Date   

Re: mezuza on angle #general

Nathan Reiss <reiss@...>
 

curwin@gezernet.co.il (curwin) writes:

While the posted question didn't seem to have anything to do with genealogy,
I think I can provide an answer with some connection to genealogy.
There was a disagreement between the Sages as to whether the mezuza
should be placed horizontally or vertically. As a compromise, it was placed
on an angle.
It should also be noted that, contrary to what was stated in the original
posting, not all mezuzas are placed at an angle. This is an Ashkenazi
custom. The Sephardi tradition is to place them vertically.

Nat Reiss
reiss@rci.rutgers.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: mezuza on angle #general

Nathan Reiss <reiss@...>
 

curwin@gezernet.co.il (curwin) writes:

While the posted question didn't seem to have anything to do with genealogy,
I think I can provide an answer with some connection to genealogy.
There was a disagreement between the Sages as to whether the mezuza
should be placed horizontally or vertically. As a compromise, it was placed
on an angle.
It should also be noted that, contrary to what was stated in the original
posting, not all mezuzas are placed at an angle. This is an Ashkenazi
custom. The Sephardi tradition is to place them vertically.

Nat Reiss
reiss@rci.rutgers.edu


ATTN: David & Shirley SHAPIRO-UC-SFO area #general

DREAME@...
 

Hi, JewishGenners, can you help?

We recently returned >from a riverboat cruise through
Ukraine and we were asked by JOSEPH SHAPIRO of Kanev, Ukraine, if
we would post a message to DAVID and SHIRLEY SHAPIRO of the San
Francisco area, whom someone may know, as David is connected with
the University of California and may be a member of JGS....

JOSEPH SHAPIRO was born Poldilskaya, November 12,
1921. He said that he WAS in touch David and Shirley Shapiro, and
then all letters stopped. He would very much like to connect with
them again. He mentioned an "agency - HARCO", but I have no idea
if it has any connection. I have a photograph of him and his full
address.

Email Shirley R. Rose directly :
Dreame@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ATTN: David & Shirley SHAPIRO-UC-SFO area #general

DREAME@...
 

Hi, JewishGenners, can you help?

We recently returned >from a riverboat cruise through
Ukraine and we were asked by JOSEPH SHAPIRO of Kanev, Ukraine, if
we would post a message to DAVID and SHIRLEY SHAPIRO of the San
Francisco area, whom someone may know, as David is connected with
the University of California and may be a member of JGS....

JOSEPH SHAPIRO was born Poldilskaya, November 12,
1921. He said that he WAS in touch David and Shirley Shapiro, and
then all letters stopped. He would very much like to connect with
them again. He mentioned an "agency - HARCO", but I have no idea
if it has any connection. I have a photograph of him and his full
address.

Email Shirley R. Rose directly :
Dreame@aol.com


[Fwd: new "Success Stories" button on JRI-Poland web site] #poland

Steven A. Zedeck <saz@...>
 

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--
* Steven A. Zedeck Internet: saz@JLC.net *
* 25 Cathedral Circle, Nashua, NH 03063 saz@compuserve.com *
*********************************************************************


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Message-ID: <35C3CD91.D04F0108@jlc.net>
Date: Sat, 01 Aug 1998 22:23:13 -0400
From: "Steven A. Zedeck" <saz@jlc.net>
X-Mailer: Mozilla 4.04 [en] (Win95; I)
MIME-Version: 1.0
To: JRI-Poland <jri-pl@mail.jewishgen.org>
Subject: new "Success Stories" button on JRI-Poland web site
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi all:
I just added a new button on the main page of the JRI-Poland
web site (http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl).

The button is entitled "Success Stories".
This links to a page that contains many success stories
people have written to me or others on the JRI board.

Have a look. If you have a success story, feel free to
either post it to this list or email it to me.

We enjoy reading these as it shows that we are doing
the right thing and we are helping many people in their
research.

Thanks,
Steve
JRI-Poland Web Master
--
* Steven A. Zedeck Internet: saz@JLC.net *
* 25 Cathedral Circle, Nashua, NH 03063 saz@compuserve.com *
*********************************************************************



--------------4DAFA1B1A238BCDE2C3E5786--


JRI Poland #Poland [Fwd: new "Success Stories" button on JRI-Poland web site] #poland

Steven A. Zedeck <saz@...>
 

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--
* Steven A. Zedeck Internet: saz@JLC.net *
* 25 Cathedral Circle, Nashua, NH 03063 saz@compuserve.com *
*********************************************************************


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Message-ID: <35C3CD91.D04F0108@jlc.net>
Date: Sat, 01 Aug 1998 22:23:13 -0400
From: "Steven A. Zedeck" <saz@jlc.net>
X-Mailer: Mozilla 4.04 [en] (Win95; I)
MIME-Version: 1.0
To: JRI-Poland <jri-pl@mail.jewishgen.org>
Subject: new "Success Stories" button on JRI-Poland web site
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi all:
I just added a new button on the main page of the JRI-Poland
web site (http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl).

