Date   

The 4th Annual One-Day Seminar on Jewish Genealogy #hungary

Rony Golan <golanron@...>
 

Dear fellow H-SIGers,

Shana Tova !

The 4th Annual One-Day Seminar organized by the Israel genealogical
Society will focus this year on:
"Oral Tradition and Lore as Sources for Family Roots Research"
and will take place on Monday, December 1, 2008 at Beit Wolyn, Givatayim.

The Seminar program, the lecture abstracts as well as the lecturers'
biographies can be see at:
http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2008/index.html

My talk is entitled:
"So, We are not really Friedmans?".
I will talk about my research of my FRIEDMAN family >from Szabolc megye.
After many years
of research I found out that my FRIEDMANs were *not* FRIEDMANs. They were
KLIANSKYs.
Would you believe ?

The registration is now open. Go to:
http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2008/YY-reg-HE-2008-final.pdf
to pick-up the registration form and be part of the Jewish genealogical
event of the year in Israel!

Shalom,

Rony Golan
for the Organizing Committee
One Day Seminar 2008
Israel Genealogical Society

Researching:
EISDORFER, FRIEDMAN, GOLDSTEIN - Laskod, Petnehaza, Nyirbator- Hungary
SLOMOVITS - Sighet, Akna Szlatina, Rozavlea, Stramtura - Romania
KRAMARUTSKY, KRIVOROUCHKI - Kaunas, Vandziogale, Lithuania
NEIMAN, NAJMAN - Beddo (Bedevla), Ukraine


Hungary SIG #Hungary The 4th Annual One-Day Seminar on Jewish Genealogy #hungary

Rony Golan <golanron@...>
 

Dear fellow H-SIGers,

Shana Tova !

The 4th Annual One-Day Seminar organized by the Israel genealogical
Society will focus this year on:
"Oral Tradition and Lore as Sources for Family Roots Research"
and will take place on Monday, December 1, 2008 at Beit Wolyn, Givatayim.

The Seminar program, the lecture abstracts as well as the lecturers'
biographies can be see at:
http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2008/index.html

My talk is entitled:
"So, We are not really Friedmans?".
I will talk about my research of my FRIEDMAN family >from Szabolc megye.
After many years
of research I found out that my FRIEDMANs were *not* FRIEDMANs. They were
KLIANSKYs.
Would you believe ?

The registration is now open. Go to:
http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/YY2008/YY-reg-HE-2008-final.pdf
to pick-up the registration form and be part of the Jewish genealogical
event of the year in Israel!

Shalom,

Rony Golan
for the Organizing Committee
One Day Seminar 2008
Israel Genealogical Society

Researching:
EISDORFER, FRIEDMAN, GOLDSTEIN - Laskod, Petnehaza, Nyirbator- Hungary
SLOMOVITS - Sighet, Akna Szlatina, Rozavlea, Stramtura - Romania
KRAMARUTSKY, KRIVOROUCHKI - Kaunas, Vandziogale, Lithuania
NEIMAN, NAJMAN - Beddo (Bedevla), Ukraine


Tracing my paternal ancestors #courland #latvia

michael eker <michael.eker@...>
 

Dear Friends at the Courland Area Research Group,

I should be very grateful for any information you might have, in trying to
trace my family history on my father's side. I joined Jewishgen two months
ago, and added the name "Eker" to their Family Finder lists, but have not
received any replies so far. I have also joined Marlene Silverman's
Suwalk-Lomza SIG, but I am wondering now if I should have contacted you in
the first place.

The only place names I know of are Marijampole, Eydtkuhnen (now
Chernyshevskoye) - and - Kurland (the spelling my father used in his
autobiography), which is my reason for writing to you now. I was born in
Sheffield, England, in 1932, and now live in England, roughly 35 miles
south-west of London. My father, Julius Eker, was born in Manchester in
1902, and died in Sheffield in 1976. My grandfather, Moses Eker, was born
possibly in Marijampole, in 1864, and married Sarah Rosen around 1880-1883.
They came to England around 1890, first to Hull, then settled in Manchester.
He died in Manchester in 1924; she died there in 1940. This is what my
father wrote about his father's connections with "Kurland":

