Date   

Yizkor Book Project, September 2018 #ukraine

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Without a doubt, September was definitely a record month for the Yizkor
Book Project. An important element behind this notable accomplishment,
is the people who prepare the web pages - Max Heffler and Jason
Hallgarten, who after their normal work day and other life activities
regularly manage to find some spare time to prepare and update a
multitude of pages each month. For their persistence and dedication, we
are truly indebted.

And if we are talking about dedication, I wish to note Lukasz Biedka's
coordination of the Przemysl Yizkor book over many years, which in this
past month bore fruit - the complete translation of this Yizkor book. I
send out my grateful thanks to Lukasz, who with the close collaboration
with professional translator, Jerrold Landau, together brought about
this lofty achievement.

At last count, we had 152 books that have been completely translated
within the Yizkor Book Project or include English books that were
generously donated to our project. Each month, the number in this list
continues to grow and I am certain that coming months will see more and
more of these projects completed. As always, if you are able to
financially support any of our ongoing translation projects to help us
realize our goals, bringing benefit to many, please see the link to our
JewishGen-erosity page at the end of this report.

Last month, we also saw the addition of another book published through
the auspices of the Yizkor Books in Print Project. The book I am
referring to is the "Memorial Book of Radzivilov" which is a translation
of the Yizkor book for the community of Radyvyliv, Ukraine. The talented
people in this project continue to devote time, after their usual life
commitments, to thoughtfully and carefully prepare the hard copy
versions of books that we have completely translated into English and we
do owe them our grateful thanks. For information about the books
available for purchase, please see the link at the end of this report.

And now for the additions and updates are what we've carried out during
September:

We have added in one new book:

- Dubiecko, Poland (Dubyetsko)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubiecko/Dubiecko.html

- Otaci, Moldova (Memorial for Ataky: A Memorial Book for a Jewish
Community in Bessarabia - Supplements)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Otaci1/Otaci1.html

We have added in 3 new entries:

- Dorohoi, Romania (Generations of Judaism and Zionism in Dorohoi,
Saveni, Mihaileni, Darabani, Herta, Radauti-Prut - volume 3)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dorohoi/Dorohoi3.html

- Mielagenai, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/Sve1583.html

- Myslowice, Poland (Sosnowiec and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sosnowiec/Sos316.html

And we have continued to update 29 of our existing projects:

- Biala Podlaska, Poland (Book of Biala Podlaska)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Biala_Podlaska/Biala_Podlaska.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Borshchiv, Ukraine (The Book of Bortschoff)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/borszczow/borszczow.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish Community of Dabrowa
Gornicza and its Destruction)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dorohoi, Romania (Generations of Judaism and Zionism in Dorohoi,
Saveni, Mihaileni, Darabani, Herta, Radauti-Prut - volume 1)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dorohoi/Dorohoi1.html

- Dynow, Poland (The Memorial Book of Jewish Dinov)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dynow1/dynow1.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On the Banks of the Vylia; In memory of
the destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Miechow, Charsznica & Ksiaz, Poland (Miechov Memorial Book,
Charsznica and Ksiaz) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miechow/Miechow.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs
of our City)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Minsk, Belarus (Minsk, Jewish Mother-City, a memorial anthology)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/minsk/minsk.html

- Monor, Hungary (Bound by Fate: In Memory of the Jewish Community of
Monor) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monor/Monor.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memories >from Nowy-Dwor)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_dwor1/nowy_dwor1.html

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozeryany/Ozeryany.html

- Plock, Poland (Plotzk; a history of an ancient Jewish community in
Poland) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/plock/plock.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed
Jewish community) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Turobin, Poland (The Turobin book; in memory of the Jewish community)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Turobin/Turobin.html

- We want to live www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/WantToLive/WantToLive.html

- Wojslawice, Poland (Yizkor Book in Memory of Voislavize)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wojslawice/Wojslawice.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations
go online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Yizkor Book Project, September 2018 #ukraine

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Without a doubt, September was definitely a record month for the Yizkor
Book Project. An important element behind this notable accomplishment,
is the people who prepare the web pages - Max Heffler and Jason
Hallgarten, who after their normal work day and other life activities
regularly manage to find some spare time to prepare and update a
multitude of pages each month. For their persistence and dedication, we
are truly indebted.

And if we are talking about dedication, I wish to note Lukasz Biedka's
coordination of the Przemysl Yizkor book over many years, which in this
past month bore fruit - the complete translation of this Yizkor book. I
send out my grateful thanks to Lukasz, who with the close collaboration
with professional translator, Jerrold Landau, together brought about
this lofty achievement.

At last count, we had 152 books that have been completely translated
within the Yizkor Book Project or include English books that were
generously donated to our project. Each month, the number in this list
continues to grow and I am certain that coming months will see more and
more of these projects completed. As always, if you are able to
financially support any of our ongoing translation projects to help us
realize our goals, bringing benefit to many, please see the link to our
JewishGen-erosity page at the end of this report.

