Date   

Re: accents and diacritical marks and funny stuff in the mail #hungary

Rakoff125
 

some ideas to share:

For writing
Other than taking the easy way out of doing [vowel' ] to indicate an accent=20
there are two other ways to do this.
In word perfect there is an option under insert for multinational symbols,=20
you can get the letter you need there....
or cut and paste--Copy the word or letter off a page on line and paste as=20
needed.

For reading
I keep the following chart taped to the monitor to help me read:
=3DE9 =3D e
=3DE4 =3D a
=3DE1 =3D a
=3DFA =3D u
=3DC1 =3D a
=3DF6 =3D o
=3DF3 =3D o
=3D46 =3D F

I also have a list based on decoding letter symbols but it wouldn't transmit=20
in email I think. here goes: only 2 came through
code=09=09=09=09=09=09=09=09=09=09
=09=09=09=09=09
=F7 =3D o=09=09=09=09=09=09=09=09=09=09
=09
=DF =3D a=09=09=09=09=09=09

I hope this helps.
Linda Rakoff, Newton, MA


mod.- Any further information about umlauts and diacrytical marks should be addressed privately. LS

Searching: ASCHNER- Hradiste, Bresova, Kosice, SpisskaNova Ves (aka Iglo,=20
Yglo,Wien;
LOW'Y-Hradiste, Spisska Nova Ves; GELBERG/LIPSHITZ-Galati; GOLDMAN(N), =20
LANGER -Kosice, Spisska Nova Ves, Bolyar; POLATSECK-Kosice; KOOPER,=20
LISSAUER-Losonc, Miskolz; KOHN, STINGL: Wien, Bratislava RAKOFF-Kelce,=20
Russia GORDON-Vilna; MELTZER, RIESENBERG, PERLBINDER, DRANSCH, LICHTENTAL=
,=20
LADENHEIM-- Horodenka, Galicia; BRETTSCHNEIDER, Galicia; BAUER,=20
Hedwig-Wien BUCHWALD- Wien, Budapest


Hungary SIG #Hungary re: accents and diacritical marks and funny stuff in the mail #hungary

Rakoff125
 

some ideas to share:

For writing
Other than taking the easy way out of doing [vowel' ] to indicate an accent=20
there are two other ways to do this.
In word perfect there is an option under insert for multinational symbols,=20
you can get the letter you need there....
or cut and paste--Copy the word or letter off a page on line and paste as=20
needed.

For reading
I keep the following chart taped to the monitor to help me read:
=3DE9 =3D e
=3DE4 =3D a
=3DE1 =3D a
=3DFA =3D u
=3DC1 =3D a
=3DF6 =3D o
=3DF3 =3D o
=3D46 =3D F

I also have a list based on decoding letter symbols but it wouldn't transmit=20
in email I think. here goes: only 2 came through
code=09=09=09=09=09=09=09=09=09=09
=09=09=09=09=09
=F7 =3D o=09=09=09=09=09=09=09=09=09=09
=09
=DF =3D a=09=09=09=09=09=09

I hope this helps.
Linda Rakoff, Newton, MA


mod.- Any further information about umlauts and diacrytical marks should be addressed privately. LS

Searching: ASCHNER- Hradiste, Bresova, Kosice, SpisskaNova Ves (aka Iglo,=20
Yglo,Wien;
LOW'Y-Hradiste, Spisska Nova Ves; GELBERG/LIPSHITZ-Galati; GOLDMAN(N), =20
LANGER -Kosice, Spisska Nova Ves, Bolyar; POLATSECK-Kosice; KOOPER,=20
LISSAUER-Losonc, Miskolz; KOHN, STINGL: Wien, Bratislava RAKOFF-Kelce,=20
Russia GORDON-Vilna; MELTZER, RIESENBERG, PERLBINDER, DRANSCH, LICHTENTAL=
,=20
LADENHEIM-- Horodenka, Galicia; BRETTSCHNEIDER, Galicia; BAUER,=20
Hedwig-Wien BUCHWALD- Wien, Budapest


* Accents and umlauts continued (a bit long) #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Hello friends,

The handling of accents in computers is VERY tricky. The first reason is
that English has no accents and computers were invented by the Americans
who initially made no provisions for such characters. Also, the first
computers run very short of memory because memory cost was *very* high. To
spare on memory, the so called 7 bits ASCII code was invented which
basically contained the upper and lover case alphabet, the numerals and the
most common signs such as + - . ; ( etc. The advantage was that it
economized 1 bit of memory in each byte (which is equal to 8 bits).