"When speaking of their country of origin, 'der Heim' - home as it was to
immigrant Jews even decades after they had left it, my parents mentioned
only two place names, Mariampol and Eydtkuhnen. The former was presumably
the nearest town to their native village, the latter is a frontier town
separating Lithuania and Poland (both under Russian rule then) >from Germany.
My parents called their region vaguely Kurland, and sometimes spoke of noble
German families, 'lords', who lived in the area, owning much land and
speaking what my mother called 'Christen-daitch', presumably Hochdeutsch,
which according to her no Jew could master. My parents' home was, then, the
Baltic lands. My parents knew a little Polish, a few German words, but no
Russian at all. Our surname, Eker, pointed to the presence of a Gentile
populace consisting of Teutonic, even Scandinavian stock. Ekman, Eklund,
Eckert are Germanic names. Had my parents lived in Russia or Poland their
surname, modelled on the names of their Gentile neighbours would have ended
in 'ovich' or 'ansky'. It was a sparsely inhabited region; my Grandfather's
occupation (a poor itinerant Hebrew teacher) shows it was sparsely inhabited
by Jews, too. My parents had no tales of pogroms. But they had no tales of
their homeland at all, they very rarely spoke of it."

The autobiography goes on to mention Eydtkuhnen: "a cousin of my father's
who lived in London, used to send him money at a poste restante address
there. When my father brought the registered letter back to his
village....." (This would appear to suggest that he lived not all that far
away >from Eydtkuhnen). "Like my father, my grandfather was also a poor
itinerant Hebrew teacher, and was also called Moses Eker. He visited remote
villages whose Jewish inhabitants were so few that they could not afford to
maintain a regular rabbi for the congregation or a teacher of religion for
the children. My grandfather would stay in a village for a few weeks
teaching the Hebrew alphabet to younger children, preparing older boys
nearing the age of thirteen for their Bar Mitzvah and, in general,
instructing the men in the performanc eof daily prayers and ritual. Always
travelling by horse and cart of which the driver was usually a Jew himself,
he would then move onto another village and again give them his services. He
stayed away for months at a time and only returned home for the Jewish
festivals. He died as a result of an accident when he was still a youngish
man. The place was a harbour where he was admiring a cargo boat which had
just come in; his foor slipped, he fell between the boat and the harbour
wall and although he could sim he was drowned. My father was born after his
father's death." (i.e. this must have been about 1864). "His name proved
that he was a posthumous child. Among Jews a son is never given the first
name of his living father, and so my father was always known as Moshe ben
Moshe, (Moses, the son of Moses)........."

I'm sorry to go on at such great length, but I thought it might help you to
decide if you or any of your colleagues felt that if I joined your Research
Group, you might be able to research more information for me. I have always
felt frustrated that I know no more than just the sketchy details I have
quoted to you here. It has occurred to me that possibly the best starting
place might be to identify exactly at which harbour, or port, my great-great
grandfather was drowned. There must surely have been an inquest, or a
newspaper report, or at least a death certificate must have been issued
there. As a minimum, this ought to show the name of my great-grandfather's
wife(widow) and his home address, which would almost certainly have been my
grandfather's birthplace, as he was born shortly after. But I have no idea
which harbour or port this might have been!

Once again I apologise for being unable to summarise this account more
effectively, but I would be extremely grateful for any help you could offer,
and look forward to hearing >from you.

Sincerely,

Michael Eker.


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia Tracing my paternal ancestors #latvia #courland

michael eker <michael.eker@...>
 

Dear Friends at the Courland Area Research Group,

I should be very grateful for any information you might have, in trying to
trace my family history on my father's side. I joined Jewishgen two months
ago, and added the name "Eker" to their Family Finder lists, but have not
received any replies so far. I have also joined Marlene Silverman's
Suwalk-Lomza SIG, but I am wondering now if I should have contacted you in
the first place.

The only place names I know of are Marijampole, Eydtkuhnen (now
Chernyshevskoye) - and - Kurland (the spelling my father used in his
autobiography), which is my reason for writing to you now. I was born in
Sheffield, England, in 1932, and now live in England, roughly 35 miles
south-west of London. My father, Julius Eker, was born in Manchester in
1902, and died in Sheffield in 1976. My grandfather, Moses Eker, was born
possibly in Marijampole, in 1864, and married Sarah Rosen around 1880-1883.
They came to England around 1890, first to Hull, then settled in Manchester.
He died in Manchester in 1924; she died there in 1940. This is what my
father wrote about his father's connections with "Kurland":

