Date   
Genealogy Project at 22nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy #galicia

JGS of Canada (Toronto) <info@...>
 

Announcements:

Genealogy is about context, as well as facts. The 22nd IAJGS International
Conference is pleased to present a range of artistic displays, entertainment
and films to delight the soul, as well as your mind. Full details of these
Programmes can be found on the Conference Programme web page at
http://www.jgstoronto2002.ca/Programme.html.

1. During the Conference you will find a range of galleries with arts and
exhibits. In one gallery you will find a limited selection >from the
original major photographic exhibition “And I Still See Their Faces: Images
of Polish Jews”. - an absorbing look at the vibrant Jewish family and
community life and diverse culture that existed in Poland in the years
before 1939. The accompanying volume will be on sale.

2. “Jewish Heritage in Poland” is selection of sixteen photographs, in
colour and black and white, of Jewish heritage sites in Poland taken by Alex
Oldfield while on a two-week Elderhostel tour in August 2001. The focus is
on Judaica in Warsaw, Tykocin, Bialystok, Lodz, and Kazimierz (Cracow), as
well as Treblinka, Majdanek and Auschwitz. Most of these photographs will be
featured in the slide show presentation: Jewish Heritage in Poland (see
Monday’s schedule).

3. “Tracing the Jewish Past Through Postal History” is a photographic
exhibition that contains samples >from the collection of Nigel Grizzard and
travels through places as diverse as Kirgistan, England, the Isle of Man,
Palestine, Egypt, Slovakia, Hungary and Argentina.

Three original art exhibitions will be on display at the Conference and the
artists will be available for an informal talk and questions.

a. Mayer Kirshenblatt’s “Childhood Memories >from Opatow, Poland” is his
reflection of stories he told his three daughters about growing up in Poland
before the Holocaust.

b. >from Montreal, artist Susan Shulman’s “In Our Memories Forever”, the
hypothetical has become real. Through the existence of a family archive of
letters written by her young grandparents between 1898-1900, the painter has
been afforded a glimpse into the lives of her ancestors and their flight
from Russia and eventual immigration to Canada.
c. Family Fabrics: An Exhibit by the Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles
of Toronto, is an exhibit of original textile pieces incorporating
genealogical research and family history. Some pieces have been constructed
using heirloom fabrics.

d. The Exhibition of Family Trees by students in Toronto Hebrew Day Schools
Grades 4 and 5 shows the work of the grade 4 students of the Toronto Heschel
School, a Jewish Day School where the arts play a major role, and the work
of grade 5 students at the Bialik Hebrew Day School of Toronto.

e. In conjunction with the Toronto Jewish Film Festival, the second
largest Jewish film festival in North America, and one of the largest Jewish
film festivals in the world, the Conference will be presenting the Jewish
Genealogical Film Festival. Films of interest to Jewish genealogists will be
featured Tuesday and Wednesday nights. Two of the films are expected to be
presented by respective film makers, one by a person portrayed in the film,
others by persons knowledgeable in the topics.

Tuesday Cinema 1: “The Jews of Poland”, & “The Secret”
Tuesday Cinema 2: “Bene Israel: A Family Portrait” & “Uncle Chatzkel”
Wednesday Cinema 1:“Wierzbnik: Impressions of a Town that Was” &
“Photographer”
Wednesday Cinema 2: “I am home” & "Minyan on the Mira”

Feed the mind, body and soul at the Conference’s Gala Closing Banquet. In
addition to our wonderful guest speaker, Dr. Irving Abella, and a great
meal, the evening will provide live entertainment. Prior to and during the
Banquet, entertainment will be provided by Beyond the Pale (see
http://www.borealisrecords.com/a_beyond.html ), who will perform Klezmer
music, the traditional folk music of eastern-European Jews.

At Toronto 2002, you’ll have it all: a great genealogical experience, great
friends, food and Jewish Genealogies own version of Arts & Entertainment. I
f you haven’t registered yet, times almost gone. Register now at
www.jgstoronto2002.ca. See you in Toronto!

Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Genealogy Project at 22nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy #galicia

JGS of Canada (Toronto) <info@...>
 

Announcements:

Genealogy is about context, as well as facts. The 22nd IAJGS International
Conference is pleased to present a range of artistic displays, entertainment
and films to delight the soul, as well as your mind. Full details of these
Programmes can be found on the Conference Programme web page at
http://www.jgstoronto2002.ca/Programme.html.