Later the computer geniuses discovered that there was a world outside the
US and decided to introduce the so called 8 bits ASCII code. It did contain
some of the accented characters but NOT ALL of them 9for instance, most of
the upper case accented characters are missing). Those who used DOS must
recall that to obtain an accented character one had to punch the 'Alt' key
with a combination of 3 or 4 numerals.

The above scheme worked well for a while but then the graphical interfaces
(Windows and the VGA graphic board) and laser printers created a new
problem with rendering characters. Now the characters had to be represented
by small dots, no more by the ASCII code which was good only for the so
called alphanumeric devices (such as were the old DOS machines). This
created the need for the so called "digital fonts", which are files
describing the form of each character when rendered by tiny dots.

The graphical interface was an improvement over the previous, allowing to
represent a larger number of accented characters. The Macintosh permits to
represent almost ALL accented characters, upper and lower cases and all
that jazz. The PC platform was stuck with its obsolete DOS base, thus it
implemented a modified 8 bits ASCII code, called ANSI. ANSI is similar to
the Macintosh code but not the same, which results in incompatable
character sets. And as the Unix machines became the standard for Internet
server, which of course handle characters rendering differently too, the
confusion was complete - no compatibility at all in a world which is
supposed to handle platforms transparently (meaning that the user should
not be concerned about what kind of operating systems the zillion computers
hooked to the Internet are using).

E-mail transmission, which is still basically alphanumeric, required a
special standard for transmitting messages. This is the raison d'etre of
the MIME protocol and encoding. Believe it or not, the guys who invented it
committed the same mistake inventing a 7 bits MIME code. The 8 bit MIME
code does exists but many of the email servers do not implement it.

This is why in email headers one receives the message:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Contrary to common belief, it is NOT enough to configure ones email program
to work with 8 bits transmission and receiving, the email servers (that
which sent the message and the one which received it) must TALK that same
"language", i.e. 8 bits MIME. Notice that the header above says
Conten-TRANSFER-Encoding, meaning that the server SENT a 7 bits message.

Finally, in answer to Margarita's question, there is NO way to represent
the long umlaut (the character she calls the 'double acute accent') UNLESS
one uses a special set of digital fonts which contain such beasts. This is
one reason why Netscape allows for the configuration of different character
sets.

my 3 centavos today ;)
Tom

---------

It is funny to observe that the message sent by <snip> came
garbled through. The reason of course is that he may have done everything
correctly but it is likely that either the JewishGen email server or his
provider's server is not configured for 8 bits transmission.


>| Subject: Subject: Accents and umlauts
>| From: <snip> <jxxxxx@sifry.com>
>|
>| You may be getting all these formatting glitches when you paste text
>| >from documents created off the 'net with word processing software. I
>| work off the Macintosh platform and to accent vowels, I hold down the
>| "option" and "e" keys then type the vowel: =E1, =F3 =E9tc.
>| For umlauts hold down the "option" and "u" keys then type the vowel: =E4,
>| =F6, =EBtc.

This is <snip> message:

>| Subject: RE: Accents and umlauts
>| From: <uxxxxx@post1.com>
>|
>| In my last e-mail, I made a mistake. I wrote:
>|
>| > I still did not discover how to make the vowel with the two dots.
>|
>| I meant:
>|
>| I still did not discover how to make the double acute accent on top
of the
>| vowels.
>|
>| <snip>=F3


Hungary SIG #Hungary * Accents and umlauts continued (a bit long) #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Hello friends,

The handling of accents in computers is VERY tricky. The first reason is
that English has no accents and computers were invented by the Americans
who initially made no provisions for such characters. Also, the first
computers run very short of memory because memory cost was *very* high. To
spare on memory, the so called 7 bits ASCII code was invented which
basically contained the upper and lover case alphabet, the numerals and the
most common signs such as + - . ; ( etc. The advantage was that it
economized 1 bit of memory in each byte (which is equal to 8 bits).

Later the computer geniuses discovered that there was a world outside the
US and decided to introduce the so called 8 bits ASCII code. It did contain
some of the accented characters but NOT ALL of them 9for instance, most of
the upper case accented characters are missing). Those who used DOS must
recall that to obtain an accented character one had to punch the 'Alt' key
with a combination of 3 or 4 numerals.

