Date   

Professor Nancy K. Miller to speak on "What They Saved: Pieces of a Jewish Past" #general

Jane Rosen Berenbeim
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society invites you to attend its next meeting,
featuring Professor Nancy K. Miller speaking about her book, What They Saved:
Pieces of a Jewish Past.

Date and Place:
Sunday, February 19, 2012, 2:00 pm
Center for Jewish History
15 West 16th Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues
New York, NY

Program:
Searching for roots as a middle-aged orphan and an assimilated Jewish New
Yorker, Nancy Miller found herself asking unexpected questions: Why do I
know so little about my family? How can I understand myself when I don't know
my past? The answers led her to a carpenter in Ukraine, a stationery
peddler on the Lower East Side, and a gangster hanger-on in the Bronx. As she
slowly pieced together her family portrait and assembled a genealogical
tree, she felt connected in unexpected ways to an immigrant narrative that
began in Eastern Europe at the turn of the twentieth century, when her
ancestors emigrated to the Lower East Side of Manhattan. In the end, her
quest to uncover the origins of her lost family becomes a memoir of renewal.

Currently a Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature
at the CUNY Graduate Center, Nancy K. Miller is the author of several books
on feminist criticism, women's writing, and most recently, family memoir,
biography, and trauma. A book-signing will follow the presentation.

This meeting will be of interest to family historians of all backgrounds.

The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at the CJH will be open at
11:00 AM for net­working with other researchers and access to research
materials and computers.

The program is free to members of JGSNY; there is a $5 charge for guests.

Jane Rosen Berenbeim
Vice President, Programming
JGS, Inc. (NY)
program@jgsny.or


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Professor Nancy K. Miller to speak on "What They Saved: Pieces of a Jewish Past" #general

Jane Rosen Berenbeim
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society invites you to attend its next meeting,
featuring Professor Nancy K. Miller speaking about her book, What They Saved:
Pieces of a Jewish Past.

Date and Place:
Sunday, February 19, 2012, 2:00 pm
Center for Jewish History
15 West 16th Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues
New York, NY

Program:
Searching for roots as a middle-aged orphan and an assimilated Jewish New
Yorker, Nancy Miller found herself asking unexpected questions: Why do I
know so little about my family? How can I understand myself when I don't know
my past? The answers led her to a carpenter in Ukraine, a stationery
peddler on the Lower East Side, and a gangster hanger-on in the Bronx. As she
slowly pieced together her family portrait and assembled a genealogical
tree, she felt connected in unexpected ways to an immigrant narrative that
began in Eastern Europe at the turn of the twentieth century, when her
ancestors emigrated to the Lower East Side of Manhattan. In the end, her
quest to uncover the origins of her lost family becomes a memoir of renewal.

Currently a Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature
at the CUNY Graduate Center, Nancy K. Miller is the author of several books
on feminist criticism, women's writing, and most recently, family memoir,
biography, and trauma. A book-signing will follow the presentation.

This meeting will be of interest to family historians of all backgrounds.

The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at the CJH will be open at
11:00 AM for net­working with other researchers and access to research
materials and computers.

The program is free to members of JGSNY; there is a $5 charge for guests.

Jane Rosen Berenbeim
Vice President, Programming
JGS, Inc. (NY)
program@jgsny.or


Bessarabia SIG: Let's introduce ourselves to our group #bessarabia

yricklevy
 

Hello,

My great-grandparents Joseph and Anna (Dorfman) Confeld, both born around
1850, came with their children in 1884 >from Kishinev to Painted Woods Jewish
farming settlement in North Dakota. My grandmother Rachel (aka Rose) Confeld
was born in Painted Woods in 1885. By 1886 they moved >from Painted Woods
to Oak Grove, Minnesota (to homestead there) and then Minneapolis, MN by 1900.
Joseph worked as a farmer, a cigar-maker, and a tailor for a time.

Anna's parents were Baruch and Hannah (Adele) Dorfman, both born around
1828. They came to Painted Woods in 1882 (with Sarah, and probably
her brothers Moses and Joseph) among the original settlers of that Jewish
farming community. I do not know if they came >from Kishinev, but they
probably did. Baruch and Hannah, Sarah and her husband, all relocated to
St. Paul, MN. Moses Dorfman went to Philadelphia, and Joseph Dorfman went
to Minneapolis.

My best accomplishments in this research have to do with a Painted Woods
related letter I discovered at the Jewish Historical Society of the Upper
Midwest, an 1887 photo of my great-grandmother=92s sister I received >from one
of my Dorfman-related cousins, as well as a 1898 bill of sale I found
recently for the property the Confeld family homesteaded in Oak Grove,
Minnesota.

I have many questions regarding the Confeld and Dorfman family. While
Dorfman was probably Baruch's name in Bessarabian records, I'm not so sure
about Joseph Confeld. Most Bessarabian record searches with the name
Confeld seem to return only a few Confeld and many Schoenfeld, Shainfeld,
Sheinfeld, and other spellings. Since I have not found any passenger list
records for the Confeld family to America or Canada, I am wondering what
spelling was used in the records. My first choice for their port of arrival
is Montreal, since I'm pretty sure they made their way to Chicago, Missouri,
and then down the river to Painted Woods.

