Date   

Internal Passports Issued in Birzai 1917-1941 #general

William Yoffee
 

The Panevezys District Research Group (PDRG) is posting a listing of 2739
internal passports that were issued in Birzai between WW1 and WW2. This is
the second of a series that began with the posting of 12700 internal
passports issued in Panevezys town during the same period. Both listings
appear as spread sheets in the Excel format under the title "Internal
Passports" in the "Links to other pages" section at the top of the left hand
column of the PDRG Shutterfly website. These data were produced and
translated by the Internal Passport Project of LitvakSIG coordinated by
Howard Margol. A discussion of the Lithuanian Internal Passport Project
including history and illustrations of documents can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/lithuania/internalpassports.htm ,
authored by Howard Margol, updated to March 2012,. The Excel spread sheets
provide information where the actual files are located.

During the period 1919-1940 when Lithuania first was an independent country,
every Lithuanian citizen age 17 or older was required to have an internal
passport, for identification but not valid for international travel. In the
beginning of the 1920s, all adult citizens, regardless of age, in order to
obtain an internal passport had to prove their right to Lithuanian
citizenship by producing evidence that they were residents of the territory
of Lithuania before WW1. Later, internal passports were issued to young
people coming of age, women when they changed their surnames after marriage,
when old passport were lost and other similar reasons. Some internal
passports were issued in Birzai even after the Soviet takeover in mid-1940
and as late as March and June 1941.

The surnames of the passport holders listed in column c) of the spread sheet
are according to their Lithuanian surnames with the Jewish surnames
following in brackets [ ].* The passport numbers in column b) indicate that
generally one passport was issued to a family, although in some cases
separate passports were issued to some family members. This is confirmed by
the family registration number in column a) which is the same for each
member of a family. Individuals and their relationship to the head of a
household can be identified by given name and patronymic in columns e), f),
and g). Ages of individuals are noted in column h), as a general rule, by
stating the age in the year the internal passport was issued or by stating
the year of birth which was before the earliest year that internal passports
were first issued. There are a few exceptions and a few cases where the age
has been omitted. Birth places are listed in column i) for only slightly
more than half of the individuals, most of whom were born in Birzai or other
Districts of Lithuania. A significant number were born in Russia,
Belorussia, Latvia and what became Poland. All but a few list their current
address simply as Birzai or a street address in Birzai. Several list other
Lithuanian towns. In column u), less than 1000 persons listed their
occupations, which included a number of housewives and both male and female
students. The "Comments" column v) notes information about the status of a
number of women on the list, including dates of marriage, and the existence
of supporting identity documents such as foreign passports contained in an
individual's file.

These data can be useful for genealogical research even in cases where a
researcher's family emigrated or was exiled before the end of WW1. Their
most significant value, however, is to trace those families who remained in
the Panevezys District but who became victims of the Holocaust. For those
families whose members were exiled to the interior parts of Russia during
WW1, some data might provide evidence of the location of the exile and
traces their return to what became the independent state of Lithuania. For
those families whose members emigrated before WW1, the data may provide some
indication of family members who remained behind and evidence of the
emigrant's place of origin.

For further information about the Internal Passport Project, please contact
Howard Margol homargol@aol.com .

For futher information about membership in the Panevezys District Research
Group, please contact me at the email address below.

*Lists of the Jewish surnames for either or both the Panevezys town and the
Birzai Internal Passport holders on the posted Excel spreadsheets are now
available to *anyone* on request to me at the email address below.

