Date   

New February Classes offered by JewishGen/Education #usa

Nancy Holden
 

Open for Registration at JewishGen/Education
www.jewishgen.org/education

FREE -
Basic 2: Search Strategies - Using Google for Genealogy
January 29 - February 11

JewishGen Education offers Free Value-Added 2 week workbook class
Free to contributors to General Fund in past 12 months
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/ValueAdded.asp)
$18. for members who do not have value added status.

FEE BASED-
Independent Study February 9 - March 1.

If you have a research problem you would love to work on with
individualized instruction...set up you own project and spend 3 weeks
with a personal mentor. The instructor will analyze your data and help
you set goals and objectives for solutions and success.

Independent Study is a way to get a helping hand. We offer a wide
range of problem solving solutions: techniques and resources.

The JewishGen Forum is a private Internet site through JewishGen/
Education that offers open 24/7.

Course Description: http://www.jewishgen.org/education
Tuition: $200.

Nancy Holden nholden@...


Yizkor Book Project, December 2017 #usa

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

It would seem that in the last month of 2017, the Yizkor Book Project
continued on it's very positive trend and we are definitely looking
forward to continuing, ever onwards, in 2018. I would like to take
this opportunity to thank the many, many and many volunteers who
tirelessly support the YB project in numerous ways, to the professional
translations who help reveal the hidden treasures in the Yizkor books
and, finally, to the generous donors, without whom, we couldn't go
forward with our projects.

So what did we do in December? To begin with, last month saw us seeing
the final translated pages of an additional three books go online. They
were:

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev) The book was entirely and
voluntarily translated by Sheli Fain, to whom we owe a great deal of
thanks. Yefim Kogan was there together with Sheli to help out with the
logistics and scanning and we do appreciate his drive and assistance in
seeing this project to completion.
- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik) This
translation project was energetically coordinated by Anita Gabbay who
managed to arrange its translation in a relatively short period of time
and our indebted thanks do go out to her.
- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj) The completion of this book, begun many
years ago by Mike Kalt, could not have come about without the great
number of translations by Susan Rosin, supported by translations by
other volunteers, including Yocheved Klausner and Daniella Heller. To
all of these good people, we send out a humble thanks.

Last month, we added in the necrology for Dubrovitsa, Ukraine which
includes a disturbing 2,626 victims >from this community. The necrologies,
apart >from immortalizing the names of the martyrs, also provide us with
significant information about the people, such as details of their
parents, spouses and children. I believe that over the years, we have
placed online the bulk of the necrologies >from the Yizkor books, but our
intention is to continue with this endeavor, till we have completed them
all.

Other important genealogical information we have added in recently, comes
in the form of lists of survivors often noted in the Yizkor books.
Examples of these lists, were the additions last month of a list of 277
survivors >from Krasnik and lists of survivors >from Wolbrom who lived in
Israel at the time of the Yizkor book's publishing. Once again, we will
continue to extract these lists as an important genealogical resource
supplied by the Yizkor books.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried
out in the Yizkor Book Project in December.

We have added in 2 new entries:

- Novo-Vitebsk, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/Jew248.html

- Trakai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00358.html

And we have continued to update 27 of our existing projects:

- Berehove, Ukraine (The Jews of Berehovo - Beregszasz in pictures)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berehove/Berehove.html

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy (Akkerman), Ukraine (Akkerman and the Towns
of its District; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kishinev/Kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dubrovitsa, Ukraine (Book of Dabrowica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubrovitsa/Dubrovitsa.html

- Gniewashow, Poland (Memorial Book Gniewashow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gniewoszow/Gniewoszow.html

- Hrodno, Belarus (Grodno; Volume IX, Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora; Memorial Book of Countries and Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/grodno/grodno.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Kock, Poland (Memorial Book of Kotsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kock/Kock.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kobylnik/Kobylnik.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dworp.html [Polish]

- Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland (Ostrowiec; a monument on the
ruins of an annihilated Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrowiec/ostrowiec.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk - Memorial book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of
Stolin and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stolin/Stolin.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of
Voronovo) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- We want to live
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/WantToLive/WantToLive.html

