Date   

Re: What Price Familiant Numbers? #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Tying up more loose ends: On the 17 July 2005 Dave Bernard of Sherborn, Mass.
wrote: According to the Familianten act only the first-born received the
Familiant license and was permitted to marry. Does anyone know how one went
about acquiring a Familianten Number in the early 1800s - other than
inheritance?

And Dave then asks what the going rate might have been in the currency of
the day - florins or guldens? His point of reference Dave states: My GGGF
(who inherited his father's Familiant #) borrowed 100 Fl. to start a business
in 1815. But I have no idea what that might be in today's money or what a
Familiant number might have brought at auction].

I have had little time to research this in depth, but I do have some points
of reference, unfortunately we need currency conversions >from Gulden and Krone
to Florins! See this discussion: http://tinyurl.com/7kvw8
I am sure some of our economists who are experts in currency conversion can
help out!

Here are some interesting preliminary points:

1. The licence required for erecting a synagogue in mid-1800s Bohemia
was a one-off payment of 1,000 Gulden and annual charge of 100 Gulden.

2. Then here is a chilling account of the *Judensteuer* in Bohemia up to 1826:
it was 261,000 Kronen/p.a. The Kaiser commented cynically when asked to defer
payment: Even if only two Jews remain in Bohemia, they would have to pay the
tax between themselves.

3. The Moravian Jewish community had to pay an annual tax of 82,000 Florins
in 1782.

As there were 8,541 Familiant in Bohemia and 5,106 in Moravia and we assume
that the tax is the same per caput, then a simple calculation tells us that
the Moravian tax should be ca 150,000 Krone, but it is given as
82,000 Florins, so one Florin must be = to about 2 Krone.

3. Wedding feasts in Bohemia in the 1700s: Only Jews who pay a tax of 100
Florins can offer a wedding feast to their guests. If the host pays a tax
of 300 Florins the wedding can have a much more elaborate menu [salmon and
trout are forbidden!]. A tax of 600 Florins however gives you a much
freer hand.

4. Barmitzvah: Unless you pay 400 Florins/p.a tax you are only allowed to
serve carp [no other fish]. The only meat permitted is beef and chicken or
goose. Cakes etc are not allowed. If you do not pay 100 Florins tax - you
are not allowed wine except for the single ritual/blessing glass. 400 Florins
brings you unlimited choice but coffee is forbidden under all circumstances.

5. Circumcision: Upto 50 Florins/pa - you are only allowed 10 male guests.
100-300 Florins allows you 20 male guests and cakes, chicken and drink. For
300 Florins you can invite 25 guests.

6. Prague Prices in 1846:

One pound of beef, veal, lamb or mutton = 2 Krone
One fowl or duck = 2 Krone
One goose = 1 Krone
One Indian hen = 10 Krone [a turkey perhaps?]

7. Travel tax: All Jews resident in Bohemia had to pay 2 Krone/day whilst
they were out of Bohemia

With all this financial data, surely we can get somewhere? Inflation was
very low in those days, so I doubt we have to figure that into the calculation.
If my "back-of-the-envelope" calculation is correct; i.e. 1 Florin = 2 Krone,
then a payment of 100 Florins for a Familiant licence can be equated to
200 Krone or 200 lbs of meat or 200 fowl. In todays parlance, this would
be the *Big Mac* currency equivalent, so beloved of economists. In the UK,
we also have a *Mars Bar* currency standard!

As families were poor in those days, this was a substantial sum of money,
equivalent to a high percentage of the family food budget for the year.

Celia Male [U.K.]


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: What Price Familiant Numbers? #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Tying up more loose ends: On the 17 July 2005 Dave Bernard of Sherborn, Mass.
wrote: According to the Familianten act only the first-born received the
Familiant license and was permitted to marry. Does anyone know how one went
about acquiring a Familianten Number in the early 1800s - other than
inheritance?

And Dave then asks what the going rate might have been in the currency of
the day - florins or guldens? His point of reference Dave states: My GGGF
(who inherited his father's Familiant #) borrowed 100 Fl. to start a business
in 1815. But I have no idea what that might be in today's money or what a
Familiant number might have brought at auction].

I have had little time to research this in depth, but I do have some points
of reference, unfortunately we need currency conversions >from Gulden and Krone
to Florins! See this discussion: http://tinyurl.com/7kvw8
I am sure some of our economists who are experts in currency conversion can
help out!

Here are some interesting preliminary points:

1. The licence required for erecting a synagogue in mid-1800s Bohemia
was a one-off payment of 1,000 Gulden and annual charge of 100 Gulden.