Bill Yoffee
Panevezys District Research Coordinator
kidsbks@verizon.net


Moishe Miller #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to locate and connect with genealogist Moishe Miller who filled
out Pages of Testimony on the Landau family of Oswiecim.
Thanks
Neil Rosenstein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Internal Passports Issued in Birzai 1917-1941 #general

William Yoffee
 

The Panevezys District Research Group (PDRG) is posting a listing of 2739
internal passports that were issued in Birzai between WW1 and WW2. This is
the second of a series that began with the posting of 12700 internal
passports issued in Panevezys town during the same period. Both listings
appear as spread sheets in the Excel format under the title "Internal
Passports" in the "Links to other pages" section at the top of the left hand
column of the PDRG Shutterfly website. These data were produced and
translated by the Internal Passport Project of LitvakSIG coordinated by
Howard Margol. A discussion of the Lithuanian Internal Passport Project
including history and illustrations of documents can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/lithuania/internalpassports.htm ,
authored by Howard Margol, updated to March 2012,. The Excel spread sheets
provide information where the actual files are located.

During the period 1919-1940 when Lithuania first was an independent country,
every Lithuanian citizen age 17 or older was required to have an internal
passport, for identification but not valid for international travel. In the
beginning of the 1920s, all adult citizens, regardless of age, in order to
obtain an internal passport had to prove their right to Lithuanian
citizenship by producing evidence that they were residents of the territory
of Lithuania before WW1. Later, internal passports were issued to young
people coming of age, women when they changed their surnames after marriage,
when old passport were lost and other similar reasons. Some internal
passports were issued in Birzai even after the Soviet takeover in mid-1940
and as late as March and June 1941.

The surnames of the passport holders listed in column c) of the spread sheet
are according to their Lithuanian surnames with the Jewish surnames
following in brackets [ ].* The passport numbers in column b) indicate that
generally one passport was issued to a family, although in some cases
separate passports were issued to some family members. This is confirmed by
the family registration number in column a) which is the same for each
member of a family. Individuals and their relationship to the head of a
household can be identified by given name and patronymic in columns e), f),
and g). Ages of individuals are noted in column h), as a general rule, by
stating the age in the year the internal passport was issued or by stating
the year of birth which was before the earliest year that internal passports
were first issued. There are a few exceptions and a few cases where the age
has been omitted. Birth places are listed in column i) for only slightly
more than half of the individuals, most of whom were born in Birzai or other
Districts of Lithuania. A significant number were born in Russia,
Belorussia, Latvia and what became Poland. All but a few list their current
address simply as Birzai or a street address in Birzai. Several list other
Lithuanian towns. In column u), less than 1000 persons listed their
occupations, which included a number of housewives and both male and female
students. The "Comments" column v) notes information about the status of a
number of women on the list, including dates of marriage, and the existence
of supporting identity documents such as foreign passports contained in an
individual's file.

These data can be useful for genealogical research even in cases where a
researcher's family emigrated or was exiled before the end of WW1. Their
most significant value, however, is to trace those families who remained in
the Panevezys District but who became victims of the Holocaust. For those
families whose members were exiled to the interior parts of Russia during
WW1, some data might provide evidence of the location of the exile and
traces their return to what became the independent state of Lithuania. For
those families whose members emigrated before WW1, the data may provide some
indication of family members who remained behind and evidence of the
emigrant's place of origin.

For further information about the Internal Passport Project, please contact
Howard Margol homargol@aol.com .

For futher information about membership in the Panevezys District Research
Group, please contact me at the email address below.

*Lists of the Jewish surnames for either or both the Panevezys town and the
Birzai Internal Passport holders on the posted Excel spreadsheets are now
available to *anyone* on request to me at the email address below.

Bill Yoffee
Panevezys District Research Coordinator
kidsbks@verizon.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Moishe Miller #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to locate and connect with genealogist Moishe Miller who filled
out Pages of Testimony on the Landau family of Oswiecim.
Thanks
Neil Rosenstein


MIRSKY, London #general

A S Goldberg
 

I would appreciate hearing >from anyone with information on Rev Simon MIRSKY
who lived in the Hackney area of London (UK) during the first 3 or 4 decades
of the 20th century.

MIRSKY's second son, Moses MIRSKY, was a child prodigy with exceptional
singing and musical talent. He became a synagogue cantor and also a
Professor at the Guildhall School of Music. Information about him and some
of his early recordings are available online.