Also, many of you probably read my posting about my grandmother's
family mystery photo taken around 1900. I am still trying to determine if
any of the Confeld family is in the photo and where it was taken. My current
research leans towards the picture having been taken just before 1900 in the
area of Oak Grove, Minnesota (perhaps their homesteaded property). The
rural structure in the background appears to be a barn or similar type of
building.

So far, I do not know anything about their life in Kishinev (or whatever
town nearby they may have migrated from) and have no records of their births
or marriages there. I have not found any good matches yet in searching the
Jewishgen Bessarabian records.

What would be my best options for having someone search the records for me
in Kishinev? Should I try to find a more recent birth certificate (1870's) or
an older one (1820's), or would it beeasier to find a marriage certificate? Is
that even possible?

Regards,
Richard S. Levine
Researching CONFELD, DORFMAN, STEINMAN, ADELE, LEVINE (Odessa), FORMAN,
KALISH (Brzeziny), ZILBERWASSER (Brzeziny), GILLER/GELLER (Brzeziny/Lodz)


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Bessarabia SIG: Let's introduce ourselves to our group #bessarabia

yricklevy
 

Hello,

My great-grandparents Joseph and Anna (Dorfman) Confeld, both born around
1850, came with their children in 1884 >from Kishinev to Painted Woods Jewish
farming settlement in North Dakota. My grandmother Rachel (aka Rose) Confeld
was born in Painted Woods in 1885. By 1886 they moved >from Painted Woods
to Oak Grove, Minnesota (to homestead there) and then Minneapolis, MN by 1900.
Joseph worked as a farmer, a cigar-maker, and a tailor for a time.

Anna's parents were Baruch and Hannah (Adele) Dorfman, both born around
1828. They came to Painted Woods in 1882 (with Sarah, and probably
her brothers Moses and Joseph) among the original settlers of that Jewish
farming community. I do not know if they came >from Kishinev, but they
probably did. Baruch and Hannah, Sarah and her husband, all relocated to
St. Paul, MN. Moses Dorfman went to Philadelphia, and Joseph Dorfman went
to Minneapolis.

My best accomplishments in this research have to do with a Painted Woods
related letter I discovered at the Jewish Historical Society of the Upper
Midwest, an 1887 photo of my great-grandmother=92s sister I received >from one
of my Dorfman-related cousins, as well as a 1898 bill of sale I found
recently for the property the Confeld family homesteaded in Oak Grove,
Minnesota.

I have many questions regarding the Confeld and Dorfman family. While
Dorfman was probably Baruch's name in Bessarabian records, I'm not so sure
about Joseph Confeld. Most Bessarabian record searches with the name
Confeld seem to return only a few Confeld and many Schoenfeld, Shainfeld,
Sheinfeld, and other spellings. Since I have not found any passenger list
records for the Confeld family to America or Canada, I am wondering what
spelling was used in the records. My first choice for their port of arrival
is Montreal, since I'm pretty sure they made their way to Chicago, Missouri,
and then down the river to Painted Woods.

Also, many of you probably read my posting about my grandmother's
family mystery photo taken around 1900. I am still trying to determine if
any of the Confeld family is in the photo and where it was taken. My current
research leans towards the picture having been taken just before 1900 in the
area of Oak Grove, Minnesota (perhaps their homesteaded property). The
rural structure in the background appears to be a barn or similar type of
building.

So far, I do not know anything about their life in Kishinev (or whatever
town nearby they may have migrated from) and have no records of their births
or marriages there. I have not found any good matches yet in searching the
Jewishgen Bessarabian records.

What would be my best options for having someone search the records for me
in Kishinev? Should I try to find a more recent birth certificate (1870's) or
an older one (1820's), or would it beeasier to find a marriage certificate? Is
that even possible?

Regards,
Richard S. Levine
Researching CONFELD, DORFMAN, STEINMAN, ADELE, LEVINE (Odessa), FORMAN,
KALISH (Brzeziny), ZILBERWASSER (Brzeziny), GILLER/GELLER (Brzeziny/Lodz)


Search for Marks, Wittenmeyer, Skladany #poland

Jan Bousse <janbousse@...>
 

Dear Friends,

I am helping a friend in the States to look for the family of her
great-grandparents >from Poland. They were:
Theodore SKLADANY, born 20/06/1858 in Wieliczka and Katarzina
WITTENMEYER, born 1/10/1867 allegedly in Plock.

They don't seem to be Jewish, but Katarzina was first married to a Jewish
man called MARKS. At least that's the surname his two children used in
America, in Poland it may well have been MARKUS. I have no data about this
MARKS, except that he is said to have died around 1892. Katarzina and Marks
indeed had two children: Olga, b. 16/10/1888 and Kasimir, b. 14/3/1892.

Katarzina then married Theodore SKLADANY, they emigrated to America in
January 1893. They must have married shortly before that date as the
youngest child of the deceased Marks was then 9 months old.

I searched the JRI-Poland database but did not find any data on Marks
and his family. I suppose the marriage was not a Jewish one. If there
is no information in that database I hope someone can indicate to me
which archive would hold the relevant data and how I could request these.

Many thanks and sincere greetings.