The above scheme worked well for a while but then the graphical interfaces
(Windows and the VGA graphic board) and laser printers created a new
problem with rendering characters. Now the characters had to be represented
by small dots, no more by the ASCII code which was good only for the so
called alphanumeric devices (such as were the old DOS machines). This
created the need for the so called "digital fonts", which are files
describing the form of each character when rendered by tiny dots.

The graphical interface was an improvement over the previous, allowing to
represent a larger number of accented characters. The Macintosh permits to
represent almost ALL accented characters, upper and lower cases and all
that jazz. The PC platform was stuck with its obsolete DOS base, thus it
implemented a modified 8 bits ASCII code, called ANSI. ANSI is similar to
the Macintosh code but not the same, which results in incompatable
character sets. And as the Unix machines became the standard for Internet
server, which of course handle characters rendering differently too, the
confusion was complete - no compatibility at all in a world which is
supposed to handle platforms transparently (meaning that the user should
not be concerned about what kind of operating systems the zillion computers
hooked to the Internet are using).

E-mail transmission, which is still basically alphanumeric, required a
special standard for transmitting messages. This is the raison d'etre of
the MIME protocol and encoding. Believe it or not, the guys who invented it
committed the same mistake inventing a 7 bits MIME code. The 8 bit MIME
code does exists but many of the email servers do not implement it.

This is why in email headers one receives the message:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Contrary to common belief, it is NOT enough to configure ones email program
to work with 8 bits transmission and receiving, the email servers (that
which sent the message and the one which received it) must TALK that same
"language", i.e. 8 bits MIME. Notice that the header above says
Conten-TRANSFER-Encoding, meaning that the server SENT a 7 bits message.

Finally, in answer to Margarita's question, there is NO way to represent
the long umlaut (the character she calls the 'double acute accent') UNLESS
one uses a special set of digital fonts which contain such beasts. This is
one reason why Netscape allows for the configuration of different character
sets.

my 3 centavos today ;)
Tom

---------

It is funny to observe that the message sent by <snip> came
garbled through. The reason of course is that he may have done everything
correctly but it is likely that either the JewishGen email server or his
provider's server is not configured for 8 bits transmission.


>| Subject: Subject: Accents and umlauts
>| From: <snip> <jxxxxx@sifry.com>
>|
>| You may be getting all these formatting glitches when you paste text
>| >from documents created off the 'net with word processing software. I
>| work off the Macintosh platform and to accent vowels, I hold down the
>| "option" and "e" keys then type the vowel: =E1, =F3 =E9tc.
>| For umlauts hold down the "option" and "u" keys then type the vowel: =E4,
>| =F6, =EBtc.

This is <snip> message:

>| Subject: RE: Accents and umlauts
>| From: <uxxxxx@post1.com>
>|
>| In my last e-mail, I made a mistake. I wrote:
>|
>| > I still did not discover how to make the vowel with the two dots.
>|
>| I meant:
>|
>| I still did not discover how to make the double acute accent on top
of the
>| vowels.
>|
>| <snip>=F3


Re: Barcika #hungary

SAA444@...
 

I recently wrote asking if anyone knew where Barcika was located. Our
Neubauer side of the family came >from this little farming town.

I have found out that Barcika is now called Kazincbarcika. It is a small
town in the north eastern part of Hungary in a region called
Borsod-Abauj-Zemplen. The capital of this region is Miskoic. Kazincbarcika
is situated about 20 miles away >from Miskoic. Before the World War II there
were four small villages where Kazincbarcika is now located. They were
Sajokazinc, Herbolya, Berente and Barcika. After the Russian invasion the
communists found these villages were strategically important and founded
Kazincbarcika, which lost its former character and became the "ideal
communist town." The farms disappeared and huge housing estates were built.

Unfortunately Kazincbarcika doesn't have a web site, although, a city hall
web site is under construction. There is a regional site at www.miskolc.hu

Sheila Adler
Cleveland, Ohio


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re:Barcika #hungary

SAA444@...
 

I recently wrote asking if anyone knew where Barcika was located. Our
Neubauer side of the family came >from this little farming town.