The button is entitled "Success Stories".
This links to a page that contains many success stories
people have written to me or others on the JRI board.

Have a look. If you have a success story, feel free to
either post it to this list or email it to me.

We enjoy reading these as it shows that we are doing
the right thing and we are helping many people in their
research.

Thanks,
Steve
JRI-Poland Web Master
--
* Steven A. Zedeck Internet: saz@JLC.net *
* 25 Cathedral Circle, Nashua, NH 03063 saz@compuserve.com *
*********************************************************************



--------------4DAFA1B1A238BCDE2C3E5786--


Belarus Roots #belarus

Michael Fener
 

Hello my name is Michael, and this is a summary of my Belarus ancestors:

My Maternal Grandmother's parents are supposed to have been >from Minska
Gobernia.

My G-Grandmother, Rose (Ruchel) KULIK was said to have been born during
1883 in Vselyub outside of Novogrudok. Her parents were Samuel KULIK and
Geyla Zelda BASHNIK. Samuel's parents were Abraham Lev KULIK and Bessie
(Peshe) BELLSKY. Abraham's father was Samuel KULIK.

My G-Grandfather Barnett (Beryl) GOLDBERG was said to have been born in
1875 in Korelichi outside of Novogrudok. His parents were Joseph GOLDBERG
and Bessie (Chana Belle) COHEN.

My G-Grandparents both came to America. So the information on my
G-G-Grandparents is based on what they told my Grandmother as well as info
reported on various documents. The info on my G-Grandmother's ancestors,
which goes back several more generations is based on word of mouth only. I
have not seen documents >from "over there", although I have not concentrated
on these branches just yet. I DO rely on the "word of mouth" info, due to
the fact that Rose's grandfather lived to be 104 and my grandmother's
oldest brother (who was born there) met him as a very young boy.
Unfortunately my grandmother's two older brothers passed away several years
ago so I have lost the opportunity to question them. Rose had an interest
in family history so that also (in my opinion) lends some credibility to
her information's accuracy in terms of names. I think that the dates are
less reliable.

I recently located another branch of KULIKs in California who are descended
from Itzchok KULIK, my G-Grandmother's older brother. Itchok's two living
offspring do vaguely recall hearing the same tree being verbally recounted
while they were children in New York.

If anyone has seen or heard of any of these names before I would be happy
to hear >from you.

Regards,
Michael



Michael Fener
New York, USA
mfener@ix.netcom.com

-------------
Searching
-------------
FENER - Hungary
FULEP/(FULOP) - Hungary
WEISS/(WEISZ) - Hungary
MARGULIES/(MARGOLIS) - Galicia
MICHAELSON/(MICHALOFSKY) - Russia
KULIK/KULIC/KULICK - Russia
BASHNICK - Russia


Belarus SIG #Belarus Belarus Roots #belarus

Michael Fener
 

Hello my name is Michael, and this is a summary of my Belarus ancestors:

My Maternal Grandmother's parents are supposed to have been >from Minska
Gobernia.

My G-Grandmother, Rose (Ruchel) KULIK was said to have been born during
1883 in Vselyub outside of Novogrudok. Her parents were Samuel KULIK and
Geyla Zelda BASHNIK. Samuel's parents were Abraham Lev KULIK and Bessie
(Peshe) BELLSKY. Abraham's father was Samuel KULIK.

My G-Grandfather Barnett (Beryl) GOLDBERG was said to have been born in
1875 in Korelichi outside of Novogrudok. His parents were Joseph GOLDBERG
and Bessie (Chana Belle) COHEN.

My G-Grandparents both came to America. So the information on my
G-G-Grandparents is based on what they told my Grandmother as well as info
reported on various documents. The info on my G-Grandmother's ancestors,
which goes back several more generations is based on word of mouth only. I
have not seen documents >from "over there", although I have not concentrated
on these branches just yet. I DO rely on the "word of mouth" info, due to
the fact that Rose's grandfather lived to be 104 and my grandmother's
oldest brother (who was born there) met him as a very young boy.
Unfortunately my grandmother's two older brothers passed away several years
ago so I have lost the opportunity to question them. Rose had an interest
in family history so that also (in my opinion) lends some credibility to
her information's accuracy in terms of names. I think that the dates are
less reliable.

I recently located another branch of KULIKs in California who are descended
from Itzchok KULIK, my G-Grandmother's older brother. Itchok's two living
offspring do vaguely recall hearing the same tree being verbally recounted
while they were children in New York.

If anyone has seen or heard of any of these names before I would be happy
to hear >from you.