Jan BOUSSE, Oostende, Belgium
janbousse@skynet.be


JRI Poland #Poland Search for Marks, Wittenmeyer, Skladany #poland

Jan Bousse <janbousse@...>
 

Dear Friends,

I am helping a friend in the States to look for the family of her
great-grandparents >from Poland. They were:
Theodore SKLADANY, born 20/06/1858 in Wieliczka and Katarzina
WITTENMEYER, born 1/10/1867 allegedly in Plock.

They don't seem to be Jewish, but Katarzina was first married to a Jewish
man called MARKS. At least that's the surname his two children used in
America, in Poland it may well have been MARKUS. I have no data about this
MARKS, except that he is said to have died around 1892. Katarzina and Marks
indeed had two children: Olga, b. 16/10/1888 and Kasimir, b. 14/3/1892.

Katarzina then married Theodore SKLADANY, they emigrated to America in
January 1893. They must have married shortly before that date as the
youngest child of the deceased Marks was then 9 months old.

I searched the JRI-Poland database but did not find any data on Marks
and his family. I suppose the marriage was not a Jewish one. If there
is no information in that database I hope someone can indicate to me
which archive would hold the relevant data and how I could request these.

Many thanks and sincere greetings.

Jan BOUSSE, Oostende, Belgium
janbousse@skynet.be


Let's introduce ourselves #bessarabia

ab.cohen@...
 

My name is Alan Cohen. I am a first cousin to Mike Glazer whose multi-lingualism is such a great
help to the SIG. Our mutual grandfather and his four brothers left Lipcani around 1900; three of
them came to London, the eldest went to New York and the youngest to Rosario in Argentina.
Those two both married girls >from Lipcani whose families had also emigrated so we have many
relations all over the place. Mike's expertise in the Russian censuses and Revision lists has helped
us trace our Glazers back to a Iosi Glazer who was probably born around 1770. Grandfather's wife
came >from Poltava, but we have hit a brick wall with her parents antecedants.

I have also spent a deal of time researching my wife's family who came >from Plock and Gostynin
in Poland and again we have gone back to about 1770 in Kutno before the research gets too
difficult.

Alan Cohen
researching GLAZER and ROITMAN >from Lipcani, KUTNOWSKY and DAJCZ >from Poland,
ROMANOFSKY >from POltava.


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Let's introduce ourselves #bessarabia

ab.cohen@...
 

My name is Alan Cohen. I am a first cousin to Mike Glazer whose multi-lingualism is such a great
help to the SIG. Our mutual grandfather and his four brothers left Lipcani around 1900; three of
them came to London, the eldest went to New York and the youngest to Rosario in Argentina.
Those two both married girls >from Lipcani whose families had also emigrated so we have many
relations all over the place. Mike's expertise in the Russian censuses and Revision lists has helped
us trace our Glazers back to a Iosi Glazer who was probably born around 1770. Grandfather's wife
came >from Poltava, but we have hit a brick wall with her parents antecedants.

I have also spent a deal of time researching my wife's family who came >from Plock and Gostynin
in Poland and again we have gone back to about 1770 in Kutno before the research gets too
difficult.

Alan Cohen
researching GLAZER and ROITMAN >from Lipcani, KUTNOWSKY and DAJCZ >from Poland,
ROMANOFSKY >from POltava.


Kalarash #bessarabia

hek2 <hek2@...>
 

To Terry Lasky and anyone else whose family is >from Kalarash:
journal >from the Kalarash Bessarabier Association is reproduced on the Kalarash
website at http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/calarasi/Journal-A.html
You might want to check the journal and the website itself to see whether there is
mention of your families. I remind you all that there is a town called Kalarash (Calarasi)
in modern-day Romania. The website to which I refer is about the shtetl Kalarash (Calarasi)
that is in modern-day Moldova, not far >from Kishinev.

Helene Kenvin
Webmaster, Kalarash Website


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Kalarash #bessarabia

hek2 <hek2@...>
 

To Terry Lasky and anyone else whose family is >from Kalarash:
journal >from the Kalarash Bessarabier Association is reproduced on the Kalarash
website at http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/calarasi/Journal-A.html
You might want to check the journal and the website itself to see whether there is
mention of your families. I remind you all that there is a town called Kalarash (Calarasi)
in modern-day Romania. The website to which I refer is about the shtetl Kalarash (Calarasi)
that is in modern-day Moldova, not far >from Kishinev.

Helene Kenvin
Webmaster, Kalarash Website


Galician Military Records photographed by the LDS #general

Thomas F. Weiss
 

Dear Fellow JGenners,

It had been widely assumed that the military records of Galician soldiers
serving in the Austro-Hungarian Army were sent to the successor states at
the end of World War I and then lost. In fact, the War Archives in Vienna
has the following statement on its website.
"Galicia: Registration sheets of officers who joined the Polish army in 1918.
Most of the registration sheets of draftees >from Galicia (Southern Poland,
Western Ukraine) has been destroyed (Centralne Archivwum Wojskowe,
PL-00910 Warszawa-Rembertow)" >from
http://oesta.gv.at/site/6413/default.aspx

Thus I was very surprised by Alex Feller's post on November 26, 2011, which
is as follows.
"The Family History Library has microfilms of military records for various
towns in Galicia >from the period of 1865- 1930. The originals are located
in fond 780 at the Central State Historical Archives in Lviv, Ukraine. The
link to this record group on the FHL website is

<https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/show?uri=http%3A%2F%2Fcatalog-search-api%3A8080%2Fwww-catalogapi-webservice%2Fitem%2F1713234>
http://tinyurl.com/7sydd2c [MOD]

I found the above note >from Alex encouraging and have investigated the 8 films
in the collection that is listed as corresponding to surnames beginning with
the letter F.

