Date   

Re: "Complete" records or not really complete? #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear Gale,

I will try to answer all your questions: (I numbered your questions below)

1. Yes, complete means that the records were transliterated and put in JewishGen. In most of the cases
we have the whole set for the town/year. There are of course some years we do not have - these are
probably lost or were not photographed by FHL for some reason or possible that FHL did not give us all
the records. But again if we have town/year translated - that most likely the whole set. Here is just one
case when part of the records might not the translated. Some large sets are spread through several
microfilms. We may have one microfilm, and not have a second one for some reason.

2. About a particular year I already answered... but how many records overall survived... what years/towns
survived... I would like to know an answer on that one.
As far as number of Jews in Bessarabia, especially in the beginning of 19 century... we have a number of
20,000 Jews or 5,000 families in 1812, probably in 1818. I personally think that this number is not correct.
We have worked on 1824 Khotin uezd records, and got about 3,000 families!!! Only >from Khotin uezd.

3. I would say - we do not have many years/towns records, but I am pretty sure that NO ONE destroyed
for example records on Bendery, 1875, and did not destroyed records for 1876. The records may still be
somewhere, and we should work on getting them.

4. Not necessarily... Of course records for places outside of Beltsy were kept separately. Sometimes we
have records for a whole district with many shteitlakh and villages around. Like I told you about Khotin
district... we have records for 1824 for MANY hundreds of localities in that district!! I also know that
there are records for Bendery district, I think not translated yet.

5. Jews could live in other places, but the records were kept only in place they were registered!
By the way, what do you know about Strimba place in Bessarabia? Did you see it on the map? I did... on
the old map. Also when I search an internet I found a number of people who were born in Strimba,
Beltsy district...

6. no, not all lost... I found 5 years of birth records, and I think 1 year of marriages, and several years of
deaths for a shteitle Kaushany in Bendery district with about 2000 Jews.. and they are listed separately.
In some place there were only 10 families of Jews or less, these would be listed together for the whole
district.

7. I do not think so... there is no evidence of that. But we need to try and get all information possible.

----------------------------
I believe I answered your questions, I would rather not assume that records are destroyed, or lost, but I
suggest you to POST a message with a little bit of information of your ancestors >from that place... include
surnames, names, if possible some date, might be approximated, also include wife with maiden name,
children, etc.... there are many people who are interested in the same Beltsy region, and they may see
something familiar, and respond to you.
The other thing there is a very good Beltry website, most of it in Russian, but you could ask people
questions in English too. Here is the website: http://shtetlbelts.ru/

Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany, Bendery, Tarutino,
Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova,
SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China

-------------------------------------------------------------------
Sent: Friday, May 01, 2015 4:14 PM
To: Bessarabia SIG
Subject: "Complete" records or not really complete?

Hi. I noticed that in the Bessarabia Vital Records Database
(http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/KishinevVRs.htm), many years are listed as Complete.

(1)I understand that complete means that the transliteration of FHL records is complete, but that does
not mean that these are complete records for that year and that city. Can I correctly assume that, for
most of the years listed, there were many other records that FHL could not photograph because they
were lost or destroyed?

(2)What percent of total records for each year survived, and what percent were lost? I wonder if it s
possible to estimate that based on knowledge of the number of Jews that lived in Bessarabia then.

(3) Of course, many years are not listed at all in the database, so one can assume that, for those years,
ALL the records were lost or destroyed.

(4) Anyway, I can t find my grandmother s birth record >from Beltz. She was born in 1878, a year which
is listed as complete. Perhaps this was because her record was lost or destroyed. I can t find the
record of her first marriage either, circa 1902, or of the birth and death of her first child.

(5)Or could the reason I can t find her records be that she was actually >from Strimbe, a few kilometers
outside of Beltz? Would Strimbe Jewish records have been kept separately >from Beltz records? Family lore
is that she was born at her relative s house in Beltz, but lived in Strimbe.

(6)That brings up another question. What about the small villages of Bessarabia? They aren t listed in
the Bessarabia database. Were Jewish vital records >from the small villages all lost?

(7)An Israeli who I recently met said that there was an archive in Israel that had information about all
the East European Jews of my grandparents era and they would have their birth information, even if it
was lost or destroyed and FHL doesn t have it. Is this true? It s kind of hard to believe.

Thanks for any answers.