Last month, we also saw the addition of another book published through
the auspices of the Yizkor Books in Print Project. The book I am
referring to is the "Memorial Book of Radzivilov" which is a translation
of the Yizkor book for the community of Radyvyliv, Ukraine. The talented
people in this project continue to devote time, after their usual life
commitments, to thoughtfully and carefully prepare the hard copy
versions of books that we have completely translated into English and we
do owe them our grateful thanks. For information about the books
available for purchase, please see the link at the end of this report.

And now for the additions and updates are what we've carried out during
September:

We have added in one new book:

- Dubiecko, Poland (Dubyetsko)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubiecko/Dubiecko.html

- Otaci, Moldova (Memorial for Ataky: A Memorial Book for a Jewish
Community in Bessarabia - Supplements)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Otaci1/Otaci1.html

We have added in 3 new entries:

- Dorohoi, Romania (Generations of Judaism and Zionism in Dorohoi,
Saveni, Mihaileni, Darabani, Herta, Radauti-Prut - volume 3)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dorohoi/Dorohoi3.html

- Mielagenai, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/Sve1583.html

- Myslowice, Poland (Sosnowiec and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sosnowiec/Sos316.html

And we have continued to update 29 of our existing projects:

- Biala Podlaska, Poland (Book of Biala Podlaska)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Biala_Podlaska/Biala_Podlaska.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Borshchiv, Ukraine (The Book of Bortschoff)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/borszczow/borszczow.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish Community of Dabrowa
Gornicza and its Destruction)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dorohoi, Romania (Generations of Judaism and Zionism in Dorohoi,
Saveni, Mihaileni, Darabani, Herta, Radauti-Prut - volume 1)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dorohoi/Dorohoi1.html

- Dynow, Poland (The Memorial Book of Jewish Dinov)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dynow1/dynow1.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On the Banks of the Vylia; In memory of
the destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Miechow, Charsznica & Ksiaz, Poland (Miechov Memorial Book,
Charsznica and Ksiaz) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miechow/Miechow.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs
of our City)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Minsk, Belarus (Minsk, Jewish Mother-City, a memorial anthology)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/minsk/minsk.html

- Monor, Hungary (Bound by Fate: In Memory of the Jewish Community of
Monor) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monor/Monor.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memories >from Nowy-Dwor)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_dwor1/nowy_dwor1.html

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozeryany/Ozeryany.html

- Plock, Poland (Plotzk; a history of an ancient Jewish community in
Poland) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/plock/plock.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed
Jewish community) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Turobin, Poland (The Turobin book; in memory of the Jewish community)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Turobin/Turobin.html

- We want to live www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/WantToLive/WantToLive.html

- Wojslawice, Poland (Yizkor Book in Memory of Voislavize)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wojslawice/Wojslawice.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations
go online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Yizkor Book Project, September 2018 #unitedkingdom

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Without a doubt, September was definitely a record month for the Yizkor
Book Project. An important element behind this notable accomplishment,
is the people who prepare the web pages - Max Heffler and Jason
Hallgarten, who after their normal work day and other life activities
regularly manage to find some spare time to prepare and update a
multitude of pages each month. For their persistence and dedication, we
are truly indebted.

And if we are talking about dedication, I wish to note Lukasz Biedka's
coordination of the Przemysl Yizkor book over many years, which in this
past month bore fruit - the complete translation of this Yizkor book. I
send out my grateful thanks to Lukasz, who with the close collaboration
with professional translator, Jerrold Landau, together brought about
this lofty achievement.

At last count, we had 152 books that have been completely translated
within the Yizkor Book Project or include English books that were
generously donated to our project. Each month, the number in this list
continues to grow and I am certain that coming months will see more and
more of these projects completed. As always, if you are able to
financially support any of our ongoing translation projects to help us
realize our goals, bringing benefit to many, please see the link to our
JewishGen-erosity page at the end of this report.

Last month, we also saw the addition of another book published through
the auspices of the Yizkor Books in Print Project. The book I am
referring to is the "Memorial Book of Radzivilov" which is a translation
of the Yizkor book for the community of Radyvyliv, Ukraine. The talented
people in this project continue to devote time, after their usual life
commitments, to thoughtfully and carefully prepare the hard copy
versions of books that we have completely translated into English and we
do owe them our grateful thanks. For information about the books
available for purchase, please see the link at the end of this report.

And now for the additions and updates are what we've carried out during
September:

We have added in one new book:

- Dubiecko, Poland (Dubyetsko)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubiecko/Dubiecko.html

- Otaci, Moldova (Memorial for Ataky: A Memorial Book for a Jewish
Community in Bessarabia - Supplements)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Otaci1/Otaci1.html

We have added in 3 new entries:

- Dorohoi, Romania (Generations of Judaism and Zionism in Dorohoi,
Saveni, Mihaileni, Darabani, Herta, Radauti-Prut - volume 3)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dorohoi/Dorohoi3.html

- Mielagenai, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/Sve1583.html

- Myslowice, Poland (Sosnowiec and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sosnowiec/Sos316.html

And we have continued to update 29 of our existing projects:

- Biala Podlaska, Poland (Book of Biala Podlaska)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Biala_Podlaska/Biala_Podlaska.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Borshchiv, Ukraine (The Book of Bortschoff)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/borszczow/borszczow.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish Community of Dabrowa
Gornicza and its Destruction)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dorohoi, Romania (Generations of Judaism and Zionism in Dorohoi,
Saveni, Mihaileni, Darabani, Herta, Radauti-Prut - volume 1)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dorohoi/Dorohoi1.html

