Date   

JGS of Georgia May Meeting #general

Sandi Goldsmith
 

*Translation Day*

Bring all those documents, tombstone photos, and letters that have been
gathering dust and have them translated by our experts.

When: Sunday, May 18, 2003

Time: 2:00 - 5:00pm

Where: Meyer Balser Center for Healthy Living
on the campus of the William Breman Jewish Home

3150 Howell Mill Road
Atlanta

404-351-8410

Check our web site for directions and additional information.
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsg/


Sandi Goldsmith
Alpharetta, GA


JFRA Israel: May 13 Tel Aviv, May 21 Ra'anana #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

All JFRA members and friends are cordially invited to our next two
meetings:

JFRA Tel Aviv (Hebrew)
Tuesday, May 13
8 pm
Beit Shalom, 2 Shir St, Tel Aviv
Speaker: Diana Fine Sommer
Topic: "Historical and sociological aspects of genealogy"

Individual reasons for doing family research are many and varied, but
historical events and sociological developments in the 20th century have
had a profound impact on the renewed interest in genealogy in general
and in Jewish genealogy in particular. Her experience has given her a
unique insight and perspective into the hows and whys of Jewish
genealogy and how they impact our lives, our research and our future.
Non-members, NIS 15.
Info: Hinda Solomon, <hinda_S@hotmail.com>


JFRA Ra'anana (English) - *Corrected Date!*
Wednesday, May 21
7 pm, program begins 7.30 pm
Bet Fisher, 5 Klausner St, Ra'anana
Speaker: Prof. Mordechai Arbell, diplomat/genealogist/researcher
specializing in Sephardim, Author of recently published "Jewish Nation
of the Caribbean: The Spanish-Portuguese Settlements in the Caribbean
and the Guianas."

Bulgarian-born, Arbell arrived in Israel and was an Israeli air force
navigator during the War of Independence. After studying at Hebrew
University, he joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. His postings
included consul in Bogota, Colombia, ambassador to Panama and Haiti. In
these places, and in many others to which he travelled, he met
descendants of Jewish colonists who recalled their religious heritage.
In 1993, he was a Touro National Heritage Trust Fellow at the John
Carter Brown Library (Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island), and a
fellow at the American Jewish Archives. He is a research fellow at the
Ben-Zvi Institute for the Study of Jewish Communities in the East at
Hebrew University, and an adviser to the World Jewish Congress. He has
devoted a good part of his life to uncovering and documenting the
elusive story of Jews who lived in Central and South America.

JFRA members, NIS 5; others, NIS 15
Info: Ingrid Rockberger, <ingrid_100@hotmail.com>


Schelly Talalay Dardashti
JFRA Israel
Tel Aviv
dardasht@barak-online.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Georgia May Meeting #general

Sandi Goldsmith
 

*Translation Day*

Bring all those documents, tombstone photos, and letters that have been
gathering dust and have them translated by our experts.

When: Sunday, May 18, 2003

Time: 2:00 - 5:00pm

Where: Meyer Balser Center for Healthy Living
on the campus of the William Breman Jewish Home

3150 Howell Mill Road
Atlanta

404-351-8410

Check our web site for directions and additional information.
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsg/


Sandi Goldsmith
Alpharetta, GA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JFRA Israel: May 13 Tel Aviv, May 21 Ra'anana #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

All JFRA members and friends are cordially invited to our next two
meetings:

JFRA Tel Aviv (Hebrew)
Tuesday, May 13
8 pm
Beit Shalom, 2 Shir St, Tel Aviv
Speaker: Diana Fine Sommer
Topic: "Historical and sociological aspects of genealogy"

Individual reasons for doing family research are many and varied, but
historical events and sociological developments in the 20th century have
had a profound impact on the renewed interest in genealogy in general
and in Jewish genealogy in particular. Her experience has given her a
unique insight and perspective into the hows and whys of Jewish
genealogy and how they impact our lives, our research and our future.
Non-members, NIS 15.
Info: Hinda Solomon, <hinda_S@hotmail.com>


JFRA Ra'anana (English) - *Corrected Date!*
Wednesday, May 21
7 pm, program begins 7.30 pm
Bet Fisher, 5 Klausner St, Ra'anana
Speaker: Prof. Mordechai Arbell, diplomat/genealogist/researcher
specializing in Sephardim, Author of recently published "Jewish Nation
of the Caribbean: The Spanish-Portuguese Settlements in the Caribbean
and the Guianas."