1. During the Conference you will find a range of galleries with arts and
exhibits. In one gallery you will find a limited selection >from the
original major photographic exhibition “And I Still See Their Faces: Images
of Polish Jews”. - an absorbing look at the vibrant Jewish family and
community life and diverse culture that existed in Poland in the years
before 1939. The accompanying volume will be on sale.

2. “Jewish Heritage in Poland” is selection of sixteen photographs, in
colour and black and white, of Jewish heritage sites in Poland taken by Alex
Oldfield while on a two-week Elderhostel tour in August 2001. The focus is
on Judaica in Warsaw, Tykocin, Bialystok, Lodz, and Kazimierz (Cracow), as
well as Treblinka, Majdanek and Auschwitz. Most of these photographs will be
featured in the slide show presentation: Jewish Heritage in Poland (see
Monday’s schedule).

3. “Tracing the Jewish Past Through Postal History” is a photographic
exhibition that contains samples >from the collection of Nigel Grizzard and
travels through places as diverse as Kirgistan, England, the Isle of Man,
Palestine, Egypt, Slovakia, Hungary and Argentina.

Three original art exhibitions will be on display at the Conference and the
artists will be available for an informal talk and questions.

a. Mayer Kirshenblatt’s “Childhood Memories >from Opatow, Poland” is his
reflection of stories he told his three daughters about growing up in Poland
before the Holocaust.

b. >from Montreal, artist Susan Shulman’s “In Our Memories Forever”, the
hypothetical has become real. Through the existence of a family archive of
letters written by her young grandparents between 1898-1900, the painter has
been afforded a glimpse into the lives of her ancestors and their flight
from Russia and eventual immigration to Canada.
c. Family Fabrics: An Exhibit by the Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles
of Toronto, is an exhibit of original textile pieces incorporating
genealogical research and family history. Some pieces have been constructed
using heirloom fabrics.

d. The Exhibition of Family Trees by students in Toronto Hebrew Day Schools
Grades 4 and 5 shows the work of the grade 4 students of the Toronto Heschel
School, a Jewish Day School where the arts play a major role, and the work
of grade 5 students at the Bialik Hebrew Day School of Toronto.

e. In conjunction with the Toronto Jewish Film Festival, the second
largest Jewish film festival in North America, and one of the largest Jewish
film festivals in the world, the Conference will be presenting the Jewish
Genealogical Film Festival. Films of interest to Jewish genealogists will be
featured Tuesday and Wednesday nights. Two of the films are expected to be
presented by respective film makers, one by a person portrayed in the film,
others by persons knowledgeable in the topics.

Tuesday Cinema 1: “The Jews of Poland”, & “The Secret”
Tuesday Cinema 2: “Bene Israel: A Family Portrait” & “Uncle Chatzkel”
Wednesday Cinema 1:“Wierzbnik: Impressions of a Town that Was” &
“Photographer”
Wednesday Cinema 2: “I am home” & "Minyan on the Mira”

Feed the mind, body and soul at the Conference’s Gala Closing Banquet. In
addition to our wonderful guest speaker, Dr. Irving Abella, and a great
meal, the evening will provide live entertainment. Prior to and during the
Banquet, entertainment will be provided by Beyond the Pale (see
http://www.borealisrecords.com/a_beyond.html ), who will perform Klezmer
music, the traditional folk music of eastern-European Jews.

At Toronto 2002, you’ll have it all: a great genealogical experience, great
friends, food and Jewish Genealogies own version of Arts & Entertainment. I
f you haven’t registered yet, times almost gone. Register now at
www.jgstoronto2002.ca. See you in Toronto!

Toronto Conference - JewishGen Luncheon - JewishGen Databases Guided Tour #galicia

Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
 

An in-depth guided tour of the JewishGen databases will be conducted by
Warren Blatt and Michael Tobias at the JewishGen luncheon scheduled for
Tuesday, August 6th at 12:30 at the Toronto Conference.

Learn all about the JewishGen Family Finder, ShtetlSeeker, Discussion
Group archives, the Family Tree of the Jewish People, and more.