Gale Marshall
Phnom Penh
Cambodia


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia RE: "Complete" records or not really complete? #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear Gale,

I will try to answer all your questions: (I numbered your questions below)

1. Yes, complete means that the records were transliterated and put in JewishGen. In most of the cases
we have the whole set for the town/year. There are of course some years we do not have - these are
probably lost or were not photographed by FHL for some reason or possible that FHL did not give us all
the records. But again if we have town/year translated - that most likely the whole set. Here is just one
case when part of the records might not the translated. Some large sets are spread through several
microfilms. We may have one microfilm, and not have a second one for some reason.

2. About a particular year I already answered... but how many records overall survived... what years/towns
survived... I would like to know an answer on that one.
As far as number of Jews in Bessarabia, especially in the beginning of 19 century... we have a number of
20,000 Jews or 5,000 families in 1812, probably in 1818. I personally think that this number is not correct.
We have worked on 1824 Khotin uezd records, and got about 3,000 families!!! Only >from Khotin uezd.

3. I would say - we do not have many years/towns records, but I am pretty sure that NO ONE destroyed
for example records on Bendery, 1875, and did not destroyed records for 1876. The records may still be
somewhere, and we should work on getting them.

4. Not necessarily... Of course records for places outside of Beltsy were kept separately. Sometimes we
have records for a whole district with many shteitlakh and villages around. Like I told you about Khotin
district... we have records for 1824 for MANY hundreds of localities in that district!! I also know that
there are records for Bendery district, I think not translated yet.

5. Jews could live in other places, but the records were kept only in place they were registered!
By the way, what do you know about Strimba place in Bessarabia? Did you see it on the map? I did... on
the old map. Also when I search an internet I found a number of people who were born in Strimba,
Beltsy district...

6. no, not all lost... I found 5 years of birth records, and I think 1 year of marriages, and several years of
deaths for a shteitle Kaushany in Bendery district with about 2000 Jews.. and they are listed separately.
In some place there were only 10 families of Jews or less, these would be listed together for the whole
district.

7. I do not think so... there is no evidence of that. But we need to try and get all information possible.

----------------------------
I believe I answered your questions, I would rather not assume that records are destroyed, or lost, but I
suggest you to POST a message with a little bit of information of your ancestors >from that place... include
surnames, names, if possible some date, might be approximated, also include wife with maiden name,
children, etc.... there are many people who are interested in the same Beltsy region, and they may see
something familiar, and respond to you.
The other thing there is a very good Beltry website, most of it in Russian, but you could ask people
questions in English too. Here is the website: http://shtetlbelts.ru/

Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany, Bendery, Tarutino,
Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova,
SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China

-------------------------------------------------------------------
Sent: Friday, May 01, 2015 4:14 PM
To: Bessarabia SIG
Subject: "Complete" records or not really complete?

Hi. I noticed that in the Bessarabia Vital Records Database
(http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/KishinevVRs.htm), many years are listed as Complete.

(1)I understand that complete means that the transliteration of FHL records is complete, but that does
not mean that these are complete records for that year and that city. Can I correctly assume that, for
most of the years listed, there were many other records that FHL could not photograph because they
were lost or destroyed?

(2)What percent of total records for each year survived, and what percent were lost? I wonder if it s
possible to estimate that based on knowledge of the number of Jews that lived in Bessarabia then.

(3) Of course, many years are not listed at all in the database, so one can assume that, for those years,
ALL the records were lost or destroyed.

(4) Anyway, I can t find my grandmother s birth record >from Beltz. She was born in 1878, a year which
is listed as complete. Perhaps this was because her record was lost or destroyed. I can t find the
record of her first marriage either, circa 1902, or of the birth and death of her first child.

(5)Or could the reason I can t find her records be that she was actually >from Strimbe, a few kilometers
outside of Beltz? Would Strimbe Jewish records have been kept separately >from Beltz records? Family lore
is that she was born at her relative s house in Beltz, but lived in Strimbe.

(6)That brings up another question. What about the small villages of Bessarabia? They aren t listed in
the Bessarabia database. Were Jewish vital records >from the small villages all lost?

(7)An Israeli who I recently met said that there was an archive in Israel that had information about all
the East European Jews of my grandparents era and they would have their birth information, even if it
was lost or destroyed and FHL doesn t have it. Is this true? It s kind of hard to believe.

Thanks for any answers.