- Dynow, Poland (The Memorial Book of Jewish Dinov)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dynow1/dynow1.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On the Banks of the Vylia; In memory of
the destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Miechow, Charsznica & Ksiaz, Poland (Miechov Memorial Book,
Charsznica and Ksiaz) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miechow/Miechow.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs
of our City)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Minsk, Belarus (Minsk, Jewish Mother-City, a memorial anthology)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/minsk/minsk.html

- Monor, Hungary (Bound by Fate: In Memory of the Jewish Community of
Monor) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monor/Monor.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memories >from Nowy-Dwor)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_dwor1/nowy_dwor1.html

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozeryany/Ozeryany.html

- Plock, Poland (Plotzk; a history of an ancient Jewish community in
Poland) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/plock/plock.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed
Jewish community) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Turobin, Poland (The Turobin book; in memory of the Jewish community)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Turobin/Turobin.html

- We want to live www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/WantToLive/WantToLive.html

- Wojslawice, Poland (Yizkor Book in Memory of Voislavize)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wojslawice/Wojslawice.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations
go online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Seeking possible child of Rita Weinstein #unitedkingdom

imap
 

Thanks to everyone for their interest and help. The child some folks mentioned
with the last name Weinstein, (Judith) was born to a Helen Weinstein. I don't
think she was related to my mom.

I am continuing to search for a child born near Brondesbury Park in
London in 1947.

Continued suggestions are welcome!

I have been using some of the links and suggestions folks already sent
me.

thanks again,

Pamela Faith Lerman
MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
----

Searching for possible child of my mother, Rita Marilyn Weinstein, who
arrived in London on February 9th, 1947 and left London October 16th,
1947.


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Yizkor Book Project, September 2018 #unitedkingdom

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Without a doubt, September was definitely a record month for the Yizkor
Book Project. An important element behind this notable accomplishment,
is the people who prepare the web pages - Max Heffler and Jason
Hallgarten, who after their normal work day and other life activities
regularly manage to find some spare time to prepare and update a
multitude of pages each month. For their persistence and dedication, we
are truly indebted.

And if we are talking about dedication, I wish to note Lukasz Biedka's
coordination of the Przemysl Yizkor book over many years, which in this
past month bore fruit - the complete translation of this Yizkor book. I
send out my grateful thanks to Lukasz, who with the close collaboration
with professional translator, Jerrold Landau, together brought about
this lofty achievement.

At last count, we had 152 books that have been completely translated
within the Yizkor Book Project or include English books that were
generously donated to our project. Each month, the number in this list
continues to grow and I am certain that coming months will see more and
more of these projects completed. As always, if you are able to
financially support any of our ongoing translation projects to help us
realize our goals, bringing benefit to many, please see the link to our
JewishGen-erosity page at the end of this report.

Last month, we also saw the addition of another book published through
the auspices of the Yizkor Books in Print Project. The book I am
referring to is the "Memorial Book of Radzivilov" which is a translation
of the Yizkor book for the community of Radyvyliv, Ukraine. The talented
people in this project continue to devote time, after their usual life
commitments, to thoughtfully and carefully prepare the hard copy
versions of books that we have completely translated into English and we
do owe them our grateful thanks. For information about the books
available for purchase, please see the link at the end of this report.

And now for the additions and updates are what we've carried out during
September:

We have added in one new book:

- Dubiecko, Poland (Dubyetsko)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubiecko/Dubiecko.html

- Otaci, Moldova (Memorial for Ataky: A Memorial Book for a Jewish
Community in Bessarabia - Supplements)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Otaci1/Otaci1.html

We have added in 3 new entries:

- Dorohoi, Romania (Generations of Judaism and Zionism in Dorohoi,
Saveni, Mihaileni, Darabani, Herta, Radauti-Prut - volume 3)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dorohoi/Dorohoi3.html

- Mielagenai, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/Sve1583.html

- Myslowice, Poland (Sosnowiec and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sosnowiec/Sos316.html

And we have continued to update 29 of our existing projects:

- Biala Podlaska, Poland (Book of Biala Podlaska)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Biala_Podlaska/Biala_Podlaska.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Borshchiv, Ukraine (The Book of Bortschoff)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/borszczow/borszczow.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish Community of Dabrowa
Gornicza and its Destruction)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dorohoi, Romania (Generations of Judaism and Zionism in Dorohoi,
Saveni, Mihaileni, Darabani, Herta, Radauti-Prut - volume 1)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dorohoi/Dorohoi1.html

- Dynow, Poland (The Memorial Book of Jewish Dinov)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dynow1/dynow1.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On the Banks of the Vylia; In memory of
the destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Miechow, Charsznica & Ksiaz, Poland (Miechov Memorial Book,
Charsznica and Ksiaz) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miechow/Miechow.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs
of our City)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Minsk, Belarus (Minsk, Jewish Mother-City, a memorial anthology)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/minsk/minsk.html

- Monor, Hungary (Bound by Fate: In Memory of the Jewish Community of
Monor) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monor/Monor.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memories >from Nowy-Dwor)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_dwor1/nowy_dwor1.html