Regards,
Michael



Michael Fener
New York, USA
mfener@ix.netcom.com

-------------
Searching
-------------
FENER - Hungary
FULEP/(FULOP) - Hungary
WEISS/(WEISZ) - Hungary
MARGULIES/(MARGOLIS) - Galicia
MICHAELSON/(MICHALOFSKY) - Russia
KULIK/KULIC/KULICK - Russia
BASHNICK - Russia


Researching LEVIN & CHOMSKY family from Grodno... #general

Gail Dechter <marvgailsarah@...>
 

I am new to researching my family & would appreciate any info you might
be able to give me . My father, Irving (Isak) Levin, & his family
immigrated >from Grudno to Ellis Island, in approximately 1915 to 1917.
My grandmother, Sonya (Chomsky) Levin, died shortly upon arrival during
childbirth. I believe she is buried in the Montefiore cemetery in NY.
My grandfather, Max Levin & the family moved to Chicago about a year
later. I would like info regarding my grandmother & the Chomsky family.
I would also appreciate any info on Grudno, & ships & passenger lists
sailing >from the area in that time frame.

Thank you in advance
for your help!
Gail.....

MODERATOR NOTE: Passenger manifest >from that time frame are a gold
mine of information. To find out how to get started with your
research, visit the JewishGen homepage, http://www.jewishgen.org
click on the FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) and print it out!
The FAQ is a primer on how to do research and it will guide you
to finding records, particularly in the U.S.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Researching LEVIN & CHOMSKY family from Grodno... #general

Gail Dechter <marvgailsarah@...>
 

I am new to researching my family & would appreciate any info you might
be able to give me . My father, Irving (Isak) Levin, & his family
immigrated >from Grudno to Ellis Island, in approximately 1915 to 1917.
My grandmother, Sonya (Chomsky) Levin, died shortly upon arrival during
childbirth. I believe she is buried in the Montefiore cemetery in NY.
My grandfather, Max Levin & the family moved to Chicago about a year
later. I would like info regarding my grandmother & the Chomsky family.
I would also appreciate any info on Grudno, & ships & passenger lists
sailing >from the area in that time frame.

Thank you in advance
for your help!
Gail.....

MODERATOR NOTE: Passenger manifest >from that time frame are a gold
mine of information. To find out how to get started with your
research, visit the JewishGen homepage, http://www.jewishgen.org
click on the FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) and print it out!
The FAQ is a primer on how to do research and it will guide you
to finding records, particularly in the U.S.


Re: TABAK TABACK #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 98-08-04 16:53:00 EDT, nister@cygnus.uwa.edu.au writes:

<< I am interested in hearing >from those with the subject surname and more
importantly what their names may have been changed from. I search for the
name TABACHOVITZ. >>

They were all probably tobacco merchants. My wife's British family had a
Tomback relative. Tabachnik is probably another alternative


Michael Bernet
*****************************
seeking:

Bernet: >from Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nürnberg, Hirschaid, (Bavaria)
Königshöfer: >from Welbhausen, Königshofen, Fürth (S. Germany)
Altmann: >from Kattowitz, Breslau, Poznan (Posen), Beuthen
(Bytom)--Upper Silesia/Poland
Wolf(f): >from Fürth, Nurnberg, Augsburg, Frankfurt (S Germany),
Rotterdam

Wolf, Sali (Salomon?) of Rotterdam, murdered by Dr. Petiot in Paris ca 1942
Weil(l), Albert, French hon. consul in Nurnberg, Germany; returned to
France 1936/7. Daughters Alice & Yvonne, b ca 1920), his mother was a Bernet
Bernet, Albert, b. 1896/7, soldier in German Army (>from Nurnberg), killed
near Lille, 1915


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: TABAK TABACK #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 98-08-04 16:53:00 EDT, nister@cygnus.uwa.edu.au writes:

<< I am interested in hearing >from those with the subject surname and more
importantly what their names may have been changed from. I search for the
name TABACHOVITZ. >>

They were all probably tobacco merchants. My wife's British family had a
Tomback relative. Tabachnik is probably another alternative


Michael Bernet
*****************************
seeking:

Bernet: >from Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nürnberg, Hirschaid, (Bavaria)
Königshöfer: >from Welbhausen, Königshofen, Fürth (S. Germany)
Altmann: >from Kattowitz, Breslau, Poznan (Posen), Beuthen
(Bytom)--Upper Silesia/Poland
Wolf(f): >from Fürth, Nurnberg, Augsburg, Frankfurt (S Germany),
Rotterdam

Wolf, Sali (Salomon?) of Rotterdam, murdered by Dr. Petiot in Paris ca 1942
Weil(l), Albert, French hon. consul in Nurnberg, Germany; returned to
France 1936/7. Daughters Alice & Yvonne, b ca 1920), his mother was a Bernet
Bernet, Albert, b. 1896/7, soldier in German Army (>from Nurnberg), killed
near Lille, 1915


no messages yesterday #hungary

Dennis Baer <dbaer@...>
 

Hello

I have not seen any HSIG messages for the last day. Did I lose my
subscription? If I did please reinstate it.

Thank you.

Dennis Baer


on Bibliographies in general #hungary

Carol Skydell <skydell@...>
 

It's really exciting to see the sharing of information as folks post book
titles that can be of help to researchers in specific areas. In addition
to posting in your own SIG digests, it would be most helpful to all
JewishGenners if you also added the names of books and a brief descriptor
about their contents to the JewishGen Interactive Publications Database.

from our homepage http://www.jewishgen.org, scroll down to SHARE/CONTRIBUTE
- Participatory Projects and Activities and click on Publications.