Gale Marshall
Phnom Penh
Cambodia


Kremenets District: Additions to Database and Concordance #bessarabia

Ellen Garshick
 

I'm pleased to announce that we now have more than 215,000 entries in
our master name index. In the past month we have added the following
records to our translations database and to our Indexed Concordance of
Personal Names and Town Names:

* Belozirka birth records, 1879-1886
* Kremenets birth records, 1902-1903, 1908-1915, 1917-1919, 1922,
1924-1925, 1929-1932
* Vishnevets birth records, 1889-1898, 1890-1898, 1900-1906, 1910-1922
* Vyshgorodok birth records, 1878-1894
* 1563 Census of Kremenets Households: This census lists 559 households,
of which 100 are Jewish
* 1748 List of Vishnevets Residents: This census lists 68 Jewish households.

Translations of the birth records are downloadable >from the Master
Documents section of the KDRG Contributors site
(https://sites.google.com/site/kdrgcontributors/documents). Translations
of the censuses are downloadable >from the Translation Spreadsheets, RS
section of that site
(https://sites.google.com/site/kdrgcontributors/translation-spreadsheets-rs)
and will soon be added to the Kremenets Kehilalinks website
(http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/web-pages/index.html).

Names >from these resources are included in the Indexed Concordance of
Personal Names & Town Names, downloadable and searchable from
* the KDRG Contributors site
(https://sites.google.com/site/kdrgcontributors/documents) and
* the Kremenets Kehilalinks website
(http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/web-pages/master-surnames.html).

The searchable Concordance is at
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/web-pages/database/krem_search_frm.html.
This index now contains more than 215,000 name-town name entries for
Kremenets-district towns.

Finally, new translations for sections of Radzivilov: Sefer zikaron
(Memorial Book of Radzivilov) have been posted in the JewishGen Yizkor
Book project: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Radzivilov/Radzivilov.html.
These include several Holocaust memoirs and testimonies (pp. 259-276,
322-325, 416-419) as well as descriptions of the town's religious life
(pp. 135-141).

As always, thanks are due to our translators. Please contact me
(ellengarshick@yahoo.com) or Ron Doctor (rddpdx@gmail.com) if you need
information about how to access the KDRG Contributors website.

Best wishes,

Ellen Garshick (ellengarshick@yahoo.com)
Silver Spring, Maryland
Board Member, Kremenets District Research Group (KDRG)
Researching BAT, AVERBAKH >from Kremenets, Shumsk, Katerburg, and
Folvarki, Ukraine; GERSHIK, HURWITCH >from Staryye Dorogi and Bobruisk,
Belarus; ROTHKOPF (ROTKOP), GOLDBERG >from Bialystok, Poland, and
Baranivichi and Slonim, Belarus


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Kremenets District: Additions to Database and Concordance #bessarabia

Ellen Garshick
 

I'm pleased to announce that we now have more than 215,000 entries in
our master name index. In the past month we have added the following
records to our translations database and to our Indexed Concordance of
Personal Names and Town Names:

* Belozirka birth records, 1879-1886
* Kremenets birth records, 1902-1903, 1908-1915, 1917-1919, 1922,
1924-1925, 1929-1932
* Vishnevets birth records, 1889-1898, 1890-1898, 1900-1906, 1910-1922
* Vyshgorodok birth records, 1878-1894
* 1563 Census of Kremenets Households: This census lists 559 households,
of which 100 are Jewish
* 1748 List of Vishnevets Residents: This census lists 68 Jewish households.

Translations of the birth records are downloadable >from the Master
Documents section of the KDRG Contributors site
(https://sites.google.com/site/kdrgcontributors/documents). Translations
of the censuses are downloadable >from the Translation Spreadsheets, RS
section of that site
(https://sites.google.com/site/kdrgcontributors/translation-spreadsheets-rs)
and will soon be added to the Kremenets Kehilalinks website
(http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/web-pages/index.html).

Names >from these resources are included in the Indexed Concordance of
Personal Names & Town Names, downloadable and searchable from
* the KDRG Contributors site
(https://sites.google.com/site/kdrgcontributors/documents) and
* the Kremenets Kehilalinks website
(http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/web-pages/master-surnames.html).

The searchable Concordance is at
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/web-pages/database/krem_search_frm.html.
This index now contains more than 215,000 name-town name entries for
Kremenets-district towns.

Finally, new translations for sections of Radzivilov: Sefer zikaron
(Memorial Book of Radzivilov) have been posted in the JewishGen Yizkor
Book project: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Radzivilov/Radzivilov.html.
These include several Holocaust memoirs and testimonies (pp. 259-276,
322-325, 416-419) as well as descriptions of the town's religious life
(pp. 135-141).

As always, thanks are due to our translators. Please contact me
(ellengarshick@yahoo.com) or Ron Doctor (rddpdx@gmail.com) if you need
information about how to access the KDRG Contributors website.