Bulgarian-born, Arbell arrived in Israel and was an Israeli air force
navigator during the War of Independence. After studying at Hebrew
University, he joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. His postings
included consul in Bogota, Colombia, ambassador to Panama and Haiti. In
these places, and in many others to which he travelled, he met
descendants of Jewish colonists who recalled their religious heritage.
In 1993, he was a Touro National Heritage Trust Fellow at the John
Carter Brown Library (Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island), and a
fellow at the American Jewish Archives. He is a research fellow at the
Ben-Zvi Institute for the Study of Jewish Communities in the East at
Hebrew University, and an adviser to the World Jewish Congress. He has
devoted a good part of his life to uncovering and documenting the
elusive story of Jews who lived in Central and South America.

JFRA members, NIS 5; others, NIS 15
Info: Ingrid Rockberger, <ingrid_100@hotmail.com>


Schelly Talalay Dardashti
JFRA Israel
Tel Aviv
dardasht@barak-online.net


JGS Southern NJ #general

Rabbi Gary M. Gans <ggans@...>
 

The Southern New Jersey affiliate of the Greater Philadelphia JGS invites
participants to our next meeting.


Date: Monday, May 19, 2003
Time: 7:30 PM
Place: Congregation Beth Tikvah, Marlton, NJ
856-983-8090

Our topics will include a "breaking down the barriers" session drawing on
the expertise of local members. Translation of documents in Hebrew will
also be available.

Admission is free and all are welcome. Light refreshments will be served.


Shalom,

Rabbi Gary M. Gans


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS Southern NJ #general

Rabbi Gary M. Gans <ggans@...>
 

The Southern New Jersey affiliate of the Greater Philadelphia JGS invites
participants to our next meeting.


Date: Monday, May 19, 2003
Time: 7:30 PM
Place: Congregation Beth Tikvah, Marlton, NJ
856-983-8090

Our topics will include a "breaking down the barriers" session drawing on
the expertise of local members. Translation of documents in Hebrew will
also be available.

Admission is free and all are welcome. Light refreshments will be served.


Shalom,

Rabbi Gary M. Gans


Re: Shoah Commemoration dates in Hungary 2003 #hungary

Gábor Hirsch <hirsch@...>
 

marcplot schrieb:

Message text written by "H-SIG"


city, date, time and place where on the following weekends a

commemoration of the Holocaust victims will be
held,<

Is there a way, if onecannot ttend, to send a message to those organizing the event in a given town, to let any survivors or relatives attending know how to contact an HSIG member who has family members who were deported? Is there a guide to the sposors or sponsoring organization with adresses? I am particularly interested in Sátoraljaújhely.

Thanks.

Marc Weiss
NYC

In case of Satoraljaujhely, I saw may be two institutions which might
lead you to the organizers, one is the city majors office, the second
the only religious organization mentioned on the home page, the
reformatus egyhazkozosseg (Calvinist) community. You can try as well to
address the Jewish community and see what happens. A letter to the
officials might lead to a wanted or unwanted effect, that the community
has to take knowledge of a coming event.

Another approach might be to write either to the Mazsihisz (the umbrella
organization of the Jewish communities) or the Uj Elet, the biweekly
Jewish newspaper, to forward your wish for your community, but also to
make pressure that information of this kind should be widely spread and
more timely, so that we should be able to react as I believe, we abroad
need more time for preparation. In the present case the publication is
dated 1. May, it arrived to Switzerland on the 8 May and the first
commemoration days are on 22. May (the mass deportations started on 14.
May 1944). It might be even preferable if the general information would
be sent directly to H-SIG (if they are willing to deal with them).