Here are my general conclusions:

(1) The film notes do not indicate what is covered by each film.

(2) Each film is organized in labeled sections, i.e. the labels are contained
on the film.

(3) Each labeled section is organized into unlabeled subsections corresponding
to the birth year of the conscript.

(4) Within these unlabeled subsections, the surnames are listed mostly
alphabetically.

(5) There may be multiple subsections for the same birth year scattered among
the films, sometimes these subsections adjoin.

(6) There does not appear to be any obvious order to the birth years.

(7) There are many WWI records.

(8) There are quite a few records out of place. There are even a few records
with surnames starting with letters other than F.

(9) The military records are heterogeneous and include at least the following:
Auskunftsbogen
Auszug aus dem Belebungsprotokolle
Dienstzettel
Entlassungsschein
Fehlkarte = faulty card
Grundbuchblatt
Haupt-Grundbuchblatt
Konduiteliste
Kopfzettel
Landsturmevidenzblatt
Landsturmlegitimationsblatt
Persons- und MeldeNachweis
Schussblatt
Stammblatt
Strafprotokoll-Auszug
Testimonium mortis
Todten-schein
Unterabteilungs-Grundbuchblatt
Vormerkblatt
Vormerkblatt fur die Qualifikationsbeschreibung
Vormerkblatt uber Kranke in Heilanstatten

The following is specific information on the 8 films for surnames beginning
with F. Except where stated otherwise, all the subsections correspond to
surnames beginning with the letter F. Each subsection corresponds to a
particular birth year within which the surnames are arranged more or less
alphabetically. These subsections vary in length >from just a few records to
many dozens.

Film 2449354
Sections 1-4 surnames beginning with U
Section 5 - 1885

Film 2448957
Section 1 - 1885, 1899
Section 2 - 1896, 1895, 1894, 1897, 1898, 1974, 1879, 1892, 1893, 1896
Section 3 - 1873, 1871, 1873, 1875, 1898, 1875, 1882, 1900

Film 2448958
Section 1 - 1890
Section 2 - 1871, 1891
Section 3 - 1876, 1892
Section 4 - 1870, 1887, 1896

Film 2448959
Section 1 - 1896
Section 2 - 1866, 1880, 1884, 1890
Section 3 - 1895, 1880, 1881
Section 4 - 1872, 1878, 1871, 1883, 1897

Film 2448960
Section 1 - 1886, 1906, 1897, 1887, 1897
Section 2 - 1886, 1868, 1886, 1886, 1891, 1893, 1869, 1876, 1878, 1888,
1889, 1877, 1888

Film 2448961
Section 1 - 1888
Section 2 - 1876, 1876, 1898
Section 3 - 1868, 1869, 1897, 1900, 1897, 1899, 1897, 1899, 1878, 1880,
1879, 1872, 1887, 1887
Section 4 - 1865, 1881

Film 2448962
Section 1 - 1881, 1894
Section 2 - 1874, 1883, 1898, 1883
Section 3 - 1873, 1877, 1884, 1895

Film 2448963
Section 1 - 1895
Section 2 - 1867, 1872, 1882, 1890, 1882
Section 3 - 1877, 1889, 1867
Section 4 - names beginning with C

My experience - I tried to find the military records of my grandfather.
I did not find them. I concluded that they might be misfiled in one of the
8 films I examined fairly carefully or they might be in a film that is listed
as being for surnames other than those beginning with the letter F. So to be
sure to find your relative, I think you have to look at all the records for
all the letters to be sure. This is a gigantic task. I spent 15 hours searching
the 8 films for the letter F.

Happy hunting,

Thomas Fischer Weiss
Newton, MA
USA
tfweiss@mit.edu
Researching:
FRENKEL (Buchach, Vienna); BUCHHALTER (Skalat); ENGEL (Vienna);
FISCHER (Hriskov, Schlan, Prague); FRAENKEL,FRUCHTER(Rozhnyatov, Vienna);
KATZ (Schlan);KLEPETAR Jistebnice); MEISELS (Nadworna,Vienna);OLLOP (Vienna);
ORLIK (Pohor, Jistebnice, Benesov,Tabor); QUADRATSTEIN(Vienna, Saarbrucken);
VODICKA (Dobronitz, Jistebnice, Benesov, Tabor)


Wishatia? in Ukraine #general

Debbie Raff
 

Does the town of Wishatia ring a bell for anyone? It appears as the place of
birth for a great uncle. This is typed in 2 different areas of his
naturalization papers.

Wishatia, Austria

This family supposedly came >from either Husyatin or Tarnopol which are now
in Ukraine. But, so far, I can't figure out which town or portion of a town
this might be.