Best wishes,

Ellen Garshick (ellengarshick@yahoo.com)
Silver Spring, Maryland
Board Member, Kremenets District Research Group (KDRG)
Researching BAT, AVERBAKH >from Kremenets, Shumsk, Katerburg, and
Folvarki, Ukraine; GERSHIK, HURWITCH >from Staryye Dorogi and Bobruisk,
Belarus; ROTHKOPF (ROTKOP), GOLDBERG >from Bialystok, Poland, and
Baranivichi and Slonim, Belarus


Yizkor Book Project, April 2015 #galicia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I was pleased to see that during April, quite a few of our "veteran" and
newer Yizkor Book projects made great leaps and bounds in the translations
and pictures that were added in during this month. Some of the projects are
now just a hairsbreadth away of being completely translated and this has
only come about through the perseverance and dedication of the coordinators
involved in them and, of course, the generous financial support of donors
and the selfless, conscientious volunteers behind the scenes. Still, to
continue this sacred work we are always in need of further financial support
and if you are able to assist in any way to one of the 75 or so Translation
Funds appearing at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
you will have done your piece in helping present generations and those to
come, to read and learn about our lost communities.

Something that also pleased me greatly was that Joel Alpert, the Yizkor Book
in Print Project Coordinator, recently informed me that the 37th Yizkor Book
in Print publication - the "Stawiski Memorial Book" has now become
available. My thanks go out to the YBIP team that made this possible and to
Jan Meisels Allen for leading this project >from its inception to this
publishing stage. Joel also pointed out that it is now three years since the
Yizkor Book in Print Project first began rolling out these unique books and
remarkable achievements have been achieved over this time for this, another
round of applause is definitely forthcoming to his team.

Now to facts and figures for April.

During this last month we have added in a new project:

- Konin/Konin.html (Memorial Book Konin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Konin/Konin.html

We have added in two new entries:

- Ustilug, Ukraine (The Growth and Destruction of the Community of Uscilug)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ustilug/Ustilugh.html [Hebrew]

- Vyalikaya Byerastavitsa, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in
Poland) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00138.html

We have continued to update 20 of our existing projects:

- Briceni, Moldova (Brichany: its Jewry in the first half of our century)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Brichany/Brichany.html

- Capresti, Moldova (Kapresht, our village; memorial book for the Jewish
community of Kapresht, Bessarabia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Capresti/Capresti.html

- Cluj-Napoca, Romania (Memorial volume for the Jews of Cluj-Kolozsvar)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Cluj-Napoca/Cluj-Napoca.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Resurrection and Destruction in Ghetto Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa4/Czestochowa4.html

- Druya, Belarus (The book of Druya and the communities of Miory, Druysk and
Leonpol) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Druya/Druya.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Husyatyn, Ukraine (Two communities: Husiatyn and Kopyczynce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Husyatyn1/Husyatyn1.html

- Jadow, Poland (The Book of Jadow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/jadow/jadow.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On The Banks Of The Vylia; In memory of the
destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Krosno, Poland (Krosno by the Wislok River)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krosno/Krosno.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Radyvyliv, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Radzivilov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Radzivilov/Radzivilov.html

- Rzeszow, Poland (Rzeszow community; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rzeszow/rzeszow.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Strzyzow, Poland (The book of Strzyzow and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Strzyzow/Strzyzow.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Telsiai, Lithuania (Telsiai Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Telsiai/telsiai.html

- Velyki Mosty, Ukraine (Mosty-Wielkie Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Velyki_Mosty/Velyki_Mosty.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Yizkor Book Project, April 2015 #galicia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I was pleased to see that during April, quite a few of our "veteran" and
newer Yizkor Book projects made great leaps and bounds in the translations
and pictures that were added in during this month. Some of the projects are
now just a hairsbreadth away of being completely translated and this has
only come about through the perseverance and dedication of the coordinators
involved in them and, of course, the generous financial support of donors
and the selfless, conscientious volunteers behind the scenes. Still, to
continue this sacred work we are always in need of further financial support
and if you are able to assist in any way to one of the 75 or so Translation
Funds appearing at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
you will have done your piece in helping present generations and those to
come, to read and learn about our lost communities.

Something that also pleased me greatly was that Joel Alpert, the Yizkor Book
in Print Project Coordinator, recently informed me that the 37th Yizkor Book
in Print publication - the "Stawiski Memorial Book" has now become
available. My thanks go out to the YBIP team that made this possible and to
Jan Meisels Allen for leading this project >from its inception to this
publishing stage. Joel also pointed out that it is now three years since the
Yizkor Book in Print Project first began rolling out these unique books and
remarkable achievements have been achieved over this time for this, another
round of applause is definitely forthcoming to his team.