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozeryany/Ozeryany.html

- Plock, Poland (Plotzk; a history of an ancient Jewish community in
Poland) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/plock/plock.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the
neighboring villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed
Jewish community) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Turobin, Poland (The Turobin book; in memory of the Jewish community)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Turobin/Turobin.html

- We want to live www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/WantToLive/WantToLive.html

- Wojslawice, Poland (Yizkor Book in Memory of Voislavize)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wojslawice/Wojslawice.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations
go online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Seeking possible child of Rita Weinstein #unitedkingdom

imap
 

Thanks to everyone for their interest and help. The child some folks mentioned
with the last name Weinstein, (Judith) was born to a Helen Weinstein. I don't
think she was related to my mom.

I am continuing to search for a child born near Brondesbury Park in
London in 1947.

Continued suggestions are welcome!

I have been using some of the links and suggestions folks already sent
me.

thanks again,

Pamela Faith Lerman
MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
----

Searching for possible child of my mother, Rita Marilyn Weinstein, who
arrived in London on February 9th, 1947 and left London October 16th,
1947.


JGS of Greater Philadelphia October 2018 Meeting #general

Mark Halpern
 

Please join us for the Fifth Annual Steven Schecter Memorial Lecture Sponsored by
Main Line Reform Temple and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia

Date: Oct. 7, 2018 Time: 1:30 PM
Place: Main Line Reform Temple 410 Montgomery Ave. Wynnewood, PA 19096.

Speaker: Robert Watson, Ph.D. Professor of American Studies, Lynn University
Topic: Hamilton: Man, Myth, Musical ... Mensch:

Robert Watson, Ph.D. is a professor, author, and media commentator. He
has published more than 40 books and hundreds of scholarly articles,
book chapters, and encyclopedia/reference essays. His most recent books,
America's First Crisis and The Nazi Titanic have, respectively, won the
book of the year in history at the Independent Publishers' Awards in NYC
and been accepted at numerous book festivals throughout the US and
internationally. Watson has been interviewed by most major media outlets
in the US, including USA Today, New York Times, NBC, and MSNBC, and many
major media outlets around the world.

Dr. Watson will explore the little known story of the Founding Father's
Jewish roots and lifelong support of Jews in America, among other topics.

He will also share some stories about the little known final days of the
Holocaust >from his book The Nazi Titanic. The brief Jewish tragedy of this ship:
In the Third Reich's final days, the ill fated ship was packed with thousands of
concentration camp prisoners. Without adequate water, food, or sanitary facilities,
the prisoners suffered as they waited for the end of the war. Just days before
Germany surrendered, the Cap Arcona was mistakenly bombed by the British Royal Air
Force, and nearly all of the prisoners were killed in the last major tragedy of the
Holocaust and one of history's worst maritime disasters. Here is a
link to the book: http://www.nazititanic.com

Mentors will be available >from 1 1:30 PM to help with your research efforts.

JGSGP website http://www.jgsgp.org is now available with latest news,
upcoming meeting notices, and links to Philadelphia resources.

We can also be found on Facebook.

Please note that JGSGP has a Speaker's Bureau which is available
to local groups on the various subjects concerning genealogy.

Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
<JGLois@verizon.net>
Mark Halpern (Program Chair)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Greater Philadelphia October 2018 Meeting #general

Mark Halpern
 

Please join us for the Fifth Annual Steven Schecter Memorial Lecture Sponsored by
Main Line Reform Temple and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia

Date: Oct. 7, 2018 Time: 1:30 PM
Place: Main Line Reform Temple 410 Montgomery Ave. Wynnewood, PA 19096.

Speaker: Robert Watson, Ph.D. Professor of American Studies, Lynn University
Topic: Hamilton: Man, Myth, Musical ... Mensch:

Robert Watson, Ph.D. is a professor, author, and media commentator. He
has published more than 40 books and hundreds of scholarly articles,
book chapters, and encyclopedia/reference essays. His most recent books,
America's First Crisis and The Nazi Titanic have, respectively, won the
book of the year in history at the Independent Publishers' Awards in NYC
and been accepted at numerous book festivals throughout the US and
internationally. Watson has been interviewed by most major media outlets
in the US, including USA Today, New York Times, NBC, and MSNBC, and many
major media outlets around the world.

Dr. Watson will explore the little known story of the Founding Father's
Jewish roots and lifelong support of Jews in America, among other topics.

He will also share some stories about the little known final days of the
Holocaust >from his book The Nazi Titanic. The brief Jewish tragedy of this ship:
In the Third Reich's final days, the ill fated ship was packed with thousands of
concentration camp prisoners. Without adequate water, food, or sanitary facilities,
the prisoners suffered as they waited for the end of the war. Just days before
Germany surrendered, the Cap Arcona was mistakenly bombed by the British Royal Air
Force, and nearly all of the prisoners were killed in the last major tragedy of the
Holocaust and one of history's worst maritime disasters. Here is a
link to the book: http://www.nazititanic.com

Mentors will be available >from 1 1:30 PM to help with your research efforts.

JGSGP website http://www.jgsgp.org is now available with latest news,
upcoming meeting notices, and links to Philadelphia resources.