- Wolbrom, Poland (Our Town Wolbrom)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolbrom/wolbrom.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online. A Happy, Healthy and Successful 2018,

Lance Ackerfeld, Yizkor Book Project Manager


Early American SIG #USA New February Classes offered by JewishGen/Education #usa

Nancy Holden
 

Open for Registration at JewishGen/Education
www.jewishgen.org/education

FREE -
Basic 2: Search Strategies - Using Google for Genealogy
January 29 - February 11

JewishGen Education offers Free Value-Added 2 week workbook class
Free to contributors to General Fund in past 12 months
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/ValueAdded.asp)
$18. for members who do not have value added status.

FEE BASED-
Independent Study February 9 - March 1.

If you have a research problem you would love to work on with
individualized instruction...set up you own project and spend 3 weeks
with a personal mentor. The instructor will analyze your data and help
you set goals and objectives for solutions and success.

Independent Study is a way to get a helping hand. We offer a wide
range of problem solving solutions: techniques and resources.

The JewishGen Forum is a private Internet site through JewishGen/
Education that offers open 24/7.

Course Description: http://www.jewishgen.org/education
Tuition: $200.

Nancy Holden nholden@...


Early American SIG #USA Yizkor Book Project, December 2017 #usa

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

It would seem that in the last month of 2017, the Yizkor Book Project
continued on it's very positive trend and we are definitely looking
forward to continuing, ever onwards, in 2018. I would like to take
this opportunity to thank the many, many and many volunteers who
tirelessly support the YB project in numerous ways, to the professional
translations who help reveal the hidden treasures in the Yizkor books
and, finally, to the generous donors, without whom, we couldn't go
forward with our projects.

So what did we do in December? To begin with, last month saw us seeing
the final translated pages of an additional three books go online. They
were:

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev) The book was entirely and
voluntarily translated by Sheli Fain, to whom we owe a great deal of
thanks. Yefim Kogan was there together with Sheli to help out with the
logistics and scanning and we do appreciate his drive and assistance in
seeing this project to completion.
- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik) This
translation project was energetically coordinated by Anita Gabbay who
managed to arrange its translation in a relatively short period of time
and our indebted thanks do go out to her.
- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj) The completion of this book, begun many
years ago by Mike Kalt, could not have come about without the great
number of translations by Susan Rosin, supported by translations by
other volunteers, including Yocheved Klausner and Daniella Heller. To
all of these good people, we send out a humble thanks.

Last month, we added in the necrology for Dubrovitsa, Ukraine which
includes a disturbing 2,626 victims >from this community. The necrologies,
apart >from immortalizing the names of the martyrs, also provide us with
significant information about the people, such as details of their
parents, spouses and children. I believe that over the years, we have
placed online the bulk of the necrologies >from the Yizkor books, but our
intention is to continue with this endeavor, till we have completed them
all.

Other important genealogical information we have added in recently, comes
in the form of lists of survivors often noted in the Yizkor books.
Examples of these lists, were the additions last month of a list of 277
survivors >from Krasnik and lists of survivors >from Wolbrom who lived in
Israel at the time of the Yizkor book's publishing. Once again, we will
continue to extract these lists as an important genealogical resource
supplied by the Yizkor books.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried
out in the Yizkor Book Project in December.

We have added in 2 new entries:

- Novo-Vitebsk, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/Jew248.html

- Trakai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00358.html

And we have continued to update 27 of our existing projects:

- Berehove, Ukraine (The Jews of Berehovo - Beregszasz in pictures)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berehove/Berehove.html

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy (Akkerman), Ukraine (Akkerman and the Towns
of its District; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kishinev/Kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dubrovitsa, Ukraine (Book of Dabrowica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubrovitsa/Dubrovitsa.html

- Gniewashow, Poland (Memorial Book Gniewashow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gniewoszow/Gniewoszow.html

