Date   

Re: How to Change a Surname in the US? #general

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

The formal process was to file a petition with a Court. I believe name changes
were done in most any non-appellate court. The change was made when the court
issued the necessary decree. The records would be among the records of the
particular court that receive the petition. For example, there are indexes of
name changes in the NY City Municipal Court records, if I remember correctly.

However, I believe that even as late as the 1920's people could informally change
their names upon arrival, or afterwards, by simply beginning to use another name.
After all, in the days before Social Security and income tax, there were few if
any government functions that tracked people for long periods of time. As far as
I know, anyone could move to a new state (or city), adopt a new name, and
basically separate themselves >from their former identity.

Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

"Renee Tepper" <renee@...> wrote in message

I understand that it was common for one to change his surname when he
arrived in America. And it seems there was no documentation needed.
However, once in America, say for 20 years, how would someone have changed
his surname in NYC? I'm interested in the years 1920-1940. Is there an
office there where he would have had to file papers? Who should I contact?

Renee Grobtuch Tepper


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: How to Change a Surname in the US? #general

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

The formal process was to file a petition with a Court. I believe name changes
were done in most any non-appellate court. The change was made when the court
issued the necessary decree. The records would be among the records of the
particular court that receive the petition. For example, there are indexes of
name changes in the NY City Municipal Court records, if I remember correctly.

However, I believe that even as late as the 1920's people could informally change
their names upon arrival, or afterwards, by simply beginning to use another name.
After all, in the days before Social Security and income tax, there were few if
any government functions that tracked people for long periods of time. As far as
I know, anyone could move to a new state (or city), adopt a new name, and
basically separate themselves >from their former identity.

Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

"Renee Tepper" <renee@...> wrote in message

I understand that it was common for one to change his surname when he
arrived in America. And it seems there was no documentation needed.
However, once in America, say for 20 years, how would someone have changed
his surname in NYC? I'm interested in the years 1920-1940. Is there an
office there where he would have had to file papers? Who should I contact?

Renee Grobtuch Tepper


When is a Widow a Widow? #general

HeyJudy123@...
 

Julia Van Zandt posted a query about her great-grandparents. She reports that she
always had been told that this particular set of great-grandparents had been
divorced, and that the man had outlived the woman. Yet, when she recently received
a copy of the woman's death certificate, it listed her as a widow. Julia wants to
know whether a divorced woman might consider herself a widow.

In a word: Yes.

Yet it is a bit more complicated than the single affirmative word might indicate.
Among the Jews of Eastern Europe in the 19th Century, I have read that they
frequently did not have civil marriages, but only religious ones.

So, if a husband later sought a civil divorce, his wife could properly consider
herself still married in the eyes of her religion. This would be equally true
today in the eyes of observant Jews.

Since a Jewish divorce (a "get") must be agreed to by both parties, if the wife
refused to participate in the process, then they would not have been divorced
under Jewish law, and she would have become a widow at his death.

(The rules regarding the Get are very specific, and I will not go into them here.)

Additionally, since there then was a common tradition of considering those who
married outside of the Jewish faith as dead, it could be that she construed her
husband's second marriage as tantamount to his death, thus deeming herself to be a
widow for the remainder of her life.

If her husband had obtained a proper civil divorce prior to re-marrying, he would
not be a bigamist under secular law. Under Jewish law, there are other
considerations, but this is not the proper forum for such a discussion.

Judy Segal
New York City, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen When is a Widow a Widow? #general

HeyJudy123@...
 

Julia Van Zandt posted a query about her great-grandparents. She reports that she
always had been told that this particular set of great-grandparents had been
divorced, and that the man had outlived the woman. Yet, when she recently received
a copy of the woman's death certificate, it listed her as a widow. Julia wants to
know whether a divorced woman might consider herself a widow.

In a word: Yes.

Yet it is a bit more complicated than the single affirmative word might indicate.
Among the Jews of Eastern Europe in the 19th Century, I have read that they
frequently did not have civil marriages, but only religious ones.