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch

The mentioned addresses:

In case of Satoraljaujhely

Polgármesteri hivatal:
3980 Sátoraljaújhely, Kossuth tér 5.
Tel: (47) 321-211 Fax: (47) 321-024

Satoraljaujhelyi Reformatus Hitkozseg
3980 Sátoraljaújhely, Peto"fi u. 5.
Telefon: 47/321-753

Mazsihisz
H-1075, Budapest, Sip utca 12

Uj Elet
a Magyar hitkozsegek lapja
H-1075, Budapest, Sip utca 12
eMail: ujelet01@freemail.hu (I hope they will react)


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Shoah Commemoration dates in Hungary 2003 #hungary

Gábor Hirsch <hirsch@...>
 

marcplot schrieb:

Message text written by "H-SIG"


city, date, time and place where on the following weekends a

commemoration of the Holocaust victims will be
held,<

Is there a way, if onecannot ttend, to send a message to those organizing the event in a given town, to let any survivors or relatives attending know how to contact an HSIG member who has family members who were deported? Is there a guide to the sposors or sponsoring organization with adresses? I am particularly interested in Sátoraljaújhely.

Thanks.

Marc Weiss
NYC

In case of Satoraljaujhely, I saw may be two institutions which might
lead you to the organizers, one is the city majors office, the second
the only religious organization mentioned on the home page, the
reformatus egyhazkozosseg (Calvinist) community. You can try as well to
address the Jewish community and see what happens. A letter to the
officials might lead to a wanted or unwanted effect, that the community
has to take knowledge of a coming event.

Another approach might be to write either to the Mazsihisz (the umbrella
organization of the Jewish communities) or the Uj Elet, the biweekly
Jewish newspaper, to forward your wish for your community, but also to
make pressure that information of this kind should be widely spread and
more timely, so that we should be able to react as I believe, we abroad
need more time for preparation. In the present case the publication is
dated 1. May, it arrived to Switzerland on the 8 May and the first
commemoration days are on 22. May (the mass deportations started on 14.
May 1944). It might be even preferable if the general information would
be sent directly to H-SIG (if they are willing to deal with them).

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch

The mentioned addresses:

In case of Satoraljaujhely

Polgármesteri hivatal:
3980 Sátoraljaújhely, Kossuth tér 5.
Tel: (47) 321-211 Fax: (47) 321-024

Satoraljaujhelyi Reformatus Hitkozseg
3980 Sátoraljaújhely, Peto"fi u. 5.
Telefon: 47/321-753

Mazsihisz
H-1075, Budapest, Sip utca 12

Uj Elet
a Magyar hitkozsegek lapja
H-1075, Budapest, Sip utca 12
eMail: ujelet01@freemail.hu (I hope they will react)


Re: translation of a Russian profession-19th century #general

William F. Hoffman <WFHoffman@...>
 

Nachum Tuchman <nachum@avichai.org.il> asked about the Russian terms
_bosnitchnyi slushitil_ and _skolnik_. There may be others who can answer
more accurately than I, and I will gladly defer to their expertise. But I
encountered these terms while researching the Russian translation guide
Jonathan Shea and I wrote, _In Their Words ... Volume 2_. I believe I'm
correct in saying both terms can be taken here to mean "synagogue
attendant."

Of course _sluzhitel'_ (as it's normally transliterated by English phonetic
values) is a common word, meaning "servant, attendant." But _bozhnichnyi_
(as I'd render it) is the adjectival form of _bozhnitsa_, "synagogue," a
term not often seen in Russian; the standard Russian term is _sinagoga_.
Since we know this document was written in Kielce province of what is now
Poland, it's reasonable to suggest this is a Russified version of the
Polish term _boznica_, "synagogue." Literally, therefore, the term
means "attendant of a synagogue"; but it's one most Russians would
probably scratch their heads over. I think you'd find it mainly used by
people living in Poland who were required to write documents in Russian
but whose greater familiarity with Polish would cause a certain amount of
linguistic "contamination."