2. Then here is a chilling account of the *Judensteuer* in Bohemia up to 1826:
it was 261,000 Kronen/p.a. The Kaiser commented cynically when asked to defer
payment: Even if only two Jews remain in Bohemia, they would have to pay the
tax between themselves.

3. The Moravian Jewish community had to pay an annual tax of 82,000 Florins
in 1782.

As there were 8,541 Familiant in Bohemia and 5,106 in Moravia and we assume
that the tax is the same per caput, then a simple calculation tells us that
the Moravian tax should be ca 150,000 Krone, but it is given as
82,000 Florins, so one Florin must be = to about 2 Krone.

3. Wedding feasts in Bohemia in the 1700s: Only Jews who pay a tax of 100
Florins can offer a wedding feast to their guests. If the host pays a tax
of 300 Florins the wedding can have a much more elaborate menu [salmon and
trout are forbidden!]. A tax of 600 Florins however gives you a much
freer hand.

4. Barmitzvah: Unless you pay 400 Florins/p.a tax you are only allowed to
serve carp [no other fish]. The only meat permitted is beef and chicken or
goose. Cakes etc are not allowed. If you do not pay 100 Florins tax - you
are not allowed wine except for the single ritual/blessing glass. 400 Florins
brings you unlimited choice but coffee is forbidden under all circumstances.

5. Circumcision: Upto 50 Florins/pa - you are only allowed 10 male guests.
100-300 Florins allows you 20 male guests and cakes, chicken and drink. For
300 Florins you can invite 25 guests.

6. Prague Prices in 1846:

One pound of beef, veal, lamb or mutton = 2 Krone
One fowl or duck = 2 Krone
One goose = 1 Krone
One Indian hen = 10 Krone [a turkey perhaps?]

7. Travel tax: All Jews resident in Bohemia had to pay 2 Krone/day whilst
they were out of Bohemia

With all this financial data, surely we can get somewhere? Inflation was
very low in those days, so I doubt we have to figure that into the calculation.
If my "back-of-the-envelope" calculation is correct; i.e. 1 Florin = 2 Krone,
then a payment of 100 Florins for a Familiant licence can be equated to
200 Krone or 200 lbs of meat or 200 fowl. In todays parlance, this would
be the *Big Mac* currency equivalent, so beloved of economists. In the UK,
we also have a *Mars Bar* currency standard!

As families were poor in those days, this was a substantial sum of money,
equivalent to a high percentage of the family food budget for the year.

Celia Male [U.K.]


Cadastral records #galicia

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Logan Kleinwaks writes:

<<Mark (Halpern) mentioned Cadastral records, which interest me greatly,
since I would like to locate precisely where some of my ancestors lived in
the late 18th century. Is anyone aware of projects to index or
systematically acquire (copies of) Galician Cadastral records? Would this
even be feasible? I imagine it would involve shtetl-specific fundraising.
Have any SIGgers acquired any Cadastral
records?>>

Gesher Galicia has long been interested in doing some kind of project with
cadastral maps, but with the closure of the Lviv Archives, any projects
involving documents held there must be postponed. There is no doubt,
however, that these maps are a potentially rich resource for genealogists.
Not only can they help us gain an accurate picture of where our ancestors
resided in their shtetls, but they can also serve as aids in deciphering
family relationships, as Israel Pickholtz pointed out.

If any Galician SIGgers have acquired copies of these maps...or any other
hand-drawn town maps during their research or travel abroad, I invite you to
contact me to see if we can begin to set up a research project in which maps
of this type can be used.

For those who want to learn more about cadastral records, I refer you to an
excellent article by Matthew Bielawa published in 2001 in "Rodziny," the
publication of the Polish Genealogical Society of America entitled: "The
Central State Historical Archive in Lviv, Ukraine and Polish Genealogical
Research." Not only is it an excellent primer for doing on-site research in
this archive, but it also provides fascinating details on cadastral maps.
Here's a link to the article:

http://www.halgal.com/TsDIALarticle.html

Matthew explains that two surveys were commissioned by the Austrian crown
upon first gaining control of the region. The Josephinian Cadastral Survey,
taking place between 1785 and 1788, and a second survey, the Franciscan
Cadastral Survey, compiled between 1819 and 1820. A third cadastre is a
series of maps and related documents for a particular village or town
produced at different points through the 19th Century and into the early
20th Century. These were usually commissioned for legal purposes to prove
land ownership and often covered a period of several years. A rough drawing
was made of the village, indicating various houses and plots of land. A
second map was drawn based on the original rough sketch, the names of the
owners were written out right on the particular plot. A final map was made
in color, but then the actual names of owners were replaced by numbers.
Accompanying documents must be used to fully understand these maps, and
often there is a guide linking the number on the map to its equivalent house
number, which may or may not be the same number that appears on vital
records. Another document lists each plot of land and its owner, which is
listed by plot number. These cross-referenced documents can be quite large
depending on the size of the village.