- Hrodno, Belarus (Grodno; Volume IX, Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora; Memorial Book of Countries and Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/grodno/grodno.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Kock, Poland (Memorial Book of Kotsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kock/Kock.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kobylnik/Kobylnik.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dworp.html [Polish]

- Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland (Ostrowiec; a monument on the
ruins of an annihilated Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrowiec/ostrowiec.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk - Memorial book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of
Stolin and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stolin/Stolin.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of
Voronovo) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- We want to live
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/WantToLive/WantToLive.html

- Wolbrom, Poland (Our Town Wolbrom)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolbrom/wolbrom.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online. A Happy, Healthy and Successful 2018,

Lance Ackerfeld, Yizkor Book Project Manager


Registration is OPEN for the 2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference #usa

IAJGS 2018 Listserv Communications <iajgs2018@...>
 

The IAJGS is delighted to announce that the 2018 Warsaw Conference to
be held Sunday, August 5, 2018 through noon on Friday, August 10, 2018
at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel & Convention Centre is now open for
full-paying conference attendees to register at an early bird price.
The conference website is for more information and a link to the
registration form. Please read the Registration Overview and Terms of
Conditions before registering. The early-bird price will be in effect
until April 28, 2018 for full-paying attendees and their significant
others.

The official conference language will be English. The program will
include over 150 presentations on a variety of subjects including
available archival material, research methodology, and the history of
Jewish communities throughout Central and Eastern Europe.
Presentations will be aimed at everyone, >from "first-time" conference
attendees to veterans of IAJGS conferences, and >from beginner to
expert level genealogists.

The conference will begin officially on Sunday with an opening
reception and program at 5 pm, but prior to that there will be morning
lectures on local archival resources and how to use the conference
mobile device app, walking tours of Warsaw, and an afternoon
"ShareFair" including experts >from all over Central & Eastern Europe.
More to come about programming at a later date, but we realize that
the starting times might be of use to planning your arrival into
Warsaw.

All official conference events (lectures, panels, receptions and
workshops) will be held at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel which is located at
63 Grzybowska Street for the convenience of our attendees. We have
reserved all regular hotel rooms at the Hilton and they are blocked
for only IAJGS conference use at the present time. We will soon open
hotel registration through a link to a special webpage provided by
Hilton. We will only guarantee rooms in the conference hotel with
proof of conference registration to be sure that the hotel will be
filled by conference attendees. The special conference price will
include: free wifi, access to the Holmes Place exercise club, and an
amazing breakfast buffet - all at a very reasonable price. So stay
tuned, and if you are ready to sign up for the conference and pay for
registration, please do... and tell all your friends to join us too!

Looking forward to seeing you in Warsaw!

Dan Oren Woodbridge, Connecticut USA
2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference Listserv Communications Liaison


Early American SIG #USA Registration is OPEN for the 2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference #usa

IAJGS 2018 Listserv Communications <iajgs2018@...>
 

The IAJGS is delighted to announce that the 2018 Warsaw Conference to
be held Sunday, August 5, 2018 through noon on Friday, August 10, 2018
at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel & Convention Centre is now open for
full-paying conference attendees to register at an early bird price.
The conference website is for more information and a link to the
registration form. Please read the Registration Overview and Terms of
Conditions before registering. The early-bird price will be in effect
until April 28, 2018 for full-paying attendees and their significant
others.

The official conference language will be English. The program will
include over 150 presentations on a variety of subjects including
available archival material, research methodology, and the history of
Jewish communities throughout Central and Eastern Europe.
Presentations will be aimed at everyone, >from "first-time" conference
attendees to veterans of IAJGS conferences, and >from beginner to
expert level genealogists.

The conference will begin officially on Sunday with an opening
reception and program at 5 pm, but prior to that there will be morning
lectures on local archival resources and how to use the conference
mobile device app, walking tours of Warsaw, and an afternoon
"ShareFair" including experts >from all over Central & Eastern Europe.
More to come about programming at a later date, but we realize that
the starting times might be of use to planning your arrival into
Warsaw.

