Date   

Antoni Schneider collection at PSA Krakow (Wawel castle branch) #poland

Russ Maurer
 

Antoni Schneider (1825-1880) is one of the more colorful, if obscure,
figures of Galician history. Largely self taught, he fought with the
Hungarians against the Hapsburgs in 1848 and was jailed for it. Later
he renounced revolution and joined the Hapsburg bureaucracy, working
in the road service and traveling all over Galicia. He fancied
himself an historian and became an obsessive and prolific, if
indiscriminate, collector of Galiciana. His delusional dream was to
write a definitive encyclopedia of Galicia - a project which only got
as far as the "B" volume. Although his project failed, he donated his
collection of materials to the Polish Academy of Learning in Krakow,
which later transferred it to the Polish State Archives. Today, the
collection resides at the PSA branch at Wawel Castle, Krakow. Because
none of it has been put online, not even a basic index, the collection
is little known and seldom used by genealogists. Yet it certainly
contains items of genealogical interest.

During a recent stay in Krakow, I was able to spend a couple of
half-days exploring this collection. Jakub Czuprynski, the
Krakow-based genealogist who first told me about the collection,
advised that an index was available at the archive. When I looked at
the index, I found the collection consisted of 1876 files. Many of
the file names were locales big and small, such as Aksmanice; others
were topical (Adwokaci - lawyers); still others were just an
alphabetical code or code range (Ab, or Ana-Andr). There was little
or nothing to indicate what any file might contain more specifically.
I was pleasantly surprised to see that entire files were devoted to
two of my towns, Jodlowa and Chyrow, and five files (!) were devoted
to Gorlice. I also found some material for Frysztak within the file
labeled Fro-Fu.

The files themselves proved to be bundles, generally three or four
inches thick, containing hundreds, if not more, mostly loose sheets of
every variety. There was no discernible organization, one simply had
to leaf through and keep an eye open for anything interesting. As my
foreign language skills are limited, much was incomprehensible. But,
having previously worked with property lists (>from cadastral surveys),
I recognized some lists that looked rather similar. They proved to be
lists of residents eligible to vote in elections for the Sejm
(Galician parliament). I found at least one, and sometimes several,
such lists in every town file I investigated. The years were
1863-1870. I found the names of two of my great great grandfathers in
the lists for Jodlowa and Chyrow, and - bonus - was rewarded with the
house numbers where they lived at that time. Time well-spent for me.

While there, I took many photographs, including photographs of the
entire index. I have assembled the index images into a pdf which I am
happy to make available. I hope my experience will entice others to
look at the index and consider hiring a researcher to see what's there
for you (if you can't get to Krakow yourself). The link to the index
is goo.gl/VgL1E6

Russ Maurer
Pepper Pike, Ohio


JRI Poland #Poland Antoni Schneider collection at PSA Krakow (Wawel castle branch) #poland

Russ Maurer
 

Antoni Schneider (1825-1880) is one of the more colorful, if obscure,
figures of Galician history. Largely self taught, he fought with the
Hungarians against the Hapsburgs in 1848 and was jailed for it. Later
he renounced revolution and joined the Hapsburg bureaucracy, working
in the road service and traveling all over Galicia. He fancied
himself an historian and became an obsessive and prolific, if
indiscriminate, collector of Galiciana. His delusional dream was to
write a definitive encyclopedia of Galicia - a project which only got
as far as the "B" volume. Although his project failed, he donated his
collection of materials to the Polish Academy of Learning in Krakow,
which later transferred it to the Polish State Archives. Today, the
collection resides at the PSA branch at Wawel Castle, Krakow. Because
none of it has been put online, not even a basic index, the collection
is little known and seldom used by genealogists. Yet it certainly
contains items of genealogical interest.

During a recent stay in Krakow, I was able to spend a couple of
half-days exploring this collection. Jakub Czuprynski, the
Krakow-based genealogist who first told me about the collection,
advised that an index was available at the archive. When I looked at
the index, I found the collection consisted of 1876 files. Many of
the file names were locales big and small, such as Aksmanice; others
were topical (Adwokaci - lawyers); still others were just an
alphabetical code or code range (Ab, or Ana-Andr). There was little
or nothing to indicate what any file might contain more specifically.
I was pleasantly surprised to see that entire files were devoted to
two of my towns, Jodlowa and Chyrow, and five files (!) were devoted
to Gorlice. I also found some material for Frysztak within the file
labeled Fro-Fu.