Thanks for your cooperation
Carol Skydell
JewishGen Support Team


Jewish communities in Hungary no.5. #hungary

Ujlaki Gyorgy <ujlaki.gyorgy@...>
 

Hello everybody! :-)

Works on individual Jewish communities are often full of genealogical
data. I have been compiling a bibliography of works on this topic. This
bibliography is far >from completed, yet it might be of help to researchers of
families >from those communities.

In the third installment, I am sending works that cover individual communities >from
countries which used to be part of historical Hungary >from E to Gy.

E

Eger, Erlau
Arthur Ehrenfeld Egri zsidsk. Jerusalem, 1975

Eperjes, Presov
M. Atlas Geschichte der J|dische Gemeinede von Presov. In:Zeitschrift f|r die
Geschichte der Juden.. IV. 1967.

Esztergom
Ortutay Andras Az esztergomi-szenttamasi zsidssag tvrtinete a bazilika
ipmtise idejin. In: Egyhazak a valtozs vilagban. Esztergom, 1991
Ortutay Andras Az esztergomi is Esztergom varmegyei zsidssag tvrtinete a
kezdetektul...Limes 1991.1. 1991

Etyek
Erdus Ferenc Kereskedu csaladok Etyeken a XIX. szazad masodik feliben.
In: Zsidsk Fejir megyiben... Szikesfehirvar, 1989

F

Fehirgyarmat -Gyarmat
J.Blasz Ayavateynu lesheavar Fehergyarmat Bnei Brak, 1965

Fvldes
Karacs Zsigmond Keresztinyek is zsidsk Fvldesen. In: MIOK Ivkvnyv.
1985-1991. Budapest, 1991

GY

Gyur, Raab
A gyuri martmrok emlikezetire kiadot f|zet Haifa, i.n.
Doman Istvan A gyuri izraelita hitkvzsig tvrtinete. Budapest, 1979
Benjamin Frishman Emlikalbum a gyuri zsidskrsl. 1989
Chana Spiegel Lezecher kedoshei Gyur
Keminy Jszsef Vazlatok a gyuri zsidssag tvrtinetibul. Gyur1930.
Gyulafehirvar-Alba Julia
Matthias (Matyas) Eisler Das Gemeindebuch von Alba Julia. In: Sinai, I
Bucuresti, 1928
Matthias (Matyas) Eisler Aus dem Gemeindleben der Juden in Alba Julia im
XVIII Jahrhundert. In: Sinai, II Bucuresti, 1929
Matthias (Matyas) Eisler Aus dem Privatleben der Juden von Siebenb|rgen
im XVIII Jahrhundert. In: Sinai, III Bucuresti, 1931


--
Ujlaki.Gyorgy@drotposta.hu
Researching: Wurm, Hollander, Konigstein, Fein, Pollak, Reich, Barany, Cucak,
Drach, Purjesz, Porges/z, Porjes/z, Bischitz, Goldschmied, Iritz


Hello??? Anyone there?? #hungary

Margarita <uzidog@...>
 

I'm not getting any messages since Friday, July 31.

Is there a problem or is it me?
Please answer to my e-mail because I think I won't even see this message.
Thank you

Margarita Lacks
Belgrano
uzidog@post1.com


[Fwd: jewish genealogical research] #hungary

Family Tree <familyt@...>
 

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from THE HUNROOT'S ARCHIVES
--
George Eotvos

____________________________________________________________________

Hungarian Roots List - URL:http://www.familytree.hu
If you like to subscribe to the list send an e-mail to
majordomo@euroweb.hu.
In the first line write subscribe HUNROOTS.
Thank you !

==============================================================


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This is the second lecture of FAMILY TREE given at the Mannheim
Conference


Ladies and Gentlemen,

Our bureau has been dealing - among others - with the history of the
Jewish families who lived in the territory of the Austro-Hungarian
Monarchy and within this, primarily in the territory of the former
historical Hungary.

This paper - naturally without aiming to be complete - is concerned with

the main problems of the research of the Jewish families who lived in
the countries which came into existence in the territory of present-day
and "historical" Hungary.

The presence of the Jews in the Carpathian basin can be traced back
till the Roman Era, and according to many - even though the continuity
cannot be proven - they were again in the region at the time when the
Hungarians settled down 1100 years ago. In this case their
co-habitation with the Hungarians is more than 1000 years old. However,
our present paper does not intend to deal with this 1100 year
co-habitation, but with a much shorter period, the last 300 years. The
presentation is concerned with those documents which originated during
the co-habitation and the existence or non-existence of which determines