Now to facts and figures for April.

During this last month we have added in a new project:

- Konin/Konin.html (Memorial Book Konin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Konin/Konin.html

We have added in two new entries:

- Ustilug, Ukraine (The Growth and Destruction of the Community of Uscilug)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ustilug/Ustilugh.html [Hebrew]

- Vyalikaya Byerastavitsa, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in
Poland) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00138.html

We have continued to update 20 of our existing projects:

- Briceni, Moldova (Brichany: its Jewry in the first half of our century)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Brichany/Brichany.html

- Capresti, Moldova (Kapresht, our village; memorial book for the Jewish
community of Kapresht, Bessarabia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Capresti/Capresti.html

- Cluj-Napoca, Romania (Memorial volume for the Jews of Cluj-Kolozsvar)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Cluj-Napoca/Cluj-Napoca.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Resurrection and Destruction in Ghetto Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa4/Czestochowa4.html

- Druya, Belarus (The book of Druya and the communities of Miory, Druysk and
Leonpol) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Druya/Druya.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Husyatyn, Ukraine (Two communities: Husiatyn and Kopyczynce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Husyatyn1/Husyatyn1.html

- Jadow, Poland (The Book of Jadow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/jadow/jadow.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On The Banks Of The Vylia; In memory of the
destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Krosno, Poland (Krosno by the Wislok River)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krosno/Krosno.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Radyvyliv, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Radzivilov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Radzivilov/Radzivilov.html

- Rzeszow, Poland (Rzeszow community; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rzeszow/rzeszow.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Strzyzow, Poland (The book of Strzyzow and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Strzyzow/Strzyzow.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Telsiai, Lithuania (Telsiai Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Telsiai/telsiai.html

- Velyki Mosty, Ukraine (Mosty-Wielkie Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Velyki_Mosty/Velyki_Mosty.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


The Revival of Jewish Culture in Poland: JGSLA program on Wednesday, May 6 in Los Angeles #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles invites you to:

An Evening of Ideas and Jazz: The Revival of Jewish Culture in Poland

Wednesday, May 6 at 7:00PM

American Jewish University - Library
15600 Mulholland Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90077

Dr. Sebastian Rejak, Special Envoy of Poland's Minister of Foreign
Affairs for Relations with the Jewish Diaspora will present a lecture
entitled "Polish Jewry, >from Destruction to Revival." He will also cover
the opening and mission of the new museum POLIN: Museum of the
History of Polish Jews in Warsaw.

Following the lecture, join us for a concert, exemplifying this cultural
resurgence, featuring noted jazz pianist Kuba Stankiewicz who
performs works >from his new album "The Music of Victor Young."
Young, an American born composer of popular songs and films
("Around the World in Eighty Days") began his career as a violinist
with the Warsaw Philharmonic.

Kuba Stankiewicz, with a catalog of over twenty albums, ranks among
the top Jazz pianists in Poland. The American-educated Stankiewicz
received an Order of Merit >from Poland for his cultural contributions
and representation of Polish ideals at home and abroad.

Reservations/ticket purchase required: go to: wcce.aju.edu or
telephone: 310-440-1246. Regular price, $15 per person. JGSLA
members discount: $8.00. Use promo code JGSLA to receive special
pricing.

This special program is co-sponsored by the JGSLA, AJU and the
Consulate General of the Republic of Poland).

More information on our website: www.jgsla.org

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair
pweisberger@gmail.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia The Revival of Jewish Culture in Poland: JGSLA program on Wednesday, May 6 in Los Angeles #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles invites you to:

An Evening of Ideas and Jazz: The Revival of Jewish Culture in Poland

Wednesday, May 6 at 7:00PM

American Jewish University - Library
15600 Mulholland Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90077

Dr. Sebastian Rejak, Special Envoy of Poland's Minister of Foreign
Affairs for Relations with the Jewish Diaspora will present a lecture
entitled "Polish Jewry, >from Destruction to Revival." He will also cover
the opening and mission of the new museum POLIN: Museum of the
History of Polish Jews in Warsaw.

Following the lecture, join us for a concert, exemplifying this cultural
resurgence, featuring noted jazz pianist Kuba Stankiewicz who
performs works >from his new album "The Music of Victor Young."
Young, an American born composer of popular songs and films
("Around the World in Eighty Days") began his career as a violinist
with the Warsaw Philharmonic.