The files themselves proved to be bundles, generally three or four
inches thick, containing hundreds, if not more, mostly loose sheets of
every variety. There was no discernible organization, one simply had
to leaf through and keep an eye open for anything interesting. As my
foreign language skills are limited, much was incomprehensible. But,
having previously worked with property lists (>from cadastral surveys),
I recognized some lists that looked rather similar. They proved to be
lists of residents eligible to vote in elections for the Sejm
(Galician parliament). I found at least one, and sometimes several,
such lists in every town file I investigated. The years were
1863-1870. I found the names of two of my great great grandfathers in
the lists for Jodlowa and Chyrow, and - bonus - was rewarded with the
house numbers where they lived at that time. Time well-spent for me.

While there, I took many photographs, including photographs of the
entire index. I have assembled the index images into a pdf which I am
happy to make available. I hope my experience will entice others to
look at the index and consider hiring a researcher to see what's there
for you (if you can't get to Krakow yourself). The link to the index
is goo.gl/VgL1E6

Russ Maurer
Pepper Pike, Ohio


Nemorozh Camp - LEMBERSKA #general

Lemberski Evelyne
 

It seems that there is a person whose family is Lemberska >from the city of
Zvenigorodka is survived at the Nemorozh Camp in Ukraine during the second
world war. would a person have information about this person please?

Evelyne Lemberski
Saint Maurice
France
evelynelemberski@yahoo.fr

MODERATOR NOTE: Please use upper case letters where appropriate for place names and
surnames. Please contact Evelyne privately with contact information.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Nemorozh Camp - LEMBERSKA #general

Lemberski Evelyne
 

It seems that there is a person whose family is Lemberska >from the city of
Zvenigorodka is survived at the Nemorozh Camp in Ukraine during the second
world war. would a person have information about this person please?

Evelyne Lemberski
Saint Maurice
France
evelynelemberski@yahoo.fr

MODERATOR NOTE: Please use upper case letters where appropriate for place names and
surnames. Please contact Evelyne privately with contact information.


Leczyca 1941 Registration Cards #general

Lande
 

I would welcome two volunteers to enter into a database 91 applications for
identity cards by Jews resident in Leczyca in 1941. Volunteers must be able
to enter information in Excel and follow instructions as to format. No
language skills are required.

Peter Lande
Washington, D.C.

MODERATOR NOTE: This database will be shared on JewishGen.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Leczyca 1941 Registration Cards #general

Lande
 

I would welcome two volunteers to enter into a database 91 applications for
identity cards by Jews resident in Leczyca in 1941. Volunteers must be able
to enter information in Excel and follow instructions as to format. No
language skills are required.

Peter Lande
Washington, D.C.

MODERATOR NOTE: This database will be shared on JewishGen.


Antoni Schneider collection at PSA Krakow (Wawel castle branch) #galicia

Russ Maurer
 

Antoni Schneider (1825-1880) is one of the more colorful, if obscure,
figures of Galician history. Largely self taught, he fought with the
Hungarians against the Hapsburgs in 1848 and was jailed for it. Later
he renounced revolution and joined the Hapsburg bureaucracy, working
in the road service and traveling all over Galicia. He fancied himself an
historian and became an obsessive and prolific, if indiscriminate,
collector of Galiciana. His delusional dream was to write a definitive
encyclopedia of Galicia - a project which only got as far as the "B"
volume. Although his project failed, he donated his collection of
materials to the Polish Academy of Learning in Krakow, which later
transferred it to the Polish State Archives. Today, the collection resides
at the PSA branch at Wawel Castle, Krakow. Because none of it has
been put online, not even a basic index, the collection is little known
and seldom used by genealogists. Yet it certainly contains items of
genealogical interest.