We can also be found on Facebook.

Please note that JGSGP has a Speaker's Bureau which is available
to local groups on the various subjects concerning genealogy.

Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
<JGLois@verizon.net>
Mark Halpern (Program Chair)


JGSCV October 7 Program Everyday Jewish Family Life in Tsarist Russia. #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County
(JGSCV) will meet Sunday, October 7 >from 1:30-3:30 pm at Temple Adat Elohim,
2420 E Hillcrest Drive in Thousand Oaks, CA. This is our 13th anniversary!
Light refreshments will be served. Come celebrate with us!

Program: Everyday Jewish Family Life in Tsarist Russia.
This talk will examine every day Jewish life in tsarist Russia
as a site of interaction with modernity, where Jews confronted
the unfamiliar and negotiated their environment in strategic and
creative ways. Prof. Freeze will present several fascinating archival
documents >from the former Soviet Union that reveal the daily struggles of
ordinary Jews as they confronted changes in the areas of family life,
religion, and health (especially mental health), as well as new
government regulations such as registration, military conscription,
and opportunities to settle outside the Pale of Settlement. The lecture
will show how to find new sources for genealogy that go beyond vital records
and census materials, and highlight the rich diversity of the Jewish
experience in the Russian empire.

Speaker: ChaeRan Freeze

ChaeRan Freeze is Professor of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies,
and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Brandeis University.
She has focused her research on the history and culture of the Jews of
Russia with a focus on women and gender. Her first book, Jewish
Marriage and Divorce in Imperial Russia (2002) examines the impact of
modernization on Jewish family practices and patterns in Imperial
Russia based on newly-declassified archival materials >from the former
Soviet Union. Her most recent book, Everyday Jewish Life in
Imperial Russia, 1825-1914: Select Documents (coauthored with Jay
Harris), documents Jewish daily life in the tsarist empire.

Schmoozing Corner: Starting at 1:00pm, facilitated by JGSCV founding Member
Hal Bookbinder

Traveling Library: Categories A and D books will available starting at 1:00
PM. To see which books that will be at the meeting, see the JGSCV website
at: www.JGSCV.org Library, traveling.

Membership: We have started our 2019 Membership renewal and joining campaign.
Membership forms are on our website, www.JGSCV.org under "about" and will be
available at the meeting. Anyone may join JGSCV. Annual dues are $25 for an
individual and $30 for a family.

The meeting is open to the public without charge.

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County is
dedicated to sharing genealogical information, techniques and research tools
with anyone interested in Jewish genealogy and family history.

For more information on JGSCV including directions please visit our website:
www.jgscv.org

Looking forward to seeing you at the meeting!

Jan Meisels Allen
President, JGSCV


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSCV October 7 Program Everyday Jewish Family Life in Tsarist Russia. #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County
(JGSCV) will meet Sunday, October 7 >from 1:30-3:30 pm at Temple Adat Elohim,
2420 E Hillcrest Drive in Thousand Oaks, CA. This is our 13th anniversary!
Light refreshments will be served. Come celebrate with us!

Program: Everyday Jewish Family Life in Tsarist Russia.
This talk will examine every day Jewish life in tsarist Russia
as a site of interaction with modernity, where Jews confronted
the unfamiliar and negotiated their environment in strategic and
creative ways. Prof. Freeze will present several fascinating archival
documents >from the former Soviet Union that reveal the daily struggles of
ordinary Jews as they confronted changes in the areas of family life,
religion, and health (especially mental health), as well as new
government regulations such as registration, military conscription,
and opportunities to settle outside the Pale of Settlement. The lecture
will show how to find new sources for genealogy that go beyond vital records
and census materials, and highlight the rich diversity of the Jewish
experience in the Russian empire.

Speaker: ChaeRan Freeze

ChaeRan Freeze is Professor of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies,
and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Brandeis University.
She has focused her research on the history and culture of the Jews of
Russia with a focus on women and gender. Her first book, Jewish
Marriage and Divorce in Imperial Russia (2002) examines the impact of
modernization on Jewish family practices and patterns in Imperial
Russia based on newly-declassified archival materials >from the former
Soviet Union. Her most recent book, Everyday Jewish Life in
Imperial Russia, 1825-1914: Select Documents (coauthored with Jay
Harris), documents Jewish daily life in the tsarist empire.

Schmoozing Corner: Starting at 1:00pm, facilitated by JGSCV founding Member
Hal Bookbinder

Traveling Library: Categories A and D books will available starting at 1:00
PM. To see which books that will be at the meeting, see the JGSCV website
at: www.JGSCV.org Library, traveling.

Membership: We have started our 2019 Membership renewal and joining campaign.
Membership forms are on our website, www.JGSCV.org under "about" and will be
available at the meeting. Anyone may join JGSCV. Annual dues are $25 for an
individual and $30 for a family.

The meeting is open to the public without charge.

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County is
dedicated to sharing genealogical information, techniques and research tools
with anyone interested in Jewish genealogy and family history.

For more information on JGSCV including directions please visit our website:
www.jgscv.org

Looking forward to seeing you at the meeting!