I have found out that Barcika is now called Kazincbarcika. It is a small
town in the north eastern part of Hungary in a region called
Borsod-Abauj-Zemplen. The capital of this region is Miskoic. Kazincbarcika
is situated about 20 miles away >from Miskoic. Before the World War II there
were four small villages where Kazincbarcika is now located. They were
Sajokazinc, Herbolya, Berente and Barcika. After the Russian invasion the
communists found these villages were strategically important and founded
Kazincbarcika, which lost its former character and became the "ideal
communist town." The farms disappeared and huge housing estates were built.

Unfortunately Kazincbarcika doesn't have a web site, although, a city hall
web site is under construction. There is a regional site at www.miskolc.hu

Sheila Adler
Cleveland, Ohio


Hungarian - Transylvanian geneology in Israel #hungary

Jklinghoff@...
 

Hi all:
I am about to leave on Tuesday for Israel. I plan to spend a few weeks
researching my ancestry. Most of my time will be spent in Haifa. I know
about Beit Hatfuzot and Yad Vashem. Anywhere else I should go? I speak both
Hebre and Hungarian.
HELP

Judith


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian - Transylvanian geneology in Israel #hungary

Jklinghoff@...
 

Hi all:
I am about to leave on Tuesday for Israel. I plan to spend a few weeks
researching my ancestry. Most of my time will be spent in Haifa. I know
about Beit Hatfuzot and Yad Vashem. Anywhere else I should go? I speak both
Hebre and Hungarian.
HELP

Judith


Re: Sheva Kehilot #hungary

Tomer Brunner <tomerbr@...>
 

In addition to Rabbi A marmorstein's answer (July 15) about
the "SHEVA KEHILOT"-

The 7 communities were under the rule of the aristocrat
ESTERHAZI (spelling might be incorrect) family.
This family was one of the most privileged in the empire.
The most known member was Paul Esterhazi (died 1715).

Rabbi Marmorstein wrote:

"I believe they were Eisenstadt, Mattersdorf, Kobersdorf,
DeutschKreutz/Tzeilem, Lakenbach, Sopron,.... forget the last one."

I think the seventh town was WIENER NEUSTADT.
The hungarian name for Eisenstadt is Kismarton and for Deutsckreutz
is Nemetkeresztur.


Tomer Brunner, ISRAEL.
tomerbr@hotmail.com

researching the following families:
Duschinsky,Reich,Marton,Squarenina,Peterzelka,Oreschan,schor
AND OTHER FAMILIES







______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com


* Supis Zidov #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear all,

Did any one found LDS films containing the Su'pis Z~idov - the census made
of Slovak Jews around 1942 and before deportation? I have the Bardejov list
but was wondering if any other places have been filmed. I was unable to
locate them.

TIA and warm regards
Tom


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Sheva Kehilot #hungary

Tomer Brunner <tomerbr@...>
 

In addition to Rabbi A marmorstein's answer (July 15) about
the "SHEVA KEHILOT"-

The 7 communities were under the rule of the aristocrat
ESTERHAZI (spelling might be incorrect) family.
This family was one of the most privileged in the empire.
The most known member was Paul Esterhazi (died 1715).

Rabbi Marmorstein wrote:

"I believe they were Eisenstadt, Mattersdorf, Kobersdorf,
DeutschKreutz/Tzeilem, Lakenbach, Sopron,.... forget the last one."

I think the seventh town was WIENER NEUSTADT.
The hungarian name for Eisenstadt is Kismarton and for Deutsckreutz
is Nemetkeresztur.


Tomer Brunner, ISRAEL.
tomerbr@hotmail.com

researching the following families:
Duschinsky,Reich,Marton,Squarenina,Peterzelka,Oreschan,schor
AND OTHER FAMILIES







______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary * Supis Zidov #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear all,

Did any one found LDS films containing the Su'pis Z~idov - the census made
of Slovak Jews around 1942 and before deportation? I have the Bardejov list
but was wondering if any other places have been filmed. I was unable to
locate them.

TIA and warm regards
Tom


Re: Austro-Hungarian SIG #hungary

Margarita Lacko <uzidog@...>
 

Dear H-siggers,

Maureen wrote, among other things:

I do think we should then rename ourselves, since no one could logicall=
y
assume that 'Hungary-SIG' includes Austria. Since 'Austro-Hungarian'
refers only to the post-1867 period, politically speaking, perhaps
'Hungary-Austria SIG' might work?
Am I the only one who assumed the "Hungarian-SIG" also included Austria? =
:-)

In the JewishGen mailing lists web page you can read:

"Hungarian Jewish Special Interest Group is for those with Jewish roots i=
n the
area known as "greater Hungary" or pre-Trianon Hungary and includes areas=
that
at one time were predominantly Hungarian speaking."

