869coll16!p15869coll20!p15869coll22!p15869coll23!p15869coll24!p15869coll14!p15869coll32/searchterm/Pennsylvania/order/nosort
If you search other than the Pennsylvania records you may be invited to subscribe.

I have no affiliation with American Ancestors.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Visiting Starokonstantinov #ukraine

philafrum
 

Dear Genners,

Both my maternal grandparents came >from Starokonstantinov.

Before I consider traveling there, I'd appreciate knowing if there's anything tangibly Jewish there to see such as remnants of a cemetery, synagogue
buildings now used for other purposes, etc.

Where are the records for that town located? I assume NOT in S-K.

Thanks.

Evan Fishman, New Jersey, USA

Mandelstein--Starokonstantinov
Adelman--Krasilov
Lisnitzer--Luchinets, Starokonstantinov, Izyaslav
Udin--Kyiv
Burstein--Radomyshl
Presseisen--Ostrog

MODERATOR'S NOTE: See the IAJGS Cemetery Project page at
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/starokonstantinov.html.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Visiting Starokonstantinov #ukraine

philafrum
 

Dear Genners,

Both my maternal grandparents came >from Starokonstantinov.

Before I consider traveling there, I'd appreciate knowing if there's anything tangibly Jewish there to see such as remnants of a cemetery, synagogue
buildings now used for other purposes, etc.

Where are the records for that town located? I assume NOT in S-K.

Thanks.

Evan Fishman, New Jersey, USA

Mandelstein--Starokonstantinov
Adelman--Krasilov
Lisnitzer--Luchinets, Starokonstantinov, Izyaslav
Udin--Kyiv
Burstein--Radomyshl
Presseisen--Ostrog

MODERATOR'S NOTE: See the IAJGS Cemetery Project page at
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/starokonstantinov.html.


Seek fate of Franziska JAHN nee JACOBSOHN & Fritz JAHN living in Berlin 1938 #germany

Harry Birnbrey
 

I have completed my family search with one exception: I have been
unable to find anything on my mother's sister Franziska (Fraenzche)
JAHN geb. Jacobsohn. Her husband Fritz JAHN was not Jewish and they
lived in Berlin. I know she was still alive in 1938 and I am trying
to find out if she died a natural death or became a victim of the
Shoah. Any help would be appreciated as this will complete my family
research.

Any help would be greatly appreciated by:

Henry Birnbrey, Atlanta, Georgia hbirnbrey@... JGID 5746


German SIG #Germany Seek fate of Franziska JAHN nee JACOBSOHN & Fritz JAHN living in Berlin 1938 #germany

Harry Birnbrey
 

I have completed my family search with one exception: I have been
unable to find anything on my mother's sister Franziska (Fraenzche)
JAHN geb. Jacobsohn. Her husband Fritz JAHN was not Jewish and they
lived in Berlin. I know she was still alive in 1938 and I am trying
to find out if she died a natural death or became a victim of the
Shoah. Any help would be appreciated as this will complete my family
research.

Any help would be greatly appreciated by:

Henry Birnbrey, Atlanta, Georgia hbirnbrey@... JGID 5746


Re: Relatives from Kupel, Russia #general

Janette Silverman
 

Steve Stein wrote:
--- During the 2015 IAJGS conference in Jerusalem, I spent two days
examining a
decade's worth of birth records >from Starokonstantinov that had been
scanned onto
CDs held by the Central Archives for the History of the Jewish People
(CAHJP)in
Jerusalem, looking for the births of my grandfather (ca. 1891) and my
grandmother
(ca. 1895). During the search, it became apparent that the records were for
Starokonstantinov City, not Starokonstantinov District (Kupel would be
included in
the latter, not the former)
--- I have been working with the leadership of Ukraine SIG to motivate
CAHJP,
one of their primary data sources, to locate and prioritize any such
vital records
or revision lists. To date, that effort has not borne any fruit.

Dear Researchers:
I want to add something very important to what Steve wrote so that some
of the process for data acquisition becomes a little clearer. Ukraine
SIG works very closely with the CAHJP and other sources to acquire
records pertaining to the Jewish communities all over the area covered
by the SIG (please see the Ukraine SIG website for the map of coverage
-- (http://www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine/default.asp ). Records in the
archival repositories are not digitized yet.

When we find out that there is a possibility of acquiring documents >from
any of the archives (this depends on contracts negotiated with the
archives) the general SIG response is to get anything and everything
pertaining to the Jewish community >from that repository. Once the
arrangements have been made with the archive, we wait. Sometimes we wait
for years until the archivists have an opportunity to digitize the
records and make them available. This is especially true of the data
from the Zhitomir archives. We first began trying to get data >from there
many years ago. It was only 3 years ago that we began to get documents
from there. We get several hundred or thousand pages at a time, which of
course is just a small part of what we hope to eventually acquire,
translate and index for searches in the JewishGen Ukraine databases.