Some possibilities? (village) Vyshnivchyk or (Urban-type settlement)
Vyshnivets

Debbie Raff
California


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Galician Military Records photographed by the LDS #general

Thomas F. Weiss
 

Dear Fellow JGenners,

It had been widely assumed that the military records of Galician soldiers
serving in the Austro-Hungarian Army were sent to the successor states at
the end of World War I and then lost. In fact, the War Archives in Vienna
has the following statement on its website.
"Galicia: Registration sheets of officers who joined the Polish army in 1918.
Most of the registration sheets of draftees >from Galicia (Southern Poland,
Western Ukraine) has been destroyed (Centralne Archivwum Wojskowe,
PL-00910 Warszawa-Rembertow)" >from
http://oesta.gv.at/site/6413/default.aspx

Thus I was very surprised by Alex Feller's post on November 26, 2011, which
is as follows.
"The Family History Library has microfilms of military records for various
towns in Galicia >from the period of 1865- 1930. The originals are located
in fond 780 at the Central State Historical Archives in Lviv, Ukraine. The
link to this record group on the FHL website is

<https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/show?uri=http%3A%2F%2Fcatalog-search-api%3A8080%2Fwww-catalogapi-webservice%2Fitem%2F1713234>
http://tinyurl.com/7sydd2c [MOD]

I found the above note >from Alex encouraging and have investigated the 8 films
in the collection that is listed as corresponding to surnames beginning with
the letter F.

Here are my general conclusions:

(1) The film notes do not indicate what is covered by each film.

(2) Each film is organized in labeled sections, i.e. the labels are contained
on the film.

(3) Each labeled section is organized into unlabeled subsections corresponding
to the birth year of the conscript.

(4) Within these unlabeled subsections, the surnames are listed mostly
alphabetically.

(5) There may be multiple subsections for the same birth year scattered among
the films, sometimes these subsections adjoin.

(6) There does not appear to be any obvious order to the birth years.

(7) There are many WWI records.

(8) There are quite a few records out of place. There are even a few records
with surnames starting with letters other than F.

(9) The military records are heterogeneous and include at least the following:
Auskunftsbogen
Auszug aus dem Belebungsprotokolle
Dienstzettel
Entlassungsschein
Fehlkarte = faulty card
Grundbuchblatt
Haupt-Grundbuchblatt
Konduiteliste
Kopfzettel
Landsturmevidenzblatt
Landsturmlegitimationsblatt
Persons- und MeldeNachweis
Schussblatt
Stammblatt
Strafprotokoll-Auszug
Testimonium mortis
Todten-schein
Unterabteilungs-Grundbuchblatt
Vormerkblatt
Vormerkblatt fur die Qualifikationsbeschreibung
Vormerkblatt uber Kranke in Heilanstatten

The following is specific information on the 8 films for surnames beginning
with F. Except where stated otherwise, all the subsections correspond to
surnames beginning with the letter F. Each subsection corresponds to a
particular birth year within which the surnames are arranged more or less
alphabetically. These subsections vary in length >from just a few records to
many dozens.

Film 2449354
Sections 1-4 surnames beginning with U
Section 5 - 1885

Film 2448957
Section 1 - 1885, 1899
Section 2 - 1896, 1895, 1894, 1897, 1898, 1974, 1879, 1892, 1893, 1896
Section 3 - 1873, 1871, 1873, 1875, 1898, 1875, 1882, 1900

Film 2448958
Section 1 - 1890
Section 2 - 1871, 1891
Section 3 - 1876, 1892
Section 4 - 1870, 1887, 1896

Film 2448959
Section 1 - 1896
Section 2 - 1866, 1880, 1884, 1890
Section 3 - 1895, 1880, 1881
Section 4 - 1872, 1878, 1871, 1883, 1897

Film 2448960
Section 1 - 1886, 1906, 1897, 1887, 1897
Section 2 - 1886, 1868, 1886, 1886, 1891, 1893, 1869, 1876, 1878, 1888,
1889, 1877, 1888

Film 2448961
Section 1 - 1888
Section 2 - 1876, 1876, 1898
Section 3 - 1868, 1869, 1897, 1900, 1897, 1899, 1897, 1899, 1878, 1880,
1879, 1872, 1887, 1887
Section 4 - 1865, 1881

Film 2448962
Section 1 - 1881, 1894
Section 2 - 1874, 1883, 1898, 1883
Section 3 - 1873, 1877, 1884, 1895

Film 2448963
Section 1 - 1895
Section 2 - 1867, 1872, 1882, 1890, 1882
Section 3 - 1877, 1889, 1867
Section 4 - names beginning with C

My experience - I tried to find the military records of my grandfather.
I did not find them. I concluded that they might be misfiled in one of the
8 films I examined fairly carefully or they might be in a film that is listed
as being for surnames other than those beginning with the letter F. So to be
sure to find your relative, I think you have to look at all the records for
all the letters to be sure. This is a gigantic task. I spent 15 hours searching
the 8 films for the letter F.

Happy hunting,

Thomas Fischer Weiss
Newton, MA
USA
tfweiss@mit.edu
Researching:
FRENKEL (Buchach, Vienna); BUCHHALTER (Skalat); ENGEL (Vienna);
FISCHER (Hriskov, Schlan, Prague); FRAENKEL,FRUCHTER(Rozhnyatov, Vienna);
KATZ (Schlan);KLEPETAR Jistebnice); MEISELS (Nadworna,Vienna);OLLOP (Vienna);
ORLIK (Pohor, Jistebnice, Benesov,Tabor); QUADRATSTEIN(Vienna, Saarbrucken);
VODICKA (Dobronitz, Jistebnice, Benesov, Tabor)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Wishatia? in Ukraine #general

Debbie Raff
 

Does the town of Wishatia ring a bell for anyone? It appears as the place of
birth for a great uncle. This is typed in 2 different areas of his
naturalization papers.