"When speaking of their country of origin, 'der Heim' - home as it was to
immigrant Jews even decades after they had left it, my parents mentioned
only two place names, Mariampol and Eydtkuhnen. The former was presumably
the nearest town to their native village, the latter is a frontier town
separating Lithuania and Poland (both under Russian rule then) >from Germany.
My parents called their region vaguely Kurland, and sometimes spoke of noble
German families, 'lords', who lived in the area, owning much land and
speaking what my mother called 'Christen-daitch', presumably Hochdeutsch,
which according to her no Jew could master. My parents' home was, then, the
Baltic lands. My parents knew a little Polish, a few German words, but no
Russian at all. Our surname, Eker, pointed to the presence of a Gentile
populace consisting of Teutonic, even Scandinavian stock. Ekman, Eklund,
Eckert are Germanic names. Had my parents lived in Russia or Poland their
surname, modelled on the names of their Gentile neighbours would have ended
in 'ovich' or 'ansky'. It was a sparsely inhabited region; my Grandfather's
occupation (a poor itinerant Hebrew teacher) shows it was sparsely inhabited
by Jews, too. My parents had no tales of pogroms. But they had no tales of
their homeland at all, they very rarely spoke of it."

The autobiography goes on to mention Eydtkuhnen: "a cousin of my father's
who lived in London, used to send him money at a poste restante address
there. When my father brought the registered letter back to his
village....." (This would appear to suggest that he lived not all that far
away >from Eydtkuhnen). "Like my father, my grandfather was also a poor
itinerant Hebrew teacher, and was also called Moses Eker. He visited remote
villages whose Jewish inhabitants were so few that they could not afford to
maintain a regular rabbi for the congregation or a teacher of religion for
the children. My grandfather would stay in a village for a few weeks
teaching the Hebrew alphabet to younger children, preparing older boys
nearing the age of thirteen for their Bar Mitzvah and, in general,
instructing the men in the performanc eof daily prayers and ritual. Always
travelling by horse and cart of which the driver was usually a Jew himself,
he would then move onto another village and again give them his services. He
stayed away for months at a time and only returned home for the Jewish
festivals. He died as a result of an accident when he was still a youngish
man. The place was a harbour where he was admiring a cargo boat which had
just come in; his foor slipped, he fell between the boat and the harbour
wall and although he could sim he was drowned. My father was born after his
father's death." (i.e. this must have been about 1864). "His name proved
that he was a posthumous child. Among Jews a son is never given the first
name of his living father, and so my father was always known as Moshe ben
Moshe, (Moses, the son of Moses)........."

I'm sorry to go on at such great length, but I thought it might help you to
decide if you or any of your colleagues felt that if I joined your Research
Group, you might be able to research more information for me. I have always
felt frustrated that I know no more than just the sketchy details I have
quoted to you here. It has occurred to me that possibly the best starting
place might be to identify exactly at which harbour, or port, my great-great
grandfather was drowned. There must surely have been an inquest, or a
newspaper report, or at least a death certificate must have been issued
there. As a minimum, this ought to show the name of my great-grandfather's
wife(widow) and his home address, which would almost certainly have been my
grandfather's birthplace, as he was born shortly after. But I have no idea
which harbour or port this might have been!

Once again I apologise for being unable to summarise this account more
effectively, but I would be extremely grateful for any help you could offer,
and look forward to hearing >from you.

Sincerely,

Michael Eker.


Re: Country Communities Vols 2 and 3 #southafrica

Bubbles Segall <Bubbles.Segall@...>
 

Dear Ralph

Vryheid will feature in Volume 4 which hasn't been published as yet.
Volumes 1, 2 and 3 have been published. Volumes 2 and 3 can be purchased
from museum@... and Volume 1 is out of print. If they get enough
interest >from people wanting to purchase Volume 1, they will do a reprint.
If you want to know which communities are in each volume, contact me
privately as I have all the information on each volume.

Regards

Bubbles Segall
Editor
Southern Africa Jewish Genealogy Special Interest Group (SA-SIG) Newsletter
bubbles.segall@...



-----Original Message-----
From: Colin and Ev Plen [mailto:evancol@...]
Sent: Tuesday, 14 October 2008 4:13 AM
To: South Africa SIG
Subject: [safrica] Country Communities Vols 2 and 3


Dear Ralph, write directly to Museum@... because the Kwazulu
Natal book that they are working on is not yet completed. If you can add
information they might still be able to use it and they will be grateful.