Kuba Stankiewicz, with a catalog of over twenty albums, ranks among
the top Jazz pianists in Poland. The American-educated Stankiewicz
received an Order of Merit >from Poland for his cultural contributions
and representation of Polish ideals at home and abroad.

Reservations/ticket purchase required: go to: wcce.aju.edu or
telephone: 310-440-1246. Regular price, $15 per person. JGSLA
members discount: $8.00. Use promo code JGSLA to receive special
pricing.

This special program is co-sponsored by the JGSLA, AJU and the
Consulate General of the Republic of Poland).

More information on our website: www.jgsla.org

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair
pweisberger@gmail.com


Re: Transcarpathian (Hungarian) Cadastral Maps now online at Mapire! #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Wow! Even though Sziget and the Slovak part of Ung megye are not
included, it is possible to see many of the smaller communities in
Maramaros. Even better, you can find the names of property owners, many
of which are familiar to me and others with families >from this part of
old Hungary

MODERATOR NOTE:
Please properly sign your e-mails with name and location.


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Re: Transcarpathian (Hungarian) Cadastral Maps now online at Mapire! #subcarpathia

Vivian Kahn
 

Wow! Even though Sziget and the Slovak part of Ung megye are not
included, it is possible to see many of the smaller communities in
Maramaros. Even better, you can find the names of property owners, many
of which are familiar to me and others with families >from this part of
old Hungary

MODERATOR NOTE:
Please properly sign your e-mails with name and location.


Bachrach / Chavas Yair #germany

Mordechai Perlman
 

Does anyone have a comprehensive family tree for the Bachrach
surname starting at least >from Rav Yair Chaim Bachrach (Chavas Yair)? My
friend, Refael Bachrach, has info on the Bachrachs in his family going back
five generations, but then the trail runs cold.

Mordechai Perlman, Jerusalem, Israel mordechaiperlman@gmail.com

Moderator reminder: Family names (last names) of people you are
researching should be written with all capital letters in Email
to this Forum. Example: Albert EINSTEIN >from Ulm, Germany


German SIG #Germany Bachrach / Chavas Yair #germany

Mordechai Perlman
 

Does anyone have a comprehensive family tree for the Bachrach
surname starting at least >from Rav Yair Chaim Bachrach (Chavas Yair)? My
friend, Refael Bachrach, has info on the Bachrachs in his family going back
five generations, but then the trail runs cold.

Mordechai Perlman, Jerusalem, Israel mordechaiperlman@gmail.com

Moderator reminder: Family names (last names) of people you are
researching should be written with all capital letters in Email
to this Forum. Example: Albert EINSTEIN >from Ulm, Germany


Re: (Germany) Munich Bans Stolpersteine (Holocaust) Plaques #germany

lehrer
 

Hi,

A years ago a Belgian Jewish group was also against it, which is why
Antwerp doesn't have these plaques while Brussels has.

Gershon Lehrer gershon.lehrer@gmail.com

Roger Lustig, GerSIG research coordinator wrote:
Please note that, throughout Germany, much of the opposition to
Stolpersteine, especially for reasons of their being underfoot, has come
from members of the Jewish community. The project remains controversial.
I would be very careful about attributing any action in this regard to
Munich's Nazi past and any modern-day attitudes toward it.


On 5/2/2015 2:44 AM, Jan Meisels Allenjanmallen@att.net wrote:
"Stolpersteine", "stumbling blocks" were created by Gunter Deming and are
small, cobblestone-sized memorials for individual Holocaust victims- and
survivors. The stones are placed in front of the former home of a Holocaust
victim. There about 50,000 in Germany, Austria and the Czech Republic.

Earlier this week. Munich's City Council rejected the plan to have
Stolpersteine placed on Munich streets. The city of Munich has banned the
memorial plaques despite a long campaign to persuade the city to face up to
its past. Munich is the city where the Nazi party was founded. Munich lost
its entire Jewish community in WW 11, about 10,000 people. The "official"
reason given for rejecting the plan was the language used to describe the
victims on the plaques and the idea of their names being walked on
underfoot. Instead the politicians prefer allowing signs on buildings where
relatives of the victim request a memorial and the owner of the building
consents-not an easy task. There was a petition with 79,000 signatures of
Munich residents supporting the Stolpersteine project.

Every other major German city and 18 other countries have allowed the small
memorial plaques to be placed in public pavements.