During a recent stay in Krakow, I was able to spend a couple of
half-days exploring this collection. Jakub Czuprynski, the
Krakow-based genealogist who first told me about the collection,
advised that an index was available at the archive. When I looked at
the index, I found the collection consisted of 1876 files. Many of the file
names were locales big and small, such as Aksmanice; others were
topical (Adwokaci - lawyers); still others were just an alphabetical code
or code range (Ab, or Ana-Andr). There was little or nothing to indicate
what any file might contain more specifically. I was pleasantly surprised
to see that entire files were devoted to two of my towns, Jodlowa and
Chyrow, and five files (!) were devoted to Gorlice. I also found some
material for Frysztak within the file labeled Fro-Fu.

The files themselves proved to be bundles, generally three or four
inches thick, containing hundreds, if not more, mostly loose sheets of
every variety. There was no discernible organization, one simply had
to leaf through and keep an eye open for anything interesting. As my
foreign language skills are limited, much was incomprehensible. But,
having previously worked with property lists (>from cadastral surveys),
I recognized some lists that looked rather similar. They proved to be
lists of residents eligible to vote in elections for the Sejm (Galician
parliament). I found at least one, and sometimes several, such lists in
every town file I investigated. The years were 1863-1870. I found the
names of two of my great great grandfathers in the lists for Jodlowa
and Chyrow, and - bonus - was rewarded with the house numbers
where they lived at that time. Time well-spent for me.

While there, I took many photographs, including photographs of the
entire index. I have assembled the index images into a pdf which I am
happy to make available. I hope my experience will entice others to
look at the index and consider hiring a researcher to see what's there
for you (if you can't get to Krakow yourself). The link to the index
is goo.gl/VgL1E6

Russ Maurer
Pepper Pike, Ohio


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Antoni Schneider collection at PSA Krakow (Wawel castle branch) #galicia

Russ Maurer
 

Antoni Schneider (1825-1880) is one of the more colorful, if obscure,
figures of Galician history. Largely self taught, he fought with the
Hungarians against the Hapsburgs in 1848 and was jailed for it. Later
he renounced revolution and joined the Hapsburg bureaucracy, working
in the road service and traveling all over Galicia. He fancied himself an
historian and became an obsessive and prolific, if indiscriminate,
collector of Galiciana. His delusional dream was to write a definitive
encyclopedia of Galicia - a project which only got as far as the "B"
volume. Although his project failed, he donated his collection of
materials to the Polish Academy of Learning in Krakow, which later
transferred it to the Polish State Archives. Today, the collection resides
at the PSA branch at Wawel Castle, Krakow. Because none of it has
been put online, not even a basic index, the collection is little known
and seldom used by genealogists. Yet it certainly contains items of
genealogical interest.

During a recent stay in Krakow, I was able to spend a couple of
half-days exploring this collection. Jakub Czuprynski, the
Krakow-based genealogist who first told me about the collection,
advised that an index was available at the archive. When I looked at
the index, I found the collection consisted of 1876 files. Many of the file
names were locales big and small, such as Aksmanice; others were
topical (Adwokaci - lawyers); still others were just an alphabetical code
or code range (Ab, or Ana-Andr). There was little or nothing to indicate
what any file might contain more specifically. I was pleasantly surprised
to see that entire files were devoted to two of my towns, Jodlowa and
Chyrow, and five files (!) were devoted to Gorlice. I also found some
material for Frysztak within the file labeled Fro-Fu.

The files themselves proved to be bundles, generally three or four
inches thick, containing hundreds, if not more, mostly loose sheets of
every variety. There was no discernible organization, one simply had
to leaf through and keep an eye open for anything interesting. As my
foreign language skills are limited, much was incomprehensible. But,
having previously worked with property lists (>from cadastral surveys),
I recognized some lists that looked rather similar. They proved to be
lists of residents eligible to vote in elections for the Sejm (Galician
parliament). I found at least one, and sometimes several, such lists in
every town file I investigated. The years were 1863-1870. I found the
names of two of my great great grandfathers in the lists for Jodlowa
and Chyrow, and - bonus - was rewarded with the house numbers
where they lived at that time. Time well-spent for me.

While there, I took many photographs, including photographs of the
entire index. I have assembled the index images into a pdf which I am
happy to make available. I hope my experience will entice others to
look at the index and consider hiring a researcher to see what's there
for you (if you can't get to Krakow yourself). The link to the index
is goo.gl/VgL1E6

Russ Maurer
Pepper Pike, Ohio


September 12: genealogy program at the Center for Jewish History in New York #germany

Moriah Amit
 

Please join us for the following program, presented by the Ackman & Ziff
Family Genealogy Institute and Yeshiva University Libraries.