the possibility of a Jewish family history work. That is the reason why
we concentrate only on the last 300 years, as the main part of the
documents originated >from that period. The last 20 years of the 17th
century were decisive not only for the Hungarians but for those Jews as
well, who lived in the Carpathian basin. In 1686 the unified Christian
forces recaptured Buda castle >from the Turks, and with this event
Hungary=92s liberation >from the 150 year long Turkish rule had started.
The Christian forces which liberated Buda indiscriminately killed or
captured all of the residents and defenders of the Castle, among them
many Jews. The news of this event spread quickly, terrifying the Jewish
population of the occupied territories. Though the Turks treated the
Jews mercilessly as well, especially if they were late with the taxes,
they did not cause the Jews any harm because of their religion. Due to
the worthening news many of the Jews decided to leave Hungary with the
withdrawing Turkish army and tried to start a new life in the Balkan
peninsula. Because of this the Jewish population of Hungary decreased
heavily by the early 18th century. Major Jewish communities remained
only on the one hand, in the north-west territory of Hungary, which was
never occupied by the Turks and where their existence was guaranteed by
the largest landowners, and on the other hand at the other end of the
country, in the Temes county.
After the expulsion of the Turks, Hungary was in ruins. Its economy was
destroyed, its population was just a little bit larger than at the
beginning of the 16th century. There was neither a sufficient work
force, nor funds for the reconstruction. Then the new lords of the
country, the Habsburgs, sent their recruitment agents across Europe who
offered different favours in order to draw settlers into the country.
And they were successful. Settlers came >from almost everywhere in
Western Europe, >from Switzerland, Belgium, France and even >from the
territory of present day Italy. However, there were uninvited guests as

well. The situation of the Jews in Poland had been continuously
declining since the Hmelnyickij - Cossack rebellion of 1648. Pogrom was
followed by pogrom, demanding thousands of lives. In the Austrian
provinces and in Czech- Moravian country, though not threatened by
pogroms, Jews lived in the shadow of expulsion and were fettered by
various restricting orders. One of the most flagrant examples is the
orders of Charles III. >from 1723, which prohibits all others outside the

family's first born son to marry and settle down in the territory of
Moravia. Considering all of these facts, it is no wonder that the Jewish

immigration >from Poland and the Czech-Moravian provinces continuously
increased during the following decades. The north-west part of the
country was the favoured territory of the Austrian, the Czech-Moravian
and the Bavarian Jews, while the north-east part of those who arrived
from Galicia and Bukovina. The main direction of their migration is
north-south and happened mainly along the big rivers (Danube, Tisza).
The Jewish settlers, similar to their Christian fellows, brought with
themselves their traditions and customs. They did not have family names,

did not keep registers, and the disputes that occurred among them were
settled in front of their own Rabbinical court instead of the secular
one. But as we know very well, development is against tradition. After
Maria Theresa's death his son, Joseph II. became the King of Hungary in
1780. He had great and ambitious plans. He would have liked to adjust
the empire to the European development. He wanted a modern state, with a

developed, bureaucratic -in the good sense of the word- state system.
However, for this he would have needed to know the peoples of his
empire. He would have needed to know the numbers of the population of
his empire, what they do, what conditions they live in, etc. And the
Jews cannot be exceptions - the Jews, who did not even have surnames,
and nobody knew their exact number, because the Jewish census of 1767
was not complete and they still did not keep registers. In such
conditions you could not collect taxes normally, and could not recruit
an army. An overall change was needed. >from tomorrow on, everyone who
previously did not have one, should have a family name. In 1787 Joseph
II obliged the Hungarian Jews to take on a German sounding family names
and to use them all the time. He ordered them to keep registers, but
resistance was strong. More than sixty years had to pass before the
absolutist authority which came to be after the defeated Hungarian war
of independence of 1848/49 could force the Hungarian Jews to begin
registration. However we should mention that there were communities
where registers had been kept since the 20s-30s of the 19th century, but

this was not at all common.

Unfortunately the registration of the Jews did not take long in Hungary.

Since 1st October 1895 the state registration had been administered in
Hungary, and the denomination registration was no longer mandatory.
Beside the most populated communities (Budapest, Pozsony) there was no
Jewish registration at all, or just occasionally and in a chaotic way.
In some parts of the country the language of the registers was Hungarian

almost all of the time, while in other parts it was German, and in some
parts a mixed German-Hungarian language was used. Registrations in
Hebrew were very rare.
Thus the two basic conditions for the research of Jewish family history
were born: the family name in 1787 and the registration in 1851. However

both of them mean a strict time limit for the researcher.

Without registration it is very difficult to bind the strings between
1787 and 1851. In this case another important source of research, the
Jewish census, could be of great help for us. It can be a national or a
regional one. Two censuses of the Hungarian Jews are worth mentioning,
the census made in 1767 and in 1848. Both were national an both remained

uncompleted. The first one provides us with mainly statistical and
economical data on the people in the censuses, and since there is not
yet a mandatory family name, it is almost impossible to identify each
persons. We can ask with reason why there is no Jewish census >from 1787.

Surprisingly one was made, however there is only one county (Tolna)
from which the material survived. In this Tolna county material it is
listed which persons had which names before 1787 and chose which family
names after this. It is really a pity that the other country censuses
did not survive. The Jewish census of 1848 provides us with more
historical data. Whole families are listed according to settlements,
with age, birthplace and occupation indications. But the great defect of

the material is that there is a lot of material missing >from those
counties which had many Jewish inhabitance .