To read the article go to: http://tinyurl.com/ot7ykm7
Original url:
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/world/munich-bans-plaques-commemorating
-holocaust-victims/story-fnb64oi6-1227330751875

Be aware The Australian requires a subscription. However, if you type into
Google, the name of the article "Munich bans plaques commemorating
Holocaust Victims" a link is available that does not require a subscription


German SIG #Germany Re: (Germany) Munich Bans Stolpersteine (Holocaust) Plaques #germany

lehrer
 

Hi,

A years ago a Belgian Jewish group was also against it, which is why
Antwerp doesn't have these plaques while Brussels has.

Gershon Lehrer gershon.lehrer@gmail.com

Roger Lustig, GerSIG research coordinator wrote:
Please note that, throughout Germany, much of the opposition to
Stolpersteine, especially for reasons of their being underfoot, has come
from members of the Jewish community. The project remains controversial.
I would be very careful about attributing any action in this regard to
Munich's Nazi past and any modern-day attitudes toward it.


On 5/2/2015 2:44 AM, Jan Meisels Allenjanmallen@att.net wrote:
"Stolpersteine", "stumbling blocks" were created by Gunter Deming and are
small, cobblestone-sized memorials for individual Holocaust victims- and
survivors. The stones are placed in front of the former home of a Holocaust
victim. There about 50,000 in Germany, Austria and the Czech Republic.

Earlier this week. Munich's City Council rejected the plan to have
Stolpersteine placed on Munich streets. The city of Munich has banned the
memorial plaques despite a long campaign to persuade the city to face up to
its past. Munich is the city where the Nazi party was founded. Munich lost
its entire Jewish community in WW 11, about 10,000 people. The "official"
reason given for rejecting the plan was the language used to describe the
victims on the plaques and the idea of their names being walked on
underfoot. Instead the politicians prefer allowing signs on buildings where
relatives of the victim request a memorial and the owner of the building
consents-not an easy task. There was a petition with 79,000 signatures of
Munich residents supporting the Stolpersteine project.

Every other major German city and 18 other countries have allowed the small
memorial plaques to be placed in public pavements.

To read the article go to: http://tinyurl.com/ot7ykm7
Original url:
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/world/munich-bans-plaques-commemorating
-holocaust-victims/story-fnb64oi6-1227330751875

Be aware The Australian requires a subscription. However, if you type into
Google, the name of the article "Munich bans plaques commemorating
Holocaust Victims" a link is available that does not require a subscription


Re: Transcarpathian (Hungarian) Cadastral Maps now online at Mapire! #hungary

jausland@...
 

Kudos!

You succeeded where I failed and we all benefit.
Congrats,
Jordan


Re: Also Kubin Wedding register #hungary

tom
 

LDS Film #1923110, "Dolny Kubin marriage records".

it's available through your local mormon church's family history centre, for a
small fee. you can go to the nearest family history centre, where the volunteers
will help you to order the film, or online through the family search website.


....... tom klein, toronto

pheilbrunn@hotmail.com wrote:

Below is a transcript of the birth certificate of a Feldmann child who died
3 days later. I am specifically interested in the last line which refers to
the marriage of my grandparents, Vilmos & Bertha Feldmann. Does someone know
how I could locate the register referred to?


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re:Transcarpathian (Hungarian) Cadastral Maps now online at Mapire! #hungary

jausland@...
 

Kudos!

You succeeded where I failed and we all benefit.
Congrats,
Jordan


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Also Kubin Wedding register #hungary

tom
 

LDS Film #1923110, "Dolny Kubin marriage records".

it's available through your local mormon church's family history centre, for a
small fee. you can go to the nearest family history centre, where the volunteers
will help you to order the film, or online through the family search website.


....... tom klein, toronto

pheilbrunn@hotmail.com wrote:

Below is a transcript of the birth certificate of a Feldmann child who died
3 days later. I am specifically interested in the last line which refers to
the marriage of my grandparents, Vilmos & Bertha Feldmann. Does someone know
how I could locate the register referred to?


Commemoration in Hungary #hungary

g_hirsch@...
 