Not only will your guides take you through each of these incredibly
valuable databases, you will learn how to make the best possible use of
them to benefit your own research and, in the case of the JewishGen
Family Finder how to add your own research interests to the existing
275,000 surname/town combinations.

Sign up now as the limited space is going fast! Go to the Tour and
Meals Order Form at < http://www.jgstoronto2002.ca/orderform.html >,
enter the requested information and when completed scroll to the
very bottom to submit the form.

Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Toronto Conference - JewishGen Luncheon - JewishGen Databases Guided Tour #galicia

Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
 

An in-depth guided tour of the JewishGen databases will be conducted by
Warren Blatt and Michael Tobias at the JewishGen luncheon scheduled for
Tuesday, August 6th at 12:30 at the Toronto Conference.

Learn all about the JewishGen Family Finder, ShtetlSeeker, Discussion
Group archives, the Family Tree of the Jewish People, and more.

Not only will your guides take you through each of these incredibly
valuable databases, you will learn how to make the best possible use of
them to benefit your own research and, in the case of the JewishGen
Family Finder how to add your own research interests to the existing
275,000 surname/town combinations.

Sign up now as the limited space is going fast! Go to the Tour and
Meals Order Form at < http://www.jgstoronto2002.ca/orderform.html >,
enter the requested information and when completed scroll to the
very bottom to submit the form.

Re: Attention: Former @home.com subscribers & GG members #galicia

Carol Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Shelley's advice is excellent and I would just like to add the
following:

If you have not done so, please update your contact information
in the JewishGen Family Finder since that is the only way others
can reach you if there is the possibility of a connection.

http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff and then click on the MODIFY
icon, enter your researcher code and password and update the
informantion. We also need you to enter your phone number which
will never be published but needed only for administrative
purposes.

Many thanks for your anticipated cooperation!
Carol

Carol Skydell, Vice President,
JewishGen Special Projects

cskydell@...


Shelley Pollero writes in part:

Many Gesher Galicia members with an @home.com email address renewed
their 2001-2 membership before the demise of that provider. These email addresses
are still listed in the Gesher Galicia Family Finder and on our membership
database. When @home.com went out of business, we all had to change our ISP
but many of you have forgotten to inform Gesher Galicia of your new address.

Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Attention: Former @home.com subscribers & GG members #galicia

Carol Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Shelley's advice is excellent and I would just like to add the
following:

If you have not done so, please update your contact information
in the JewishGen Family Finder since that is the only way others
can reach you if there is the possibility of a connection.

http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff and then click on the MODIFY
icon, enter your researcher code and password and update the
informantion. We also need you to enter your phone number which
will never be published but needed only for administrative
purposes.

Many thanks for your anticipated cooperation!
Carol

Carol Skydell, Vice President,
JewishGen Special Projects

cskydell@...


Shelley Pollero writes in part:

Many Gesher Galicia members with an @home.com email address renewed
their 2001-2 membership before the demise of that provider. These email addresses
are still listed in the Gesher Galicia Family Finder and on our membership
database. When @home.com went out of business, we all had to change our ISP
but many of you have forgotten to inform Gesher Galicia of your new address.

A communal Yizkor list for a Jewish cemetery in Galicia #galicia

Eva Floersheim <evaflor@...>
 

You have travelled half the world to visit the Jewish cemetery in Galicia
where your family was buried.
Now you have finally arrived, but found out that most gravestones have only
first names, no family names.

In such a situation, could a possible solution be to locate a gravestone
with a Jahrzeit around the day of your visit and have that gravestone as a
symbolic gravestone for putting a little stone on it?
Can one do some kind of religious ritual? What does the Halacha say about
this?

Can there be some kind of mutual responsibility/connection in such a special
situation?

I have made such a communal Yizkor list for the around 400 graves I
registered in Lubaczow, with the exact location of each grave. Does a
cemetery list arranged according to the Hebrew date of death make sense for
you?
In any case I intend to leave one such copy with a Polish friend who lives
near Lubaczow.

The registered information will be on the JOWBR in due time, but that is a
completely different way of presenting the material and for a different
purpose.

I would be glad to hear your reactions, based on both feelings and/or
religious traditions.

Eva Floersheim
Shadmot Dvorah
Israel

Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia A communal Yizkor list for a Jewish cemetery in Galicia #galicia

Eva Floersheim <evaflor@...>
 

You have travelled half the world to visit the Jewish cemetery in Galicia
where your family was buried.
Now you have finally arrived, but found out that most gravestones have only
first names, no family names.