The main locality for both the registers and the censuses are the
archives. As you may very well know, historical Hungary no longer
existed after the Trianon Treaty which closed World War I. Many new
states came to be within its territory, and due to this fact the
documents concerning the Jews who lived in historical Hungary can be
found at present in the archives of different countries.

- In Hungary the greater part of the documents can be found on microfilm

in the National Archives. They can be researched without limitation,
copies can be made openly. The smaller part of the material can be found

either in the regional (county archives, or in the specified archives:
Jewish Archives, Statistical Archives). A very small part of them are in

the still operating Jewish communities, where official certificate
copies can be obtained, if necessary. For the exact location of the
Jewish material the excellent two volume Hungarian Jewish Archival
Repertoire is a great help for the researcher.

- The Jewish registers in Slovakia can be found in the regional
archives, they are open to research, but in most places it is not
possible to make photocopies. There is a usage fee for each volume of
the registers.

- Fortunately, we do not have to travel to Austria in order to research
the Hungarian Jewish registers that can be found there, because their
microfilm copies can be researched in the Hungarian National Archives.

- In the Ukraine the location of the Jewish certificates concerning the
Sub-Carpathian territory has not yet been clarified. There is no list
of the registers, still emerging, their exact location spreads from
father to son.

- The situation is a little bit better in Romania, however as a foreign
citizen you have to obtain all sorts of permissions, and making
photocopies is very circumstantial. Unfortunately, there are no good
list at all.

We were talking about temporal and spatial limits which make research
more difficult. However, there is an objective impediment existing as
well, which in certain cases makes the successful completion of
research impossible. And that is the complete absence of the registers.
The frequent border changes and the huge devastation of World War II.
destroyed the complete document material of several Communities, and
many times even the register copies which were kept in the Archives were

destroyed as well. The situation in those cases is nearly hopeless since

there is nothing to work with, the primary sources are missing. In such
cases the other documents, at other times regarded as secondary and
tercially sources, are the main work source for us. Which are these?

- The national census documents. Since 1780 there were yearly censuses
in the territory of Hungary, and its documentation is kept in the
regional archives.

-The local and national electoral name lists. They contain more or less
data depending on the years they are from. They are not really useful
for finding out the family connections, but they contain much precious
information concerning specific people.

-Obituaries. This does not require much commentary, those who have
already seen an obituary >from the previous century may know very well,
what a great help it is for the researcher. In Hungary there are many
places where such collections can be found, but the greatest one is the
more than 800,000 piece collection of the National Sz=E9ch=E9nyi Library =
in
Budapest.

-Cemetery registers. Unfortunately, only the biggest Jewish cemeteries
have such a database >from earlier times. The quality of the information
found in them varies. Sometimes only the exact grave location of the
deceased is given, but in some cases the exact birth and death data can
be found as well.

- The demographical mobility statistics of the regional periodicals. In
Hungary since the 60s-70s of the past century more and more settlements

weekly or biweekly publish the list of those who were born, contracted
a marriage and died in the settlement. This lists in some cases contains

only names, but sometimes we can find the age, the religion and the
occupation indications as well. Their significance intensifies when the
certificates of a given settlement were destroyed.

- Community monographs and memory books. After the Holocaust everywhere
in the world, where Hungarian Jewish refugees lived some kind of book
series was publishing about the Jewish settlements of their region.
These monographs and memorial volumes nearly all of the cases contain a
deportation list and in some cases the new residence of the survivors.

- Civil registers. These can be researched keeping in mind certain
statutory rights and time limitations.

Considering all of these things, a history of a Jewish family who lived
in the territory of historical Hungary can be researched by our bureau
within two-four months according the demand of the client.


George Eotvos
Partner & Research Director

FAMILY TREE Ltd. Genealogical Research Bureau - HUNGARY
Member of the National Genealogical Society (USA)
Phone: (36 1) 331 3569 / Fax: (36 1) 302 7388
mailto:familyt@hungary.net
http://www.familytree.hu

COME AND VISIT US AT THE 1998 NGS CONFERENCE IN DENVER, CO, 6-9 MAY.
YOU ARE WELCOME AT OUR BOOTH NO. 533.
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=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
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=3D




--------------B040F469ABA9E4407803B70D--


Jewish communities in Hungary no.6. #hungary

Ujlaki Gyorgy <ujlaki.gyorgy@...>
 

In the sixth installment, I am sending works that cover individual commun=
ities from=20
countries which used to be part of historical Hungary >from H to K.