Wishatia, Austria

This family supposedly came >from either Husyatin or Tarnopol which are now
in Ukraine. But, so far, I can't figure out which town or portion of a town
this might be.

Some possibilities? (village) Vyshnivchyk or (Urban-type settlement)
Vyshnivets

Debbie Raff
California


Re: Let's introduce ourselves #bessarabia

Gloria Wolfson
 

My father was Hanoch Halevi Krupnick (although on his immigration papers, it
was spelled Crupnic (which I understand was the Roumanian spelling). He was
born in Brichany in about 1907. He came >from a family of 10 children. My
grandfather's name was David Tzvi ben Ze'ev Halevi Krupnick. We believe he
was born in about 1863. He was married to Goldah Feinbaum >from Sekurany
whom we believe was born in about 1868.

The family immigrated in waves. The eldest son left the earliest. His name
was Louis and he went to Brazil as there was already family in Brazil on the
Fainbaum (or Vainbaum) side. Two of the oldest girls immigrated a bit later
and went to their aunt Sarah Fainbaum Kenner in Rhode Island. One of the
girls (Ethel) came first and the other (Fanny) came later to join her sister
in Rhode Island. The rest of the family came together in and lived in
Brooklyn. In addition to the living children, they also had two other
children. Adina died in a fire and then there was another infant boy who
died of Pneumonia.

I believe that my grandfather was born in Shargarod and was the grandson of
Rabbi Hanoch ben Halevi Krupnick of Shargarod, who died approximately 1905,
One of his sons was Ze'ev who was my great grandfather. He was related in
practice to the Twersky line of Hassids. My grandfather was not a
particularly religious man and I am given to understand left Shargarod in
order to get away >from what he saw as repressive religiousity. He worked as
an agricultural manager for a Prince in Brichany.

According to my cousin, her mother (Ethel) called the town they came >from
Sekarov. According to records, Ethel arrived >from Sekurany on June 3, 1911.

Other Krupnicks are found in Podalia in Uman, Berdichev, Khotin, Shargarod,
Zhitomar, Volynsky, Soroca, Chelmnicki. Grodno. Biala Podalska

Flavio Mendes Bitelman (who is also a member of this list serve) lives in
Brazil and confirms that he is a cousin. His mother's family were Fainbaums.
My grandmother Goldie had 2 sisters (Breina and Sarah) and 2 brothers -
Shalom and Yankel. Yankel married a woman named Rivka. Sholom married Sarah
(last name unknown) and they had 4 children-Israel, Ethel, Fanny or Frida,
and Shendel (note that the names Israel, Ethel, and Fanny) are also repeated
in my father's family. They moved to Recife Brazil in the early 1900s.

Flavio's mother's grandfather was Yankel Fainbaum who married Rivka.(My
mother's name is Revecca (Rivka) Fainbaum Malay Mendes Bitelman. Yankel
(Jacob) lost his wife Rifka in Sekurany and went to Brazil to look for
opportunities. He left his 4 children (Israel, Ethel, Fanny, and Shendel) in
Britchany, presumably with their aunt (my grandmother). He later came and
took the children home with him to Brazil. Israel and Isaac apparently never
married. Shendel became Sonia and married and had 3 children.

My father belonged to a burial society called the Smotricher Podalier
Society. The family plot is on Staten Island. I remember going to the the
society meetings as a child, I used to call it the "poodle society."

Other names that "pop" up are Roitman, Handleman (or Gendleman).

So, if anyone has any other information, I'd be glad to share it. I have not
been able to establish a connection with any of the other Krupnicks in the
US. Any information would be welcome.


Gloria K Wolfson, RSW, EdD
Vancouver, BC
604-264-1973


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia re: Let's introduce ourselves #bessarabia

Gloria Wolfson
 

My father was Hanoch Halevi Krupnick (although on his immigration papers, it
was spelled Crupnic (which I understand was the Roumanian spelling). He was
born in Brichany in about 1907. He came >from a family of 10 children. My
grandfather's name was David Tzvi ben Ze'ev Halevi Krupnick. We believe he
was born in about 1863. He was married to Goldah Feinbaum >from Sekurany
whom we believe was born in about 1868.

The family immigrated in waves. The eldest son left the earliest. His name
was Louis and he went to Brazil as there was already family in Brazil on the
Fainbaum (or Vainbaum) side. Two of the oldest girls immigrated a bit later
and went to their aunt Sarah Fainbaum Kenner in Rhode Island. One of the
girls (Ethel) came first and the other (Fanny) came later to join her sister
in Rhode Island. The rest of the family came together in and lived in
Brooklyn. In addition to the living children, they also had two other
children. Adina died in a fire and then there was another infant boy who
died of Pneumonia.