Simon MIRSKY was married to Rose nee STEINBERG >from the Bialystok area.
They had a number of children and I would love to learn about them and
their current descendants. I know that the family was related to my
paternal family but have no idea how and, hence, my desire to discover
current descendants who might be able to cast light on the connection.

Please respond to me direct at alancomm@netmedia.net.il

Many thanks

Abraham Goldberg
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen MIRSKY, London #general

A S Goldberg
 

I would appreciate hearing >from anyone with information on Rev Simon MIRSKY
who lived in the Hackney area of London (UK) during the first 3 or 4 decades
of the 20th century.

MIRSKY's second son, Moses MIRSKY, was a child prodigy with exceptional
singing and musical talent. He became a synagogue cantor and also a
Professor at the Guildhall School of Music. Information about him and some
of his early recordings are available online.

Simon MIRSKY was married to Rose nee STEINBERG >from the Bialystok area.
They had a number of children and I would love to learn about them and
their current descendants. I know that the family was related to my
paternal family but have no idea how and, hence, my desire to discover
current descendants who might be able to cast light on the connection.

Please respond to me direct at alancomm@netmedia.net.il

Many thanks

Abraham Goldberg
Jerusalem


Re: Aruytok near Bialystok? #general

Alexander Sharon <olek.sharon@...>
 

Marx Jeff wrote:

A family memoir states that family members moved >from Orla, Poland and
settled in "Aruytok near Bialystok." Any of you map mavens have any
ideas to what dorf or shtetl this might be?
Most probably this is a corrupted version of the settlement Antoniuk,
currently a North suburb of Bialystok.

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Aruytok near Bialystok? #general

Alexander Sharon <olek.sharon@...>
 

Marx Jeff wrote:

A family memoir states that family members moved >from Orla, Poland and
settled in "Aruytok near Bialystok." Any of you map mavens have any
ideas to what dorf or shtetl this might be?
Most probably this is a corrupted version of the settlement Antoniuk,
currently a North suburb of Bialystok.

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


Online access to New York Rimes #general

Neil@...
 

Looking for help in how to gain access to the NYTimes on-line for
various articles, etc.
Is it still free or available through subscription or thro libraries, etc?
Thanks
Neil Rosenstein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Online access to New York Rimes #general

Neil@...
 

Looking for help in how to gain access to the NYTimes on-line for
various articles, etc.
Is it still free or available through subscription or thro libraries, etc?
Thanks
Neil Rosenstein


Moishe Miller #rabbinic

Neil Rosenstein
 

Trying to locate and connect with genealogist Moishe Miller who filled
out Pages of Testimony on the Landau family of Oswiecim.
Thanks
Neil Rosenstein


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Moishe Miller #rabbinic

Neil Rosenstein
 

Trying to locate and connect with genealogist Moishe Miller who filled
out Pages of Testimony on the Landau family of Oswiecim.
Thanks
Neil Rosenstein


Yisrael of Ostrogh-19th cent. #rabbinic

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

Several months ago someone, I presume, on this list sent me copies of
a sefer, in Hebrew, mentioning several rabbanim/sofrim who may have
been my ggggrandfather , Yisrael of Ostrogh, who was a Chosid of the
Apta Rov (Heschel) and who was also a mechutan of the Admo"r of
Lechowitz (Reb Aharon and Pearl).

As we recently moved and most of my previous material are hidden in
boxes, if anyone on this list was the sender, I'd appreciate getting
the pages again.

If anyone has any more information on my ancestor, Yisrael of Ostragh,
who made aliya to Tzfat during the first half of the 19th cent. I'd be
happy to hear >from you.

Shabbat shalom

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem (formerly Efrat-Gush Etzion)


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Yisrael of Ostrogh-19th cent. #rabbinic

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

Several months ago someone, I presume, on this list sent me copies of
a sefer, in Hebrew, mentioning several rabbanim/sofrim who may have
been my ggggrandfather , Yisrael of Ostrogh, who was a Chosid of the
Apta Rov (Heschel) and who was also a mechutan of the Admo"r of
Lechowitz (Reb Aharon and Pearl).