H

Hajd=FAb=F6sz=F6rm=E9ny
Kardos P=E1l Adal=E9kok a hajd=FAb=F6sz=F6rm=E9nyi zsid=F3s=E1g t=F6rt=E9=
net=E9hez.=09
Hajd=FAb=F6sz=F6rm=E9ny, 1949

Hajd=FAn=E1n=E1s
Mose Elijahu Gonda A debreceni zsid=F3k sz=E1z =E9ve. Tel Aviv, 1970

Hajd=FAs=E1mson
Mose Elijahu Gonda A debreceni zsid=F3k sz=E1z =E9ve. Tel Aviv, 1970

Halmi
Yehuda Schwartz Zikhron netsah lekehilot hakedoshot Halmin-Turcz vehasevi=
va=20
asher nehrevu beshoa. Tel Aviv, 1968

H=E9th=E1rs-Lipjany
Grosswirth Jen=F5 A h=E9th=E1rs-lipjanyi zsid=F3s=E1g t=F6rt=E9nete. Jeru=
zs=E1lem, 1980

H=F3dmez=F5v=E1s=E1rhely
Dr. Silberstein Adolf H=F3dmez=F5v=E1s=E1rhelyi zsid=F3k. H=F3dmez=F5v=E1=
s=E1rhely,=20
1943
Mak=F3 Imre-Katona Lajos A m=E1sodik vil=E1ghabor=FA =E9s a fasizmus=20
h=F3dmez=F5v=E1s=E1rhelyi =E1ldozatai. H=F3dmez=F5v=E1s=E1rhely, 1991
Kov=E1cs Istv=E1n, et al, ed. A h=F3dmez=F5v=E1s=E1rhelyi zsid=F3s=E1g 17=
40-1993.=09
H=F3dmez=F5v=E1s=E1rhely, 1993

Homonna-Humenne
David Friedmann Geschichte der Juden in Humenne.=09

Hunfalva-Hunsdorf-Hunkovce
Guttmann J=F3zsef Hunfalva-Hunsdorf. A mester =E9s tan=EDtv=E1nya. 1981
=09
I

Ikl=F3d
Michael Bar-On Szamos=FAjv=E1r, Ikl=F3d =E9s k=F6rny=E9ke Tel Aviv, 1971

Illava-Ilava
J.Nathan Kacer 300 Jahre Chewra-Kadischa Ilava 5389-5689. Ilava,1929

Ipolys=E1g-Sahy
A. Asher, J.Gidron Ner tamid lezecher yehudut Ipolysag vehaseviva. 1994
=09
J

J=E1nosh=E1za-Jankov=E1c
Blasz Jen=F5 J=E1nosh=E1z=E1n f=FCty=FClt a zsid=F3.=09
=09
K

Kaposv=E1r
Hars=E1nyi L=E1szl=F3 A kaposv=E1ri zsid=F3k m=FAltj=E1nak kezdetei. In: =
MIOK =C9vk=F6nyv=20
1977-78. Budapest, 1978

Karcag
Laha Prinster A karcagi zsid=F3k t=F6rt=E9nete. Tel Aviv, 1977
Hersk=F3 M=F3zes Toldot kehilat Karcag vekehilot mehoz Nagykuns=E1g.=09
Jerusalem, 1977

Kassa-Kassau-Kosice
G=F6r=F6g Art=FAr A kassai zsid=F3s=E1g gal=E9ri=E1ja. 1991
Yehuda Schlanger Divrei yemei kehilat Kosice. Bnei Brak, 1993
E. Enten Zur Geschichte der Juden in Kosice. In: Zeitschrift f=FCr die Ge=
schichte=20
der Juden in Tschechoslovakei. II. 1931/32. 280.=09

Kaszony
Joseph Eden (Einczig) The Jews of Kaszony, Subcarpatia. New York,=20
1988

Kecskem=E9t
Hornyik J=E1nos A kecskem=E9ti zsid=F3k t=F6rt=E9nete. (B=E1cs-Kiskun Meg=
yei Lev=E9lt=E1ri=20
F=FCzetek 2.) Gyula, 1988

Kesm=E1rk-Kezamarok
Shmuel Dov Gottesmann Toldot yehudei Kezamarok vehaseviva.=09

Kir=E1lyhelmec-Kralovsky Chlmec
Aaron Ehrman Kir=E1lyhelmec-Kralovsky Chlmec and the Bodrog District.=09
1997

Kisk=F5r=F6s
Akiva Klein Zsid=F3 m=FAlt Kisk=F5r=F6s=F6n. 1994

Kismarton-Eisenstadt
Shmuel Hakohen Weingarten Arim veimahot beyisrael vol.1: Munk=E1cs, Kisma=
rton=09
Jerusalem, 1947
B. Wachstein Urkunden und akten zur Geschichte der Juden in Eisenstadt=20
und den Siebengemeinde. Wien-Leipzig, 1926
Josef Klampfer Das Eisenstadter Ghetto. Eisenstadt, 1965
Johannes Reiss Zichronam livracha - Zum Segen seit ihn Andenken -=20
Eisenstadt 1994

Kisv=E1rda-Kleinvardein
Dr. J=F3lesz K=E1roly Eml=E9kk=F6nyv Kisv=E1rda =E9s k=F6rny=E9ke...Sefer=
yizkor lekehilat=20
Kleinvardein vehaseviva. TelAviv, 1980