In such a situation, could a possible solution be to locate a gravestone
with a Jahrzeit around the day of your visit and have that gravestone as a
symbolic gravestone for putting a little stone on it?
Can one do some kind of religious ritual? What does the Halacha say about
this?

Can there be some kind of mutual responsibility/connection in such a special
situation?

I have made such a communal Yizkor list for the around 400 graves I
registered in Lubaczow, with the exact location of each grave. Does a
cemetery list arranged according to the Hebrew date of death make sense for
you?
In any case I intend to leave one such copy with a Polish friend who lives
near Lubaczow.

The registered information will be on the JOWBR in due time, but that is a
completely different way of presenting the material and for a different
purpose.

I would be glad to hear your reactions, based on both feelings and/or
religious traditions.

Eva Floersheim
Shadmot Dvorah
Israel

Genealogy Project at 22nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy #galicia

JGS of Canada (Toronto) <info@...>
 

Billy Crystal & Simon Wiesenthal Center to Announce Major New
Genealogy Project at 22nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy


The 22nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy is pleased to
announce that noted actor, comedian and humanitarian Mr. Billy Crystal and
the Simon Wiesenthal Center/ Museum of Tolerance have chosen to announce a
major new genealogical project at the Opening of the Conference on the
evening of August 4. Mr. Rafi Guber, the creator and historian/genealogist
for the project and speaker at the Conference, will be presenting a personal
message to the Conference >from Mr. Crystal after which the attendees will
watch a short video introducing a major new Genealogical project at the
Simon Wiesenthal Center in which Mr. Crystal is a major participant.

Gert Rogers, Chair of the Conference noted that "We are very pleased that
Mr. Crystal has chosen to greet our Conference and announce this major new
project. Mr. Crystal has been involved for some time in Jewish genealogy.
He has been working with Rafael Guber on his family over the last five
years and Mr. Crystal is well known to be committed to the cause of Jewish
identity. We are pleased that he has recognized the importance of our
Conference as a place to make this important announcement.

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada (Toronto) is hosting the 22nd
IAJGS Conference on Jewish Genealogy at the Toronto Sheraton Centre, August
4-9, 2002. The Conference is an opportunity to advance Jewish Genealogy at
home and internationally. Up to 1,000 Jewish genealogists >from around the
world are expected to come to Toronto for a series of lectures, meetings
and special events, making it the largest international Jewish gathering in
Canada this year. Detailed information about the Conference can be found
at the Conference website at www.jgstoronto2002.ca.

Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Genealogy Project at 22nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy #galicia

JGS of Canada (Toronto) <info@...>
 

Billy Crystal & Simon Wiesenthal Center to Announce Major New
Genealogy Project at 22nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy


The 22nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy is pleased to
announce that noted actor, comedian and humanitarian Mr. Billy Crystal and
the Simon Wiesenthal Center/ Museum of Tolerance have chosen to announce a
major new genealogical project at the Opening of the Conference on the
evening of August 4. Mr. Rafi Guber, the creator and historian/genealogist
for the project and speaker at the Conference, will be presenting a personal
message to the Conference >from Mr. Crystal after which the attendees will
watch a short video introducing a major new Genealogical project at the
Simon Wiesenthal Center in which Mr. Crystal is a major participant.

Gert Rogers, Chair of the Conference noted that "We are very pleased that
Mr. Crystal has chosen to greet our Conference and announce this major new
project. Mr. Crystal has been involved for some time in Jewish genealogy.
He has been working with Rafael Guber on his family over the last five
years and Mr. Crystal is well known to be committed to the cause of Jewish
identity. We are pleased that he has recognized the importance of our
Conference as a place to make this important announcement.

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada (Toronto) is hosting the 22nd
IAJGS Conference on Jewish Genealogy at the Toronto Sheraton Centre, August
4-9, 2002. The Conference is an opportunity to advance Jewish Genealogy at
home and internationally. Up to 1,000 Jewish genealogists >from around the
world are expected to come to Toronto for a series of lectures, meetings
and special events, making it the largest international Jewish gathering in
Canada this year. Detailed information about the Conference can be found
at the Conference website at www.jgstoronto2002.ca.