All official conference events (lectures, panels, receptions and
workshops) will be held at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel which is located at
63 Grzybowska Street for the convenience of our attendees. We have
reserved all regular hotel rooms at the Hilton and they are blocked
for only IAJGS conference use at the present time. We will soon open
hotel registration through a link to a special webpage provided by
Hilton. We will only guarantee rooms in the conference hotel with
proof of conference registration to be sure that the hotel will be
filled by conference attendees. The special conference price will
include: free wifi, access to the Holmes Place exercise club, and an
amazing breakfast buffet - all at a very reasonable price. So stay
tuned, and if you are ready to sign up for the conference and pay for
registration, please do... and tell all your friends to join us too!

Looking forward to seeing you in Warsaw!

Dan Oren Woodbridge, Connecticut USA
2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference Listserv Communications Liaison


New February Classes offered by JewishGen/Education #unitedkingdom

Nancy Holden
 

Open for Registration at JewishGen/Education
www.jewishgen.org/education

FREE -
Basic 2: Search Strategies - Using Google for Genealogy
January 29 - February 11

JewishGen Education offers Free Value-Added 2 week workbook class
Free to contributors to General Fund in past 12 months
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/ValueAdded.asp)
$18. for members who do not have value added status.

FEE BASED-
Independent Study February 9 - March 1.

If you have a research problem you would love to work on with
individualized instruction...set up you own project and spend 3 weeks
with a personal mentor. The instructor will analyze your data and help
you set goals and objectives for solutions and success.

Independent Study is a way to get a helping hand. We offer a wide
range of problem solving solutions: techniques and resources.

The JewishGen Forum is a private Internet site through JewishGen/
Education that offers open 24/7.

Course Description: http://www.jewishgen.org/education
Tuition: $200.

Nancy Holden
Email Nancy Holden
nholden@...


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom New February Classes offered by JewishGen/Education #unitedkingdom

Nancy Holden
 

Open for Registration at JewishGen/Education
www.jewishgen.org/education

FREE -
Basic 2: Search Strategies - Using Google for Genealogy
January 29 - February 11

JewishGen Education offers Free Value-Added 2 week workbook class
Free to contributors to General Fund in past 12 months
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/ValueAdded.asp)
$18. for members who do not have value added status.

FEE BASED-
Independent Study February 9 - March 1.

If you have a research problem you would love to work on with
individualized instruction...set up you own project and spend 3 weeks
with a personal mentor. The instructor will analyze your data and help
you set goals and objectives for solutions and success.

Independent Study is a way to get a helping hand. We offer a wide
range of problem solving solutions: techniques and resources.

The JewishGen Forum is a private Internet site through JewishGen/
Education that offers open 24/7.

Course Description: http://www.jewishgen.org/education
Tuition: $200.

Nancy Holden
Email Nancy Holden
nholden@...


USS Gen. Sturgis, Transport of Displaced Persons #germany

Alex Magocsi
 

The [ship] US General Sturgis transported numerous Displaced Persons
between Bremerhaven and Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

The transport I am interested in arrived Halifax on or about
14 February 1948.

How and where might I find when this ship departed Bremerhaven?

Thank you for your feedback

Alex Magocsi awmjr@...


German SIG #Germany USS Gen. Sturgis, Transport of Displaced Persons #germany

Alex Magocsi
 

The [ship] US General Sturgis transported numerous Displaced Persons
between Bremerhaven and Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

The transport I am interested in arrived Halifax on or about
14 February 1948.

How and where might I find when this ship departed Bremerhaven?

Thank you for your feedback

Alex Magocsi awmjr@...


Stuttgart Main Railroad Station: 1948 #germany

Alex Magocsi
 

Early in 1948, a group of "children" >from the Aglasterhausen Displaced
Children's Home traveled to Flandern Kaserne in Stuttgart in preparation
for their voyage to & resettlement in, Canada.
(Note: Flandern Kaserne became the US Army's Robinson Barracks)
They next traveled by train >from Stuttgart to Bremerhaven.

I assume the children departed Stuttgart >from the Main Station.
Was the Stuttgarter Hauptbahnhof / Main Station operational
at that point? It was reportedly heavily damaged.
Or did the children depart >from an alternate US Military station?
If so, which one?