Jan Meisels Allen
President, JGSCV


Viewmate translation request -- German #germany

Alice
 

I've posted vital records in German for which I need translations.
They are on Viewmate at the following addresses ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69663
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69662
http://www/jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69661
http://www/jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69659

Please respond via the form provided in the Viewmate application.

Thank you very much. Alice Riley, Raleigh, NC, USA
< ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ >
Please thank those who help you and support ViewMate, JewishGen
and GerSIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Honors/
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp


German SIG #Germany Viewmate translation request -- German #germany

Alice
 

I've posted vital records in German for which I need translations.
They are on Viewmate at the following addresses ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69663
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69662
http://www/jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69661
http://www/jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69659

Please respond via the form provided in the Viewmate application.

Thank you very much. Alice Riley, Raleigh, NC, USA
< ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ >
Please thank those who help you and support ViewMate, JewishGen
and GerSIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Honors/
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp


ViewMate translation requests - German #germany

Peter Dreifuss
 

I have posted two vital records in German obtained >from the Hessen
Gatermann Index hoping to obtain translations. They are on ViewMate at
the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69630
This is believed to be the marriage record of my great granduncle Joseph
(Josef) HESS to Regina STERN in Fulda. Column headings translations
should also be helpful.
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69639
This is the believed to be the birth record of a STERN child in Flieden.
The parents are believed to be a possible STERN relative and a
DIFENBACH. Column headings translations should also be helpful. Please
respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

I am extremely grateful to all who donate their time to help fellow
researchers. Thank you very much.

Peter A Dreifuss, Watertown, Mass.


German SIG #Germany ViewMate translation requests - German #germany

Peter Dreifuss
 

I have posted two vital records in German obtained >from the Hessen
Gatermann Index hoping to obtain translations. They are on ViewMate at
the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69630
This is believed to be the marriage record of my great granduncle Joseph
(Josef) HESS to Regina STERN in Fulda. Column headings translations
should also be helpful.
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69639
This is the believed to be the birth record of a STERN child in Flieden.
The parents are believed to be a possible STERN relative and a
DIFENBACH. Column headings translations should also be helpful. Please
respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

I am extremely grateful to all who donate their time to help fellow
researchers. Thank you very much.

Peter A Dreifuss, Watertown, Mass.


childen immigrated, parents did not #lithuania

Herbert Lazerow
 

<< My grandfather John Nagrocki came to the US in 1913 >from Vilkija at
the age of 15. His parents never visited
him in the US. Was this common in Lithuania at this time, that the
children immigrated to the US while the parents stayed behind? >>

It was not uncommon.
Typically, young people came first to a place in the U.S. where
they knew someone. They worked hard and saved their money to bring
their relatives over. It was apparently easier to accumulate a
surplus in the U.S. than in Lithuania.
However, older people tended to be less adventurous and to have
more ties at home. Older people may have had illnesses that prevented
their immigration.
For instance, my grandfather's much older brother >from Kelme
Lithuania immigrated in the 1880s. My gf came in 1896. His brother
followed. Their parents never immigrated. Their sister, who was
married and had (at least) three children, did not immigrate. Then
the sister's teenaged children immigrated.
It was also common for the children to bring their parents and
their younger siblings to the U.S.
There is a special problem in your case. Soon after your gf
immigrated, World War I broke out. Immigration >from Europe plummets.
There were more than a million European immigrants in both 1913 and
1914. That drops to 200,000 in 1915, 150,000 in 1916 and 1917, 30,000
in 1918, and 25,000 in 1919, before rising to 250,000 in 1920 and
650,000 in 1921. Then comes the Immigration Act of 1922, and
immigration severely declines again.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
Professor of Law, University of San Diego
lazer@sandiego.edu
Author: Mastering Art Law (Carolina Academic Press 2015)


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania childen immigrated, parents did not #lithuania

Herbert Lazerow
 

<< My grandfather John Nagrocki came to the US in 1913 >from Vilkija at
the age of 15. His parents never visited
him in the US. Was this common in Lithuania at this time, that the
children immigrated to the US while the parents stayed behind? >>

It was not uncommon.
Typically, young people came first to a place in the U.S. where
they knew someone. They worked hard and saved their money to bring
their relatives over. It was apparently easier to accumulate a
surplus in the U.S. than in Lithuania.
However, older people tended to be less adventurous and to have
more ties at home. Older people may have had illnesses that prevented
their immigration.
For instance, my grandfather's much older brother >from Kelme
Lithuania immigrated in the 1880s. My gf came in 1896. His brother
followed. Their parents never immigrated. Their sister, who was
married and had (at least) three children, did not immigrate. Then
the sister's teenaged children immigrated.
It was also common for the children to bring their parents and
their younger siblings to the U.S.
There is a special problem in your case. Soon after your gf
immigrated, World War I broke out. Immigration >from Europe plummets.
There were more than a million European immigrants in both 1913 and
1914. That drops to 200,000 in 1915, 150,000 in 1916 and 1917, 30,000
in 1918, and 25,000 in 1919, before rising to 250,000 in 1920 and
650,000 in 1921. Then comes the Immigration Act of 1922, and
immigration severely declines again.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
Professor of Law, University of San Diego
lazer@sandiego.edu
Author: Mastering Art Law (Carolina Academic Press 2015)


ROSENBAUM descendants of R'Naftali KATZ ("Smichas Chachamim") #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

My greatgrandfather's grandfather, a certain Yisrael (ROSENBAUM) of Ostrov was
(supposedly) a descendant of the Mahara"l and the Maharsha"l through Reb Naftali
KATZ (a.k.a "The Smichas Chachomim"). The above Yisrael , a student of the "Apta"
rav came to Eretz Yisrael during the first half of the 19th cent. to Tzfat.
According to family lore he moved >from Tzfat to Tveria and then possibly to
Jerusalem.