As we recently moved and most of my previous material are hidden in
boxes, if anyone on this list was the sender, I'd appreciate getting
the pages again.

If anyone has any more information on my ancestor, Yisrael of Ostragh,
who made aliya to Tzfat during the first half of the 19th cent. I'd be
happy to hear >from you.

Shabbat shalom

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem (formerly Efrat-Gush Etzion)


Galician Polish towns: Dukla, Korczyna, Jedlicze #galicia

Phyllis Kramer
 

Some exciting new info has been posted on KehilaLinks web pages:

Dukla
There's been a revival and some Polish students organized a Jewish
Culture Day in Dukla, which took place August 10, 2012; on the
kehilalinks website
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Zmigrod/zmigrodduklaellis.htm
you can see the invitation and photographs of the event, complete with
survivors and the local priests. All this has been created by Robert Sez,
from Dukla. And we have also received, and posted, an image of one of
the original Torahs >from Dukla.

Jedlicze
A list >from Yad Vashem
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/krosnotowns.htm#JEDLICZE

Korczyna
We've just added hundreds of student entries >from the 1920s
schoolbooks. These entries contain student names, dates of birth, and
parents' names. The original registrations >from the Korczyna
Schoolbooks are now available on the Korczyna Kehilalinks page at
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/krosnokorsCHOOL.htm

A sincere thank you to Anna Wasco, the teacher in Korczyna who
photocopied all of the entries >from the books, and to Rabbi Edward Boraz
of the Dartmouth Hillel Project Preservation program whose student
members restore cemeteries in Eastern Europe; it was their contact
with Anna that made this transcription possible.
(http://www.dartmouth.edu/~projpreservation/)

Isn't JewishGen wonderful!!

Phyllis Kramer, New York City, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
V.P. Education, JewishGen Inc: www.JewishGen.org/education
Researching (all Galicia) KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna
...SCHEINER, KANDEL >from Strzyzow & Dubiecko
...LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn, Burstyn
...STECHER, TRACHMAN >from Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla
family web site: www.KehilaLinks.JewishGen.org/Krosno/Kramer.htm


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Galician Polish towns: Dukla, Korczyna, Jedlicze #galicia

Phyllis Kramer
 

Some exciting new info has been posted on KehilaLinks web pages:

Dukla
There's been a revival and some Polish students organized a Jewish
Culture Day in Dukla, which took place August 10, 2012; on the
kehilalinks website
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Zmigrod/zmigrodduklaellis.htm
you can see the invitation and photographs of the event, complete with
survivors and the local priests. All this has been created by Robert Sez,
from Dukla. And we have also received, and posted, an image of one of
the original Torahs >from Dukla.

Jedlicze
A list >from Yad Vashem
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/krosnotowns.htm#JEDLICZE

Korczyna
We've just added hundreds of student entries >from the 1920s
schoolbooks. These entries contain student names, dates of birth, and
parents' names. The original registrations >from the Korczyna
Schoolbooks are now available on the Korczyna Kehilalinks page at
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/krosnokorsCHOOL.htm

A sincere thank you to Anna Wasco, the teacher in Korczyna who
photocopied all of the entries >from the books, and to Rabbi Edward Boraz
of the Dartmouth Hillel Project Preservation program whose student
members restore cemeteries in Eastern Europe; it was their contact
with Anna that made this transcription possible.
(http://www.dartmouth.edu/~projpreservation/)

Isn't JewishGen wonderful!!

Phyllis Kramer, New York City, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
V.P. Education, JewishGen Inc: www.JewishGen.org/education
Researching (all Galicia) KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna
...SCHEINER, KANDEL >from Strzyzow & Dubiecko
...LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn, Burstyn
...STECHER, TRACHMAN >from Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla
family web site: www.KehilaLinks.JewishGen.org/Krosno/Kramer.htm


Free Webinar - Thursday, February 7 - Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA #general

Elise
 

JewishGenners,

Please join us for our free monthly webinar!