Colin Plen

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ralph Cilevitz" <ralphc@...>
To: "South Africa SIG" <safrica@...>
Sent: Sunday, October 12, 2008 4:05 PM
Subject: RE:[safrica] Country Communities Vols 2 and 3


Hi Saul,

Can you tell me if Vryheid (Natal) is featured in the book?

Thanks

Ralph


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica RE: Country Communities Vols 2 and 3 #southafrica

Bubbles Segall <Bubbles.Segall@...>
 

Dear Ralph

Vryheid will feature in Volume 4 which hasn't been published as yet.
Volumes 1, 2 and 3 have been published. Volumes 2 and 3 can be purchased
from museum@... and Volume 1 is out of print. If they get enough
interest >from people wanting to purchase Volume 1, they will do a reprint.
If you want to know which communities are in each volume, contact me
privately as I have all the information on each volume.

Regards

Bubbles Segall
Editor
Southern Africa Jewish Genealogy Special Interest Group (SA-SIG) Newsletter
bubbles.segall@...



-----Original Message-----
From: Colin and Ev Plen [mailto:evancol@...]
Sent: Tuesday, 14 October 2008 4:13 AM
To: South Africa SIG
Subject: [safrica] Country Communities Vols 2 and 3


Dear Ralph, write directly to Museum@... because the Kwazulu
Natal book that they are working on is not yet completed. If you can add
information they might still be able to use it and they will be grateful.

Colin Plen

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ralph Cilevitz" <ralphc@...>
To: "South Africa SIG" <safrica@...>
Sent: Sunday, October 12, 2008 4:05 PM
Subject: RE:[safrica] Country Communities Vols 2 and 3


Hi Saul,

Can you tell me if Vryheid (Natal) is featured in the book?

Thanks

Ralph


Re: Tykocin #poland

Avigdor Ben-Dov <a.bendov@...>
 

The town of Tykocin is not very large, but large enough to have its own
Jewish cemetery. But the question is whether or not Jews >from Zawady, my
home village, were also buried there? According to Tomszak, author of
Jewish Bialystok and vicinity, Tykocin was the burial place, at least up
to the 1930s (?). Lapy, another small town, allegedly also used the
Tykocin cemetery.

I am trying to ascertain where my gfather, Zvi Gersko (Hersh)
RUTKIEWICZ/RUDKIEWICZ was buried. His home was in Zawady as can be
seen on the hand-drawn map on the Shtetlinks webpage for that town. My
father related that a Jewish cemetery was only 300 meters >from the town
of Zawady in a NW direction (towards Tykocin), but Tykocin is about 14 km.
from Zawady so it cannot be the same cemetery!? So far, none of the
matzevot found or identified in Tykocin match the picture I have of the
gravestone.

Avigdor Ben-Dov
Israel

RUTKIEWICZ, NURZEC, SUSMAN, SOLARZ


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: Tykocin #poland

Avigdor Ben-Dov <a.bendov@...>
 

The town of Tykocin is not very large, but large enough to have its own
Jewish cemetery. But the question is whether or not Jews >from Zawady, my
home village, were also buried there? According to Tomszak, author of
Jewish Bialystok and vicinity, Tykocin was the burial place, at least up
to the 1930s (?). Lapy, another small town, allegedly also used the
Tykocin cemetery.

I am trying to ascertain where my gfather, Zvi Gersko (Hersh)
RUTKIEWICZ/RUDKIEWICZ was buried. His home was in Zawady as can be
seen on the hand-drawn map on the Shtetlinks webpage for that town. My
father related that a Jewish cemetery was only 300 meters >from the town
of Zawady in a NW direction (towards Tykocin), but Tykocin is about 14 km.
from Zawady so it cannot be the same cemetery!? So far, none of the
matzevot found or identified in Tykocin match the picture I have of the
gravestone.

Avigdor Ben-Dov
Israel

RUTKIEWICZ, NURZEC, SUSMAN, SOLARZ


Rawa Mazowiecki Funding Complete #poland

Joe Ross <joeross1220@...>
 

I am pleased to report that as a result of a generous donation by a
researcher of the town of Rawa Mazowiecki, the funding for the PSA project
for this town is now complete. Soon, the indexed data for this town will be
available for research in the JRI-Poland database. The data covers the years
1863 through 1903, with gaps in some years.

Rawa Mazowiecki is about 30 miles to the east of Lodz and was located in the
former Piotrikow gubernia of the Russian empire. Its records are kept in the
Grodzisk Mazowiecki branch of the Polish State Archive.