Perhaps someone can answer my questions or point me to
an applicable web site.

Thank you, Alex Magocsi awmjr@...


German SIG #Germany Stuttgart Main Railroad Station: 1948 #germany

Alex Magocsi
 

Early in 1948, a group of "children" >from the Aglasterhausen Displaced
Children's Home traveled to Flandern Kaserne in Stuttgart in preparation
for their voyage to & resettlement in, Canada.
(Note: Flandern Kaserne became the US Army's Robinson Barracks)
They next traveled by train >from Stuttgart to Bremerhaven.

I assume the children departed Stuttgart >from the Main Station.
Was the Stuttgarter Hauptbahnhof / Main Station operational
at that point? It was reportedly heavily damaged.
Or did the children depart >from an alternate US Military station?
If so, which one?

Perhaps someone can answer my questions or point me to
an applicable web site.

Thank you, Alex Magocsi awmjr@...


Re: Name adoption/change conventions during Napoleonic occupation of the Rhineland #germany

Bert Fischel <bert@...>
 

In 1808 my generation 6 ancestor changed his name >from Nathan Anschel
to Napoleon Johnathan Roos, and tis is recoerded in the name change
book in the Speyer Stadtarchives. I visited the Speyer archives to
discover this information. They were extremely helpful in documenting
much of my family history.

Bert Fischel <bert@...>

On Jan. 17, Michael Rubin <rubinmichaels@...> wrote:

I am seeking input on naming practices during the Napoleonic-ordered
name adoption wave of 1808 in communities west of the Rhine.
In Hessen and elsewhere, it's my experience that only formal last names
were taken to replace patronymics. During the Napoleonic name-adoption,
however, I see evidence of wholesale name changes including first name
and adoption of formal new last/family name, such as Isaac Feist becoming
Elias STERN. I am interested in the experience of others with family
originating in this region.


German SIG #Germany Re: Name adoption/change conventions during Napoleonic occupation of the Rhineland #germany

Bert Fischel <bert@...>
 

In 1808 my generation 6 ancestor changed his name >from Nathan Anschel
to Napoleon Johnathan Roos, and tis is recoerded in the name change
book in the Speyer Stadtarchives. I visited the Speyer archives to
discover this information. They were extremely helpful in documenting
much of my family history.

Bert Fischel <bert@...>

On Jan. 17, Michael Rubin <rubinmichaels@...> wrote:

I am seeking input on naming practices during the Napoleonic-ordered
name adoption wave of 1808 in communities west of the Rhine.
In Hessen and elsewhere, it's my experience that only formal last names
were taken to replace patronymics. During the Napoleonic name-adoption,
however, I see evidence of wholesale name changes including first name
and adoption of formal new last/family name, such as Isaac Feist becoming
Elias STERN. I am interested in the experience of others with family
originating in this region.


Re: Name adoption/change conventions during Napoleonic occupation of the Rhineland #germany

Fran Luebke@wi.rr.com <franluebke@...>
 

This may be redundant of source cited but half of my paternal family
lived west of the Rhine and in every case both old patronymic and
new first and last names are listed.

Often first names were changed to more French names, I found this
more common among females.

In some cases the last names were hardly distinguishable as Jewish.
In my Loeb family there were several in the same town who chose
Jakob as a new first name so these Jakob Loebs were followed
by I, II or III to distinguish them.

My great grandfather was known as Jakob Loeb I. As you know, half
the fun is they were written in French using the French Republican calendar.

Fran Loeb Luebke Franluebke@...

Researching LOEB, HYMAN / HAIMAN / HEIMAN, MASS / MOSS, MANNHEIMER, LINDENTHAL


German SIG #Germany Re: Name adoption/change conventions during Napoleonic occupation of the Rhineland #germany

Fran Luebke@wi.rr.com <franluebke@...>
 

This may be redundant of source cited but half of my paternal family
lived west of the Rhine and in every case both old patronymic and
new first and last names are listed.

Often first names were changed to more French names, I found this
more common among females.