As many of you already know, Brian Lenius, author of the "Genealogical
Gazetteer of Galicia," has also written extensively about cadastral maps and
their importance in genealogical research.

Pamela Weisberger
Research Coordinator, Gesher Galicia
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Cadastral records #galicia

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Logan Kleinwaks writes:

<<Mark (Halpern) mentioned Cadastral records, which interest me greatly,
since I would like to locate precisely where some of my ancestors lived in
the late 18th century. Is anyone aware of projects to index or
systematically acquire (copies of) Galician Cadastral records? Would this
even be feasible? I imagine it would involve shtetl-specific fundraising.
Have any SIGgers acquired any Cadastral
records?>>

Gesher Galicia has long been interested in doing some kind of project with
cadastral maps, but with the closure of the Lviv Archives, any projects
involving documents held there must be postponed. There is no doubt,
however, that these maps are a potentially rich resource for genealogists.
Not only can they help us gain an accurate picture of where our ancestors
resided in their shtetls, but they can also serve as aids in deciphering
family relationships, as Israel Pickholtz pointed out.

If any Galician SIGgers have acquired copies of these maps...or any other
hand-drawn town maps during their research or travel abroad, I invite you to
contact me to see if we can begin to set up a research project in which maps
of this type can be used.

For those who want to learn more about cadastral records, I refer you to an
excellent article by Matthew Bielawa published in 2001 in "Rodziny," the
publication of the Polish Genealogical Society of America entitled: "The
Central State Historical Archive in Lviv, Ukraine and Polish Genealogical
Research." Not only is it an excellent primer for doing on-site research in
this archive, but it also provides fascinating details on cadastral maps.
Here's a link to the article:

http://www.halgal.com/TsDIALarticle.html

Matthew explains that two surveys were commissioned by the Austrian crown
upon first gaining control of the region. The Josephinian Cadastral Survey,
taking place between 1785 and 1788, and a second survey, the Franciscan
Cadastral Survey, compiled between 1819 and 1820. A third cadastre is a
series of maps and related documents for a particular village or town
produced at different points through the 19th Century and into the early
20th Century. These were usually commissioned for legal purposes to prove
land ownership and often covered a period of several years. A rough drawing
was made of the village, indicating various houses and plots of land. A
second map was drawn based on the original rough sketch, the names of the
owners were written out right on the particular plot. A final map was made
in color, but then the actual names of owners were replaced by numbers.
Accompanying documents must be used to fully understand these maps, and
often there is a guide linking the number on the map to its equivalent house
number, which may or may not be the same number that appears on vital
records. Another document lists each plot of land and its owner, which is
listed by plot number. These cross-referenced documents can be quite large
depending on the size of the village.

As many of you already know, Brian Lenius, author of the "Genealogical
Gazetteer of Galicia," has also written extensively about cadastral maps and
their importance in genealogical research.

Pamela Weisberger
Research Coordinator, Gesher Galicia
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Maxmilian Grab - 2. #austria-czech

Hans Peter Grab <hpgrab@...>
 

Dear SIGers,

with help >from Monica Leonards and >from Alex Woodle I currently know:

Maxmilian GRAB on 5 Dec 1895 married Helen MCCOY in Grand Rapids, Kent
County, Michigan.

Helen MCCOY was daughter of Daniel/David MCCOY, b. 1846 PA and of Gail, nee
AYRE/AYER, b. 1851 MA. Helen was born 28 Jun 1871 in Romeo, Macomb,
Michigan.

Maxmilien and Helen stayed in Chicago, Michigan and NY. Their son Fred was
born 1897-8 in Chicago, daughter Margaret 1898-9 in Michigan and son Robert
1904-5 in NY. The last known family addres in 1920 was: 61 Locust Hill Ave,
Yonkers/NY.

Nobody find any information about brothers Victor and Rudolf and about
children Fred, Margaret and Robert.

Thanks in advance for every future research help.