In a book called "Mazkeret Legedolei Ostrov " he mentions two R' Yisrael of Ostrov
and comments that they may have been the same person. The book doesn't mention the
family name ROSENBAUM, but some researchers in our family believe that was his
name. Eventually his children took the family name, SCHECHTER, according to their
profession. One of the better known SCHECHTERs of this family is Harav Yaacov Meir
SCHECHTER one of the leading Rabbis of the Breslev chassidut.

In the book "Tveria" published in the 1970s there is a list of families who lived
at any time in Tveria without any indication when they lived there. The name
ROSENBOIM appears there.

Are there any descendants of Reb Yisrael of Ostrov who would like to make
connection with me so that we can coordinate our data on our family roots?

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem

MODERATOR: Private responses, please


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ROSENBAUM descendants of R'Naftali KATZ ("Smichas Chachamim") #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

My greatgrandfather's grandfather, a certain Yisrael (ROSENBAUM) of Ostrov was
(supposedly) a descendant of the Mahara"l and the Maharsha"l through Reb Naftali
KATZ (a.k.a "The Smichas Chachomim"). The above Yisrael , a student of the "Apta"
rav came to Eretz Yisrael during the first half of the 19th cent. to Tzfat.
According to family lore he moved >from Tzfat to Tveria and then possibly to
Jerusalem.

In a book called "Mazkeret Legedolei Ostrov " he mentions two R' Yisrael of Ostrov
and comments that they may have been the same person. The book doesn't mention the
family name ROSENBAUM, but some researchers in our family believe that was his
name. Eventually his children took the family name, SCHECHTER, according to their
profession. One of the better known SCHECHTERs of this family is Harav Yaacov Meir
SCHECHTER one of the leading Rabbis of the Breslev chassidut.

In the book "Tveria" published in the 1970s there is a list of families who lived
at any time in Tveria without any indication when they lived there. The name
ROSENBOIM appears there.

Are there any descendants of Reb Yisrael of Ostrov who would like to make
connection with me so that we can coordinate our data on our family roots?

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem

MODERATOR: Private responses, please


Issue 135 of Genealo-J has just been published #france

georges.graner@...
 

/Genealo-J, /publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 135, Fall 2018, has just been published. This issue is almost
completely devoted to North-African and Sephardic Jewish communities.

When she was a child, Brigitte Benkemoun's grandmother used to tell
about her uncle Albert Achache who left Algeria for France mainland and
made a fortune in Nice but, denounced by his partner, a “M. Roux”, was
deported and killed in Auschwitz. When Benkemoun stood in front of the
wall of names at the Holocaust Memorial in Paris, she understood that
the story was more intricate than the legend. She decided to reconstruct
Albert’s entire life >from Tlemcen, where he was born in 1888, to
Auschwitz. She found that Albert’s name was Achache-Roux, as he was
adopted in 1933 by Justin Roux, a wealthy jeweler with no children. This
Justin Roux had previously adopted a Gaston Roux who /might/ have been
the denouncer.

Before the French protectorate of Tunisia was established in 1881, the
country had no official metrical registers. An active group of members
of our Society has retrieved many religious, consular or commercial
sources to compensate for this lack of registers. Links have existed for
centuries between Tunis and the Jewish community of Leghorn (today
Livorno), Italy. Gilles Boulu exploited all these new sources, in
Tunisia or in Leghorn, to extend the genealogy of the Mendes Ossuna or
Ossona family. In Leghorn, two registers, written in Portuguese, reach
the year 1668. The author found there the /ketuboth/ of Moise Mendes
Ossuna born circa 1640, who was the first one of the Ossuna family to
leave Leghorn for Tunis. His father Abram, born 1610-20 might have been
the first one of his family to come >from the Iberic peninsula where he
would have lived previously as a /converso /(crypto-Jew). Boulu can now
cite at least 12 generations of this family up to people presently
alive. Note that Osuna is a Spanish town in the province of Seville.

David Encaoua belongs to the Al-Naqua (and various other spellings)
lineage. The oldest known members of this family are Yehouda and Shmuel
Al-Naqua who lived in Toledo, Spain, and were hanged about 1200. Encoua
details the lives of four illustrious members of this family. Israel ben
Yossef Al-Naqua, burned alive in 1391 in Toledo, wrote numerous
liturgical, poetical and philosophical works. His son, Ephraim ben
Israel Al Naqua, who wrote influential philosophical works, born in
Toledo 1359 left Spain for Tlemcen, Algeria, where he died in 1442.
Several centuries later, Abraham Ankawa (born Sale 1812 - died Mascara
1890) spent most of his life in Morocco, but also travelled in Algeria
and in Leghorn. He was an expert on Jewish jurisprudence. Raphael
Encaoua (Sale 1838 - Sale 1935) became the first president of the
Rabbinical High Court of Morocco during the French protectorate.