I believe that my grandfather was born in Shargarod and was the grandson of
Rabbi Hanoch ben Halevi Krupnick of Shargarod, who died approximately 1905,
One of his sons was Ze'ev who was my great grandfather. He was related in
practice to the Twersky line of Hassids. My grandfather was not a
particularly religious man and I am given to understand left Shargarod in
order to get away >from what he saw as repressive religiousity. He worked as
an agricultural manager for a Prince in Brichany.

According to my cousin, her mother (Ethel) called the town they came >from
Sekarov. According to records, Ethel arrived >from Sekurany on June 3, 1911.

Other Krupnicks are found in Podalia in Uman, Berdichev, Khotin, Shargarod,
Zhitomar, Volynsky, Soroca, Chelmnicki. Grodno. Biala Podalska

Flavio Mendes Bitelman (who is also a member of this list serve) lives in
Brazil and confirms that he is a cousin. His mother's family were Fainbaums.
My grandmother Goldie had 2 sisters (Breina and Sarah) and 2 brothers -
Shalom and Yankel. Yankel married a woman named Rivka. Sholom married Sarah
(last name unknown) and they had 4 children-Israel, Ethel, Fanny or Frida,
and Shendel (note that the names Israel, Ethel, and Fanny) are also repeated
in my father's family. They moved to Recife Brazil in the early 1900s.

Flavio's mother's grandfather was Yankel Fainbaum who married Rivka.(My
mother's name is Revecca (Rivka) Fainbaum Malay Mendes Bitelman. Yankel
(Jacob) lost his wife Rifka in Sekurany and went to Brazil to look for
opportunities. He left his 4 children (Israel, Ethel, Fanny, and Shendel) in
Britchany, presumably with their aunt (my grandmother). He later came and
took the children home with him to Brazil. Israel and Isaac apparently never
married. Shendel became Sonia and married and had 3 children.

My father belonged to a burial society called the Smotricher Podalier
Society. The family plot is on Staten Island. I remember going to the the
society meetings as a child, I used to call it the "poodle society."

Other names that "pop" up are Roitman, Handleman (or Gendleman).

So, if anyone has any other information, I'd be glad to share it. I have not
been able to establish a connection with any of the other Krupnicks in the
US. Any information would be welcome.


Gloria K Wolfson, RSW, EdD
Vancouver, BC
604-264-1973


Re: Let's introduce ourselves #bessarabia

Pat Fuller
 

Dear Bessarabians:

Thanks so much, Yefim, for giving us this opportunity! I will try not to
make this too long.

My paternal grandparents came >from Bessarabia. My grandfather, Benjamin
Moses ROITMAN, was born in Karpineny (now Carpineni) on 18 Feb 1881. My
grandmother, Esther FAINBOIM, was born in Romanovca (I believe this is the
very small village near Cornesti on the Romanian border, not the larger
Romanovka on the Ukrainian border that is now Basarabeasca), in about 1892.
They married in Bessarabia, had two children, Sam, who died at age 2, and
Liba (Lillian), who was born on 5 Feb 1911 and just celebrated her 101st
birthday! In 1913-14, Benjamin and Esther immigrated to the U.S. changed
their name to REDMAN, and settled in Roscoe, South Dakota, where my father,
Joseph Gabriel REDMAN, was born on 16 Jan 1916.

I have been relatively lucky with my grandmother's family, because FAINBOIM
is not a very common name. My grandmother's parents were Nukhim and Hinda
FAINBOIM (born about 1850). According to an unverified family story, they
originally came >from Poland where their parents were killed in a pogrom, and
they and other orphaned infants were taken to an orphanage in Bessarabia,
where they lived and raised 9 children, 8 girls and 1 boy. My grandmother,
Esther, was the youngest. Her siblings were Chana, Feiga, Leib, Rivka,
Ruhel, Udel, and Sheiva. I have traced Chana's family, and have corresponded
with and met several of her descendents. I have not been able to trace the
other siblings, although I know that some went to Israel and some (possibly)
to South America. Nukhim died of natural causes in about 1930, and Hinda was
killed while running >from Nazis in Zhitomir, Ukraine, in 1941, at age 91
(according to a Yad Vashem POT).

I have not been so lucky with my grandfather's family, because ROITMAN is
such a common name in that area. I have found out nothing about his family
in Europe. I know only (>from U.S. records) that his father's name was Isaac
Moses ROITMAN and his mother's name was Toba SHKOLNIK, and that he had
brothers. According to my father, at least one (maybe two) of my
grandfather's brothers (or uncles?) was a blind cantor. (I know there is a
famous cantor David ROITMAN, but I can't find a connection.) The only other
relatives of my grandfather that I know about are his first cousins, the
RAICH family (originally RACHBUCH) >from Hoceni. There were 4 boys: Jacob,
Samuel, David, and Joseph, all of whom immigrated to the U.S and settled in
Greenway, South Dakota, where my grandparents joined them when they first
came to the U.S. I believe (>from U.S. documents) that their mother was a
ROITMAN.

That is probably enough information for now. If anyone knows of any
connections to this family, please contact me! Thank you.

Patricia (Redman) Fuller (patbfuller@roadrunner.com)
Simi Valley, California, USA

Researching: In Bessarabia/Moldova: FAINBOIM in Romanovca or Sculeni;
RAICH or RACHBUCH in Hoceni; ROITMAN in Carpineni; SHKOLNIK in ?.
In Lithuania: FREDE and NATHANSON in Taurage; KAPLITS and MUSS in Ukmerge;
In East Prussia (now Russia): GOLDBERG and LIPPMAN in Kaliningrad (formerly
Konigsberg).