So, if a husband later sought a civil divorce, his wife could properly consider
herself still married in the eyes of her religion. This would be equally true
today in the eyes of observant Jews.

Since a Jewish divorce (a "get") must be agreed to by both parties, if the wife
refused to participate in the process, then they would not have been divorced
under Jewish law, and she would have become a widow at his death.

(The rules regarding the Get are very specific, and I will not go into them here.)

Additionally, since there then was a common tradition of considering those who
married outside of the Jewish faith as dead, it could be that she construed her
husband's second marriage as tantamount to his death, thus deeming herself to be a
widow for the remainder of her life.

If her husband had obtained a proper civil divorce prior to re-marrying, he would
not be a bigamist under secular law. Under Jewish law, there are other
considerations, but this is not the proper forum for such a discussion.

Judy Segal
New York City, USA


Shoemakers, bricklayers and other trades #belarus

HeyJudy123@...
 

Deborah Glassman raised the issue of shoemakers, bricklayers and other types of
tradesmen. This may be of no assistance, but I thought that it bears mentioning
that the Baron Moritz DE HIRSCH (originally of Bavaria and, later, of Paris)
dedicated his entire fortune to his efforts to rescue the Jews of Czarist Russia,
including setting up agricultural colonies in (among other places) Argentina and
New Jersey in the United States. Of course, at that moment in time, Czarist Russia
would have included modern Ukraine, Lithuania, Belarus, Latvia, etc.

More pertinent to the issue at hand, the Baron funded trade schools for various
disciplines, to provide the Jews of Russia with the means of earning a living. It
is possible that these schools included training in bricklaying and shoemaking.
I believe that some of these schools were located in New York, London and then
Palestine.

There are several biographies of the Baron that would provide more detailed
information.

Judy Segal
New York City


Belarus SIG #Belarus Shoemakers, bricklayers and other trades #belarus

HeyJudy123@...
 

Deborah Glassman raised the issue of shoemakers, bricklayers and other types of
tradesmen. This may be of no assistance, but I thought that it bears mentioning
that the Baron Moritz DE HIRSCH (originally of Bavaria and, later, of Paris)
dedicated his entire fortune to his efforts to rescue the Jews of Czarist Russia,
including setting up agricultural colonies in (among other places) Argentina and
New Jersey in the United States. Of course, at that moment in time, Czarist Russia
would have included modern Ukraine, Lithuania, Belarus, Latvia, etc.

More pertinent to the issue at hand, the Baron funded trade schools for various
disciplines, to provide the Jews of Russia with the means of earning a living. It
is possible that these schools included training in bricklaying and shoemaking.
I believe that some of these schools were located in New York, London and then
Palestine.

There are several biographies of the Baron that would provide more detailed
information.

Judy Segal
New York City


STROEKMEISTER in Lvov 1915 #galicia

Miltone@...
 

Searching STOCKMASTER in Lvov 1900-1915
STROEKMEISTER
STOCKMEISTER
STROEKMASTER

Milton E. Botwinick
Philadelphia, PA
http://hometown.aol.com/botwinick/myhomepage/index.html


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia STROEKMEISTER in Lvov 1915 #galicia

Miltone@...
 

Searching STOCKMASTER in Lvov 1900-1915
STROEKMEISTER
STOCKMEISTER
STROEKMASTER

Milton E. Botwinick
Philadelphia, PA
http://hometown.aol.com/botwinick/myhomepage/index.html


Fw: Looking for my Aunt - GLASER #galicia

arie meir
 

Looking for my aunt Dvora Jeanty GLASER who was born in Przemysl in 1927
to her father Chaim GLASER (who was my grandfather) and to her mother
Rachela, whose former name was STOLZBERG. They married in Przemysl in
1926.

Chaim GLASER was previously married to my grandmother Chaia-Helena. Her
former name was MONDERER.