Joe Ross
Co-Archive Coordinator
Grodzisk Mazowiecki PSA Archive project


JRI Poland #Poland Rawa Mazowiecki Funding Complete #poland

Joe Ross <joeross1220@...>
 

I am pleased to report that as a result of a generous donation by a
researcher of the town of Rawa Mazowiecki, the funding for the PSA project
for this town is now complete. Soon, the indexed data for this town will be
available for research in the JRI-Poland database. The data covers the years
1863 through 1903, with gaps in some years.

Rawa Mazowiecki is about 30 miles to the east of Lodz and was located in the
former Piotrikow gubernia of the Russian empire. Its records are kept in the
Grodzisk Mazowiecki branch of the Polish State Archive.

Joe Ross
Co-Archive Coordinator
Grodzisk Mazowiecki PSA Archive project


Panevezys Internal Passport Records #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

I have just distributed to qualified donors, another Excel spreadsheet
containing translated records of Internal Passport records for Panevezys.
This makes 6,814 Panevezys Internal Passport records that have been sent
to contributors. There are additional records to be translated but the
necessary funds are lacking. If you have any connection to Panevezys,
a minimum contribution of $100 would be appreciated so the remaining
Panevezys Internal Passport records can be translated. You would not
only receive these records but also the previously translated records
and the records translated in the future as well.

Your $100 contribution can actually double in value. The JGS, Inc.
(New York) has issued a matching challenge grant to LitvakSIG for the
Internal Passport Project, and if a research donates $100, another $100
from the challenge grant would go to translate more Panevezys Internal
Passport records.

The information included in the Internal Passport records is simply
amazing and can lead to further discoveries. A week ago I sent Birzai I.P.
records to contributors and following are just two examples of success
stories I received as a result.

One researcher wrote that "The internal passport info in the last few
months is the first solid information that some of my Furman and Sugalsky
families were still in Birzai as late in the 1920s. My father and other
living relatives including those living in the 1970s were unaware of this."

Another success story is the following - a researcher said his family left
Birzai in 1914 so he was not sure the Internal Passport records would be
of any value to him. After receiving the surname >from him, I informed him
that 15 individuals with that surname were listed in the Birzai I.P.
records. His immediate family may have left in Lithuania but probably not
every family member left. He made his contribution and I sent him the
records. Following is his next message to me after receiving the records.

"You were absolutely right. These records helped me immediately to find
the family members and even more than that - to get an info that I even
couldn't imagine exists ! Now I have to go thoroughly through these
records to digest all the info."

Perhaps you will also find "gold" in the Panevezys Internal Passport
records.

For a full explanation of Internal Passports, and to view the various types
of documents contained in the files, go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/InternalPassports.htm

To make your donation, go to www.litvaksig.org and click on BECOME A
CONTRIBUTOR. Be sure and mention that your donation is for Internal
Passports - Panevezys - or for another town of your choice. You can use
your credit card as the site is secure.

Howard Margol
Coordiantor - Internal Passport Project


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Panevezys Internal Passport Records #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

I have just distributed to qualified donors, another Excel spreadsheet
containing translated records of Internal Passport records for Panevezys.
This makes 6,814 Panevezys Internal Passport records that have been sent
to contributors. There are additional records to be translated but the
necessary funds are lacking. If you have any connection to Panevezys,
a minimum contribution of $100 would be appreciated so the remaining
Panevezys Internal Passport records can be translated. You would not
only receive these records but also the previously translated records
and the records translated in the future as well.

Your $100 contribution can actually double in value. The JGS, Inc.
(New York) has issued a matching challenge grant to LitvakSIG for the
Internal Passport Project, and if a research donates $100, another $100
from the challenge grant would go to translate more Panevezys Internal
Passport records.

The information included in the Internal Passport records is simply
amazing and can lead to further discoveries. A week ago I sent Birzai I.P.
records to contributors and following are just two examples of success
stories I received as a result.

One researcher wrote that "The internal passport info in the last few
months is the first solid information that some of my Furman and Sugalsky
families were still in Birzai as late in the 1920s. My father and other
living relatives including those living in the 1970s were unaware of this."

Another success story is the following - a researcher said his family left
Birzai in 1914 so he was not sure the Internal Passport records would be
of any value to him. After receiving the surname >from him, I informed him
that 15 individuals with that surname were listed in the Birzai I.P.
records. His immediate family may have left in Lithuania but probably not
every family member left. He made his contribution and I sent him the
records. Following is his next message to me after receiving the records.