Umschlagplatz Discovered in Lodz--Jewish Press Newspaper #lodz #poland

Ronisl@...
 

In its Friday July 19th issue, _ The Jewish Press_ (NY edition), ran an
article on page 32 with the above title. (I couldn't find it in their on-line
edition.) Article reports that the orginal building located on Stalowa
Street near Infloncka served as the Umschlagplatz. The tracks could also be
seen. This is quite a find since most of these buildings in other towns
were destroyed. It still has the original walls, doors, and ramps. Simcha
Keller, head of the Jewish Community in Lodz, is organizing the restoration
of the site. It's possible that old inscriptions may be found. The present
owner has agreed to sell and vacate the building within a month or so.

Regards,
Roni Seibel Liebowitz
New York

Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Umschlagplatz Discovered in Lodz--Jewish Press Newspaper #poland #lodz

Ronisl@...
 

In its Friday July 19th issue, _ The Jewish Press_ (NY edition), ran an
article on page 32 with the above title. (I couldn't find it in their on-line
edition.) Article reports that the orginal building located on Stalowa
Street near Infloncka served as the Umschlagplatz. The tracks could also be
seen. This is quite a find since most of these buildings in other towns
were destroyed. It still has the original walls, doors, and ramps. Simcha
Keller, head of the Jewish Community in Lodz, is organizing the restoration
of the site. It's possible that old inscriptions may be found. The present
owner has agreed to sell and vacate the building within a month or so.

Regards,
Roni Seibel Liebowitz
New York

Problems we Face [was: Doe s the Yizkor list include only Holocaust victims?] #yizkorbooks

p ng <png42@...>
 

I just wanted to thank Eva Floersheim and Marian Rubin for their comments.
It is so helpful for us to hear about some of the problems and issues that
we all struggle with. I am the Przemysl YB translation coordinator. I have
not experienced the same issues with the Holocaust victims information (not
yet, I should say) but Eva's and Marian's comments speak to a broader issue
of how difficult it is to provide an accurate Yizkor Book translation. Also,
I don't think that most people realize how much work is involved in doing
this kind of translation. I certainly did not before I started...
Translating >from Hebrew is not like translating >from other languages, like
Polish or German, where there is no need to do additional research on an
on-going basis just to be able to verify if certain details have been
deciphered correctly. I am not saying that there is no need for research in
other ranslations, but certainly not to the same extent.

For one, in the Hebrew original there are no diacritical
marks to distinguish between certain letters and no vowels, so that names
could be transliterated correnctly, or details be translated properly. How
do we render properly the text which sometimes is difficult to decipher
and/or even to understand, where there are all sorts of inconsistencies,
including spelling. The Przemysl book, for example, is full of words or even
sentences that are quite interesting linguistically (e.g. with Polish or
Yiddish loan-words; sometimes even Yiddish or German passages being simply
intermingled with the Hebrew; Polish grammatical endings in town names,
etc.).

One of the things that might explain some of these problems is that Hebrew
was not the native language for the authors of these books, and they were
not free >from the natural influences of their native Yiddish, Polish, or
whatever the language may have been... However, discovering that some of the
details in the original may not even be correct brings the issue of accuracy
to a whole different level. How do we deal with that? In my opinion, the
best we can do is what Eva has been doing -- trying to comment on it as the
problems get discovered. I don't know about other coordinators but >from my
own perspective, one thing that would help me in keeping the material
accurate is to be able to do my own HTML. That way, it would be much easier
to make changes and keep track of the corrected files. Otherwise, it becomes
really cumbersome to tell the HTML-er what changes need to be made and
where, and it is more difficult to keep track of different versions of the
translation. But that's a different issue...

When I was first experiencing some of the problems with our translation, my
immediate reaction was: "we must be doing something wrong". But as we
progressed in our work, I was more and more realizing that some of the
problems are just endemic to this kind of translation. That is why I find it
helpful to hear about the struggles that other coordinators and/or
translators are facing.

Unfortunately, I am not able to attend the conference in
Toronto. However, I hope that there will be a chance there for those of us
who will be attending to get together and talk about some of the issues,
frustrations and problems that we have experienced. It may even be worth to
put together an "infofile" that would give people an idea of what kinds of
problems they may face in doing this kind of translation, and how some
people have dealt with them.