They got married in Vienna and had three children. One of them was Cilli
Glaser MAYER, who was my mother. Chaim Glaser divorced my grandmother in
the early twenties, left Vienna and moved to Przemysl, where he married
Rachela and had this one daughter, I am looking for. The last time my
family heard >from them was in 1939, a short time before World War Two
broke out. If anyone has information on what happened to them please let
me know .

Arieh Meyer
Israel
my email is: meir1935@...


Question #galicia

Perry Mittler <perrymi@...>
 

I have a document in I believe Polish, that I can email to someone, who
could please translate it. I believe it is my grandmothers birth
certificate.

Thank you in advance
Perry Mittler


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Fw: Looking for my Aunt - GLASER #galicia

arie meir
 

Looking for my aunt Dvora Jeanty GLASER who was born in Przemysl in 1927
to her father Chaim GLASER (who was my grandfather) and to her mother
Rachela, whose former name was STOLZBERG. They married in Przemysl in
1926.

Chaim GLASER was previously married to my grandmother Chaia-Helena. Her
former name was MONDERER.

They got married in Vienna and had three children. One of them was Cilli
Glaser MAYER, who was my mother. Chaim Glaser divorced my grandmother in
the early twenties, left Vienna and moved to Przemysl, where he married
Rachela and had this one daughter, I am looking for. The last time my
family heard >from them was in 1939, a short time before World War Two
broke out. If anyone has information on what happened to them please let
me know .

Arieh Meyer
Israel
my email is: meir1935@...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Question #galicia

Perry Mittler <perrymi@...>
 

I have a document in I believe Polish, that I can email to someone, who
could please translate it. I believe it is my grandmothers birth
certificate.

Thank you in advance
Perry Mittler


Query Re: Wedding in a Chinese Restaurant #general

HeyJudy123@...
 

Fran SEGALL has posted a message detailing her confusion over her parents' wedding
invitation. When she finally saw a copy of the invitation recently, it listed a
Chinese restaurant in Brooklyn as the location of the wedding, though the marriage
certificate shows the name of what appears to be a non-Chinese catering hall as
the site of the ceremony.

I have been pondering this curious mystery. Certainly, it has been traditional
(though not obligated by Jewish law) for the Jews of the New York metropolitan
area to be married either in synagogues which have catering halls physically
attached, or to have the ceremony and reception in one-and-the-same catering
facility which, with the passage of time, has come to include luxury hotels.

Thus, the only solution to Fran's mystery that I can come up with is that her
parents may have had their ceremony in the catering hall, and their reception in a
presumably non-kosher Chinese restaurant.

I will say that my own father grew up near Pitkin Avenue, where the Chinese
restaurant shown in Fran's invitation is located. This is part of the neighborhood
that I believe is called "Brownsville" (home of "Murder, Inc.") For the rest of
his life, Dad reminisced about how wonderful the restaurants of Pitkin Avenue used
to be. And noted literary agent Irving ("Swifty") LAZER, who grew up in the same
place, began his autobiography with a recollection of the wonderful delicatessens
on Pitkin Avenue.

So it may be that, if a Chinese restaurant on Pitkin Avenue was where Fran's
parents' wedding reception had been held, that they had been acting as trendy
gourmets in their choice of venue.

Judy Segal
New York City

From: "Fran Segall" <FranSegall@...>

I recently got a copy of the actual invitation. It is a standard invitation but,
to my surprise, it invites everyone to their marriage at Little Oriental
Restaurant on Pitkin Ave in Brooklyn.  That sounds more to me like where a
reception would be held than the wedding.>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Query Re: Wedding in a Chinese Restaurant #general

HeyJudy123@...
 

Fran SEGALL has posted a message detailing her confusion over her parents' wedding
invitation. When she finally saw a copy of the invitation recently, it listed a
Chinese restaurant in Brooklyn as the location of the wedding, though the marriage
certificate shows the name of what appears to be a non-Chinese catering hall as
the site of the ceremony.

