Date   

Gravestone Photos request at Memorial Park Cemetery, Skokie, Illinois #poland

Steven Rosenberg
 

Hi,

I'm looking for someone in the Skokie, Illinois area who would be willing
to take and send me photos of some Gravestones at the Memorial Park Cemetery.

The family came >from the town of Derechin, Slonim District which was part of
Poland between WWI and WWII as well as before the Partitions of Poland. Their
original surname was Wolkowisky, but they changed it when immigrating to the
USA.

Please contact me at stvnrsnbrg@hotmail.com and I can send the exact location
information for each stone of interest.

Thank you for your help.

With Best Regards.
Steven Rosenberg.


JRI Poland #Poland Gravestone Photos request at Memorial Park Cemetery, Skokie, Illinois #poland

Steven Rosenberg
 

Hi,

I'm looking for someone in the Skokie, Illinois area who would be willing
to take and send me photos of some Gravestones at the Memorial Park Cemetery.

The family came >from the town of Derechin, Slonim District which was part of
Poland between WWI and WWII as well as before the Partitions of Poland. Their
original surname was Wolkowisky, but they changed it when immigrating to the
USA.

Please contact me at stvnrsnbrg@hotmail.com and I can send the exact location
information for each stone of interest.

Thank you for your help.

With Best Regards.
Steven Rosenberg.


Translation from Russian #poland

Ariel K <arielvfu@...>
 

hello I will highly appreciate a translation for a marriage
certificate of the Gilary/Hilary family (>from Russian)

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26358

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26359

please be as accurate as possible when translating it

Thank you
Ariel Koby

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately or on the Viewmate form.


JRI Poland #Poland Translation from Russian #poland

Ariel K <arielvfu@...>
 

hello I will highly appreciate a translation for a marriage
certificate of the Gilary/Hilary family (>from Russian)

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26358

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26359

please be as accurate as possible when translating it

Thank you
Ariel Koby

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately or on the Viewmate form.


Linkuva Internal Passports 1920-1938 #lithuania

William Yoffee
 

Linkuva Internal Passports 1920-1938

The Panevezys District Research Group (PDRG) is posting on its Shutterfly
website a list of 437 internal passports issued to Jews in Linkuva during
the period between WW1 and WW2. In the first two years (1920 and 1921) more
than three-quarters of these internal passports were issued to those age
17 and older who claimed Lithuanian citizenship based on pre-WWI residence
in the territory of what became the newly independent Lithuania. It is
highly likely that many if not most of them had been displaced during the
war. Based on the family registration numbers that are recorded, the vast
majority of these were individuals, not family groups. Place of birth is
recorded for only 67 applicants; none before 1924. Only two individuals
were recorded as having been born in Russia and one in Latvia. The
remainder were born in Linkuva or some other location in Lithuania.

During the inter-war period, Lithuania was divided into 23 self governing
"counties" (By comparison now there are only 10 Districts ). Linkuva was
located in Siauliai "county" (Now it is in Panevezys District along with
Pakruojis, and with Birzai which at the time was a separate "county"). For
details, and a history of the political geography of Lithuania, including
maps, see www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Administrative_divisions_of_Lithuania . In
the years 1920-1922 a number of applicants resided in surrounding shtetls
within a 5 mile radius of Linkuva, namely Dvaryukay, Pamushis, Rimkunay,
Udeka, and Trishkonis. In later years, residences were recorded in towns
further away, such as Zeimelis, Pusalotas, Pumpanai, Pakruojis, Joniskis,
Vabalninkas and Panevezys.

The value of these data for genealogical research is manifold, even in cases
where a researcher's family emigrated or was exiled before the end of WWI.
Their most significant value is to trace those families who remained in the
Panevezys District but who became victims of the Holocaust. For those
families whose members were exiled to the interior parts of Russia during
WWI, some data >from the archived file might provide evidence of the location
of the exile and traces of their return to what became the independent state
of Lithuania. For those families whose members emigrated before WWI, the
data may provide some indication of family members who remained behind and
evidence of the emigrant's place of origin. Previous postings of Internal
Passports have included discussions their nature, history and legal
significance of internal passports and the distinctions >from international
passports.