Alexander Beider attacks the problem of the origin of the North African
Jews, namely those living there before the migration of the Portuguese
and Spanish Jews. Many authors have written that Berber tribes converted
to Judaism before the Arabic invasion. Beider refutes this theory
primarily using onomastic arguments. He finds that a Berber origin is
valid for one only given name and several dozen of Jewish surnames >from
Morocco, as well as a few surnames in eastern Algeria. These names
appeared in the Jewish communities that used a Berber idiom as their
vernacular language. Nothing indicates that they already existed in the
Middle Ages. Beider claims that the theory of the Berber origin of these
Jews is purely speculative. The question of their origin is still open.

Pierre-Andre Meyer writes a short paper in memory of two of the last
soldiers of World War I, Roger Cahen and Roger Weill, both were born in
1896. Roger Cahen died on July 6, 2003, at age 106. Roger Weill died on
June 6, 2006, one month before his 110th birthday. Only six soldiers of
World War I survived him. Meyer traces the genealogies of Cahen and of
Weill back to Alsace.

Georges Graner
georges.graner@wanadoo.fr
www.genealoj.org


French SIG #France Issue 135 of Genealo-J has just been published #france

georges.graner@...
 

/Genealo-J, /publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 135, Fall 2018, has just been published. This issue is almost
completely devoted to North-African and Sephardic Jewish communities.

When she was a child, Brigitte Benkemoun's grandmother used to tell
about her uncle Albert Achache who left Algeria for France mainland and
made a fortune in Nice but, denounced by his partner, a “M. Roux”, was
deported and killed in Auschwitz. When Benkemoun stood in front of the
wall of names at the Holocaust Memorial in Paris, she understood that
the story was more intricate than the legend. She decided to reconstruct
Albert’s entire life >from Tlemcen, where he was born in 1888, to
Auschwitz. She found that Albert’s name was Achache-Roux, as he was
adopted in 1933 by Justin Roux, a wealthy jeweler with no children. This
Justin Roux had previously adopted a Gaston Roux who /might/ have been
the denouncer.

Before the French protectorate of Tunisia was established in 1881, the
country had no official metrical registers. An active group of members
of our Society has retrieved many religious, consular or commercial
sources to compensate for this lack of registers. Links have existed for
centuries between Tunis and the Jewish community of Leghorn (today
Livorno), Italy. Gilles Boulu exploited all these new sources, in
Tunisia or in Leghorn, to extend the genealogy of the Mendes Ossuna or
Ossona family. In Leghorn, two registers, written in Portuguese, reach
the year 1668. The author found there the /ketuboth/ of Moise Mendes
Ossuna born circa 1640, who was the first one of the Ossuna family to
leave Leghorn for Tunis. His father Abram, born 1610-20 might have been
the first one of his family to come >from the Iberic peninsula where he
would have lived previously as a /converso /(crypto-Jew). Boulu can now
cite at least 12 generations of this family up to people presently
alive. Note that Osuna is a Spanish town in the province of Seville.

David Encaoua belongs to the Al-Naqua (and various other spellings)
lineage. The oldest known members of this family are Yehouda and Shmuel
Al-Naqua who lived in Toledo, Spain, and were hanged about 1200. Encoua
details the lives of four illustrious members of this family. Israel ben
Yossef Al-Naqua, burned alive in 1391 in Toledo, wrote numerous
liturgical, poetical and philosophical works. His son, Ephraim ben
Israel Al Naqua, who wrote influential philosophical works, born in
Toledo 1359 left Spain for Tlemcen, Algeria, where he died in 1442.
Several centuries later, Abraham Ankawa (born Sale 1812 - died Mascara
1890) spent most of his life in Morocco, but also travelled in Algeria
and in Leghorn. He was an expert on Jewish jurisprudence. Raphael
Encaoua (Sale 1838 - Sale 1935) became the first president of the
Rabbinical High Court of Morocco during the French protectorate.

Alexander Beider attacks the problem of the origin of the North African
Jews, namely those living there before the migration of the Portuguese
and Spanish Jews. Many authors have written that Berber tribes converted
to Judaism before the Arabic invasion. Beider refutes this theory
primarily using onomastic arguments. He finds that a Berber origin is
valid for one only given name and several dozen of Jewish surnames >from
Morocco, as well as a few surnames in eastern Algeria. These names
appeared in the Jewish communities that used a Berber idiom as their
vernacular language. Nothing indicates that they already existed in the
Middle Ages. Beider claims that the theory of the Berber origin of these
Jews is purely speculative. The question of their origin is still open.

Pierre-Andre Meyer writes a short paper in memory of two of the last
soldiers of World War I, Roger Cahen and Roger Weill, both were born in
1896. Roger Cahen died on July 6, 2003, at age 106. Roger Weill died on
June 6, 2006, one month before his 110th birthday. Only six soldiers of
World War I survived him. Meyer traces the genealogies of Cahen and of
Weill back to Alsace.

Georges Graner
georges.graner@wanadoo.fr
www.genealoj.org

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