What: Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA
Date: Thursday, February 7, 2013
Time: 1pm Eastern
(10am Pacific, 11am Mountain, 12pm Central, 6pm GMT, 8pm Israel)
Where: Your computer!

Unable to attend live? Register to view the recording instead!

*Registration*

To register for either the live session or recording of this webinar,
please visit:

http://relativeroots.net/webinars/intro-ftdna/

*Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA*

What is Genetic Genealogy? What tests are available and which one
should I order? How much does a Genetic Genealogy test cost? Do I
need to be a geneticist to understand my results?

If you're a complete beginner to Genetic Genealogy and want answers to
these questions and more, then this webinar is for you! Attendees
will learn about the history of genetic genealogy, be introduced to
DNA basics, learn about the different types of DNA tests available for
genealogy, and learn about resources that will help you make the most
of your genetic genealogy experience. Focus will be on the genetic
genealogy tests offered by JewishGen's DNA testing partner, Family
Tree DNA.

*Discount >from Family Tree DNA*

Attendees of this webinar receive an exclusive, limited-time discount
on select new test kits and upgrades >from Family Tree DNA.

*What is a Webinar?*

Webinars are "web-based seminars" -- presentations given via the
internet. You attend >from the comfort of your own home, see and hear
the presentation via your own computer (or you can listen by phone if
your computer doesn't have speakers), and you can ask questions just
like you can at an in-person presentation.

Regards,
Elise Friedman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Free Webinar - Thursday, February 7 - Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA #general

Elise
 

JewishGenners,

Please join us for our free monthly webinar!

What: Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA
Date: Thursday, February 7, 2013
Time: 1pm Eastern
(10am Pacific, 11am Mountain, 12pm Central, 6pm GMT, 8pm Israel)
Where: Your computer!

Unable to attend live? Register to view the recording instead!

*Registration*

To register for either the live session or recording of this webinar,
please visit:

http://relativeroots.net/webinars/intro-ftdna/

*Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA*

What is Genetic Genealogy? What tests are available and which one
should I order? How much does a Genetic Genealogy test cost? Do I
need to be a geneticist to understand my results?

If you're a complete beginner to Genetic Genealogy and want answers to
these questions and more, then this webinar is for you! Attendees
will learn about the history of genetic genealogy, be introduced to
DNA basics, learn about the different types of DNA tests available for
genealogy, and learn about resources that will help you make the most
of your genetic genealogy experience. Focus will be on the genetic
genealogy tests offered by JewishGen's DNA testing partner, Family
Tree DNA.

*Discount >from Family Tree DNA*

Attendees of this webinar receive an exclusive, limited-time discount
on select new test kits and upgrades >from Family Tree DNA.

*What is a Webinar?*

Webinars are "web-based seminars" -- presentations given via the
internet. You attend >from the comfort of your own home, see and hear
the presentation via your own computer (or you can listen by phone if
your computer doesn't have speakers), and you can ask questions just
like you can at an in-person presentation.

Regards,
Elise Friedman


Gesher Galicia thanks Peter Zavon #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia would like to bid a fond farewell to longtime board
member, and editor of the Gesher Galicia Family Finder, Peter Zavon,
who is leaving the board of directors after many years of service to
pursue his own research interests.

We thank him for his years of service and dedication to the field of
Galician Jewish genealogy and wish him well as he continues to follow
his passion.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Gesher Galicia thanks Peter Zavon #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia would like to bid a fond farewell to longtime board
member, and editor of the Gesher Galicia Family Finder, Peter Zavon,
who is leaving the board of directors after many years of service to
pursue his own research interests.

We thank him for his years of service and dedication to the field of
Galician Jewish genealogy and wish him well as he continues to follow
his passion.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com

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