As data becomes available, we make arrangements to acquire it. Each
year, we access more records. Recently the JewishGen Discussion Group
published in 3 parts a list of the towns >from which we are arranging to
acquire 41,000 pages of documents. This acquisition will cost the SIG
over $8,000 - we have raised approximately half of that amount already.
If you would like to assist in this effort, please make a donation
through JewishGen to Ukraine SIG's Digital Documents Acquisition
Project. These 41,000 pages come >from the archives in Kiev, Vinnitsa,
and Khmelnitskii. Last year's data set came >from Kiev, Ternopil and
Zhitomir. In 2015 we received records >from Zhitomir, Khmelnitskii,
Nikolaev, Ternopil and Riwne.

Janette
--
Dr. Janette Silverman
JewishGen Ukraine-SIG Coordinator
ukrainesig.coordinator@...
http://www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine/default.asp
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ukraine-SIG/180102942060505


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: Relatives from Kupel, Russia #ukraine

Janette Silverman
 

Steve Stein wrote:
--- During the 2015 IAJGS conference in Jerusalem, I spent two days
examining a
decade's worth of birth records >from Starokonstantinov that had been
scanned onto
CDs held by the Central Archives for the History of the Jewish People
(CAHJP)in
Jerusalem, looking for the births of my grandfather (ca. 1891) and my
grandmother
(ca. 1895). During the search, it became apparent that the records were for
Starokonstantinov City, not Starokonstantinov District (Kupel would be
included in
the latter, not the former)
--- I have been working with the leadership of Ukraine SIG to motivate
CAHJP,
one of their primary data sources, to locate and prioritize any such
vital records
or revision lists. To date, that effort has not borne any fruit.

Dear Researchers:
I want to add something very important to what Steve wrote so that some
of the process for data acquisition becomes a little clearer. Ukraine
SIG works very closely with the CAHJP and other sources to acquire
records pertaining to the Jewish communities all over the area covered
by the SIG (please see the Ukraine SIG website for the map of coverage
-- (http://www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine/default.asp ). Records in the
archival repositories are not digitized yet.

When we find out that there is a possibility of acquiring documents >from
any of the archives (this depends on contracts negotiated with the
archives) the general SIG response is to get anything and everything
pertaining to the Jewish community >from that repository. Once the
arrangements have been made with the archive, we wait. Sometimes we wait
for years until the archivists have an opportunity to digitize the
records and make them available. This is especially true of the data
from the Zhitomir archives. We first began trying to get data >from there
many years ago. It was only 3 years ago that we began to get documents
from there. We get several hundred or thousand pages at a time, which of
course is just a small part of what we hope to eventually acquire,
translate and index for searches in the JewishGen Ukraine databases.

As data becomes available, we make arrangements to acquire it. Each
year, we access more records. Recently the JewishGen Discussion Group
published in 3 parts a list of the towns >from which we are arranging to
acquire 41,000 pages of documents. This acquisition will cost the SIG
over $8,000 - we have raised approximately half of that amount already.
If you would like to assist in this effort, please make a donation
through JewishGen to Ukraine SIG's Digital Documents Acquisition
Project. These 41,000 pages come >from the archives in Kiev, Vinnitsa,
and Khmelnitskii. Last year's data set came >from Kiev, Ternopil and
Zhitomir. In 2015 we received records >from Zhitomir, Khmelnitskii,
Nikolaev, Ternopil and Riwne.

Janette
--
Dr. Janette Silverman
JewishGen Ukraine-SIG Coordinator
ukrainesig.coordinator@...
http://www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine/default.asp
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ukraine-SIG/180102942060505


Wurtzburger family in Montreal #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with family of Mirl Wurtzburger, died in 1999,
about her rabbinic ancestry through her father Isaac Grunfeld of
Michalovce son of Abraham Shlomo Grunfeld

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Wurtzburger family in Montreal #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with family of Mirl Wurtzburger, died in 1999,
about her rabbinic ancestry through her father Isaac Grunfeld of
Michalovce son of Abraham Shlomo Grunfeld

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Re: identifying maternal vs paternal matches #dna

Raina Accardi <rainaraina@...>
 

June,

The Y-DNA test only identifies men who match your cousin through his
father and all the fathers before him. Women can't pass the Y chromosome
down to their children so there are no matches who are related to your
cousin >from his maternal line. However, it is very possible for a match
to be related to your cousin multiple ways which you may discover if you
have tested his autosomal DNA. The autosomal DNA is passed down >from
both the paternal and maternal lines.

The reason your cousin has Y matches with different haplogroups or
different subgroups is that a mutation that changes the DNA in a
paternal line happens roughly every 100 years, I think, so those
matches may be related very far back in time. The GD or genetic
distance estimate can give you an idea of how far back in time that
might be. Some of the matches may also be false matches.