I have been pondering this curious mystery. Certainly, it has been traditional
(though not obligated by Jewish law) for the Jews of the New York metropolitan
area to be married either in synagogues which have catering halls physically
attached, or to have the ceremony and reception in one-and-the-same catering
facility which, with the passage of time, has come to include luxury hotels.

Thus, the only solution to Fran's mystery that I can come up with is that her
parents may have had their ceremony in the catering hall, and their reception in a
presumably non-kosher Chinese restaurant.

I will say that my own father grew up near Pitkin Avenue, where the Chinese
restaurant shown in Fran's invitation is located. This is part of the neighborhood
that I believe is called "Brownsville" (home of "Murder, Inc.") For the rest of
his life, Dad reminisced about how wonderful the restaurants of Pitkin Avenue used
to be. And noted literary agent Irving ("Swifty") LAZER, who grew up in the same
place, began his autobiography with a recollection of the wonderful delicatessens
on Pitkin Avenue.

So it may be that, if a Chinese restaurant on Pitkin Avenue was where Fran's
parents' wedding reception had been held, that they had been acting as trendy
gourmets in their choice of venue.

Judy Segal
New York City

From: "Fran Segall" <FranSegall@...>

I recently got a copy of the actual invitation. It is a standard invitation but,
to my surprise, it invites everyone to their marriage at Little Oriental
Restaurant on Pitkin Ave in Brooklyn.  That sounds more to me like where a
reception would be held than the wedding.>


New to list: REST family #latinamerica

Elaine Bush <erbush@...>
 

Hello,

I am a member on several other Jewishgen SIGs and am just now beginning
to look at Argentina as a possible continuation of my family tree. The
REST family name appeared on the Argentina Death Records website
recently posted on the JewishGen Discussion Group. Several people
have inquired as to how one might go about getting more information on
these lists (lookups). I would appreciate any information folks on
this list might have to offer.

Elaine Bush
Pleasant Hill, CA


Latin America #LatinAmerica New to list: REST family #latinamerica

Elaine Bush <erbush@...>
 

Hello,

I am a member on several other Jewishgen SIGs and am just now beginning
to look at Argentina as a possible continuation of my family tree. The
REST family name appeared on the Argentina Death Records website
recently posted on the JewishGen Discussion Group. Several people
have inquired as to how one might go about getting more information on
these lists (lookups). I would appreciate any information folks on
this list might have to offer.

Elaine Bush
Pleasant Hill, CA


Re: seeking authentic strudel recipe #hungary

Gábor Hirsch <hirsch@...>
 

As I was always for a not to strict moderating and as no housewife
offered any recipe until now, I try to do my best. In our Jewish
cookbooks I didn't found any, but on the Homepage of the MAZSIHISZ under
the titel "A Zsido Konyha Csodai (Wonders of the Jewish Kitchen)" there
are some recipes one is the Vegetable Strudel. I found also a wide
variety of strudels in "Kis Magyar Szakacskonyv" and in "Kleines
uUngarisches Kochbuch" both >from Gundel Karoly one in Hungarian the
other German, because of copyright restrictions of jewishgen I don't
copy it but I can send it to you on request preferably in German or
Hungarian. By the way the Hungarian recipe uses the ready made
dough/pastry/teszta which you can buy, you can get it also in Austria
and Switzerland too. It is very thin, like homemade, so thin that you
can read a book through it.

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch

PS Gundel's book deals with fruit, walnut, almond, cabbage, puppy,
chocolate and quark strudel

DRGOLDIN90@... schrieb:
> Hi All
>
> This isn't exactly genealogically related, but my family is recently
> returned >from a trip to our roots in Budapest. While we were there
> my cousin spoke of our ggm's strudel which was reported to be
> fabulous. Of course, unfortunately, no one has the recipe and we are
> hoping to revive the skill with the help of someone else's ancestor.
> Thanks in advance for your help!
>
> Marge Goldin Dix Hills, NY
>
> Moderator: Although not related to family research, such items do
> relate to our collective Hungarian-Jewish experience. Would you like
> to include such family memories in our communications subject to the
> Moderator's discretion?