Kolozsv=E1r-Cluj-Cluj-Napoca-Klausenburg
Sh. Zimroni, Y.Schwartz Zikkaron netsah hakehila hakedosha=20
Kolozsv=E1r-Klausenburg asher nehreva beshoa Tel Aviv, 1968
Moses Carmilly-Weinberger A Kolozsv=E1ri zsid=F3s=E1g eml=E9kk=F6nyve New=
York,=20
1970
Moses Carmilly-Weinberger A Kolozsv=E1ri zsid=F3s=E1g eml=E9kk=F6nyve New=
York,=20
1988
Benamy S=E1ndor K=E9t varosr=F3l. 2. Eml=E9kez=E9s a r=E9gi Kolozsv=E1rra=
. In: MIOK=20
=C9vk=F6nyv. 1983-84. Budapest, 1984
Kony=E1r
Mose Elijahu Gonda A debreceni zsid=F3k sz=E1z =E9ve. Tel Aviv, 1970

K=F5r=F6smez=F5-Yassinah
Pinchas Bressler Iyrotei Yassinah. 1988

K=F5szeg
Hars=E1nyi L=E1szl=F3 K=F5szegi zsid=F3k. Budapest1974

Kir=E1lydar=F3c
Mose Jehuda Lajos Herschkovits Eml=E9kez=E9s helyett. A kir=E1lydar=F3ci=20
hitk=F6zs=E9g, amely m=E1r nincs. Kiryat Bialik=E9.n.

Kurima
Baruch Shanan (Friedman) Yizkor yehudey Kurima vehaseviva. 1989

--
Ujlaki.Gyorgy@drotposta.hu
Budapest, Hungary
Researching: Wurm, Hollander, Konigstein, Fein, Pollak, Reich, Barany, C=
ucak,
Drach, Purjesz, Porges/z, Porjes/z, Bischitz, Goldschmied, Iritz


Jewish communities in Hungary no.4. #hungary

Ujlaki Gyorgy <ujlaki.gyorgy@...>
 

What new can I write?

Works on individual Jewish communities are often full of genealogical
data. I have been compiling a bibliography of works on this topic. This
bibliography is far >from completed, yet it might be of help to researchers of
families >from those communities.

In the third installment, I am sending works that cover individual communities >from
countries which used to be part of historical Hungary >from C to D.

C, CS

Csaktornya-Cakovec
Moshe Etz-Hayyim (Tibor Gr|nwald) Megilat hashoa shel kehilat kodesh
Cakovec. Tel Aviv, 1977

Csenger
Shlomo Friedmann Sefer yizkor lekedoshei Csenger, Porcsalma vehaseviva.
Tel Aviv, 1966

D

Debrecen
Szabs Istvan A zsidsk letelepedise Debrecenben 1840-1867. Kizirat
Dr. Weisz Miksa A debreceni izraelita hitkvzsig templomainak is rabbijainak
tvrtinete. (kizirat) 1943
Dr. Kardos Albert A debreceni zsids hitkvzseg. In: Magyar Zsids Szemle 1886
1886
Zoltai Lajos A zsidsk letelepedise Debrecenben. In: Magyar Zsids Szemle
1934.
Sss Endre A zsidsk ztja a kalvinista Rsmaban. 1943
Sss Endre A zsidsk ztja a kalvinista Rsmaban. In: Magyar Zsids Szemle
1946 (Guttmann M. emlikkvnyv) 1946
Dr. Vighazi Istvan Adalikok a debreceni zsidsk tvrtinetihez. 1967
Mose Elijahu Gonda A debreceni zsidsk szaz ive. Tel Aviv, 1970

Derecske
Arje Moskovits Derecske is vidike zsidssaga Tel Aviv, 1984

Dis
Singer Zoltan Volt egyszer egy Dis...Bethlen, Magyarlapos, Retteg,
Nagyilonda is kvrnyike. 2 vol. Tel Aviv ,i.n.,, (1970)
Yitzchak Greshoni Tapuach - kovetz shemot upratim metoldot kehilat Des.
1994

Dolha
Kedishei Sheva Kehilot (Dolha, Zadne, Kosnica...) 1993

Dunaszerdahely, Dunajska Streda
Alfred (Abraham) Engel A dunaszerdahelyi hitkvzsig emlikvnyve.
Tel Aviv, 1975
Engel Alfrid A dunaszerdahelyi hitkvzsig emlikvnyve. (Nevek nilk|l)
Pozsony, 1995
--
Ujlaki.Gyorgy@drotposta.hu
Researching: Wurm, Hollander, Konigstein, Fein, Pollak, Reich, Barany, Cucak,
Drach, Purjesz, Porges/z, Porjes/z, Bischitz, Goldschmied, Iritz


Hungary SIG #Hungary no messages yesterday #hungary

Dennis Baer <dbaer@...>
 

Hello

I have not seen any HSIG messages for the last day. Did I lose my
subscription? If I did please reinstate it.

Thank you.

Dennis Baer