As for _skolnik_, or _shkol'nik_, Alexander Beider's book on Jewish
surnames >from the Kingdom of Poland indicates this term can mean "sexton
in a synagogue" (and even "executive director of the Jewish community").
It comes >from _shkola_, the Eastern Slavic version of the word appearing
in Polish as _szkola_, in German as _Schule_, and in English as _school_.
So the basic meaning of _shkol'nik_ is "one attending school," which
explains why modern Russians would interpret it as "school kid." But
context is everything, and within a Jewish context surely the link with
_shul_, rather than "school," is relevant. In this case I'd say it's used
as simply another way of saying "attendant at a synagogue."

I hope this helps, and I welcome correction if I'm wrong.

William F. Hoffman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: translation of a Russian profession-19th century #general

William F. Hoffman <WFHoffman@...>
 

Nachum Tuchman <nachum@avichai.org.il> asked about the Russian terms
_bosnitchnyi slushitil_ and _skolnik_. There may be others who can answer
more accurately than I, and I will gladly defer to their expertise. But I
encountered these terms while researching the Russian translation guide
Jonathan Shea and I wrote, _In Their Words ... Volume 2_. I believe I'm
correct in saying both terms can be taken here to mean "synagogue
attendant."

Of course _sluzhitel'_ (as it's normally transliterated by English phonetic
values) is a common word, meaning "servant, attendant." But _bozhnichnyi_
(as I'd render it) is the adjectival form of _bozhnitsa_, "synagogue," a
term not often seen in Russian; the standard Russian term is _sinagoga_.
Since we know this document was written in Kielce province of what is now
Poland, it's reasonable to suggest this is a Russified version of the
Polish term _boznica_, "synagogue." Literally, therefore, the term
means "attendant of a synagogue"; but it's one most Russians would
probably scratch their heads over. I think you'd find it mainly used by
people living in Poland who were required to write documents in Russian
but whose greater familiarity with Polish would cause a certain amount of
linguistic "contamination."

As for _skolnik_, or _shkol'nik_, Alexander Beider's book on Jewish
surnames >from the Kingdom of Poland indicates this term can mean "sexton
in a synagogue" (and even "executive director of the Jewish community").
It comes >from _shkola_, the Eastern Slavic version of the word appearing
in Polish as _szkola_, in German as _Schule_, and in English as _school_.
So the basic meaning of _shkol'nik_ is "one attending school," which
explains why modern Russians would interpret it as "school kid." But
context is everything, and within a Jewish context surely the link with
_shul_, rather than "school," is relevant. In this case I'd say it's used
as simply another way of saying "attendant at a synagogue."

I hope this helps, and I welcome correction if I'm wrong.

William F. Hoffman


Re: translation of a Russian profession-19th century #general

Gary Goldberg <XGaryG@...>
 

"Nachum" <nachum@avichai.org.il> wrote:

Dear List,
snip<
Some Russian speaking friends are helping me with the translations, and
I have a question regarding my GGF's profesion. His name was Chaim
Yitzchak KLARMAN, born app. 1844. His wife was Chaya Leah, nee ASPIS,
born app. 1845.

The earlier records say that he was a "bosnitchnyi slushitil" (this is
an English tranliteration >from the Russian, as best as I can write it).


One friend says that this means 'servant of G-d' or clerk (slushitil) of
G-d'.
Another friend thinks that this may mean that he was a Rabbi, although
there's no tradition in our family that he was a Rabbi.

Does anyone have an idea as to what my GGF's profession/job may have
been?

snip<
Thanks in advance.

Nachum Tuchman
Tekoa, Israel
With the change of one letter, it's "hospital attendant" (bol'nichnyy
sluzhitel' in usual transliteration).