Shabbat Shalom,

Barbara U. Yeager
Przemysl YB Coordinator
png42@...

"Eva Floersheim" evaflor@...
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 21:48:49 +0200

<< As you probably all know, translating names that were
written in Hebrew back to Latin letters is always a
problem, so this is why such a translation is never really
finished. Getting to know more and more relevant lists that
were originally written in Latin letter >from those places,
makes it necessary every now and then to revise the
translation. I hope to improve the Yizkor lists for
Lubaczow and Lwow within the coming year. While preparing
for this, I have come upon a difficult problem. >>

<< Stage Four: >>from learning more and more about the Jews
of Lubaczow >from relatives, >from Pages of Testimony at Yad
Vashem, and >from other sources, I discovered that some of
those listed had died BEFORE Holocaust. Stage Five: The
list must now be revised, but how? Should I make special
notes under those names who I now know were not Holocaust
victims? Should I add some short explanation before the
list that most of those listed died in Holocaust, but a few
died before the war, and in the case of the Lwow list, some
died AFTER the war? >>

Marian Rubin MERUBIN@...
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 19:59:21 EDT

<< I'm coordinating the translation of the Rzeszow Yizkor
Book. A section titled "In Memoriam", which has been
translated/transliterated, contains memorial tributes from
relatives, grouped by family, and is primarily a
remembrance of those who were killed in the
Holocaust.However, grandparents who died some years before
are sometimes included. There is no long list. Many
relatives submitted family photos, identifying those in the
photo, usually with a few words. Some tributes are text
only, naming the deceased and relationships of family
members, some of whom were still living. Each is signed by
the relatives who submitted the tribute, so it was clear
that those individuals were still living in 1966-1967 when
the book was published. After our translation went online,
little by little, I have learned that some in the family
photos survived the war or had emigrated before the war. I
know of one case where the tribute is for a person who died
in Israel in the early 1960s. >>

Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Problems we Face [was: Doe s the Yizkor list include only Holocaust victims?] #yizkorbooks

p ng <png42@...>
 

I just wanted to thank Eva Floersheim and Marian Rubin for their comments.
It is so helpful for us to hear about some of the problems and issues that
we all struggle with. I am the Przemysl YB translation coordinator. I have
not experienced the same issues with the Holocaust victims information (not
yet, I should say) but Eva's and Marian's comments speak to a broader issue
of how difficult it is to provide an accurate Yizkor Book translation. Also,
I don't think that most people realize how much work is involved in doing
this kind of translation. I certainly did not before I started...
Translating >from Hebrew is not like translating >from other languages, like
Polish or German, where there is no need to do additional research on an
on-going basis just to be able to verify if certain details have been
deciphered correctly. I am not saying that there is no need for research in
other ranslations, but certainly not to the same extent.

For one, in the Hebrew original there are no diacritical
marks to distinguish between certain letters and no vowels, so that names
could be transliterated correnctly, or details be translated properly. How
do we render properly the text which sometimes is difficult to decipher
and/or even to understand, where there are all sorts of inconsistencies,
including spelling. The Przemysl book, for example, is full of words or even
sentences that are quite interesting linguistically (e.g. with Polish or
Yiddish loan-words; sometimes even Yiddish or German passages being simply
intermingled with the Hebrew; Polish grammatical endings in town names,
etc.).

One of the things that might explain some of these problems is that Hebrew
was not the native language for the authors of these books, and they were
not free >from the natural influences of their native Yiddish, Polish, or
whatever the language may have been... However, discovering that some of the
details in the original may not even be correct brings the issue of accuracy
to a whole different level. How do we deal with that? In my opinion, the
best we can do is what Eva has been doing -- trying to comment on it as the
problems get discovered. I don't know about other coordinators but >from my
own perspective, one thing that would help me in keeping the material
accurate is to be able to do my own HTML. That way, it would be much easier
to make changes and keep track of the corrected files. Otherwise, it becomes
really cumbersome to tell the HTML-er what changes need to be made and
where, and it is more difficult to keep track of different versions of the
translation. But that's a different issue...

When I was first experiencing some of the problems with our translation, my
immediate reaction was: "we must be doing something wrong". But as we
progressed in our work, I was more and more realizing that some of the
problems are just endemic to this kind of translation. That is why I find it
helpful to hear about the struggles that other coordinators and/or
translators are facing.