In some cases the last names were hardly distinguishable as Jewish.
In my Loeb family there were several in the same town who chose
Jakob as a new first name so these Jakob Loebs were followed
by I, II or III to distinguish them.

My great grandfather was known as Jakob Loeb I. As you know, half
the fun is they were written in French using the French Republican calendar.

Fran Loeb Luebke Franluebke@...

Researching LOEB, HYMAN / HAIMAN / HEIMAN, MASS / MOSS, MANNHEIMER, LINDENTHAL


A little more on Baden's on-line records #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear all:

Having used the Collection 390 (Karlsruhe) and L10 (Freiburg) on-line
Baden vital records quite a bit, let me add a few more points.

1) These are duplicate registers, i.e., annual copies handed in to the
local government. They are bound together year by year.

2) It was not necessarily a Christian clergyman keeping the Jewish records.

3) Universal civil registration began in Baden on Feb. 1, 1870 and
adopted the German Empire's standard forms on Jan. 1, 1876.

4) The whole "conversion" misunderstanding may have been exacerbated by
FamilySearch and Ancestry, which have indexed zillions of these records
and called many if not all the Jewish ones "Lutheran"--including the
9-volume Jewish-only set for Mannheim. I have pointed this out to the
organizations involved.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA  research coordinator, GerSIG


German SIG #Germany A little more on Baden's on-line records #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear all:

Having used the Collection 390 (Karlsruhe) and L10 (Freiburg) on-line
Baden vital records quite a bit, let me add a few more points.

1) These are duplicate registers, i.e., annual copies handed in to the
local government. They are bound together year by year.

2) It was not necessarily a Christian clergyman keeping the Jewish records.

3) Universal civil registration began in Baden on Feb. 1, 1870 and
adopted the German Empire's standard forms on Jan. 1, 1876.

4) The whole "conversion" misunderstanding may have been exacerbated by
FamilySearch and Ancestry, which have indexed zillions of these records
and called many if not all the Jewish ones "Lutheran"--including the
9-volume Jewish-only set for Mannheim. I have pointed this out to the
organizations involved.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA  research coordinator, GerSIG


Name adoption/change conventions during Napoleonic occupation of the Rhineland #germany

Michael Rubin
 

I am seeking input on naming practices during the Napoleonic-ordered
name adoption wave of 1808 in communities west of the Rhine.
In Hessen and elsewhere, it's my experience that only formal last names
were taken to replace patronymics. During the Napoleonic name-adoption,
however, I see evidence of wholesale name changes including first name
and adoption of formal new last/family name, such as Isaac Feist becoming
Elias STERN. I am interested in the experience of others with family
originating in this region.

Michael Rubin, Boston rubinmichaels@...

Moderator note: Like all questions about German Jewish surnames,
a detailed answer can be found in the 125 page Introduction * to
"A Dictionary of German Jewish Surnames" by Obermayer Award winner
Lars Menk. Avotaynu Press, 2005
ISBN-10: 1886223203 ISBN-13: 978-1886223202
* The introduction includes a 20 page bibliography. Mod 1


German SIG #Germany Name adoption/change conventions during Napoleonic occupation of the Rhineland #germany

Michael Rubin
 

I am seeking input on naming practices during the Napoleonic-ordered
name adoption wave of 1808 in communities west of the Rhine.
In Hessen and elsewhere, it's my experience that only formal last names
were taken to replace patronymics. During the Napoleonic name-adoption,
however, I see evidence of wholesale name changes including first name
and adoption of formal new last/family name, such as Isaac Feist becoming
Elias STERN. I am interested in the experience of others with family
originating in this region.

Michael Rubin, Boston rubinmichaels@...

Moderator note: Like all questions about German Jewish surnames,
a detailed answer can be found in the 125 page Introduction * to
"A Dictionary of German Jewish Surnames" by Obermayer Award winner
Lars Menk. Avotaynu Press, 2005
ISBN-10: 1886223203 ISBN-13: 978-1886223202
* The introduction includes a 20 page bibliography. Mod 1

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