(Remove "X" >from address to reply)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: translation of a Russian profession-19th century #general

Gary Goldberg <XGaryG@...>
 

"Nachum" <nachum@avichai.org.il> wrote:

Dear List,
snip<
Some Russian speaking friends are helping me with the translations, and
I have a question regarding my GGF's profesion. His name was Chaim
Yitzchak KLARMAN, born app. 1844. His wife was Chaya Leah, nee ASPIS,
born app. 1845.

The earlier records say that he was a "bosnitchnyi slushitil" (this is
an English tranliteration >from the Russian, as best as I can write it).


One friend says that this means 'servant of G-d' or clerk (slushitil) of
G-d'.
Another friend thinks that this may mean that he was a Rabbi, although
there's no tradition in our family that he was a Rabbi.

Does anyone have an idea as to what my GGF's profession/job may have
been?

snip<
Thanks in advance.

Nachum Tuchman
Tekoa, Israel
With the change of one letter, it's "hospital attendant" (bol'nichnyy
sluzhitel' in usual transliteration).

(Remove "X" >from address to reply)


query #lithuania

Lev Raphael <levraphael@...>
 

Can someone tell me how exactly to accurately spell the name of the
Lithuanian town that sounds like "Vilvoviskes"?

I've just learned I had relatives there and would like to do more
research.

Feel free to email me off-list: <levraphael@attbi.com>.

Thanks,
Lev Raphael, researching Klaczko or Kliatchko or Klatchko or Klyachko
(Vilna, St. Petersburg, Kaunus, Montevideo); Lass (Vilna),
Solonovitch (Vilna), Lavarishik (Vilna), Minikes (Vilna, St.
Petersburg).
--
Visit My Home Page at
http://www.levraphael.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Researchers looking for the current spelling of a Lithuanian town can check the "Shtetls of Lithuania" feature on the LitvakSIG homepage < www.jewishgen.org/Litvak >


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania query #lithuania

Lev Raphael <levraphael@...>
 

Can someone tell me how exactly to accurately spell the name of the
Lithuanian town that sounds like "Vilvoviskes"?

I've just learned I had relatives there and would like to do more
research.

Feel free to email me off-list: <levraphael@attbi.com>.

Thanks,
Lev Raphael, researching Klaczko or Kliatchko or Klatchko or Klyachko
(Vilna, St. Petersburg, Kaunus, Montevideo); Lass (Vilna),
Solonovitch (Vilna), Lavarishik (Vilna), Minikes (Vilna, St.
Petersburg).
--
Visit My Home Page at
http://www.levraphael.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Researchers looking for the current spelling of a Lithuanian town can check the "Shtetls of Lithuania" feature on the LitvakSIG homepage < www.jewishgen.org/Litvak >


Vilna 1858 Revision List - Distribution of Records #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

The Vilna District Research Group is proud to announce the distribution of
records >from the Vilna 1858 Revision List. Records set #6 was sent out
yesterday, completing the distribution of records in the contigous range of sets 1-11. In total, over 10,800 records >from this Revision List have now been distributed to members.

Anyone interested in the 1858 Vilna Revision List or other activities of the Vilna District Research Group, including the other shtetls in the Vilna uyezd [district] should contact Joel Ratner at Joelrat@aol.com.

Joel Ratner


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Vilna 1858 Revision List - Distribution of Records #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

The Vilna District Research Group is proud to announce the distribution of
records >from the Vilna 1858 Revision List. Records set #6 was sent out
yesterday, completing the distribution of records in the contigous range of sets 1-11. In total, over 10,800 records >from this Revision List have now been distributed to members.

Anyone interested in the 1858 Vilna Revision List or other activities of the Vilna District Research Group, including the other shtetls in the Vilna uyezd [district] should contact Joel Ratner at Joelrat@aol.com.

Joel Ratner


Re: scandinavia digest: May 06, 2003 #scandinavia

norman.poser@...
 

Dear Leif:

Thank you very much for the information. I will get in touch with
Mr. Carlsson. Are you sure the email address you gave me is right,
because it has a space in it, which doesn't seem right.
Could you please give me the address again.