True, it says "predominantly Hungarian speaking". The key word here is
"predominantly" which means "not only", as far as I'm concerned.

In our own Web Page you can read:

"... This includes the whole of or parts of present day Slovakia, Poland,
Ukraine, Czech Republic, Hungary, Austria, Croatia, Serbia, and Romania."

So we are already covering all these countries, including Austria. So, I'=
m as
puzzled as Linda and Herb.


If the "tragedy" is to change or not to change our name, Herb writes:

To change the name to Austro-Hungarian would give the impression that
the SIG would be restricted to that topic whereas now the H-SIG include=
s
that as well as post Austro-Hungarian periods.
I agree. Also, "Hungary-Austria SIG" might limit it to just Hungary and
Austria. Would our name then have to be
"Hungary-Austria-Czech-Slovakia-Ukraine-Poland-etc."?

I just want to add that my great-grandfather LEICHT comes >from Austria, n=
o
idea which town or village. So I also would welcome more info about Austr=
ia.

Greetings,

Margarita Lack=F3
uzidog@post1.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Austro-Hungarian SIG #hungary

Margarita Lacko <uzidog@...>
 

Dear H-siggers,

Maureen wrote, among other things:

I do think we should then rename ourselves, since no one could logicall=
y
assume that 'Hungary-SIG' includes Austria. Since 'Austro-Hungarian'
refers only to the post-1867 period, politically speaking, perhaps
'Hungary-Austria SIG' might work?
Am I the only one who assumed the "Hungarian-SIG" also included Austria? =
:-)

In the JewishGen mailing lists web page you can read:

"Hungarian Jewish Special Interest Group is for those with Jewish roots i=
n the
area known as "greater Hungary" or pre-Trianon Hungary and includes areas=
that
at one time were predominantly Hungarian speaking."

True, it says "predominantly Hungarian speaking". The key word here is
"predominantly" which means "not only", as far as I'm concerned.

In our own Web Page you can read:

"... This includes the whole of or parts of present day Slovakia, Poland,
Ukraine, Czech Republic, Hungary, Austria, Croatia, Serbia, and Romania."

So we are already covering all these countries, including Austria. So, I'=
m as
puzzled as Linda and Herb.


If the "tragedy" is to change or not to change our name, Herb writes:

To change the name to Austro-Hungarian would give the impression that
the SIG would be restricted to that topic whereas now the H-SIG include=
s
that as well as post Austro-Hungarian periods.
I agree. Also, "Hungary-Austria SIG" might limit it to just Hungary and
Austria. Would our name then have to be
"Hungary-Austria-Czech-Slovakia-Ukraine-Poland-etc."?

I just want to add that my great-grandfather LEICHT comes >from Austria, n=
o
idea which town or village. So I also would welcome more info about Austr=
ia.

Greetings,

Margarita Lack=F3
uzidog@post1.com


Austria-Hungary SIG #hungary

MTB <71431.1612@...>
 

As a historian of Jewish Burgenland communities, which are just on the
border of Austria and Hungary, I have found the discussion fascinating
about enlarging our focus to include Austria. In particular, the issue o=
f
changing our name has been intriguing, and I can well understand the
objections to doing so.

I joined the Germany-SIG to see for myself how helpful it would be for
Austrian Jewish life. To date, I have found its posts about genealogy an=
d
sources to be 'a foreign land,' i.e., in no way addressing the Austrian
situation.

Therefore, I wonder if it would be possible for us to keep our title of
H-Sig, but to welcome those who have questions about Austrian-Jewish
genealogy? I suggest this for two reasons. First, many of the topics an=
d
sources we now address would be helpful to Austrian Jews, because many, i=
f
not most, came to Austria >from the various lands of Greater Hungary only
after the laws changed in 1857. In fact, since so many 'Hungarian' Jews
went to Austria, we might well profit >from this expanded focus.

Second, the original poster of the request to enter H-Sig said there are
only about 2 dozen who would be interested in joining us, so the potentia=
l
number of questions should not be too many for us to absorb.