"You were absolutely right. These records helped me immediately to find
the family members and even more than that - to get an info that I even
couldn't imagine exists ! Now I have to go thoroughly through these
records to digest all the info."

Perhaps you will also find "gold" in the Panevezys Internal Passport
records.

For a full explanation of Internal Passports, and to view the various types
of documents contained in the files, go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/InternalPassports.htm

To make your donation, go to www.litvaksig.org and click on BECOME A
CONTRIBUTOR. Be sure and mention that your donation is for Internal
Passports - Panevezys - or for another town of your choice. You can use
your credit card as the site is secure.

Howard Margol
Coordiantor - Internal Passport Project


Grandfather used mother's maiden name #galicia

Marilyn Rabin <maflnc@...>
 

Hello everyone and a happy and healthy New Year.

After searching the ships passenger lists for 2 years for my
grandfather Benjamin Abraham HECHLER, I may have found him thanks to
a member recently mentioning the males >from Galicia area may have
used their mother's maiden names. Wow! I previously paid a
professional genealogist a lot of money and had given up until last
week, and now I believe I have found his passenger list info under
name of Benjamin GOTTENPLAN (GUTTENPLAN). Since his 2 brothers came
to the USA just before him and used the name Hechler I mistakenly
thought he would have also. Wrong. I should know not to assume
anything with genealogy. I hope someone can answer my question if I
am writing to the correct place.

He arrived in 2/1899 under name of Benjamin GOTTENPLAN. Starting
with the US Census of 1900 his name is always listed as Benjamin
HECHLER (our family name). What would an immigrant have had to do to
change his name? Were there legal channels they had to go through or
did they just change it on their own?

Every time I read about someone finding a family member I am so
excited for them. I hope I will join that group soon. Any help >from
anyone telling me how he changed his name will be greatly appreciated.

Marilyn Hechler Rabin
maflnc@...
Florida USA


Noda BeYehuda descendants #galicia

Ami Elyasaf
 

Searching for Yechezkel LANDAU 1861-1941 married to Reyla RAND,
daughter of R. Menachem Mendel RAND (Lutowiska - Jerusalem 1917).
How is he related to Noda BeYehuda?

Ami Elyasaf


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Grandfather used mother's maiden name #galicia

Marilyn Rabin <maflnc@...>
 

Hello everyone and a happy and healthy New Year.

After searching the ships passenger lists for 2 years for my
grandfather Benjamin Abraham HECHLER, I may have found him thanks to
a member recently mentioning the males >from Galicia area may have
used their mother's maiden names. Wow! I previously paid a
professional genealogist a lot of money and had given up until last
week, and now I believe I have found his passenger list info under
name of Benjamin GOTTENPLAN (GUTTENPLAN). Since his 2 brothers came
to the USA just before him and used the name Hechler I mistakenly
thought he would have also. Wrong. I should know not to assume
anything with genealogy. I hope someone can answer my question if I
am writing to the correct place.

He arrived in 2/1899 under name of Benjamin GOTTENPLAN. Starting
with the US Census of 1900 his name is always listed as Benjamin
HECHLER (our family name). What would an immigrant have had to do to
change his name? Were there legal channels they had to go through or
did they just change it on their own?

Every time I read about someone finding a family member I am so
excited for them. I hope I will join that group soon. Any help >from
anyone telling me how he changed his name will be greatly appreciated.

Marilyn Hechler Rabin
maflnc@...
Florida USA


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Noda BeYehuda descendants #galicia

Ami Elyasaf
 

Searching for Yechezkel LANDAU 1861-1941 married to Reyla RAND,
daughter of R. Menachem Mendel RAND (Lutowiska - Jerusalem 1917).
How is he related to Noda BeYehuda?

Ami Elyasaf


AUFRECHT of Oberschlesien - the PRINGSHEIM link #germany

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Roger Lustig wrote: "The birth of Dr. Paul AUFRECHT (1867-1942) of Gleiwitz
is not recorded in Upper Silesian records, but my father's notes (presumably
from the Gleiwitz Jewish Community's card catalog) indicate that he was born
in Frankfurt/O! He brought my father into the world and was a friend of the
family. He and his wife Martha geb. PRINGSHEIM (>from Oppeln) committed
suicide on the eve of the first deportation >from Gleiwitz."