Family History Today: Jewish Genealogical Resources in Yeshiva University
Library's Special Collections
Date: September 12, 6:30 PM
Place: Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011
Description: An illustrated overview of archival collections and manuscripts
relating to German, Hungarian, and American Jewish genealogical research
held by Yeshiva University Library's Special Collections. Lecture presented
by Shulamith Z. Berger, Curator of Special Collections at Yeshiva
University's Mendel Gottesman Library.

Tickets: Free; reservations required at bpt.me/3568854.

Moriah Amit, New York mamit@cjh.org


German SIG #Germany September 12: genealogy program at the Center for Jewish History in New York #germany

Moriah Amit
 

Please join us for the following program, presented by the Ackman & Ziff
Family Genealogy Institute and Yeshiva University Libraries.

Family History Today: Jewish Genealogical Resources in Yeshiva University
Library's Special Collections
Date: September 12, 6:30 PM
Place: Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011
Description: An illustrated overview of archival collections and manuscripts
relating to German, Hungarian, and American Jewish genealogical research
held by Yeshiva University Library's Special Collections. Lecture presented
by Shulamith Z. Berger, Curator of Special Collections at Yeshiva
University's Mendel Gottesman Library.

Tickets: Free; reservations required at bpt.me/3568854.

Moriah Amit, New York mamit@cjh.org


Else JORDAN born ROSENBERG from Unna living in Berlin #germany

Mike Redel <redel.mike@...>
 

Dear gersigs,

I hope anyone could help me.

I am searching for informations about Else Jordan Born Rosenberg. Else
Jordan was Born 22-Sep-1891 in Unna.

In 1939 she lived in Berlin Joachinsthal Eibenweg 67. I haven't found
informations in the German Gedenkbuch.

What is happend with her?

Regards, Mike Redel, Unna - Germany redel.mike@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany Else JORDAN born ROSENBERG from Unna living in Berlin #germany

Mike Redel <redel.mike@...>
 

Dear gersigs,

I hope anyone could help me.

I am searching for informations about Else Jordan Born Rosenberg. Else
Jordan was Born 22-Sep-1891 in Unna.

In 1939 she lived in Berlin Joachinsthal Eibenweg 67. I haven't found
informations in the German Gedenkbuch.

What is happend with her?

Regards, Mike Redel, Unna - Germany redel.mike@gmail.com


Deceased Estate records #southafrica

arlene@...
 

"After about 1960, records are kept at the various offices of the Master of
the Supreme Court in major cities."

The estates files in the Cape Town Archives go up to the end of 1960, as far
as I am aware.

The estates file in the National Archives in Pretoria go up to the end of
1974 (i. e. estates reported to the Master up to the end of 1974.)

I have made databases of the following estates which are online care of the
LDS (Latter Day Saints):

Cape Town: 1974

Transvaal: 1951 - up to number 1786/1951 (the files disappeared when the LDS
reformatted its website recently)
1955-60. This is not of all the files for these years. Sometimes there are
files online which are not listed & sometimes files that are listed as being
online but are not online. (I won't go into the files that are incorrectly
listed or were copied in reverse order, etc.!)

Louis Zetler
Israel


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Deceased Estate records #southafrica

arlene@...
 

"After about 1960, records are kept at the various offices of the Master of
the Supreme Court in major cities."

The estates files in the Cape Town Archives go up to the end of 1960, as far
as I am aware.

The estates file in the National Archives in Pretoria go up to the end of
1974 (i. e. estates reported to the Master up to the end of 1974.)

I have made databases of the following estates which are online care of the
LDS (Latter Day Saints):

Cape Town: 1974

Transvaal: 1951 - up to number 1786/1951 (the files disappeared when the LDS
reformatted its website recently)
1955-60. This is not of all the files for these years. Sometimes there are
files online which are not listed & sometimes files that are listed as being
online but are not online. (I won't go into the files that are incorrectly
listed or were copied in reverse order, etc.!)