Hanus Grab


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Maxmilian Grab - 2. #austria-czech

Hans Peter Grab <hpgrab@...>
 

Dear SIGers,

with help >from Monica Leonards and >from Alex Woodle I currently know:

Maxmilian GRAB on 5 Dec 1895 married Helen MCCOY in Grand Rapids, Kent
County, Michigan.

Helen MCCOY was daughter of Daniel/David MCCOY, b. 1846 PA and of Gail, nee
AYRE/AYER, b. 1851 MA. Helen was born 28 Jun 1871 in Romeo, Macomb,
Michigan.

Maxmilien and Helen stayed in Chicago, Michigan and NY. Their son Fred was
born 1897-8 in Chicago, daughter Margaret 1898-9 in Michigan and son Robert
1904-5 in NY. The last known family addres in 1920 was: 61 Locust Hill Ave,
Yonkers/NY.

Nobody find any information about brothers Victor and Rudolf and about
children Fred, Margaret and Robert.

Thanks in advance for every future research help.

Hanus Grab


Mines Family #poland

adam1gs@...
 

I am attempting to find any information at all on: CHAJA or CHAVA MINES,
maiden name, JEZIERSKI, with a last known address of: # 12 Kowienska Ul.
in Bialystok in 1926. Thank you -

Fred Klein
adam1gs@adelphia.net


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Mines Family #poland

adam1gs@...
 

I am attempting to find any information at all on: CHAJA or CHAVA MINES,
maiden name, JEZIERSKI, with a last known address of: # 12 Kowienska Ul.
in Bialystok in 1926. Thank you -

Fred Klein
adam1gs@adelphia.net


Re: Can't find Dolhinif, Russia #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Arnold Rabinowitz wrote in

I retreived my uncle's Petition for Citizenship - on it is "I was born
in Dolhinif, Russia on March 9, 1905".

Can not find town, village, city or anything about this?
Arnold,

This is Dolginovo (ex Dolginuv, Dolginov, or Dolhinow) located near the
larger town Vileyka in Belarus at 5439 2729.

Town used to be located in Vilna Guberniya (Russian Empire) prior to the end
ofWWI, and was in Poland, Wilno Province during the interwar period.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Can't find Dolhinif, Russia #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Arnold Rabinowitz wrote in

I retreived my uncle's Petition for Citizenship - on it is "I was born
in Dolhinif, Russia on March 9, 1905".

Can not find town, village, city or anything about this?
Arnold,

This is Dolginovo (ex Dolginuv, Dolginov, or Dolhinow) located near the
larger town Vileyka in Belarus at 5439 2729.

Town used to be located in Vilna Guberniya (Russian Empire) prior to the end
ofWWI, and was in Poland, Wilno Province during the interwar period.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


Re: Can't find Dolhinif, Russia #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sat, 6 Aug 2005 04:49:11 UTC, arnold.rabinowitz@gmail.com
(LiquidMirror) opined:

I retreived my uncle's Petition for Citizenship - on it is "I was born
in Dolhinif, Russia on March 9, 1905".

Can not find town, village, city or anything about this?

Can you help???????????

Arnold Rabinowitz
Wallingford, CT
Given that the name has an "H" in it, you are probably barking up the
wrong tree by looking in Russia. Not every place that was in the
Russian Empire (which is what the petition form wanted) is or was in
Russia. Much more likely, your uncle was born in Ukraina.

The last syllable of "Dolhinif" is very suspicious and improbable. It
would be a good idea to scan the relevant portion of the petition
(just the word itself) in as high a definition as you can manage, so
that it will be large enough to enable people to ponder what the
letters really are, and post it on Viewmate.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.

MODERATOR NOTE: ViewMate is at http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ .


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Can't find Dolhinif, Russia #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sat, 6 Aug 2005 04:49:11 UTC, arnold.rabinowitz@gmail.com
(LiquidMirror) opined:

I retreived my uncle's Petition for Citizenship - on it is "I was born
in Dolhinif, Russia on March 9, 1905".

Can not find town, village, city or anything about this?

Can you help???????????

Arnold Rabinowitz
Wallingford, CT
Given that the name has an "H" in it, you are probably barking up the
wrong tree by looking in Russia. Not every place that was in the
Russian Empire (which is what the petition form wanted) is or was in
Russia. Much more likely, your uncle was born in Ukraina.

The last syllable of "Dolhinif" is very suspicious and improbable. It
would be a good idea to scan the relevant portion of the petition
(just the word itself) in as high a definition as you can manage, so
that it will be large enough to enable people to ponder what the
letters really are, and post it on Viewmate.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.