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia re: Let's introduce ourselves #bessarabia

Pat Fuller
 

Dear Bessarabians:

Thanks so much, Yefim, for giving us this opportunity! I will try not to
make this too long.

My paternal grandparents came >from Bessarabia. My grandfather, Benjamin
Moses ROITMAN, was born in Karpineny (now Carpineni) on 18 Feb 1881. My
grandmother, Esther FAINBOIM, was born in Romanovca (I believe this is the
very small village near Cornesti on the Romanian border, not the larger
Romanovka on the Ukrainian border that is now Basarabeasca), in about 1892.
They married in Bessarabia, had two children, Sam, who died at age 2, and
Liba (Lillian), who was born on 5 Feb 1911 and just celebrated her 101st
birthday! In 1913-14, Benjamin and Esther immigrated to the U.S. changed
their name to REDMAN, and settled in Roscoe, South Dakota, where my father,
Joseph Gabriel REDMAN, was born on 16 Jan 1916.

I have been relatively lucky with my grandmother's family, because FAINBOIM
is not a very common name. My grandmother's parents were Nukhim and Hinda
FAINBOIM (born about 1850). According to an unverified family story, they
originally came >from Poland where their parents were killed in a pogrom, and
they and other orphaned infants were taken to an orphanage in Bessarabia,
where they lived and raised 9 children, 8 girls and 1 boy. My grandmother,
Esther, was the youngest. Her siblings were Chana, Feiga, Leib, Rivka,
Ruhel, Udel, and Sheiva. I have traced Chana's family, and have corresponded
with and met several of her descendents. I have not been able to trace the
other siblings, although I know that some went to Israel and some (possibly)
to South America. Nukhim died of natural causes in about 1930, and Hinda was
killed while running >from Nazis in Zhitomir, Ukraine, in 1941, at age 91
(according to a Yad Vashem POT).

I have not been so lucky with my grandfather's family, because ROITMAN is
such a common name in that area. I have found out nothing about his family
in Europe. I know only (>from U.S. records) that his father's name was Isaac
Moses ROITMAN and his mother's name was Toba SHKOLNIK, and that he had
brothers. According to my father, at least one (maybe two) of my
grandfather's brothers (or uncles?) was a blind cantor. (I know there is a
famous cantor David ROITMAN, but I can't find a connection.) The only other
relatives of my grandfather that I know about are his first cousins, the
RAICH family (originally RACHBUCH) >from Hoceni. There were 4 boys: Jacob,
Samuel, David, and Joseph, all of whom immigrated to the U.S and settled in
Greenway, South Dakota, where my grandparents joined them when they first
came to the U.S. I believe (>from U.S. documents) that their mother was a
ROITMAN.

That is probably enough information for now. If anyone knows of any
connections to this family, please contact me! Thank you.

Patricia (Redman) Fuller (patbfuller@roadrunner.com)
Simi Valley, California, USA

Researching: In Bessarabia/Moldova: FAINBOIM in Romanovca or Sculeni;
RAICH or RACHBUCH in Hoceni; ROITMAN in Carpineni; SHKOLNIK in ?.
In Lithuania: FREDE and NATHANSON in Taurage; KAPLITS and MUSS in Ukmerge;
In East Prussia (now Russia): GOLDBERG and LIPPMAN in Kaliningrad (formerly
Konigsberg).


Szerov, Galicia, Austria #galicia

Shari Kantrow
 

I finally found my great-grandfather's Max SCHNEIDER's (1869-1938)
naturalization papers, and he declares he is >from Szerov, Galicia, in
Austria. According to the papers, he came to US in 1889. He had six
sons, Sam, Jacob, Irving, Solomon, and Leo. One of his sons, Nathan,
died in 1917. Max was married to Dora MAYER. Max and Dora are
buried in Mt. Carmel cemetery in NY, with the Dr. Nathan Adler lodge.
I have looked on JRI-Poland, but cannot conclusively discern what
town Szerov is today.

Does anyone have any ideas?

I appreciate your help in advance.

Shari Kantrow
Bloomfield, NJ

SCHNEIDER, MAURER: Szerov, Galicia > Brooklyn, New York
MAYER, GENZER: Radomysl Wielki > Manhattan, New York


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Szerov, Galicia, Austria #galicia

Shari Kantrow
 

I finally found my great-grandfather's Max SCHNEIDER's (1869-1938)
naturalization papers, and he declares he is >from Szerov, Galicia, in
Austria. According to the papers, he came to US in 1889. He had six
sons, Sam, Jacob, Irving, Solomon, and Leo. One of his sons, Nathan,
died in 1917. Max was married to Dora MAYER. Max and Dora are
buried in Mt. Carmel cemetery in NY, with the Dr. Nathan Adler lodge.
I have looked on JRI-Poland, but cannot conclusively discern what
town Szerov is today.

Does anyone have any ideas?

I appreciate your help in advance.

Shari Kantrow
Bloomfield, NJ

SCHNEIDER, MAURER: Szerov, Galicia > Brooklyn, New York
MAYER, GENZER: Radomysl Wielki > Manhattan, New York

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