Unfortunately, I am not able to attend the conference in
Toronto. However, I hope that there will be a chance there for those of us
who will be attending to get together and talk about some of the issues,
frustrations and problems that we have experienced. It may even be worth to
put together an "infofile" that would give people an idea of what kinds of
problems they may face in doing this kind of translation, and how some
people have dealt with them.

Shabbat Shalom,

Barbara U. Yeager
Przemysl YB Coordinator
png42@...

"Eva Floersheim" evaflor@...
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 21:48:49 +0200

<< As you probably all know, translating names that were
written in Hebrew back to Latin letters is always a
problem, so this is why such a translation is never really
finished. Getting to know more and more relevant lists that
were originally written in Latin letter >from those places,
makes it necessary every now and then to revise the
translation. I hope to improve the Yizkor lists for
Lubaczow and Lwow within the coming year. While preparing
for this, I have come upon a difficult problem. >>

<< Stage Four: >>from learning more and more about the Jews
of Lubaczow >from relatives, >from Pages of Testimony at Yad
Vashem, and >from other sources, I discovered that some of
those listed had died BEFORE Holocaust. Stage Five: The
list must now be revised, but how? Should I make special
notes under those names who I now know were not Holocaust
victims? Should I add some short explanation before the
list that most of those listed died in Holocaust, but a few
died before the war, and in the case of the Lwow list, some
died AFTER the war? >>

Marian Rubin MERUBIN@...
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 19:59:21 EDT

<< I'm coordinating the translation of the Rzeszow Yizkor
Book. A section titled "In Memoriam", which has been
translated/transliterated, contains memorial tributes from
relatives, grouped by family, and is primarily a
remembrance of those who were killed in the
Holocaust.However, grandparents who died some years before
are sometimes included. There is no long list. Many
relatives submitted family photos, identifying those in the
photo, usually with a few words. Some tributes are text
only, naming the deceased and relationships of family
members, some of whom were still living. Each is signed by
the relatives who submitted the tribute, so it was clear
that those individuals were still living in 1966-1967 when
the book was published. After our translation went online,
little by little, I have learned that some in the family
photos survived the war or had emigrated before the war. I
know of one case where the tribute is for a person who died
in Israel in the early 1960s. >>

Passports #galicia

Errol Schneegurt
 

I would like to know what a person would need to supply to the controlling
authorities in the Eastern European countries and Russia in order to get an
approved passport before 1920. I am assuming that at minimum some record of
birth would have been needed.
I know that when my father came here in 1927 he had to answer verbal
questions asked by a person at the American Embassy in Lviv. One of the
questions was "how many legs does an American chicken have"?
Errol Schneegurt LI NY ESLVIV@...

Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Passports #galicia

Errol Schneegurt
 

I would like to know what a person would need to supply to the controlling
authorities in the Eastern European countries and Russia in order to get an
approved passport before 1920. I am assuming that at minimum some record of
birth would have been needed.
I know that when my father came here in 1927 he had to answer verbal
questions asked by a person at the American Embassy in Lviv. One of the
questions was "how many legs does an American chicken have"?
Errol Schneegurt LI NY ESLVIV@...

Re: searching BERMAN from Grodno #general

Mitch Berman <mmb@...>
 

Greetings,

My Berman relatives came >from the Grodno Guberniya, now Belarus (then
Russia) and moved to Chicago in 1903-1912 time period. Let me know if
anything connects.
Mitch Berman


Subject: A list of Names I am researching if you know if you are
From: moshe@...
Date: Mon, 08 Jul 2002 01:44:35 +0200
X-Message-Number: 39

This is a list of names I am researching if you have any connection no
matter how small please be in touch with me. I have also put where I know
that part of the family came >from and the last place that I know they end
up in. Most of this families end up in New York >from 1890 to 1940. Thank
you for your help. Thank you again for your help.
moshe schaeffer