I was most interested in Roger's reply and especially the connection between
the AUFRECHT and PRINGSHEIM families. Some members of this PRINGSHEIM family
moved to Vienna and are connected with the SCHROEFL, GRAF and BRYK families.
I personally knew the GRAF descendants of Fritz and Flora who were >from Oppeln
in Upper Silesia and emigrated to Sydney, NSW.
See this tombstone in a prominent position in the Zentralfriedhof, Vienna:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cam37/2059824124/

I have often looked at this family tree and it mentions the AUFRECHT link:

http://www.genealogy.metastudies.net/ZDocs/Webp/Pringsheim_FamilyTree.htm

and Mrs AUFRECHT [nee PRINGSHEIM], who must have had genealogical leanings,
indeed gave some details of the relationship between the PRINGSHEIM family
members - see note 107 - and confusion between two different Siegfrieds.
We could do with her help now concerning the AUFRECHT family

These two articles about Fritz Robert PRINGSHEIM are most enlightening:
http://users.ox.ac.uk/~alls0079/fritz2.pdf
http://www.fpp.co.uk/Himmler/Langbehn/Pringsheim_020146.html

Obviously, the PRINGSHEIM were another very academic family >from Upper Silesia,
Breslau and environs - and we must not forget the famous link to Thomas MANN.

Celia Male - London, U.K. celiamale@...

Footnote: re Umlauts and Moderator 1's edict. Although I could see Fritz
Neubauer's umlaut as such [on my computer, another genner received it as
garbled symbols.
**** It seems that the way umlauts are perceived depends on the operating
system of your computer or your E-mail program.
***** [This recent experience shows why it's important to avoid using
the umlaut and other international accents in our email to these lists.]


German SIG #Germany AUFRECHT of Oberschlesien - the PRINGSHEIM link #germany

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Roger Lustig wrote: "The birth of Dr. Paul AUFRECHT (1867-1942) of Gleiwitz
is not recorded in Upper Silesian records, but my father's notes (presumably
from the Gleiwitz Jewish Community's card catalog) indicate that he was born
in Frankfurt/O! He brought my father into the world and was a friend of the
family. He and his wife Martha geb. PRINGSHEIM (>from Oppeln) committed
suicide on the eve of the first deportation >from Gleiwitz."

I was most interested in Roger's reply and especially the connection between
the AUFRECHT and PRINGSHEIM families. Some members of this PRINGSHEIM family
moved to Vienna and are connected with the SCHROEFL, GRAF and BRYK families.
I personally knew the GRAF descendants of Fritz and Flora who were >from Oppeln
in Upper Silesia and emigrated to Sydney, NSW.
See this tombstone in a prominent position in the Zentralfriedhof, Vienna:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cam37/2059824124/

I have often looked at this family tree and it mentions the AUFRECHT link:

http://www.genealogy.metastudies.net/ZDocs/Webp/Pringsheim_FamilyTree.htm

and Mrs AUFRECHT [nee PRINGSHEIM], who must have had genealogical leanings,
indeed gave some details of the relationship between the PRINGSHEIM family
members - see note 107 - and confusion between two different Siegfrieds.
We could do with her help now concerning the AUFRECHT family

These two articles about Fritz Robert PRINGSHEIM are most enlightening:
http://users.ox.ac.uk/~alls0079/fritz2.pdf
http://www.fpp.co.uk/Himmler/Langbehn/Pringsheim_020146.html

Obviously, the PRINGSHEIM were another very academic family >from Upper Silesia,
Breslau and environs - and we must not forget the famous link to Thomas MANN.

Celia Male - London, U.K. celiamale@...

Footnote: re Umlauts and Moderator 1's edict. Although I could see Fritz
Neubauer's umlaut as such [on my computer, another genner received it as
garbled symbols.
**** It seems that the way umlauts are perceived depends on the operating
system of your computer or your E-mail program.
***** [This recent experience shows why it's important to avoid using
the umlaut and other international accents in our email to these lists.]


Re: AUFRECHT of Oberschlesien {was: Looking for Ernst AUFRECHT} #germany

Roger Lustig
 

This is getting interesting! According to Menk, the only AUFRECHTs
found outside of Silesia were in Frankfurt/O. Moreover, they probably
arrived there after 1812, because they do not appear on the
surname/citizenship list. Among the Silesians, one head of household
(Mendel) was in Breslau in 1812; the other 5, in Upper Silesia.

Between then and 1874 there were many, many vital events of AUFRECHTs
recorded in Upper Silesia, incl. the births of Emanuel and Sigismund A.
The latter's mother was named Rosalie LUSTIG. No proven relationship to
myself--yet.