MODERATOR NOTE: ViewMate is at http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ .


Reading a US census record #general

meowkatt2002@...
 

Hi, I haven't had much luck finding my grandfather on anything I have
looked up. I have tried all kinds of name versions. Anyway, I found him
in the 1930 Chicago census. I looked it up on [commercial site]. If I want to
get into record it costs alot. Is there a free site I can look this up on?
What is on the census form? Would it have some info on where he came >from
etc? Thanks Pam Prince

Searching: William PRINCE, Belarus, maybe Brest-Litovsk. Father Benjamin.
14 kids in family.

MODERATOR NOTE: Read the JewishGen FAQ -- Frequently Asked Questions --
at http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/faq.html . It has information
about the National Archives and Family History Centers, both of which
offer the US Census on microfilm. See if there's a location near you.
The FAQ has a lot of valuable information about genealogy research,
and was updated just last month.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Reading a US census record #general

meowkatt2002@...
 

Hi, I haven't had much luck finding my grandfather on anything I have
looked up. I have tried all kinds of name versions. Anyway, I found him
in the 1930 Chicago census. I looked it up on [commercial site]. If I want to
get into record it costs alot. Is there a free site I can look this up on?
What is on the census form? Would it have some info on where he came >from
etc? Thanks Pam Prince

Searching: William PRINCE, Belarus, maybe Brest-Litovsk. Father Benjamin.
14 kids in family.

MODERATOR NOTE: Read the JewishGen FAQ -- Frequently Asked Questions --
at http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/faq.html . It has information
about the National Archives and Family History Centers, both of which
offer the US Census on microfilm. See if there's a location near you.
The FAQ has a lot of valuable information about genealogy research,
and was updated just last month.


Thanksgiving: location is key #general

robert fraser <robertandginafraser@...>
 

Dear JGenners -

In the past day, I've noted messages >from genners asking for "the date of
Thanksgiving" and details about a "petition for citizenship".

Pleae don't assume that all readers live in America and know what you're
talking about. Readers are spread all over the globe and speak many
languages besides English. Please spare a thought for them.

Shabbat shalom

Robert W Fraser
Dianella, Western Australia
robertandginafraser@iinet.net.au


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Thanksgiving: location is key #general

robert fraser <robertandginafraser@...>
 

Dear JGenners -

In the past day, I've noted messages >from genners asking for "the date of
Thanksgiving" and details about a "petition for citizenship".

Pleae don't assume that all readers live in America and know what you're
talking about. Readers are spread all over the globe and speak many
languages besides English. Please spare a thought for them.

Shabbat shalom

Robert W Fraser
Dianella, Western Australia
robertandginafraser@iinet.net.au


ancestry.com #general

Hal Smith
 

Does anyone know it this for fee service is a very
good way to research immigration, census, WWI draft,
etc, or is there a more expedient or cost effective
way? Your experience with Ancestry.com is appreciated.
Thanks,
Hal Smith, researcher #38684
hmstahoe@sbcglobal.net

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send opinions of commercial services privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ancestry.com #general

Hal Smith
 

Does anyone know it this for fee service is a very
good way to research immigration, census, WWI draft,
etc, or is there a more expedient or cost effective
way? Your experience with Ancestry.com is appreciated.
Thanks,
Hal Smith, researcher #38684
hmstahoe@sbcglobal.net

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send opinions of commercial services privately.


Margulies/Margolioth connections #galicia

Dan Rottenberg <d.rottenberg@...>
 

Dear Gesher Galicia:

Re Margulies/Margolioth:

I'm seeking help in figuring out how/if my Margulies/Margolioth
ancestors >from Zbarazh, Galicia were related to the famous Margolioth
rabbinic dynasty, some of whose members flourished in that area.

I have four good reasons for believing such a connection exists, and
one reason to believe that it doesn't. The reasons in favor:

1. Two of my Margulies relatives told me years ago that the family
was descended >from rabbis.

2. In the 18th Century, two generations of the famous Margolioth
rabbinical family served as rabbis in Zbarazh, the same town where my
Margulies ancestors lived at least as far back as 1750. Zbarazh had a
Jewish population of just 910 in 1765, so it seems likely that any
Jews with such a distinctive name in such a small community would be
related somehow.