Hello,

in the 1st May Issue of the Hungarian Jewish periodical "Uj Elet" was published the commemoration dates of the deportation different communities. I tried to describe it according the Jewishgen rules, by removing accents and formating, I hope there is no errors in it, Still you should check the dates >from time to time as they could be change. The Ã?j Elet" can be found on the MAZSIHISZ Homepage the link is

http://mazsihisz.hu/index.php?page=dm_list&dmcid=2

I hope some of you will be present on one of the the commemorations

All the best
Gabor Hirsch
Switzerland

Commemoration Hungary 2015

May 31.
Baja 10.30 Ady Endre konyvtar
Mosonmagyarovar 15.00 Cemetery
Paszto 10.00 Synagoguewal, Memorial, Cemetery
Nyiregyhaza 9.30 Memorial 11.00 Cemetery
Nagykanizsa 10.30 Cemetery
Acs 14.00 Memorial
Devecser 11.00 Cemetery

June 7.
Gyongyos 11.00 Cemetery
Kiskunhalas 11.00 Synagogue
Kecskemet 15.00 Cemetery
Eger 15.00 Cemetery
Szentes 11.00 Cemetery
Kispest 11.00 Cemetery
Miskolc 11.00 Avasi Cemetery
Tata 10.00 Cemetery
Tatabanya 14.00 Cemetery
Zalaegerszeg 10.30 Synagogue 12.00 Cemetery

June 14.
Balassagyarmat 11.00 Cemetery
Nagykoros 11.00 Synagogue
Salgotarjan 11.00 Cemetery
Esztergom 11.00 Cemetery
Revkomarom 10.30 Cemetery
Gyor 11.00 Cemetery
Szekesfehervar 11.00 Cemetery
Kapolnasnyek 14.30 Cemetery

June 21.
Nagykata 10.30 Cemetery
Szecseny 11.00 Cemetery

June 28.
Veszprem 10.00 Cemetery
Cegled 9.30 Synagogue
Szolnok 11.30 Synagogue
Szeged 10.00 Gettomemorial 11.00 Synagogue
Bekescsaba 15.00 Cemetery
Dombovar 14.00 Synagogue
Kaposvar 11.00 Cemetery
Gyula 12.00 Cemetery

June 30.
Vac 10.00 Cemetery

July 5.
Jaszbereny 11.00 Cemetery
Karcag 11.00 Synagogue
Szombathely 11.00 Cemetery
Tapolca 13.30 Memorial 14.00 Cemetery

July 12.
Sopron 11.00 Cemetery


Hungary SIG #Hungary Commemoration in Hungary #hungary

g_hirsch@...
 

Hello,

in the 1st May Issue of the Hungarian Jewish periodical "Uj Elet" was published the commemoration dates of the deportation different communities. I tried to describe it according the Jewishgen rules, by removing accents and formating, I hope there is no errors in it, Still you should check the dates >from time to time as they could be change. The Ã?j Elet" can be found on the MAZSIHISZ Homepage the link is

http://mazsihisz.hu/index.php?page=dm_list&dmcid=2

I hope some of you will be present on one of the the commemorations

All the best
Gabor Hirsch
Switzerland

Commemoration Hungary 2015

May 31.
Baja 10.30 Ady Endre konyvtar
Mosonmagyarovar 15.00 Cemetery
Paszto 10.00 Synagoguewal, Memorial, Cemetery
Nyiregyhaza 9.30 Memorial 11.00 Cemetery
Nagykanizsa 10.30 Cemetery
Acs 14.00 Memorial
Devecser 11.00 Cemetery

June 7.
Gyongyos 11.00 Cemetery
Kiskunhalas 11.00 Synagogue
Kecskemet 15.00 Cemetery
Eger 15.00 Cemetery
Szentes 11.00 Cemetery
Kispest 11.00 Cemetery
Miskolc 11.00 Avasi Cemetery
Tata 10.00 Cemetery
Tatabanya 14.00 Cemetery
Zalaegerszeg 10.30 Synagogue 12.00 Cemetery

June 14.
Balassagyarmat 11.00 Cemetery
Nagykoros 11.00 Synagogue
Salgotarjan 11.00 Cemetery
Esztergom 11.00 Cemetery
Revkomarom 10.30 Cemetery
Gyor 11.00 Cemetery
Szekesfehervar 11.00 Cemetery
Kapolnasnyek 14.30 Cemetery

June 21.
Nagykata 10.30 Cemetery
Szecseny 11.00 Cemetery

June 28.
Veszprem 10.00 Cemetery
Cegled 9.30 Synagogue
Szolnok 11.30 Synagogue
Szeged 10.00 Gettomemorial 11.00 Synagogue
Bekescsaba 15.00 Cemetery
Dombovar 14.00 Synagogue
Kaposvar 11.00 Cemetery
Gyula 12.00 Cemetery

June 30.
Vac 10.00 Cemetery

July 5.
Jaszbereny 11.00 Cemetery
Karcag 11.00 Synagogue
Szombathely 11.00 Cemetery
Tapolca 13.30 Memorial 14.00 Cemetery

July 12.
Sopron 11.00 Cemetery

95341 - 95360 of 662728