The birth of Dr. Paul AUFRECHT (1867-1942) of Gleiwitz is not recorded
in Upper Silesian records, but my father's notes (presumably >from the
Gleiwitz Jewish Community's card catalog) indicate that he was born in
Frankfurt/O! He brought my father into the world and was a friend of
the family. He and his wife Martha geb. PRINGSHEIM (>from Oppeln)
committed suicide on the eve of the first deportation >from Gleiwitz. He
settled in Gleiwitz between 1899 and 1905; so it's entirely possible
that the Frankfurt/O AUFRECHTs were related to those >from Oberschlesien
(Upper Silesia).

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA Research co-ordinator, GerSIG

Celia Male - London, U.K. celiamale@... wrote:
Fritz Neubauer found a thesis by Ernst AUFRECHT in Breslau.....
I too have found academic qualifications/articles for two AUFRECHT of this
region as well as the holocaust death certificate of one of them. They may
all be related. I have no idea how many AUFRECHT families there were in this
area but we now have a regional cluster of three academic AUFRECHT.
1. Emanuel AUFRECHT born 1844 in Loslau, Oberschlesien, a distinguished doctor
in Magdeburg, with many research interests [German article/ Festschrift for
his 80th birthday]: http://tinyurl.com/4mpp3m
2. Sigismund AUFRECHT born 1862 in Loslau, Preussen - University of Zurich
degree in philosophy: http://tinyurl.com/4pewag
8949 philo SS 1890 AUFRECHT Sigismund *1862 m
Loslau Preussen Dtld. Breslau ab mit Zgn.03.03.1891 E: majorenn
Here, sadly is Sigismund's death notification on Yad vashem, ironically
at the same age as Emanuel received his congratulatory Festschrift in 1924.....
[snip]
I have found only one AUFRECHT living in Bohemia in 1793.... [snip]


German SIG #Germany Re: AUFRECHT of Oberschlesien {was: Looking for Ernst AUFRECHT} #germany

Roger Lustig
 

This is getting interesting! According to Menk, the only AUFRECHTs
found outside of Silesia were in Frankfurt/O. Moreover, they probably
arrived there after 1812, because they do not appear on the
surname/citizenship list. Among the Silesians, one head of household
(Mendel) was in Breslau in 1812; the other 5, in Upper Silesia.

Between then and 1874 there were many, many vital events of AUFRECHTs
recorded in Upper Silesia, incl. the births of Emanuel and Sigismund A.
The latter's mother was named Rosalie LUSTIG. No proven relationship to
myself--yet.

The birth of Dr. Paul AUFRECHT (1867-1942) of Gleiwitz is not recorded
in Upper Silesian records, but my father's notes (presumably >from the
Gleiwitz Jewish Community's card catalog) indicate that he was born in
Frankfurt/O! He brought my father into the world and was a friend of
the family. He and his wife Martha geb. PRINGSHEIM (>from Oppeln)
committed suicide on the eve of the first deportation >from Gleiwitz. He
settled in Gleiwitz between 1899 and 1905; so it's entirely possible
that the Frankfurt/O AUFRECHTs were related to those >from Oberschlesien
(Upper Silesia).

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA Research co-ordinator, GerSIG

Celia Male - London, U.K. celiamale@... wrote:
Fritz Neubauer found a thesis by Ernst AUFRECHT in Breslau.....
I too have found academic qualifications/articles for two AUFRECHT of this
region as well as the holocaust death certificate of one of them. They may
all be related. I have no idea how many AUFRECHT families there were in this
area but we now have a regional cluster of three academic AUFRECHT.
1. Emanuel AUFRECHT born 1844 in Loslau, Oberschlesien, a distinguished doctor
in Magdeburg, with many research interests [German article/ Festschrift for
his 80th birthday]: http://tinyurl.com/4mpp3m
2. Sigismund AUFRECHT born 1862 in Loslau, Preussen - University of Zurich
degree in philosophy: http://tinyurl.com/4pewag
8949 philo SS 1890 AUFRECHT Sigismund *1862 m
Loslau Preussen Dtld. Breslau ab mit Zgn.03.03.1891 E: majorenn
Here, sadly is Sigismund's death notification on Yad vashem, ironically
at the same age as Emanuel received his congratulatory Festschrift in 1924.....
[snip]
I have found only one AUFRECHT living in Bohemia in 1793.... [snip]