3. Rabbi Meir Wunder of Jerusalem, the authority on Galician
rabbinical genealogies, once told me himself that all Margolioths
from Eastern Galicia are related.
4. My Margulies ancestors in Zbarazh were intermarried with two other
families with famous rabbinic names. My great-great-grandfather
Schaie Margulies (1838-1885) married Reizel Schapira, daughter of
Leib Schapira (1800-1863). Leib Schapira's wife (Reizel's mother) was
Czarne Barak Schapira (1818-1878), daughter of Markus Barak (born
about 1790). The name Schapira is often traced back to the Spira
rabbinic dynasty, and Barak is often an acronym for "ben Reb
Kalonymus," indicating descent >from the Kalonymus rabbinic dynasty. I
have no idea if my Schapira and Barak ancestors are of rabbinic
descent, but the interconnection of these names is striking.

One reason that casts doubt on a connection:

1. My great-grandfather Louis Margulies (1864-1923) was a Levite,
according to his gravestone. I've found nothing in any rabbinic
literature to indicate that the rabbinical Margolioths were Levites.

Any help in shedding light on my quest would be appreciated. The
details about my Margolioth ancestors >from Zbarazh are as follows: My
great-grandfather Louis Margulies (1864-1923) was the son of Schaie
Margulies (1838-1885), who was the son of Leizer Margulies
(1808-1859). Leizer's father's name isn't known, but his mother's
married name was Ruchel Margulies (1790-1831). She in turn was the
daughter-in-law of another Ruchel Margulies (1750-1834), whose
husband's name also isn't known. I'm speculating that one of these
two Ruchels may have been married to a descendant of the Margolioth
rabbinic dynasty. But how explain the Levite designation? Thanks for
any help you can provide.

Dan Rottenberg
Philadelphia PA USA
Reply to: d.rottenberg@verizon.net
Website: http://mysite.verizon.net/d.rottenberg

Moderator Note: Personal address and phone numbers have been removed
as per JewishGen policy. Contact Mr. Rottenberg via email or his web site.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Margulies/Margolioth connections #galicia

Dan Rottenberg <d.rottenberg@...>
 

Dear Gesher Galicia:

Re Margulies/Margolioth:

I'm seeking help in figuring out how/if my Margulies/Margolioth
ancestors >from Zbarazh, Galicia were related to the famous Margolioth
rabbinic dynasty, some of whose members flourished in that area.

I have four good reasons for believing such a connection exists, and
one reason to believe that it doesn't. The reasons in favor:

1. Two of my Margulies relatives told me years ago that the family
was descended >from rabbis.

2. In the 18th Century, two generations of the famous Margolioth
rabbinical family served as rabbis in Zbarazh, the same town where my
Margulies ancestors lived at least as far back as 1750. Zbarazh had a
Jewish population of just 910 in 1765, so it seems likely that any
Jews with such a distinctive name in such a small community would be
related somehow.

3. Rabbi Meir Wunder of Jerusalem, the authority on Galician
rabbinical genealogies, once told me himself that all Margolioths
from Eastern Galicia are related.
4. My Margulies ancestors in Zbarazh were intermarried with two other
families with famous rabbinic names. My great-great-grandfather
Schaie Margulies (1838-1885) married Reizel Schapira, daughter of
Leib Schapira (1800-1863). Leib Schapira's wife (Reizel's mother) was
Czarne Barak Schapira (1818-1878), daughter of Markus Barak (born
about 1790). The name Schapira is often traced back to the Spira
rabbinic dynasty, and Barak is often an acronym for "ben Reb
Kalonymus," indicating descent >from the Kalonymus rabbinic dynasty. I
have no idea if my Schapira and Barak ancestors are of rabbinic
descent, but the interconnection of these names is striking.

One reason that casts doubt on a connection:

1. My great-grandfather Louis Margulies (1864-1923) was a Levite,
according to his gravestone. I've found nothing in any rabbinic
literature to indicate that the rabbinical Margolioths were Levites.

Any help in shedding light on my quest would be appreciated. The
details about my Margolioth ancestors >from Zbarazh are as follows: My
great-grandfather Louis Margulies (1864-1923) was the son of Schaie
Margulies (1838-1885), who was the son of Leizer Margulies
(1808-1859). Leizer's father's name isn't known, but his mother's
married name was Ruchel Margulies (1790-1831). She in turn was the
daughter-in-law of another Ruchel Margulies (1750-1834), whose
husband's name also isn't known. I'm speculating that one of these
two Ruchels may have been married to a descendant of the Margolioth
rabbinic dynasty. But how explain the Levite designation? Thanks for
any help you can provide.

Dan Rottenberg
Philadelphia PA USA
Reply to: d.rottenberg@verizon.net
Website: http://mysite.verizon.net/d.rottenberg

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