Moderator: As long as we don't get overwhelmed by discussions regarding Hungarian food, all H-SIG subscribers, regardless of gender, are welcome to submit appropriate messages.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: seeking authentic strudel recipe #hungary

Gábor Hirsch <hirsch@...>
 

As I was always for a not to strict moderating and as no housewife
offered any recipe until now, I try to do my best. In our Jewish
cookbooks I didn't found any, but on the Homepage of the MAZSIHISZ under
the titel "A Zsido Konyha Csodai (Wonders of the Jewish Kitchen)" there
are some recipes one is the Vegetable Strudel. I found also a wide
variety of strudels in "Kis Magyar Szakacskonyv" and in "Kleines
uUngarisches Kochbuch" both >from Gundel Karoly one in Hungarian the
other German, because of copyright restrictions of jewishgen I don't
copy it but I can send it to you on request preferably in German or
Hungarian. By the way the Hungarian recipe uses the ready made
dough/pastry/teszta which you can buy, you can get it also in Austria
and Switzerland too. It is very thin, like homemade, so thin that you
can read a book through it.

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch

PS Gundel's book deals with fruit, walnut, almond, cabbage, puppy,
chocolate and quark strudel

DRGOLDIN90@... schrieb:
> Hi All
>
> This isn't exactly genealogically related, but my family is recently
> returned >from a trip to our roots in Budapest. While we were there
> my cousin spoke of our ggm's strudel which was reported to be
> fabulous. Of course, unfortunately, no one has the recipe and we are
> hoping to revive the skill with the help of someone else's ancestor.
> Thanks in advance for your help!
>
> Marge Goldin Dix Hills, NY
>
> Moderator: Although not related to family research, such items do
> relate to our collective Hungarian-Jewish experience. Would you like
> to include such family memories in our communications subject to the
> Moderator's discretion?

Moderator: As long as we don't get overwhelmed by discussions regarding Hungarian food, all H-SIG subscribers, regardless of gender, are welcome to submit appropriate messages.


Re: Budapest archives #hungary

Barbara & Steve Wasser <swasser@...>
 

In January 1991 we were in Budapest and through my contacts as a
regional director for the State of Israel Bonds we were able to meet
with Russians on their way through to Israel. We also had an
introduction to Mrs. Geiza Seifert who had just retired as the
General Secretary of the Central Board of the Jewish Community. Her
late husband had served as the President of that Board for twelve
years prior to that time.

Mrs. Seifert took us to an office that held the Jewish archives and
we were able to spend a few minutes looking through hand written
records of birth, death, marriage. Unfortunately we were hurried so
we did not find anything that was meaningful for us. Another time
but we haven't been back yet. I cannot find my notes regarding the
whereabouts of these records but it definitely was not next to the
Doheny Synagogue. I will look again and report if I can locate the
street name.

Barbara
Barbara & Steve Wasser
swasser@...
Niskayuna NY


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Budapest archives #hungary

Barbara & Steve Wasser <swasser@...>
 

In January 1991 we were in Budapest and through my contacts as a
regional director for the State of Israel Bonds we were able to meet
with Russians on their way through to Israel. We also had an
introduction to Mrs. Geiza Seifert who had just retired as the
General Secretary of the Central Board of the Jewish Community. Her
late husband had served as the President of that Board for twelve
years prior to that time.

Mrs. Seifert took us to an office that held the Jewish archives and
we were able to spend a few minutes looking through hand written
records of birth, death, marriage. Unfortunately we were hurried so
we did not find anything that was meaningful for us. Another time
but we haven't been back yet. I cannot find my notes regarding the
whereabouts of these records but it definitely was not next to the
Doheny Synagogue. I will look again and report if I can locate the
street name.

Barbara
Barbara & Steve Wasser
swasser@...
Niskayuna NY