Louis Zetler
Israel


Descent from the Vilna Gaon #dna

Chaim freedman
 

Chaim Freedman uses DNA testing to verify families' descent >from the Vilna
Gaon.

The evidence, based on Chaim Freedman's research over many years, is
explained on his blog,

http://eliyahusbranches.blogspot.com/2018/08/genetic-master-list-for-relatives-of.html?m=1
[or https://tinyurl.com/ycddp84w --Mod.]

To expand the growing list of Vilna Gaon descendants whose descent can now
be proven by DNA testing Chaim is encouraging people who believe they are
related to the Vilna Gaon to do the test.

Chaim Freedman


DNA Research #DNA Descent from the Vilna Gaon #dna

Chaim freedman
 

Chaim Freedman uses DNA testing to verify families' descent >from the Vilna
Gaon.

The evidence, based on Chaim Freedman's research over many years, is
explained on his blog,

http://eliyahusbranches.blogspot.com/2018/08/genetic-master-list-for-relatives-of.html?m=1
[or https://tinyurl.com/ycddp84w --Mod.]

To expand the growing list of Vilna Gaon descendants whose descent can now
be proven by DNA testing Chaim is encouraging people who believe they are
related to the Vilna Gaon to do the test.

Chaim Freedman


Gaon of Vilna and Rashi #rabbinic

David Goldman
 

I am aware that in the past more than one rabbi was called by the title
"Gaon" after his death. But the most known one is the Gaon of Vilna,
Rabbi Eliyahu of Vilna. Does anyone know when and why he came to be
called by that name as compared to other people?
And is there a known description of the lines of descent >from Rashi under
various permutations of the name Shapiro/Shapira/Spira etc. into various
regions, in particular White Russia?

David Goldman
NYC


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Gaon of Vilna and Rashi #rabbinic

David Goldman
 

I am aware that in the past more than one rabbi was called by the title
"Gaon" after his death. But the most known one is the Gaon of Vilna,
Rabbi Eliyahu of Vilna. Does anyone know when and why he came to be
called by that name as compared to other people?
And is there a known description of the lines of descent >from Rashi under
various permutations of the name Shapiro/Shapira/Spira etc. into various
regions, in particular White Russia?

David Goldman
NYC


Need some guidance on how to read a set of records (Ukrainian or Russian?) #ukraine

Carole Shaw
 

I replied privately to the enquirer who posted the message but for everyone'S
info:-

Definitely Ukrainian. You can see that by their use of Roman i in certain
instances not Cyrillic for i Ukrainian is probably the closest lang to
Russian out of all the Slavonic langs. Any Russian speaker should be able
to it do it for you.

Re pdf docs - in 2008 there used to be a computer prog called abbyfine or
similar that converted pdf to word doc. Check on google search as the world
has moved on a lot since then.

NB: Google just offered me the option to translate and hey presto it worked
on the main page. When I clicked on the link to the first record it brought
up a pdf. When I looked briefly at the pdf, it seemed to me as if the
language is pre-revolutionary Russian, not Ukrainian. They changed spelling
rules after 1917. The more I scroll down it looks like Russian and very
clear handwriting, unlike some docs.

Carole Shaw
Sunny London (makes a change >from rain of last few days)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Need some guidance on how to read a set of records (Ukrainian or Russian?) #ukraine

Carole Shaw
 

I replied privately to the enquirer who posted the message but for everyone'S
info:-

Definitely Ukrainian. You can see that by their use of Roman i in certain
instances not Cyrillic for i Ukrainian is probably the closest lang to
Russian out of all the Slavonic langs. Any Russian speaker should be able
to it do it for you.

Re pdf docs - in 2008 there used to be a computer prog called abbyfine or
similar that converted pdf to word doc. Check on google search as the world
has moved on a lot since then.

NB: Google just offered me the option to translate and hey presto it worked
on the main page. When I clicked on the link to the first record it brought
up a pdf. When I looked briefly at the pdf, it seemed to me as if the
language is pre-revolutionary Russian, not Ukrainian. They changed spelling
rules after 1917. The more I scroll down it looks like Russian and very
clear handwriting, unlike some docs.

Carole Shaw
Sunny London (makes a change >from rain of last few days)

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