Date   

Out of the box solution ?? Can anyone help #general

David Zoldan
 

In a tape recording made in 1989 my grandmother related that her
grandfather Shraga Feivel Chesner of Chelm was often consulted on
halachic questions. My grandmother continued on the tape "in fact that
is how he died... " Grandma said that after he provided the answers to
the people, they would give him a potch or pat him on the back, "and
tell him shkoyach (thank you) Reb Feivel ... and I guess after all those
potches he just ... passed away".

Now, of course, I don't think he died >from being patted on the back.
Obviously.

But, I do think that my grandmother was remembering some story which has
some truth in it. Perhaps that truth could be valuable to me.

I realize there is no one who could tell what happened. But perhaps
somebody could provide a suggestion what this could be, some out of the
box solution.

Thanks for reading.

David Zoldan
researcher # 382214

Researching in Poland - Chesner, Einbinder, Bienenfeld, Sova, Kapota,
Tyk, Rozenknopf
Researching in the Carpathians - Zoldan, Steinberg, Meyer, Shlezinger,
Solomon, Weisberger


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Out of the box solution ?? Can anyone help #general

David Zoldan
 

In a tape recording made in 1989 my grandmother related that her
grandfather Shraga Feivel Chesner of Chelm was often consulted on
halachic questions. My grandmother continued on the tape "in fact that
is how he died... " Grandma said that after he provided the answers to
the people, they would give him a potch or pat him on the back, "and
tell him shkoyach (thank you) Reb Feivel ... and I guess after all those
potches he just ... passed away".

Now, of course, I don't think he died >from being patted on the back.
Obviously.

But, I do think that my grandmother was remembering some story which has
some truth in it. Perhaps that truth could be valuable to me.

I realize there is no one who could tell what happened. But perhaps
somebody could provide a suggestion what this could be, some out of the
box solution.

Thanks for reading.

David Zoldan
researcher # 382214

Researching in Poland - Chesner, Einbinder, Bienenfeld, Sova, Kapota,
Tyk, Rozenknopf
Researching in the Carpathians - Zoldan, Steinberg, Meyer, Shlezinger,
Solomon, Weisberger


Question regarding immigration to the U.S. (CHESNER - EINBINDER family from Chelm) #general

David Zoldan
 

My great grandmother, Yitta Machla Einbinder (nee Chesner) and her
brother, Itcha Chesner, immigrated to the U.S. >from Chelm.

The men, i.e my great grandfather, Jack Einbinder, and my great great
uncle, Itcha Chesner, came first in 1924.

The women, i.e my great grandmother, Yitta Machla Einbinder, and her
sister in law, Dora Chesner and the kids came in 1929.

In took 5 years for the two men to bring over their wives and families.

Another brother of my great grandmother, Jacob Chesner, came to the U.S.
in 1904 and brought his wife, Bertha Chesner and their kids over to join
him in 1906, after only 2 years (even less).

Now, I know that the immigration laws to enter the U.S. became stricter
in 1924. Is it possible that this contributed to the extended time, 5
years, which it took for my great grandfather to bring over his family,
as opposed to the 2 years which it took his brother in law to do the
same thing 20 years before.

Does anyone know? Does anyone have a comparable story?

I realize no two stories are exactly the same but I am wondering if this
was common.

Thanks for any help

David Zoldan
researcher # 382214

Researching in Poland - Chesner, Einbinder, Bienenfeld, Sova, Kapota,
Tyk, Rozenknopf
Researching in the Carpathians - Zoldan, Steinberg, Meyer, Shlezinger,
Solomon, Weisberger


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Question regarding immigration to the U.S. (CHESNER - EINBINDER family from Chelm) #general

David Zoldan
 

My great grandmother, Yitta Machla Einbinder (nee Chesner) and her
brother, Itcha Chesner, immigrated to the U.S. >from Chelm.

The men, i.e my great grandfather, Jack Einbinder, and my great great
uncle, Itcha Chesner, came first in 1924.

The women, i.e my great grandmother, Yitta Machla Einbinder, and her
sister in law, Dora Chesner and the kids came in 1929.

In took 5 years for the two men to bring over their wives and families.

Another brother of my great grandmother, Jacob Chesner, came to the U.S.
in 1904 and brought his wife, Bertha Chesner and their kids over to join
him in 1906, after only 2 years (even less).

Now, I know that the immigration laws to enter the U.S. became stricter
in 1924. Is it possible that this contributed to the extended time, 5
years, which it took for my great grandfather to bring over his family,
as opposed to the 2 years which it took his brother in law to do the
same thing 20 years before.

Does anyone know? Does anyone have a comparable story?

I realize no two stories are exactly the same but I am wondering if this
was common.

Thanks for any help

David Zoldan
researcher # 382214

Researching in Poland - Chesner, Einbinder, Bienenfeld, Sova, Kapota,
Tyk, Rozenknopf
Researching in the Carpathians - Zoldan, Steinberg, Meyer, Shlezinger,
Solomon, Weisberger


Grandfather from Wangerin / Wegorzyno #germany

Dieter Schimmelpfennig <dieter51@...>
 

Dear listmembers,

new to this list, I want to introduce myself.

My name is Dieter W.H. Schimmelpfennig, 67 years old, living in Northern
Germany near the Danish border.

I am doing genealogy for more than 25 years and I am an expert for the
former Kreis ( County ) Belgard-Schivelbein in Pomerania.

The reason why I am in this list is that I know nothing about one
important part of my family. I know nothing about my grandfather and his
family.

This is what I have:

My grandmother Elfriede Ida Mathilde WUTZKE was born in 1893 as the
daughter of an evangelical-lutheran family in Wangerin, Kreis ( County )
Regenwalde, Pomerania / today Wegorzyno, Poland. In 1912 she worked for
the family of a Jewish salesman ( names unknown ) in Wangerin and became
pregnant. My father Harry Otto WUTZKE was born in 1913 not as usual in
those days at home or in the nearest hospital, but in a special hospital
in Stettin, the capital of Pomerania.

In 1920 she married Erich SCHIMMELPFENNIG, a bookprinter in the city of
Schivelbein / today Swidwin, Poland. He did not adopt my father but
allowed him to wear his familyname SCHIMMELPFENNIG. After that marriage
Erich SCHIMMELPFENNIG suddenly was the owner of a house and a shop in
the mains treet of Schivelbein. It was said "they bought Harry Otto a
father". In those days that was not unusual.

My father studied in Stettin. Than he went to Elbing / today Elblag,
Poland to learn to work as a teacher. In 1933 he should work as a
teacher for the first time. But now, because of the Nazis, he had to
confirm that he was "of german blood". So Erich SCHIMMELPFENNIG declared
in 1933, that he is "the real father" of Harry Otto and his son is "of
german blood". That is not really possible, because Erich S. was 15
years old, when my father was born.

Some years later my father had to become a soldier. When he came back in
1948 >from a Russian POW-Camp, the family was expelled >from Pomerania and
his mother and some other members of the family had died. Erich S. was
married again.

During the next years my father tried to find out the name of his real
father. He knew that his father was Jewish. The persons who knew
something about his father are either dead or not willing to talk about it.

I tried several years to find something about my grandfather without any
success. Last year I made 3 DNA-Testings ( myheritage, ancestry and
familytreedna ) and found out that I have between 20 % and 25 % (
differences between the providers ) ashkenazy DNA.

That is the point where I am. I have no idea what to do next.

Best wishes,

Dieter Schimmelpfennig, Northern Germany dieter51@yahoo.de

Der Kreis Belgard-Schivelbein in Pommern
http://www.belgard.org

Familiendatenbank Belgard-Schivelbein
http://ofb.genealogy.net/schivelbein/


German SIG #Germany Grandfather from Wangerin / Wegorzyno #germany

Dieter Schimmelpfennig <dieter51@...>
 

Dear listmembers,

new to this list, I want to introduce myself.

My name is Dieter W.H. Schimmelpfennig, 67 years old, living in Northern
Germany near the Danish border.

I am doing genealogy for more than 25 years and I am an expert for the
former Kreis ( County ) Belgard-Schivelbein in Pomerania.

The reason why I am in this list is that I know nothing about one
important part of my family. I know nothing about my grandfather and his
family.

This is what I have:

My grandmother Elfriede Ida Mathilde WUTZKE was born in 1893 as the
daughter of an evangelical-lutheran family in Wangerin, Kreis ( County )
Regenwalde, Pomerania / today Wegorzyno, Poland. In 1912 she worked for
the family of a Jewish salesman ( names unknown ) in Wangerin and became
pregnant. My father Harry Otto WUTZKE was born in 1913 not as usual in
those days at home or in the nearest hospital, but in a special hospital
in Stettin, the capital of Pomerania.

In 1920 she married Erich SCHIMMELPFENNIG, a bookprinter in the city of
Schivelbein / today Swidwin, Poland. He did not adopt my father but
allowed him to wear his familyname SCHIMMELPFENNIG. After that marriage
Erich SCHIMMELPFENNIG suddenly was the owner of a house and a shop in
the mains treet of Schivelbein. It was said "they bought Harry Otto a
father". In those days that was not unusual.

My father studied in Stettin. Than he went to Elbing / today Elblag,
Poland to learn to work as a teacher. In 1933 he should work as a
teacher for the first time. But now, because of the Nazis, he had to
confirm that he was "of german blood". So Erich SCHIMMELPFENNIG declared
in 1933, that he is "the real father" of Harry Otto and his son is "of
german blood". That is not really possible, because Erich S. was 15
years old, when my father was born.

Some years later my father had to become a soldier. When he came back in
1948 >from a Russian POW-Camp, the family was expelled >from Pomerania and
his mother and some other members of the family had died. Erich S. was
married again.

During the next years my father tried to find out the name of his real
father. He knew that his father was Jewish. The persons who knew
something about his father are either dead or not willing to talk about it.

I tried several years to find something about my grandfather without any
success. Last year I made 3 DNA-Testings ( myheritage, ancestry and
familytreedna ) and found out that I have between 20 % and 25 % (
differences between the providers ) ashkenazy DNA.

That is the point where I am. I have no idea what to do next.

Best wishes,

Dieter Schimmelpfennig, Northern Germany dieter51@yahoo.de

Der Kreis Belgard-Schivelbein in Pommern
http://www.belgard.org

Familiendatenbank Belgard-Schivelbein
http://ofb.genealogy.net/schivelbein/


Out of the box solution ?? Can anyone help #poland

David Zoldan
 

In a tape recording made in 1989 my grandmother related that her
grandfather Shraga Feivel Chesner of Chelm was often consulted on
halachic questions. My grandmother continued on the tape "in fact that
is how he died... " Grandma said that after he provided the answers to
the people, they would give him a potch or pat him on the back, "and
tell him shkoyach (thank you) Reb Feivel ... and I guess after all those
potches he just ... passed away".

Now, of course, I don't think he died >from being patted on the back.
Obviously.

But, I do think that my grandmother was remembering some story which has
some truth in it. Perhaps that truth could be valuable to me.

I realize there is no one who could tell what happened. But perhaps
somebody could provide a suggestion what this could be, some out of the
box solution.

Thanks for reading.

David Zoldan
researcher # 382214

Researching in Poland - Chesner, Einbinder, Bienenfeld, Sova, Kapota,
Tyk, Rozenknopf
Researching in the Carpathians - Zoldan, Steinberg, Meyer, Shlezinger,
Solomon, Weisberger


JRI Poland #Poland Out of the box solution ?? Can anyone help #poland

David Zoldan
 

In a tape recording made in 1989 my grandmother related that her
grandfather Shraga Feivel Chesner of Chelm was often consulted on
halachic questions. My grandmother continued on the tape "in fact that
is how he died... " Grandma said that after he provided the answers to
the people, they would give him a potch or pat him on the back, "and
tell him shkoyach (thank you) Reb Feivel ... and I guess after all those
potches he just ... passed away".

Now, of course, I don't think he died >from being patted on the back.
Obviously.

But, I do think that my grandmother was remembering some story which has
some truth in it. Perhaps that truth could be valuable to me.

I realize there is no one who could tell what happened. But perhaps
somebody could provide a suggestion what this could be, some out of the
box solution.

Thanks for reading.

David Zoldan
researcher # 382214

Researching in Poland - Chesner, Einbinder, Bienenfeld, Sova, Kapota,
Tyk, Rozenknopf
Researching in the Carpathians - Zoldan, Steinberg, Meyer, Shlezinger,
Solomon, Weisberger


Question regarding immigration to the U.S. (Chesner - Einbinder family from Chelm) #poland

David Zoldan
 

My great grandmother, Yitta Machla Einbinder (nee Chesner) and her
brother, Itcha Chesner, immigrated to the U.S. >from Chelm.

The men, i.e my great grandfather, Jack Einbinder, and my great great
uncle, Itcha Chesner, came first in 1924.

The women, i.e my great grandmother, Yitta Machla Einbinder, and her
sister in law, Dora Chesner and the kids came in 1929.

In took 5 years for the two men to bring over their wives and families.

Another brother of my great grandmother, Jacob Chesner, came to the U.S.
in 1904 and brought his wife, Bertha Chesner and their kids over to join
him in 1906, after only 2 years (even less).

Now, I know that the immigration laws to enter the U.S. became stricter
in 1924. Is it possible that this contributed to the extended time, 5
years, which it took for my great grandfather to bring over his family,
as opposed to the 2 years which it took his brother in law to do the
same thing 20 years before.

Does anyone know? Does anyone have a comparable story?

I realize no two stories are exactly the same but I am wondering if this
was common.

Thanks for any help

David Zoldan
researcher # 382214

Researching in Poland - Chesner, Einbinder, Bienenfeld, Sova, Kapota,
Tyk, Rozenknopf
Researching in the Carpathians - Zoldan, Steinberg, Meyer, Shlezinger,
Solomon, Weisberger


JRI Poland #Poland Question regarding immigration to the U.S. (Chesner - Einbinder family from Chelm) #poland

David Zoldan
 

My great grandmother, Yitta Machla Einbinder (nee Chesner) and her
brother, Itcha Chesner, immigrated to the U.S. >from Chelm.

The men, i.e my great grandfather, Jack Einbinder, and my great great
uncle, Itcha Chesner, came first in 1924.

The women, i.e my great grandmother, Yitta Machla Einbinder, and her
sister in law, Dora Chesner and the kids came in 1929.

In took 5 years for the two men to bring over their wives and families.

Another brother of my great grandmother, Jacob Chesner, came to the U.S.
in 1904 and brought his wife, Bertha Chesner and their kids over to join
him in 1906, after only 2 years (even less).

Now, I know that the immigration laws to enter the U.S. became stricter
in 1924. Is it possible that this contributed to the extended time, 5
years, which it took for my great grandfather to bring over his family,
as opposed to the 2 years which it took his brother in law to do the
same thing 20 years before.

Does anyone know? Does anyone have a comparable story?

I realize no two stories are exactly the same but I am wondering if this
was common.

Thanks for any help

David Zoldan
researcher # 382214

Researching in Poland - Chesner, Einbinder, Bienenfeld, Sova, Kapota,
Tyk, Rozenknopf
Researching in the Carpathians - Zoldan, Steinberg, Meyer, Shlezinger,
Solomon, Weisberger


Seeking information on Hanoch HALICZER (originally from Jagielnica, near Czortkow) #galicia

Douglas Hykle <dhykle@...>
 

Hanoch HALICZER, born around 1922 or 1923, reportedly served as a member
of the Ordnungsdienst (Jewish police) in Jagielnica around 1942-43. Evidently,
he also spent time in a work camp at Ulaszkowce. As he spoke good German,
he was the liaison between the farmers, supervisors, and the German director
of the camp.

In January 1944, thanks to his good relations with the local population, he
secured a hiding place for a Jewish family (GUTSTEIN) with a Ukrainian
peasant near Ulaszkowce. Towards the time of liberation by Soviet troops
(March 1944), he returned to his hometown of Jagielnica, where he volunteered
to point out to the military authorities Ukrainians who had killed Jews and/or
had collaborated with the Germans. In the same period, he was also involved in
the rescue of Jews who had been hiding in a cave near the town of Ulaszkowce.
These individuals included Abraham MORGENSTERN.

Hanoch Haliczer was reported to still be alive, living in Czortkow (then part of
USSR, present-day Ukraine) in November 1969, and possibly even much later
than 1972. Apparently, at that time, he was living on Shkolnaja Street and he
served as an instructor in the volunteer fire brigade.

I would like to know if anyone reading this forum (or their older relatives) would
remember Hanoch Haliczer and have any information on what became of him.
For example, did he continue to live in Czortkow after 1972, did he have any
children, did he/they eventually resettle elsewhere etc. etc.

Douglas Hykle
Tovste, Ukraine


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Seeking information on Hanoch HALICZER (originally from Jagielnica, near Czortkow) #galicia

Douglas Hykle <dhykle@...>
 

Hanoch HALICZER, born around 1922 or 1923, reportedly served as a member
of the Ordnungsdienst (Jewish police) in Jagielnica around 1942-43. Evidently,
he also spent time in a work camp at Ulaszkowce. As he spoke good German,
he was the liaison between the farmers, supervisors, and the German director
of the camp.

In January 1944, thanks to his good relations with the local population, he
secured a hiding place for a Jewish family (GUTSTEIN) with a Ukrainian
peasant near Ulaszkowce. Towards the time of liberation by Soviet troops
(March 1944), he returned to his hometown of Jagielnica, where he volunteered
to point out to the military authorities Ukrainians who had killed Jews and/or
had collaborated with the Germans. In the same period, he was also involved in
the rescue of Jews who had been hiding in a cave near the town of Ulaszkowce.
These individuals included Abraham MORGENSTERN.

Hanoch Haliczer was reported to still be alive, living in Czortkow (then part of
USSR, present-day Ukraine) in November 1969, and possibly even much later
than 1972. Apparently, at that time, he was living on Shkolnaja Street and he
served as an instructor in the volunteer fire brigade.

I would like to know if anyone reading this forum (or their older relatives) would
remember Hanoch Haliczer and have any information on what became of him.
For example, did he continue to live in Czortkow after 1972, did he have any
children, did he/they eventually resettle elsewhere etc. etc.

Douglas Hykle
Tovste, Ukraine


Does this indicate a rabbi? #general

Carol Karp
 

My gggrandfather Jonas Kreisz tombstone was translated as follows: Here lies
the honorable Mr Yoni son do Avraham Kreisz of blessed memory the 26 th day
of Iyar in the year 5670

It includes the abbreviation Kafka-hah stands for kavod ha-r.

Would this indicate that he or his father was a rabbi? And if so how would I
verify this?

Carol Karp
Tucson Arizona

KREISZ,GROSZ,FEURMAN,REICHARD,ROTH,KAUFMAN

MODERATOR NOTE: Readers of the JewishGen Discussion Group may be able to answer
the question, but when referring to an inscription, it is always best practice
to either upload an image to ViewMate or post a link if the image is already
online somewhere. For ViewMate, see https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Does this indicate a rabbi? #general

Carol Karp
 

My gggrandfather Jonas Kreisz tombstone was translated as follows: Here lies
the honorable Mr Yoni son do Avraham Kreisz of blessed memory the 26 th day
of Iyar in the year 5670

It includes the abbreviation Kafka-hah stands for kavod ha-r.

Would this indicate that he or his father was a rabbi? And if so how would I
verify this?

Carol Karp
Tucson Arizona

KREISZ,GROSZ,FEURMAN,REICHARD,ROTH,KAUFMAN

MODERATOR NOTE: Readers of the JewishGen Discussion Group may be able to answer
the question, but when referring to an inscription, it is always best practice
to either upload an image to ViewMate or post a link if the image is already
online somewhere. For ViewMate, see https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/


ViewMate: German record from Heubach - GOLDSCHMIDT / SUNDHEIMER #general

Yitzhak Sapir
 

Hello

I would appreciate help in translating the following record uploaded
to ViewMate:
https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=73319

The most bottom row (fifth) is probably the 1829 marriage register of
Mordechai Goldschmidt whose geni page is here:
https://www.geni.com/people/Mordechai-Goldschmidt/6000000006374317084

I'm interested to know the names, locations, and other details such as
occupations as they appear in this record. There is also a long
comment on the right-hand side apparently written later in 1831 that
discusses earlier dates and I would appreciate knowing what it says.

Yitzhak Sapir

MODERATOR NOTE: Please response either within the ViewMate application or via
email directly to Yitzhak.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate: German record from Heubach - GOLDSCHMIDT / SUNDHEIMER #general

Yitzhak Sapir
 

Hello

I would appreciate help in translating the following record uploaded
to ViewMate:
https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=73319

The most bottom row (fifth) is probably the 1829 marriage register of
Mordechai Goldschmidt whose geni page is here:
https://www.geni.com/people/Mordechai-Goldschmidt/6000000006374317084

I'm interested to know the names, locations, and other details such as
occupations as they appear in this record. There is also a long
comment on the right-hand side apparently written later in 1831 that
discusses earlier dates and I would appreciate knowing what it says.

Yitzhak Sapir

MODERATOR NOTE: Please response either within the ViewMate application or via
email directly to Yitzhak.


(Russia) World War II Data Base Updated With Adding 5 Million Records #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Memorial databank is a website of information about those who died
defending Russia during the Great Patriotic War and post-war period. It
was founded by the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation in 2007.
The website contains up to 17 million digital copies of documents and 20
million personal record of the Red Army losses in the Great Patriotic War.
Access to the records is free and unlimited. Currently, there are the names
of one million war prisoners although German records indicate there were
over 5 million Soviet citizens in captivity. There are over 5 million
records for soldiers who died, went missing or became prisoners of war. The
website does not require registration.

Information includes: full name, birthdate, or birth year, place of birth,
date and place of recruitment, last place of service, military rank and
reason service ended. Records may be saved as .jpg or pdf's. See:
https://obd-memorial.ru/html/about.htm

The database is in Russian and for those of us who are not conversant in
Russian you will need to use a translation service such as google translate
https://translate.google.com/

For suggestions on how to use the database without knowing Russian see:
https://tinyurl.com/y4qrr2f4
Original url:
https://lostrussianfamily.wordpress.com/2019/05/11/free-database-on-wwii-soldiers-grows-by-more-than-5-million-records/

The article in Lost Russian Family suggests after doing the above, to search
for relatives and ancestors in the website: Memory of the People:
https://pamyat-naroda.ru/heroes/?adv_search=y which is in Russian and
English.

The Russian Military Archives provides a guide to this database in English,
See:
https://pamyat-naroda.ru/how-to-search/
If it opens in Russian click on the EN on upper right

This website also has more free databases. See:
https://lostrussianfamily.wordpress.com/free-databases/

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

MODERATOR NOTE: It appears that one may also easily access this database using
a tool on Steve Morse's One-Step website:
https://stevemorse.org/russian/ussrmil.html


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (Russia) World War II Data Base Updated With Adding 5 Million Records #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Memorial databank is a website of information about those who died
defending Russia during the Great Patriotic War and post-war period. It
was founded by the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation in 2007.
The website contains up to 17 million digital copies of documents and 20
million personal record of the Red Army losses in the Great Patriotic War.
Access to the records is free and unlimited. Currently, there are the names
of one million war prisoners although German records indicate there were
over 5 million Soviet citizens in captivity. There are over 5 million
records for soldiers who died, went missing or became prisoners of war. The
website does not require registration.

Information includes: full name, birthdate, or birth year, place of birth,
date and place of recruitment, last place of service, military rank and
reason service ended. Records may be saved as .jpg or pdf's. See:
https://obd-memorial.ru/html/about.htm

The database is in Russian and for those of us who are not conversant in
Russian you will need to use a translation service such as google translate
https://translate.google.com/

For suggestions on how to use the database without knowing Russian see:
https://tinyurl.com/y4qrr2f4
Original url:
https://lostrussianfamily.wordpress.com/2019/05/11/free-database-on-wwii-soldiers-grows-by-more-than-5-million-records/

The article in Lost Russian Family suggests after doing the above, to search
for relatives and ancestors in the website: Memory of the People:
https://pamyat-naroda.ru/heroes/?adv_search=y which is in Russian and
English.

The Russian Military Archives provides a guide to this database in English,
See:
https://pamyat-naroda.ru/how-to-search/
If it opens in Russian click on the EN on upper right

This website also has more free databases. See:
https://lostrussianfamily.wordpress.com/free-databases/

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

MODERATOR NOTE: It appears that one may also easily access this database using
a tool on Steve Morse's One-Step website:
https://stevemorse.org/russian/ussrmil.html


ViewMate Translation Request - Russian #general

philafrum
 

I've posted a card in Russian for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate
at the following address,

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73314

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much.

Evan Fishman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate Translation Request - Russian #general

philafrum
 

I've posted a card in Russian for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate
at the following address,

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73314

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much.

Evan Fishman

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