As you are no doubt aware, access to the Panevezys District Research
Group's (PDRG) Shutterfly website is available only to its contributors.
Contributions totaling $100 or more qualifies an individual, and, for the
next five years, provides access to the website, as well as exclusive access
to all newly translated records for at least 18 months before they are made
publicly available on the All Lithuania Database (ALD).

Your contributions go entirely to support translation of newly discovered
records, of which over a million for all LitvakSIG Districts have so far
been translated. All previously translated records as well as the newly
translated records on the PDRG Shutterfly website are maintained by
category in the Excel format, which makes them much easier to search than
in the format of the ALD.

General support for the Internal Passport Project would be very much
appreciated so additional records can be translated. Go to
www.litvaksig.org/contribute and scroll down to Special Projects and select
Internal Passports.

Your tax deductible (for US taxpayers) contributions can be made to
www.litvaksig.org/contribute by credit card, or by check at the address
that is listed there. Please be sure to designate the Panevezys DRG or the
Internal Passport Project as the recipient.

An alphabetical list of Jewish surnames is available to ANYONE >from me at
the email address below.

Bill Yoffee
Panevezys District Research Coordinator
kidsbks@verizon.net


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Linkuva Internal Passports 1920-1938 #lithuania

William Yoffee
 

Linkuva Internal Passports 1920-1938

The Panevezys District Research Group (PDRG) is posting on its Shutterfly
website a list of 437 internal passports issued to Jews in Linkuva during
the period between WW1 and WW2. In the first two years (1920 and 1921) more
than three-quarters of these internal passports were issued to those age
17 and older who claimed Lithuanian citizenship based on pre-WWI residence
in the territory of what became the newly independent Lithuania. It is
highly likely that many if not most of them had been displaced during the
war. Based on the family registration numbers that are recorded, the vast
majority of these were individuals, not family groups. Place of birth is
recorded for only 67 applicants; none before 1924. Only two individuals
were recorded as having been born in Russia and one in Latvia. The
remainder were born in Linkuva or some other location in Lithuania.

During the inter-war period, Lithuania was divided into 23 self governing
"counties" (By comparison now there are only 10 Districts ). Linkuva was
located in Siauliai "county" (Now it is in Panevezys District along with
Pakruojis, and with Birzai which at the time was a separate "county"). For
details, and a history of the political geography of Lithuania, including
maps, see www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Administrative_divisions_of_Lithuania . In
the years 1920-1922 a number of applicants resided in surrounding shtetls
within a 5 mile radius of Linkuva, namely Dvaryukay, Pamushis, Rimkunay,
Udeka, and Trishkonis. In later years, residences were recorded in towns
further away, such as Zeimelis, Pusalotas, Pumpanai, Pakruojis, Joniskis,
Vabalninkas and Panevezys.

The value of these data for genealogical research is manifold, even in cases
where a researcher's family emigrated or was exiled before the end of WWI.
Their most significant value is to trace those families who remained in the
Panevezys District but who became victims of the Holocaust. For those
families whose members were exiled to the interior parts of Russia during
WWI, some data >from the archived file might provide evidence of the location
of the exile and traces of their return to what became the independent state
of Lithuania. For those families whose members emigrated before WWI, the
data may provide some indication of family members who remained behind and
evidence of the emigrant's place of origin. Previous postings of Internal
Passports have included discussions their nature, history and legal
significance of internal passports and the distinctions >from international
passports.

As you are no doubt aware, access to the Panevezys District Research
Group's (PDRG) Shutterfly website is available only to its contributors.
Contributions totaling $100 or more qualifies an individual, and, for the
next five years, provides access to the website, as well as exclusive access
to all newly translated records for at least 18 months before they are made
publicly available on the All Lithuania Database (ALD).

Your contributions go entirely to support translation of newly discovered
records, of which over a million for all LitvakSIG Districts have so far
been translated. All previously translated records as well as the newly
translated records on the PDRG Shutterfly website are maintained by
category in the Excel format, which makes them much easier to search than
in the format of the ALD.

General support for the Internal Passport Project would be very much
appreciated so additional records can be translated. Go to
www.litvaksig.org/contribute and scroll down to Special Projects and select
Internal Passports.

Your tax deductible (for US taxpayers) contributions can be made to
www.litvaksig.org/contribute by credit card, or by check at the address
that is listed there. Please be sure to designate the Panevezys DRG or the
Internal Passport Project as the recipient.

An alphabetical list of Jewish surnames is available to ANYONE >from me at
the email address below.

Bill Yoffee
Panevezys District Research Coordinator
kidsbks@verizon.net


Lithuanian compensation for survivors #lithuania

Saul Issroff
 

The recent posting of a message about compensation to Lithuanian survivors
was not accurate. I have a clarification >from one of the people who
negotiated the "settlement" but cannot post it due to discussion group
guidelines.

Please contact me privately for this.


Saul Issroff


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Lithuanian compensation for survivors #lithuania

Saul Issroff
 

The recent posting of a message about compensation to Lithuanian survivors
was not accurate. I have a clarification >from one of the people who
negotiated the "settlement" but cannot post it due to discussion group
guidelines.

Please contact me privately for this.


Saul Issroff


The Great Bialystoker Triangle #poland

Mark Halpern
 

This weekend was the great Bialystok triangle. While fellow Bialystok
genealogists Joy Kestenbaum, Mark Gordon and I were at the Bialystoker
Synagogue http://www.bialystoker.org/ on the Lower East Side of New York
City helping to host the Mayor of Bialystok, Lucy Lisowska hosted high
school students >from Yehud, Israel in Bialystok. Yehud is the city in Israel
where Kiriat Bialystok http://www.zchor.org/bialystok/kiriat_bialystok.htm
is located.

The Bialystoker Synagogue is located near the Bialystok Center, the now
shuttered home of the Bialystoker Landsmanschaft in New York. The
Bialystoker Center was the driving force behind the establishment in 1950 of
the Kiriat Bialystok settlement for survivors >from Bialystok and surrounding
areas.

In New York, on behalf of BIALYGen, the three Bialystoker genealogists
presented Bialystok Mayor Tadeusz Truskolaski a copy of The Bialystoker
Memorial Book, a Yiddish and English Yizkor book published in New York City
in 1982. Rabbi Zvi Romm of the Bialystoker Synagogue provided a tour and
some history of the Shul and led all of us to Kossar's Bialys
http://www.kossarsbialys.com/ for a taste of the baked goods of our
ancestors.

Mayor Truskolaski and his administration have boldly supported the Diaspora
of Bialystoker Jews and the Jewish community's representative in Bialystok,
Lucy Lisowska, by collaborating with Lucy in protecting and securing the
Wschodnia Street Cemetery, in honoring the departed with a memorial on the
grounds of the Bema Street Cemetery, in supporting the annual Zachor
Festival of Jewish Culture and the annual Commemoration of the liquidation
of the Bialystok Ghetto, and for donating a building on Warynskiego Street
for a future Jewish museum.

In Bialystok, nearly 400 young people >from Israel visited on Saturday. It
was an opportunity to get to know the city, but also to establish a
relationship with their Polish peers - the Bialystok high school students of
III, V and VIII School. Organizer of the arrival of the Israeli youth was
Lucy Lisowska, President of the Center for Civic Education Poland - Israel
http://www.bialystok.jewish.org.pl/en/ She says that the young people >from
Israel will be meeting with representatives of the local government and
Bialystok high school students.

The young guests are representatives of the Israel city of Yehud, where
Kiriat Bialystok is located. Therefore, among the guests >from Israel may
also be those whose relatives come >from the Bialystok.
The news about the Yehud students' trip to Bialystok was excerpted >from an
article in Gazeta Bialystok - http://goo.gl/kvcNc

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland The Great Bialystoker Triangle #poland

Mark Halpern
 

This weekend was the great Bialystok triangle. While fellow Bialystok
genealogists Joy Kestenbaum, Mark Gordon and I were at the Bialystoker
Synagogue http://www.bialystoker.org/ on the Lower East Side of New York
City helping to host the Mayor of Bialystok, Lucy Lisowska hosted high
school students >from Yehud, Israel in Bialystok. Yehud is the city in Israel
where Kiriat Bialystok http://www.zchor.org/bialystok/kiriat_bialystok.htm
is located.

The Bialystoker Synagogue is located near the Bialystok Center, the now
shuttered home of the Bialystoker Landsmanschaft in New York. The
Bialystoker Center was the driving force behind the establishment in 1950 of
the Kiriat Bialystok settlement for survivors >from Bialystok and surrounding
areas.

In New York, on behalf of BIALYGen, the three Bialystoker genealogists
presented Bialystok Mayor Tadeusz Truskolaski a copy of The Bialystoker
Memorial Book, a Yiddish and English Yizkor book published in New York City
in 1982. Rabbi Zvi Romm of the Bialystoker Synagogue provided a tour and
some history of the Shul and led all of us to Kossar's Bialys
http://www.kossarsbialys.com/ for a taste of the baked goods of our
ancestors.

Mayor Truskolaski and his administration have boldly supported the Diaspora
of Bialystoker Jews and the Jewish community's representative in Bialystok,
Lucy Lisowska, by collaborating with Lucy in protecting and securing the
Wschodnia Street Cemetery, in honoring the departed with a memorial on the
grounds of the Bema Street Cemetery, in supporting the annual Zachor
Festival of Jewish Culture and the annual Commemoration of the liquidation
of the Bialystok Ghetto, and for donating a building on Warynskiego Street
for a future Jewish museum.

In Bialystok, nearly 400 young people >from Israel visited on Saturday. It
was an opportunity to get to know the city, but also to establish a
relationship with their Polish peers - the Bialystok high school students of
III, V and VIII School. Organizer of the arrival of the Israeli youth was
Lucy Lisowska, President of the Center for Civic Education Poland - Israel
http://www.bialystok.jewish.org.pl/en/ She says that the young people >from
Israel will be meeting with representatives of the local government and
Bialystok high school students.

The young guests are representatives of the Israel city of Yehud, where
Kiriat Bialystok is located. Therefore, among the guests >from Israel may
also be those whose relatives come >from the Bialystok.
The news about the Yehud students' trip to Bialystok was excerpted >from an
article in Gazeta Bialystok - http://goo.gl/kvcNc

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator


ROM-SIG Needs Translators- Apply Here! #romania

Bob Wascou
 

ROM-SIG needs volunteers who can translate Romanian, Cyrillic Romanian
or German to work on or various projects.

We are getting many records >from Romania but without more translators
it will take us that much longer to get them online. Our first birth,
marriage and death online records databases will be added to the
JewishGen Romania Database
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/> in June or July.

Please volunteer at http://tinyurl.com/vol-transcriber or by
contacting any of the ROM-SIG Coordinators.

ROM-SIG is on a roll!! Join us and Watch us go!

Your coordinators
Bob <bobwascou@gmail.com>
Rosanne <rdleeson@comcast.net>
Jeni <jeni.armandez@yahoo.com>


Romania SIG #Romania ROM-SIG Needs Translators- Apply Here! #romania

Bob Wascou
 

ROM-SIG needs volunteers who can translate Romanian, Cyrillic Romanian
or German to work on or various projects.

We are getting many records >from Romania but without more translators
it will take us that much longer to get them online. Our first birth,
marriage and death online records databases will be added to the
JewishGen Romania Database
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/> in June or July.

Please volunteer at http://tinyurl.com/vol-transcriber or by
contacting any of the ROM-SIG Coordinators.

ROM-SIG is on a roll!! Join us and Watch us go!

Your coordinators
Bob <bobwascou@gmail.com>
Rosanne <rdleeson@comcast.net>
Jeni <jeni.armandez@yahoo.com>


ViewMate Assistance: Osmanic document issued in Vienna #romania

Bay, Vera <vk.bay@...>
 

Hello!

I've posted an Osmanic document of unknown content, related to my
great-grandmother Fanny Sachs, née Bercovici, born in Boucharest in 1861,
married in Vienna.

It is on ViewMate at the following address:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26393

I would be very grateful for any help with deciphering or translating this
document, or any information about the correct name of the language in which
it is written.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much!

Vera Bay-Sachs
7220 Schiers, Switzerland


Romania SIG #Romania ViewMate Assistance: Osmanic document issued in Vienna #romania

Bay, Vera <vk.bay@...>
 

Hello!

I've posted an Osmanic document of unknown content, related to my
great-grandmother Fanny Sachs, née Bercovici, born in Boucharest in 1861,
married in Vienna.

It is on ViewMate at the following address:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26393

I would be very grateful for any help with deciphering or translating this
document, or any information about the correct name of the language in which
it is written.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much!

Vera Bay-Sachs
7220 Schiers, Switzerland


Gosches, Sandbank, Schneider and Altman #galicia

Shelley English <englishs@...>
 

Looking for information re the Gosches family in Lviv/Lemberg. Ruchel
(Sarah?) Gosches (maiden/married name??), b in Lviv, d 1914 in Lipsko.
Her father was a Judaic scholar in Lemberg. She married Leib Sandbank
(mohel, registrar, bal tefilah,Talmudic scholar and legal rep. of Lipsko
born approx. 1865-70 died 1914. One of their children, Debora
Sheindel Sandbank, married Leib Joseph Schneider, b 1900 d 1981, son
of Isaac Hersh Schneider and Rifka Altman. Devorah and Joseph moved
to Antwerp in the 1920s and had two children. All four survived the war
and later moved to NYC.

Shelley English
englishs@mac.com
www.newyorktraumatherapy.com


Irene Weissengrun - from Rudki #galicia

Barbara Ras Wechsler
 

Hi

I am trying to trace the origins of Irene Wechsler. Her maiden name was
Weissengrun and was buried in Trieste in the Jewish Cemetery. She
was 85 years of age at the time of death.

There are no further traces of the Weissengrun family in Trieste. She
probably came to Italy together with her husband (and children?). She
shares her grave with Rosa Wechsler, who died 10 years prior at the age
of 74 years and was probably unmarried.

I don't know the first name of Irene's husband, all I have is her death
date and approximate birthdate:
- born about 1845
- died December 20th, 1930

Dates of Rosa Wechsler
- born about 1846
- died September 14th, 1920

The only Weissengruns I found are >from Rudki, L'viv, Ukraine and
proximity. So at present, I'm assuming she came to Italy >from the
Lemberg / Lviv area with her husband.

Maybe somebody is researching the Weissengrun family and can help
me out.

Regards

Barbara Ras Wechsler
bwras@bluewin.ch


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Gosches, Sandbank, Schneider and Altman #galicia

Shelley English <englishs@...>
 

Looking for information re the Gosches family in Lviv/Lemberg. Ruchel
(Sarah?) Gosches (maiden/married name??), b in Lviv, d 1914 in Lipsko.
Her father was a Judaic scholar in Lemberg. She married Leib Sandbank
(mohel, registrar, bal tefilah,Talmudic scholar and legal rep. of Lipsko
born approx. 1865-70 died 1914. One of their children, Debora
Sheindel Sandbank, married Leib Joseph Schneider, b 1900 d 1981, son
of Isaac Hersh Schneider and Rifka Altman. Devorah and Joseph moved
to Antwerp in the 1920s and had two children. All four survived the war
and later moved to NYC.

Shelley English
englishs@mac.com
www.newyorktraumatherapy.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Irene Weissengrun - from Rudki #galicia

Barbara Ras Wechsler
 

Hi

I am trying to trace the origins of Irene Wechsler. Her maiden name was
Weissengrun and was buried in Trieste in the Jewish Cemetery. She
was 85 years of age at the time of death.

There are no further traces of the Weissengrun family in Trieste. She
probably came to Italy together with her husband (and children?). She
shares her grave with Rosa Wechsler, who died 10 years prior at the age
of 74 years and was probably unmarried.

I don't know the first name of Irene's husband, all I have is her death
date and approximate birthdate:
- born about 1845
- died December 20th, 1930

Dates of Rosa Wechsler
- born about 1846
- died September 14th, 1920

The only Weissengruns I found are >from Rudki, L'viv, Ukraine and
proximity. So at present, I'm assuming she came to Italy >from the
Lemberg / Lviv area with her husband.

Maybe somebody is researching the Weissengrun family and can help
me out.

Regards

Barbara Ras Wechsler
bwras@bluewin.ch


Rewiew of Gaugusch's Wer Einmal War #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

Edward Timms has written an excellent review in the Times Literary
Supplement of Georg Gaugusch's first volume of Austrian Jewish genealogy
"Wer Einmal War."

See http://www.the-tls.co.uk/tls/public/article1217603.ece

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Rewiew of Gaugusch's Wer Einmal War #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

Edward Timms has written an excellent review in the Times Literary
Supplement of Georg Gaugusch's first volume of Austrian Jewish genealogy
"Wer Einmal War."

See http://www.the-tls.co.uk/tls/public/article1217603.ece

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA

140981 - 141000 of 658611