Hope this helps,

Raina Accardi

-----Original Message-----

I have had my paternal first cousin Y tested. He is J-M172, subclad
(?) BY268. Can I then safely assume that anyone who matches him but
has a different haplogroup must match him on him on his maternal side
or am I missing something here?


DNA Research #DNA Re: identifying maternal vs paternal matches #dna

Raina Accardi <rainaraina@...>
 

June,

The Y-DNA test only identifies men who match your cousin through his
father and all the fathers before him. Women can't pass the Y chromosome
down to their children so there are no matches who are related to your
cousin >from his maternal line. However, it is very possible for a match
to be related to your cousin multiple ways which you may discover if you
have tested his autosomal DNA. The autosomal DNA is passed down >from
both the paternal and maternal lines.

The reason your cousin has Y matches with different haplogroups or
different subgroups is that a mutation that changes the DNA in a
paternal line happens roughly every 100 years, I think, so those
matches may be related very far back in time. The GD or genetic
distance estimate can give you an idea of how far back in time that
might be. Some of the matches may also be false matches.

Hope this helps,

Raina Accardi

-----Original Message-----

I have had my paternal first cousin Y tested. He is J-M172, subclad
(?) BY268. Can I then safely assume that anyone who matches him but
has a different haplogroup must match him on him on his maternal side
or am I missing something here?


Journal of Genetic Genealogy First Issue Free Online #dna

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The first issue (Vol 8 #1) of the newly relaunched Journal of Genetic
Genealogy (JoGG) Is available online.
"JOGG is a free open access peer reviewed journal which provides a
much-needed platform for publication of articles on all aspects of genetic
genealogy." Included in this issue are articles by renowned genealogy
genetic experts, Blaine T. Bettinger, Ph.D., J.D. and CeCe Moore. Of special
interest to Jewish genealogists is the article entitled," Evidence of early
gene flow between Ashkenazi Jews and non-Jewish European in mitochondrial
DNA haplogroup H7, By: Doron Yacobi and Felice L. Bedford, Ph.D.; pages
21-34, in PDF.

To access the journal see: http://jogg.info/pages/current-issue.html

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


DNA Research #DNA Journal of Genetic Genealogy First Issue Free Online #dna

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The first issue (Vol 8 #1) of the newly relaunched Journal of Genetic
Genealogy (JoGG) Is available online.
"JOGG is a free open access peer reviewed journal which provides a
much-needed platform for publication of articles on all aspects of genetic
genealogy." Included in this issue are articles by renowned genealogy
genetic experts, Blaine T. Bettinger, Ph.D., J.D. and CeCe Moore. Of special
interest to Jewish genealogists is the article entitled," Evidence of early
gene flow between Ashkenazi Jews and non-Jewish European in mitochondrial
DNA haplogroup H7, By: Doron Yacobi and Felice L. Bedford, Ph.D.; pages
21-34, in PDF.

To access the journal see: http://jogg.info/pages/current-issue.html

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Warning: Holocaust denier book: BOOK CITE- Jewish Emigration from the Third Reich [free download] #germany

Yvonne Stern
 

MODERATOR NOTE: This book _Jewish Emigration >from the Third Reich_
is >from a Holocaust denier.

You probably should *** not *** download the file.
If you do, read the book with the understanding of what it is.
--------------->>

Dear GerSIG,
The author of the book Ingrid Weckert is a
Holocaust denier. I am very, very sorry for this terrible misunderstanding.

I was searching for the original in German and found the following biography
of Mrs. Weckert in Wikipedia.

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingrid_Weckert

This is very embarrassing and I'm very sorry.
With my profound apologies, Yvonne

Yvonne Stern, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

I apologize to GerSig Members for having sent information
of a book of a Holocaust denier today.Considering the
title and the subject and having browsed through the book
It didn't occur to me that it could be the opposite of what I first
thought.
It was an unintentional mistake and for this I apologize once more.

Yvonne Stern Rio de Janeiro


German SIG #Germany Warning: Holocaust denier book: BOOK CITE- Jewish Emigration from the Third Reich [free download] #germany

Yvonne Stern
 

MODERATOR NOTE: This book _Jewish Emigration >from the Third Reich_
is >from a Holocaust denier.

You probably should *** not *** download the file.
If you do, read the book with the understanding of what it is.
--------------->>

Dear GerSIG,
The author of the book Ingrid Weckert is a
Holocaust denier. I am very, very sorry for this terrible misunderstanding.

I was searching for the original in German and found the following biography
of Mrs. Weckert in Wikipedia.

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingrid_Weckert

This is very embarrassing and I'm very sorry.
With my profound apologies, Yvonne

Yvonne Stern, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

I apologize to GerSig Members for having sent information
of a book of a Holocaust denier today.Considering the
title and the subject and having browsed through the book
It didn't occur to me that it could be the opposite of what I first
thought.
It was an unintentional mistake and for this I apologize once more.

Yvonne Stern Rio de Janeiro

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