(MODERATOR: Here is the e-mail address:
carl-henrik.carlsson@hist.uu.se)

I hope everything is going well ith you. Since we met two years ago, I
have done a lot of research about the Salomons and plan to put it all
together in a book next year. Next Spring, we plan to visit Scandinavia
again and I look forward to seeing you.

Has the Jewish Danish Museum opened? I have not heard anything about it.

Best regards,

Norman

----------------------------
Subject: Re:Salomon
From: Leif Rosenstock <leif.rosenstock@mail.tele.dk>
Date: Tue, 06 May 2003 15:53:18 +0200

I suggest that you mail to Carl Henrik Carlsson in Uppsala,Sweden.
His mail dress is: Carl Henrik.Carlsson@hist.uu.se.
He is chairman for the Jewish Genealogical Society of Sweden.
-----------------------------


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Re: scandinavia digest: May 06, 2003 #scandinavia

norman.poser@...
 

Dear Leif:

Thank you very much for the information. I will get in touch with
Mr. Carlsson. Are you sure the email address you gave me is right,
because it has a space in it, which doesn't seem right.
Could you please give me the address again.

(MODERATOR: Here is the e-mail address:
carl-henrik.carlsson@hist.uu.se)

I hope everything is going well ith you. Since we met two years ago, I
have done a lot of research about the Salomons and plan to put it all
together in a book next year. Next Spring, we plan to visit Scandinavia
again and I look forward to seeing you.

Has the Jewish Danish Museum opened? I have not heard anything about it.

Best regards,

Norman

----------------------------
Subject: Re:Salomon
From: Leif Rosenstock <leif.rosenstock@mail.tele.dk>
Date: Tue, 06 May 2003 15:53:18 +0200

I suggest that you mail to Carl Henrik Carlsson in Uppsala,Sweden.
His mail dress is: Carl Henrik.Carlsson@hist.uu.se.
He is chairman for the Jewish Genealogical Society of Sweden.
-----------------------------


KLOR, KATZ, KOPUL, MAGIDSON #latvia

jacqueline gill <shibko@...>
 

I note >from the latest edition of the Latvia SIG Family Finder
that there are other researchers interested in two of my family names,
KATZ and KLOR. As I am not sure how to contact them, I hope this
posting will be successful.

Marianne JOEL, my relative, married Bentsian KATZ in Riga in 1902
( son of Shimcha >from Braslav), and her sister Mihle married
Movshe KLOR in Riga in 1907.

I am also seeking information on another sister of theirs, Sara, who
married Hatzkel KOPUL (son of Aizik) in Bausk in 1896, and on my
grandfather's sister, Hanna/Anna JOEL, who married Morduch-David
MAGIDSON (son of Elias) in Riga in 1922.

All the foregoing information is >from a family tree prepared by the
Riga Archives, and I would be very pleased to hear >from anyone with
connections to these people to exchange further details.

Jacqueline E. Gill (U.K.)


Latvia SIG #Latvia KLOR, KATZ, KOPUL, MAGIDSON #latvia

jacqueline gill <shibko@...>
 

I note >from the latest edition of the Latvia SIG Family Finder
that there are other researchers interested in two of my family names,
KATZ and KLOR. As I am not sure how to contact them, I hope this
posting will be successful.

Marianne JOEL, my relative, married Bentsian KATZ in Riga in 1902
( son of Shimcha >from Braslav), and her sister Mihle married
Movshe KLOR in Riga in 1907.

I am also seeking information on another sister of theirs, Sara, who
married Hatzkel KOPUL (son of Aizik) in Bausk in 1896, and on my
grandfather's sister, Hanna/Anna JOEL, who married Morduch-David
MAGIDSON (son of Elias) in Riga in 1922.

All the foregoing information is >from a family tree prepared by the
Riga Archives, and I would be very pleased to hear >from anyone with
connections to these people to exchange further details.

Jacqueline E. Gill (U.K.)