BACHMAN, Poland - New York
BERG, Unknown - USA
BESMAN, Russia - New York
BERMAN, Unknown - USA
BUCHMAK, Unknown- Tri- State
GOLDBERG, Russia - New York
HIRSCHOWITZ, Russia - New York
KAUFF, Wolocysk, Russia - New York
KADISH, Unknown - New York State
KAMINSKY , Unknown - New York
KIRSCHNER, Warsaw, Poland - New York
KIRZNER, Unknown - Warsaw, Poland
LEOME, Russia - New York
LEVY, Unknown - New York
PAVE, Unknown - New York
ROSENSTEIN, Russia - New York
RUBINSTEIN, Unknown - New York
RUCHAMES, Unknown - New York
SCHAEFFER, Russia - New York
SCHAFFER, Russia - New York
SHUVAL, Unknown - New York
WEISS, Russia - New York
WORK, Russia - New York

Thank you for your help again
moshe schaeffer

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: searching BERMAN from Grodno #general

Mitch Berman <mmb@...>
 

Greetings,

My Berman relatives came >from the Grodno Guberniya, now Belarus (then
Russia) and moved to Chicago in 1903-1912 time period. Let me know if
anything connects.
Mitch Berman


Subject: A list of Names I am researching if you know if you are
From: moshe@...
Date: Mon, 08 Jul 2002 01:44:35 +0200
X-Message-Number: 39

This is a list of names I am researching if you have any connection no
matter how small please be in touch with me. I have also put where I know
that part of the family came >from and the last place that I know they end
up in. Most of this families end up in New York >from 1890 to 1940. Thank
you for your help. Thank you again for your help.
moshe schaeffer

BACHMAN, Poland - New York
BERG, Unknown - USA
BESMAN, Russia - New York
BERMAN, Unknown - USA
BUCHMAK, Unknown- Tri- State
GOLDBERG, Russia - New York
HIRSCHOWITZ, Russia - New York
KAUFF, Wolocysk, Russia - New York
KADISH, Unknown - New York State
KAMINSKY , Unknown - New York
KIRSCHNER, Warsaw, Poland - New York
KIRZNER, Unknown - Warsaw, Poland
LEOME, Russia - New York
LEVY, Unknown - New York
PAVE, Unknown - New York
ROSENSTEIN, Russia - New York
RUBINSTEIN, Unknown - New York
RUCHAMES, Unknown - New York
SCHAEFFER, Russia - New York
SCHAFFER, Russia - New York
SHUVAL, Unknown - New York
WEISS, Russia - New York
WORK, Russia - New York

Thank you for your help again
moshe schaeffer

Re: How to decipher a compound surname, Austro-Hungarian style? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 7/20/2002 2:53:04 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
shgarber@... writes:

<< In my relentless quest to ferret-out documents about ZLOCZOWERs, I found a
Mr. Feibisch ZLACZOWER V. HALLER.
I guessed that HALLER might be his mother's maiden name. I'd found another
ZLOCZOWER whose mom was a HALLER, so I made a leap-of-faith that they might
be siblings. Does anyone know what surname A v. surname B meant in Austrian
or German context? >>

Generally, in German documents of Jews, I have found v.
to be an abbreviation of von, meaning "from" and not
as part of a "noble" title.

The next word would therefore be the name of the location where the person
was born, or last lived. I would start off by assuming that both your
ZLACZOWERs came >from the town of HALLER. and, given the relative rarity of
the ZLACZOWER name, most likely related.

There are two Hallers on shtettelseeker:
HALLER 47.29N 10.35E in Austria
HALLER 47.55N 9.38E in Germany

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@...>
seeking
WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: How to decipher a compound surname, Austro-Hungarian style? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 7/20/2002 2:53:04 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
shgarber@... writes:

<< In my relentless quest to ferret-out documents about ZLOCZOWERs, I found a
Mr. Feibisch ZLACZOWER V. HALLER.
I guessed that HALLER might be his mother's maiden name. I'd found another
ZLOCZOWER whose mom was a HALLER, so I made a leap-of-faith that they might
be siblings. Does anyone know what surname A v. surname B meant in Austrian
or German context? >>

Generally, in German documents of Jews, I have found v.
to be an abbreviation of von, meaning "from" and not
as part of a "noble" title.

The next word would therefore be the name of the location where the person
was born, or last lived. I would start off by assuming that both your
ZLACZOWERs came >from the town of HALLER. and, given the relative rarity of
the ZLACZOWER name, most likely related.

There are two Hallers on shtettelseeker:
HALLER 47.29N 10.35E in Austria
HALLER 47.55N 9.38E in Germany

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@...>
seeking
WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER