Date   

Lemberg/Lwow/Lvov 1849/1853 Cadastral Map on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #poland

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to announce the first cadastral map of
Lemberg/Lwow/Lvov to be posted in our Cadastral Map Room:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/lviv-lwow-lemberg-1853/

A complete cadastral map of the city of Lemberg surveyed 1849 and
lithographed in 1853. A very clear and beautiful full-color cadastral
map, showing this gem of the Austrian Empire already developed with
many of the streets and significant buildings still visible today. The
city center is ringed by numbered quarters and well-built named
neighborhoods, including at least three known Jewish districts. All
buildings and land parcels are numbered. Labeled on the map are two
synagogues and almost two dozen churches and monasteries, major Jewish
and Christian cemeteries, military and other imperial facilities,
theaters, parks, schools, and more, with many named streets and
squares.

Researchers and historians might want to take note of the following
observations which compare old Lemberg to present-day Lviv, provided
by GG map room coordinator, Jay Osborn:

- the Rathaus (city hall, still in use), listed as building #1, in the
Ring Platz (today's market square or rynek)

- the river Pelterv (Poltva), still running through the city today but
completely covered since the early 20th century

- the Israeliten Spital (Jewish hospital, also known as the Rappaport
hospital today) #2125, WNW of the town center

- the large old Jewish cemetery #5106 just behind the Jewish hospital
(today a large open market)

- the synagogue #2633, beside the fish market; destroyed in WWII, it
is memorialized in today's Staryi Rynok (Old Market Square)

- the Golden Rose synagogue probably #259 but unlabeled, just ESE of
the rynek; destroyed in WWII but surviving today as a ruin

- the adjacent synagogue #367, today an empty square behind the armory building

- Judenplatz (Jewish Square), Judengasse (Jewish Street) and
Wechslergasse (Moneychanger Street), all southeast of the rynok around
the synagogue above

- the Ossolinski Library (Ossolineum) #520 southwest of the town
center, today the Stefanyk Library

- the Map Archive (!) #80 (no longer extant), just west of the rynek
(market square)

- the Citadelle, today an archive and prominent military ruin above
the city on a hill SSW of the town center, curiously blank of
buildings and roads on the map; perhaps it was mapped on a separate
sheet now lost, or perhaps it was blank for reasons of military
security.

- buildings are block-numbered in the city center, making it easy to
associate neighboring residences and offices; this suggests a
re-numbering of the city properties not long before this map was made

- Serbengasse (Serbian Street) in the city center was renamed after
1853 for the 16th-century Moscow/Lwow printer Ivan Federov; oddly, the
adjacent former Blechergasse (Tinsmith Street, also a Germanic family
name) is now named Serbska

- separate large facilities for care of the deaf and the blind were
located east of the city center, near the military hospital and a
German hospital

- a very large brewery is shown near the northeast edge of the map; a
smaller one is shown near the southeast edge

- there are statues drawn on the map in some of the downtown squares!

Thanks to Jay Osborn for stitching together this map and Natalie Dunai
for sourcing it.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org
www.geshergalicia.org


JRI Poland #Poland Lemberg/Lwow/Lvov 1849/1853 Cadastral Map on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #poland

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to announce the first cadastral map of
Lemberg/Lwow/Lvov to be posted in our Cadastral Map Room:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/lviv-lwow-lemberg-1853/

A complete cadastral map of the city of Lemberg surveyed 1849 and
lithographed in 1853. A very clear and beautiful full-color cadastral
map, showing this gem of the Austrian Empire already developed with
many of the streets and significant buildings still visible today. The
city center is ringed by numbered quarters and well-built named
neighborhoods, including at least three known Jewish districts. All
buildings and land parcels are numbered. Labeled on the map are two
synagogues and almost two dozen churches and monasteries, major Jewish
and Christian cemeteries, military and other imperial facilities,
theaters, parks, schools, and more, with many named streets and
squares.

Researchers and historians might want to take note of the following
observations which compare old Lemberg to present-day Lviv, provided
by GG map room coordinator, Jay Osborn:

- the Rathaus (city hall, still in use), listed as building #1, in the
Ring Platz (today's market square or rynek)

- the river Pelterv (Poltva), still running through the city today but
completely covered since the early 20th century

- the Israeliten Spital (Jewish hospital, also known as the Rappaport
hospital today) #2125, WNW of the town center

- the large old Jewish cemetery #5106 just behind the Jewish hospital
(today a large open market)

- the synagogue #2633, beside the fish market; destroyed in WWII, it
is memorialized in today's Staryi Rynok (Old Market Square)

- the Golden Rose synagogue probably #259 but unlabeled, just ESE of
the rynek; destroyed in WWII but surviving today as a ruin

- the adjacent synagogue #367, today an empty square behind the armory building

- Judenplatz (Jewish Square), Judengasse (Jewish Street) and
Wechslergasse (Moneychanger Street), all southeast of the rynok around
the synagogue above

- the Ossolinski Library (Ossolineum) #520 southwest of the town
center, today the Stefanyk Library

- the Map Archive (!) #80 (no longer extant), just west of the rynek
(market square)

- the Citadelle, today an archive and prominent military ruin above
the city on a hill SSW of the town center, curiously blank of
buildings and roads on the map; perhaps it was mapped on a separate
sheet now lost, or perhaps it was blank for reasons of military
security.

- buildings are block-numbered in the city center, making it easy to
associate neighboring residences and offices; this suggests a
re-numbering of the city properties not long before this map was made

- Serbengasse (Serbian Street) in the city center was renamed after
1853 for the 16th-century Moscow/Lwow printer Ivan Federov; oddly, the
adjacent former Blechergasse (Tinsmith Street, also a Germanic family
name) is now named Serbska

- separate large facilities for care of the deaf and the blind were
located east of the city center, near the military hospital and a
German hospital

- a very large brewery is shown near the northeast edge of the map; a
smaller one is shown near the southeast edge

- there are statues drawn on the map in some of the downtown squares!

Thanks to Jay Osborn for stitching together this map and Natalie Dunai
for sourcing it.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org
www.geshergalicia.org


Re: Question about use of German in Polish documents #poland

Igor Holyboroda
 

Hello!
During WW1 Germans took central Poland as the result of their
offensive and the "Great retreat" of Russian Army in 1915.
Poland was under German control until the defeat of Germany in 1918.
Possibly, in 1920 the officials in Lodz still used blanks of
the documents printed during the German occupation.

Regards,
Igor Holyboroda,
Lviv-Lwow-Lemberg, Ukraine



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Question about use of German in Polish documents
From: Apollo Israel <apollo@netvision.net.il>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 10:54:52 +0300
X-Message-Number: 1

I recently received a number of documents about my family >from the Polish
State Archives in Lodz, and was surprised to see that a number of them -
from the population register of 1918-1920 - are printed in both German and
Polish. I knew that before World War I central Poland (which includes the
Lodz area) was under Russian control, and I have many documents in Russian
from the late 19th century and first decade of the 20th century. I also
knew that after WWI, Poland regained its independence and I have documents
in Polish >from the 1920s and 1930s.

But what was happening during WWI and shortly afterward? Was there a period
of German control? Or was German perhaps used in Poland as a kind of
international language in a period of shifting control? I have tried to
find information about this, but haven't succeeded and would welcome an
informed response.

Note that it is the printed parts of the documents that are in both German
and Polish; the handwritten details that have been filled out are just in
Polish.

Thanking you,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana.


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Question about use of German in Polish documents #poland

Igor Holyboroda
 

Hello!
During WW1 Germans took central Poland as the result of their
offensive and the "Great retreat" of Russian Army in 1915.
Poland was under German control until the defeat of Germany in 1918.
Possibly, in 1920 the officials in Lodz still used blanks of
the documents printed during the German occupation.

Regards,
Igor Holyboroda,
Lviv-Lwow-Lemberg, Ukraine



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Question about use of German in Polish documents
From: Apollo Israel <apollo@netvision.net.il>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 10:54:52 +0300
X-Message-Number: 1

I recently received a number of documents about my family >from the Polish
State Archives in Lodz, and was surprised to see that a number of them -
from the population register of 1918-1920 - are printed in both German and
Polish. I knew that before World War I central Poland (which includes the
Lodz area) was under Russian control, and I have many documents in Russian
from the late 19th century and first decade of the 20th century. I also
knew that after WWI, Poland regained its independence and I have documents
in Polish >from the 1920s and 1930s.

But what was happening during WWI and shortly afterward? Was there a period
of German control? Or was German perhaps used in Poland as a kind of
international language in a period of shifting control? I have tried to
find information about this, but haven't succeeded and would welcome an
informed response.

Note that it is the printed parts of the documents that are in both German
and Polish; the handwritten details that have been filled out are just in
Polish.

Thanking you,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana.


"The Galitzianer," June issue, + new Gesher Galicia videos...and a reminder about membership #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Dear Galitzianers!

We are about to publish the June issue of Gesher Galicia's quarterly
journal, "The Galitizianer," so this is a good time to remind all our
discussion group subscribers that you need to be a GG member to
receive the journal.

(Subscribing only to this mailing list does not make you a member of
Gesher Galicia! It just means you are a very valued subscriber to our
mailing list. Thank you for that! However... membership in Gesher
Galicia is completely separate and membership dues start at $25 per
year.)

Gesher Galicia membership entitles you to a four-issue subscription
to "The Galitzianer," special member access to the Family Finder and
other member benefits like ordering two free scans of the 1910
Tarnopol Jewish Census. More importantly, these dues help to fund
our ongoing research projects, IAJGS conference and regional
programs, sponsoring overseas archivists and researchers, and
uploading videos, new maps and records to the All Galicia Database,
Cadastral Map Room and website home page. Member dues also fund
ourmatching grant program for the Galician Archival Records Project
and cover the costs of dedicated researchers working year round in
Poland and Ukraine. Help us to help you to learn more about your
Galician ancestors by supporting our activities.

If you are not yet a member (or a former member who has not yet
renewed) why not join now? If you join by Monday you will be added
to the Galitzianer distribution list for our next issue!

Just go to: http://www.geshergalicia.org/join-gesher-galicia/

Or click the "donate" button on our home page. You can pay by
check, or credit card/Paypal, and you can choose an electronic or
paper copy membership. We do not pro-rate memberships, but you
will be sent all the back issues >from this year when you join. If you
represent an organization who might benefit >from a paper
subscription to "The G," we offer that option.

Here's a sneak preview of "The Galitzianer" June issue:

Preservationist's Corner: Czernowitz
Marla Raucher Osborn
Research Corner: Austrian Ministries & Galician Refugees Projects
Pamela Weisberger
New Polish Vital Records Law
Tony Kahane
The Dead Man in the Zellermayer House
Israel Pickholtz
The Name Remains the Same
Robin A. Meltzer
I Remember Drohobycz
David Einsiedler
Family Album: The Mandels >from Stryj
Frances Smith

Plus updates on projects involving: Lwow (Eli Brauner), Strelisk
(Janice M. Sellers), and Zbaraz (Tony Kahane).

Gesher Galicia has also just uploaded three new videos to our site,
found on our video home page:

http://www.geshergalicia.org/videos/

- I Remember Jewish Drohobycz with David Einsiedler (>from 2005)
- The Gesher Galicia Spring Meeting in New York City and "Austria,
Poland, Ukraine: 3 Countries, 5 Archives, 12 Wonderful Days of
Discovery" (May 2014)
- Interview with 91 year-old Shlomo Kahane about growing up in
Grzyamlow, Poland (Hebrew only - January 2014)

For those of you who cannot attend the upcoming IAJGS Conference,
we'll be putting several Galician conference videos online this fall.
Gesher Galicia is the fastest growing SIG around, having almost
doubled our membership in the past year. Why not join us now?
http://www.geshergalicia.org/join-gesher-galicia/

If already a member, consider making a donation to further our
research. Read about our projects here:
http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/garp/

Donate here: http://www.geshergalicia.org/donate/

If you think you paid your 2014 but aren't sure, please contact our
membership chair, Ben Tysch, directly at: bentysch@gmail.com.

We want to thank all our members, near and far, for their support in
all our work and I look forward to seeing many of you at the IAJGS
Conference coming up in Salt Lake City, or next year in Jerusalem.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia "The Galitzianer," June issue, + new Gesher Galicia videos...and a reminder about membership #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Dear Galitzianers!

We are about to publish the June issue of Gesher Galicia's quarterly
journal, "The Galitizianer," so this is a good time to remind all our
discussion group subscribers that you need to be a GG member to
receive the journal.

(Subscribing only to this mailing list does not make you a member of
Gesher Galicia! It just means you are a very valued subscriber to our
mailing list. Thank you for that! However... membership in Gesher
Galicia is completely separate and membership dues start at $25 per
year.)

Gesher Galicia membership entitles you to a four-issue subscription
to "The Galitzianer," special member access to the Family Finder and
other member benefits like ordering two free scans of the 1910
Tarnopol Jewish Census. More importantly, these dues help to fund
our ongoing research projects, IAJGS conference and regional
programs, sponsoring overseas archivists and researchers, and
uploading videos, new maps and records to the All Galicia Database,
Cadastral Map Room and website home page. Member dues also fund
ourmatching grant program for the Galician Archival Records Project
and cover the costs of dedicated researchers working year round in
Poland and Ukraine. Help us to help you to learn more about your
Galician ancestors by supporting our activities.

If you are not yet a member (or a former member who has not yet
renewed) why not join now? If you join by Monday you will be added
to the Galitzianer distribution list for our next issue!

Just go to: http://www.geshergalicia.org/join-gesher-galicia/

Or click the "donate" button on our home page. You can pay by
check, or credit card/Paypal, and you can choose an electronic or
paper copy membership. We do not pro-rate memberships, but you
will be sent all the back issues >from this year when you join. If you
represent an organization who might benefit >from a paper
subscription to "The G," we offer that option.

Here's a sneak preview of "The Galitzianer" June issue:

Preservationist's Corner: Czernowitz
Marla Raucher Osborn
Research Corner: Austrian Ministries & Galician Refugees Projects
Pamela Weisberger
New Polish Vital Records Law
Tony Kahane
The Dead Man in the Zellermayer House
Israel Pickholtz
The Name Remains the Same
Robin A. Meltzer
I Remember Drohobycz
David Einsiedler
Family Album: The Mandels >from Stryj
Frances Smith

Plus updates on projects involving: Lwow (Eli Brauner), Strelisk
(Janice M. Sellers), and Zbaraz (Tony Kahane).

Gesher Galicia has also just uploaded three new videos to our site,
found on our video home page:

http://www.geshergalicia.org/videos/

- I Remember Jewish Drohobycz with David Einsiedler (>from 2005)
- The Gesher Galicia Spring Meeting in New York City and "Austria,
Poland, Ukraine: 3 Countries, 5 Archives, 12 Wonderful Days of
Discovery" (May 2014)
- Interview with 91 year-old Shlomo Kahane about growing up in
Grzyamlow, Poland (Hebrew only - January 2014)

For those of you who cannot attend the upcoming IAJGS Conference,
we'll be putting several Galician conference videos online this fall.
Gesher Galicia is the fastest growing SIG around, having almost
doubled our membership in the past year. Why not join us now?
http://www.geshergalicia.org/join-gesher-galicia/

If already a member, consider making a donation to further our
research. Read about our projects here:
http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/garp/

Donate here: http://www.geshergalicia.org/donate/

If you think you paid your 2014 but aren't sure, please contact our
membership chair, Ben Tysch, directly at: bentysch@gmail.com.

We want to thank all our members, near and far, for their support in
all our work and I look forward to seeing many of you at the IAJGS
Conference coming up in Salt Lake City, or next year in Jerusalem.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com


Lemberg/Lwow/Lvov 1849/1853 Cadastral Map on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to announce the first cadastral map of
Lemberg/Lwow/Lvov to be posted in our Cadastral Map Room:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/lviv-lwow-lemberg-1853/

A complete cadastral map of the city of Lemberg surveyed 1849 and
lithographed in 1853. A very clear and beautiful full-color cadastral
map, showing this gem of the Austrian Empire already developed with
many of the streets and significant buildings still visible today. The
city center is ringed by numbered quarters and well-built named
neighborhoods, including at least three known Jewish districts. All
buildings and land parcels are numbered. Labeled on the map are two
synagogues and almost two dozen churches and monasteries, major
Jewish and Christian cemeteries, military and other imperial facilities,
theaters, parks, schools, and more, with many named streets and
squares.

Researchers and historians might want to take note of the following
observations which compare old Lemberg to present-day Lviv,
provided by GG map room coordinator, Jay Osborn:

- the Rathaus (city hall, still in use), listed as building #1, in the Ring
Platz (today's market square or rynek)

- the river Pelterv (Poltva), still running through the city today but
completely covered since the early 20th century

- the Israeliten Spital (Jewish hospital, also known as the Rappaport
hospital today) #2125, WNW of the town center

- the large old Jewish cemetery #5106 just behind the Jewish hospital
(today a large open market)

- the synagogue #2633, beside the fish market; destroyed in WWII, it
is memorialized in today's Staryi Rynek (Old Market Square)

- the Golden Rose synagogue probably #259 but unlabeled, just ESE of
the rynek; destroyed in WWII but surviving today as a ruin

- the adjacent synagogue #367, today an empty square behind the
armory building

- Judenplatz (Jewish Square), Judengasse (Jewish Street) and
Wechslergasse (Moneychanger Street), all southeast of the rynek
around the synagogue above

- the Ossolinski Library (Ossolineum) #520 southwest of the town
center, today the Stefanyk Library

- the Map Archive (!) #80 (no longer extant), just west of the rynek
(market square)

- the Citadelle, today an archive and prominent military ruin above the
city on a hill SSW of the town center, curiously blank of buildings and
roads on the map; perhaps it was mapped on a separate sheet now lost,
or perhaps it was blank for reasons of military security.

- buildings are block-numbered in the city center, making it easy to
associate neighboring residences and offices; this suggests a
re-numbering of the city properties not long before this map was made

- Serbengasse (Serbian Street) in the city center was renamed after
1853 for the 16th-century Moscow/Lwow printer Ivan Federov; oddly,
the adjacent former Blechergasse (Tinsmith Street, also a Germanic
family name) is now named Serbska

- separate large facilities for care of the deaf and the blind were
located east of the city center, near the military hospital and a German
hospital

- a very large brewery is shown near the northeast edge of the map; a
smaller one is shown near the southeast edge

- there are statues drawn on the map in some of the downtown squares!

Thanks to Jay Osborn for stitching together this map and Natalie Dunai
for sourcing it.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org
www.geshergalicia.org


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Lemberg/Lwow/Lvov 1849/1853 Cadastral Map on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to announce the first cadastral map of
Lemberg/Lwow/Lvov to be posted in our Cadastral Map Room:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/lviv-lwow-lemberg-1853/

A complete cadastral map of the city of Lemberg surveyed 1849 and
lithographed in 1853. A very clear and beautiful full-color cadastral
map, showing this gem of the Austrian Empire already developed with
many of the streets and significant buildings still visible today. The
city center is ringed by numbered quarters and well-built named
neighborhoods, including at least three known Jewish districts. All
buildings and land parcels are numbered. Labeled on the map are two
synagogues and almost two dozen churches and monasteries, major
Jewish and Christian cemeteries, military and other imperial facilities,
theaters, parks, schools, and more, with many named streets and
squares.

Researchers and historians might want to take note of the following
observations which compare old Lemberg to present-day Lviv,
provided by GG map room coordinator, Jay Osborn:

- the Rathaus (city hall, still in use), listed as building #1, in the Ring
Platz (today's market square or rynek)

- the river Pelterv (Poltva), still running through the city today but
completely covered since the early 20th century

- the Israeliten Spital (Jewish hospital, also known as the Rappaport
hospital today) #2125, WNW of the town center

- the large old Jewish cemetery #5106 just behind the Jewish hospital
(today a large open market)

- the synagogue #2633, beside the fish market; destroyed in WWII, it
is memorialized in today's Staryi Rynek (Old Market Square)

- the Golden Rose synagogue probably #259 but unlabeled, just ESE of
the rynek; destroyed in WWII but surviving today as a ruin

- the adjacent synagogue #367, today an empty square behind the
armory building

- Judenplatz (Jewish Square), Judengasse (Jewish Street) and
Wechslergasse (Moneychanger Street), all southeast of the rynek
around the synagogue above

- the Ossolinski Library (Ossolineum) #520 southwest of the town
center, today the Stefanyk Library

- the Map Archive (!) #80 (no longer extant), just west of the rynek
(market square)

- the Citadelle, today an archive and prominent military ruin above the
city on a hill SSW of the town center, curiously blank of buildings and
roads on the map; perhaps it was mapped on a separate sheet now lost,
or perhaps it was blank for reasons of military security.

- buildings are block-numbered in the city center, making it easy to
associate neighboring residences and offices; this suggests a
re-numbering of the city properties not long before this map was made

- Serbengasse (Serbian Street) in the city center was renamed after
1853 for the 16th-century Moscow/Lwow printer Ivan Federov; oddly,
the adjacent former Blechergasse (Tinsmith Street, also a Germanic
family name) is now named Serbska

- separate large facilities for care of the deaf and the blind were
located east of the city center, near the military hospital and a German
hospital

- a very large brewery is shown near the northeast edge of the map; a
smaller one is shown near the southeast edge

- there are statues drawn on the map in some of the downtown squares!

Thanks to Jay Osborn for stitching together this map and Natalie Dunai
for sourcing it.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org
www.geshergalicia.org


Re: Poland - Changing Surnames #general

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org (Amit Naor amitna87@gmail.com) wrote on 17 jul
2014 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

I have information >from a local Book of Residents implying a surname
change around the early 1800's. The name appears in the shape of "Name
X vel Name Y". I know it was a time when many changed their names in
the transition >from patronymic names. My question is whether such name
changes were registered anywhere? Or a person could be registered once
in his old name and next time with a new name? How about later years
(such as the end of the 19th century or the early 20th)?
Latin "vel" can better be translated with "also named", without any pointing
to a quality or temporal difference. We see that here in the Saxon part of
the Netherlands and the corresponding German land on the other side of the
border. It could be that families were named after their farm, or had also
another farm by marriage or inheritance, and both names were necessary to
insure their rights.

A kinui was to hide the original Jewish name, so I wouldn't expect:
"Naftali vel Hirsch"

But then, I am not an expert on Polish nameing.

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
exjxwxhannivoortATinterxnlxnet
(Please change the x'es to dots)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Poland - Changing Surnames #general

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org (Amit Naor amitna87@gmail.com) wrote on 17 jul
2014 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

I have information >from a local Book of Residents implying a surname
change around the early 1800's. The name appears in the shape of "Name
X vel Name Y". I know it was a time when many changed their names in
the transition >from patronymic names. My question is whether such name
changes were registered anywhere? Or a person could be registered once
in his old name and next time with a new name? How about later years
(such as the end of the 19th century or the early 20th)?
Latin "vel" can better be translated with "also named", without any pointing
to a quality or temporal difference. We see that here in the Saxon part of
the Netherlands and the corresponding German land on the other side of the
border. It could be that families were named after their farm, or had also
another farm by marriage or inheritance, and both names were necessary to
insure their rights.

A kinui was to hide the original Jewish name, so I wouldn't expect:
"Naftali vel Hirsch"

But then, I am not an expert on Polish nameing.

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
exjxwxhannivoortATinterxnlxnet
(Please change the x'es to dots)


Re: Poland - Changing Surnames #general

Jules Levin
 

On 7/17/2014 7:52 AM, Amit Naor amitna87@gmail.com wrote:
I have information >from a local Book of Residents implying a surname
change around the early 1800's. The name appears in the shape of "Name
X vel Name Y". I know it was a time when many changed their names in
the transition >from patronymic names. My question is whether such name
changes were registered anywhere? Or a person could be registered once
in his old name and next time with a new name? How about later years
(such as the end of the 19th century or the early 20th)?
I've been examining the early records of Lith towns trying to find
patterns in surname acquisition. There is no consistent pattern,
which to me signifies more an organic development without much
guidance >from officials. For example, in my ggf's village the
development goes:
I: Moshe ben Faivish (no surname),
II: Shmuel ben Moshe Faivish (Faivish used as surname),
III: Moshe ben Shmuel Faivisovich (by the 1850's, -ovich or -zohn
added to surname. This then stabilizes)

This looks like a purely organic natural development.
On the other hand, there are villages where suddenly everyone
has a surname and the roster looks like the membership in a
modern Reform Temple. How that happens I have no idea.
Finally, a comment on the administrative competence of Russia.
The Russians were not Germans. Everything was always in a state
of modified chaos. Rules were ignored, and rules were made up
by local officials.

See Gogol's play Revizor (The Government Inspector) to get a
flavor of what things were like when Jews were adding surnames.

Jules Levin


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Poland - Changing Surnames #general

Jules Levin
 

On 7/17/2014 7:52 AM, Amit Naor amitna87@gmail.com wrote:
I have information >from a local Book of Residents implying a surname
change around the early 1800's. The name appears in the shape of "Name
X vel Name Y". I know it was a time when many changed their names in
the transition >from patronymic names. My question is whether such name
changes were registered anywhere? Or a person could be registered once
in his old name and next time with a new name? How about later years
(such as the end of the 19th century or the early 20th)?
I've been examining the early records of Lith towns trying to find
patterns in surname acquisition. There is no consistent pattern,
which to me signifies more an organic development without much
guidance >from officials. For example, in my ggf's village the
development goes:
I: Moshe ben Faivish (no surname),
II: Shmuel ben Moshe Faivish (Faivish used as surname),
III: Moshe ben Shmuel Faivisovich (by the 1850's, -ovich or -zohn
added to surname. This then stabilizes)

This looks like a purely organic natural development.
On the other hand, there are villages where suddenly everyone
has a surname and the roster looks like the membership in a
modern Reform Temple. How that happens I have no idea.
Finally, a comment on the administrative competence of Russia.
The Russians were not Germans. Everything was always in a state
of modified chaos. Rules were ignored, and rules were made up
by local officials.

See Gogol's play Revizor (The Government Inspector) to get a
flavor of what things were like when Jews were adding surnames.

Jules Levin


Re: Poland - Changing Surnames #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dear Amit:
Which Poland? Russian? Galicia? Prussia? And which town?

I think many people would be interested in seeing this item.
Could you put the relevant page up on ViewMate along with a
few source details -- or otherwise give a reference?
I'd be very grateful for either one.

Thanks,

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 7/17/2014 10:52 AM, Amit Naor amitna87@gmail.com wrote:
Hello,

I have information >from a local Book of Residents implying a surname
change around the early 1800's. The name appears in the shape of
"Name X vel Name Y". I know it was a time when many changed their
names in the transition >from patronymic names. My question is
whether such name changes were registered anywhere? Or a person
could be registered once in his old name and next time with a
new name? How about later years (such as the end of the 19th century
or the early 20th)?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Poland - Changing Surnames #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dear Amit:
Which Poland? Russian? Galicia? Prussia? And which town?

I think many people would be interested in seeing this item.
Could you put the relevant page up on ViewMate along with a
few source details -- or otherwise give a reference?
I'd be very grateful for either one.

Thanks,

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 7/17/2014 10:52 AM, Amit Naor amitna87@gmail.com wrote:
Hello,

I have information >from a local Book of Residents implying a surname
change around the early 1800's. The name appears in the shape of
"Name X vel Name Y". I know it was a time when many changed their
names in the transition >from patronymic names. My question is
whether such name changes were registered anywhere? Or a person
could be registered once in his old name and next time with a
new name? How about later years (such as the end of the 19th century
or the early 20th)?


Re: Maps of Jewish Communities and their Populations in Europe: 1750 - 1950 #general

Todd Edelman <edelman@...>
 

I very much appreciate the technical quality of these maps and the user
guide but I am curious what percentage of Jewish people lived in places
with below the 3,000 min. Jewish population. It must have been quite
high even after restrictions were eased related to the Pale and 1ate
1860's changes in what became Austria-Hungary, and it definitely
excludes the small towns and villages of many of my relatives even up
until World War II, such as Hanusovce nad Toplou and Perechyn.

In addition, the proportion of Jews to Gentile population is also very
relevant as it can give some indications on significance of the Jewish
population in a particular place. This information can be ascertained
using these maps and other means, but since it is clearly within the
capability of the map makers at IIJG it is oddly missing.

In any case the display here of only towns and cities with higher
populations is troubling if this map is used prominently or
definitively -- this other example >from 1881 shows percentages but only
by entire area: http://tinyurl.com/jvqodst
(real url:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_Europe#mediaviewer/File:Juden_1881.JPG)

So is the data available to create a map that includes much smaller
settlements and proportions? In regards to the gross numbers and bias
towards everything >from medium-sized towns and up, these maps if used
without context end up under-representing the Jews who lived in those
(much) smaller towns, who are likely more religious and lower on the
economic scale.

Thanks,
Todd Edelman,
Los Angeles

On 07/16/2014 05:49 PM, Sandra Crystall rosapalustris@gmail.com wrote:
-----
The International Institute for Jewish Genealogy has made available
interactive online Maps of Jewish Communities and their Populations in
Europe: 1750 - 1950.

The maps, user guide and report are available at
http://iijg.org/maps-of-jewish-communities/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Maps of Jewish Communities and their Populations in Europe: 1750 - 1950 #general

Todd Edelman <edelman@...>
 

I very much appreciate the technical quality of these maps and the user
guide but I am curious what percentage of Jewish people lived in places
with below the 3,000 min. Jewish population. It must have been quite
high even after restrictions were eased related to the Pale and 1ate
1860's changes in what became Austria-Hungary, and it definitely
excludes the small towns and villages of many of my relatives even up
until World War II, such as Hanusovce nad Toplou and Perechyn.

In addition, the proportion of Jews to Gentile population is also very
relevant as it can give some indications on significance of the Jewish
population in a particular place. This information can be ascertained
using these maps and other means, but since it is clearly within the
capability of the map makers at IIJG it is oddly missing.

In any case the display here of only towns and cities with higher
populations is troubling if this map is used prominently or
definitively -- this other example >from 1881 shows percentages but only
by entire area: http://tinyurl.com/jvqodst
(real url:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_Europe#mediaviewer/File:Juden_1881.JPG)

So is the data available to create a map that includes much smaller
settlements and proportions? In regards to the gross numbers and bias
towards everything >from medium-sized towns and up, these maps if used
without context end up under-representing the Jews who lived in those
(much) smaller towns, who are likely more religious and lower on the
economic scale.

Thanks,
Todd Edelman,
Los Angeles

On 07/16/2014 05:49 PM, Sandra Crystall rosapalustris@gmail.com wrote:
-----
The International Institute for Jewish Genealogy has made available
interactive online Maps of Jewish Communities and their Populations in
Europe: 1750 - 1950.

The maps, user guide and report are available at
http://iijg.org/maps-of-jewish-communities/


Rabbi RIMMER #general

Neil@...
 

Looking for information on the parents of (and biography and family
of) R. Benjamin RIMMER of the Chebiner Yeshiva, Jerusalem, married
Gita (Gitel), daughter of R. Joseph Shalom ELYASHEV, 1910-2012, Rosh
Beit Din, Jerusalem
His mother was a daughter of Eliyahu SHACHOR.

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR: Please respond directly to Neil with any information.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Rabbi RIMMER #general

Neil@...
 

Looking for information on the parents of (and biography and family
of) R. Benjamin RIMMER of the Chebiner Yeshiva, Jerusalem, married
Gita (Gitel), daughter of R. Joseph Shalom ELYASHEV, 1910-2012, Rosh
Beit Din, Jerusalem
His mother was a daughter of Eliyahu SHACHOR.

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR: Please respond directly to Neil with any information.


New SA Kehilalinks - your input is welcome #southafrica

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Hi All

I am currently setting up the following new Kehilalinks for JewishGen,
so I would appreciate any relevant input including stories, memoirs and
photos that could be shared on these sites:

Port Elizabeth
Pretoria
Oudtshoorn
Cape Town
Johannesburg


Please visit my two latest kehilalinks sites, Kimberley and Pietersburg,
to see how these are now being set up.

Kimberley:

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kimberley

Pietersburg:

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/pietersburg

Geraldine Auerbach MBE is the driving force behind the Kimberley
Kehilalink. She is energetically providing me with lots of great ideas
on the new structure and input.

I have also had great help >from Charlotte Wiener in Israel on the
Pietersburg Kehilalink.

My thanks to Geraldine and Charlotte for their excellent support and
contributions. I am looking forward to working with others on my new
projects.

The following kehilalinks are also in the pipeline:

Berlin
Sydney
Melbourne and
Perth

Please let your landsleiters know.

I look forward to hearing >from you.

Best regards

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia
eli@elirab.com
http://elirab.me


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica New SA Kehilalinks - your input is welcome #southafrica

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Hi All

I am currently setting up the following new Kehilalinks for JewishGen,
so I would appreciate any relevant input including stories, memoirs and
photos that could be shared on these sites:

Port Elizabeth
Pretoria
Oudtshoorn
Cape Town
Johannesburg


Please visit my two latest kehilalinks sites, Kimberley and Pietersburg,
to see how these are now being set up.

Kimberley:

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kimberley

Pietersburg:

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/pietersburg

Geraldine Auerbach MBE is the driving force behind the Kimberley
Kehilalink. She is energetically providing me with lots of great ideas
on the new structure and input.

I have also had great help >from Charlotte Wiener in Israel on the
Pietersburg Kehilalink.

My thanks to Geraldine and Charlotte for their excellent support and
contributions. I am looking forward to working with others on my new
projects.

The following kehilalinks are also in the pipeline:

Berlin
Sydney
Melbourne and
Perth

Please let your landsleiters know.

I look forward to hearing >from you.

Best regards

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia
eli@elirab.com
http://elirab.me

117761 - 117780 of 668653