We could invite these 'Austrians' to join us for 6 months and then evalua=
te
it. If they found the group helpful, and if their questions did not undu=
ly
dilute the H-Sig focus, they would be welcome to stay. On the other hand=
,
if they found H-Sig to be less than helpful, or if we original H-Siggers
found that our own issues and questions were suffering >from the expansion=
,
we could invite the 'Austrians' to join another group.

Maureen Tighe-Brown


Hungary SIG #Hungary Austria-Hungary SIG #hungary

MTB <71431.1612@...>
 

As a historian of Jewish Burgenland communities, which are just on the
border of Austria and Hungary, I have found the discussion fascinating
about enlarging our focus to include Austria. In particular, the issue o=
f
changing our name has been intriguing, and I can well understand the
objections to doing so.

I joined the Germany-SIG to see for myself how helpful it would be for
Austrian Jewish life. To date, I have found its posts about genealogy an=
d
sources to be 'a foreign land,' i.e., in no way addressing the Austrian
situation.

Therefore, I wonder if it would be possible for us to keep our title of
H-Sig, but to welcome those who have questions about Austrian-Jewish
genealogy? I suggest this for two reasons. First, many of the topics an=
d
sources we now address would be helpful to Austrian Jews, because many, i=
f
not most, came to Austria >from the various lands of Greater Hungary only
after the laws changed in 1857. In fact, since so many 'Hungarian' Jews
went to Austria, we might well profit >from this expanded focus.

Second, the original poster of the request to enter H-Sig said there are
only about 2 dozen who would be interested in joining us, so the potentia=
l
number of questions should not be too many for us to absorb.

We could invite these 'Austrians' to join us for 6 months and then evalua=
te
it. If they found the group helpful, and if their questions did not undu=
ly
dilute the H-Sig focus, they would be welcome to stay. On the other hand=
,
if they found H-Sig to be less than helpful, or if we original H-Siggers
found that our own issues and questions were suffering >from the expansion=
,
we could invite the 'Austrians' to join another group.

Maureen Tighe-Brown


Jews Currently in China! #lithuania

DBH12345@...
 

Forwarded letter >from Tevia Shere by Ellen Sadove Renck:

<<Subject: Re: shtetlinks digest: July 22, 1999
From: Tedsherr@aol.com
Date: Fri, 23 Jul 1999 18:07:04 EDT
X-Message-Number: 2

Yes I just got back >from China and to my surprise I found some Chinese in
the foreign Office with the name SHER coming >from Lita about 100 years ago. I will be back in 3 months also found many jews intermarried with Chinese Tibet has the same stories Jews >from Lita Tevia Sher Plunge Lithuania
PS All interested in their yiddish backround >>

David Hoffman
Co-Coordinator, LitvakSIG


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Jews Currently in China! #lithuania

DBH12345@...
 

Forwarded letter >from Tevia Shere by Ellen Sadove Renck:

<<Subject: Re: shtetlinks digest: July 22, 1999
From: Tedsherr@aol.com
Date: Fri, 23 Jul 1999 18:07:04 EDT
X-Message-Number: 2

Yes I just got back >from China and to my surprise I found some Chinese in
the foreign Office with the name SHER coming >from Lita about 100 years ago. I will be back in 3 months also found many jews intermarried with Chinese Tibet has the same stories Jews >from Lita Tevia Sher Plunge Lithuania
PS All interested in their yiddish backround >>

David Hoffman
Co-Coordinator, LitvakSIG


A Record in Radomsko #poland

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

I just sent the Radomsko film (1,713,988) back
to Utah--a bit too soon. I need to have a copy of
one page. To do this will take a two-hour round
trip drive, a four-week wait, and another two-hour
drive.

Does anyone have access to this film? I have all
of the details.

Dan

Daniel Kazez / dkazez@mail.wittenberg.edu
Professor of Music / Wittenberg University / Springfield, Ohio USA
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/WebPage.html


JRI Poland #Poland A Record in Radomsko #poland

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

I just sent the Radomsko film (1,713,988) back
to Utah--a bit too soon. I need to have a copy of
one page. To do this will take a two-hour round
trip drive, a four-week wait, and another two-hour
drive.

Does anyone have access to this film? I have all
of the details.

Dan

Daniel Kazez / dkazez@mail.wittenberg.edu
Professor of Music / Wittenberg University / Springfield, Ohio USA
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/WebPage.html