Date   

Re: Report on Visit to Rogachev #belarus

Norma Brewer <Nlbrewer@...>
 

I really appreciated your comments, which are really poignant for the
reader.

I have been visiting Poland ( for work) during the past 4 years, and
have been making brief notes on signs of Jewish ife in some of the towns
I have visited - cf the synagogue in Poznan that is now a swimming pool.

I will try and send some notes, though Poland is not Belarus.

Norma Brewer

nlbrewer@btinternet.com
===================================================


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Report on Visit to Rogachev #belarus

Norma Brewer <Nlbrewer@...>
 

I really appreciated your comments, which are really poignant for the
reader.

I have been visiting Poland ( for work) during the past 4 years, and
have been making brief notes on signs of Jewish ife in some of the towns
I have visited - cf the synagogue in Poznan that is now a swimming pool.

I will try and send some notes, though Poland is not Belarus.

Norma Brewer

nlbrewer@btinternet.com
===================================================


Re: Grodno Gibernia #belarus

lgud@...
 

In a message dated 8/29/99 2:18:21 PM EST, Susan Pearlman writes:

<< lived in or near Grodno Gubernyia, including Bialystok, Jalowke, Krynki,
Porozowa, Volkovysk and Wolpa. This was the family WISHNIATSKY, with
additional names (marriages, etc.) of BLECHOCHEVSKY, CHERNITSKY, DOLGIN,
GLASSER, GOLDBERG, >>

Several of the towns you mentioned I am also researching and have also
visited. In addition to the towns underlined above, Swisloch (Sislovitch),
Brest Litovsk, Liscov.

They are all in the same general area east of Bialystok. The chernitsky
is very similar to the family name but each brother changed to another
name: CAPLAN, SCHOCHET and WOLPE or WOLLFE. The name MALAT also seems
to be mentioned with roots in France.

The Bialystok name is PESHKIN. My great great grandmother was burried
in Krinki: Zisal nee Peshkin. Three husbands, Margolis, Goldberg and
last Abramson.

Lucille Gudis
New York, NY
LGud@aol.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Grodno Gibernia #belarus

lgud@...
 

In a message dated 8/29/99 2:18:21 PM EST, Susan Pearlman writes:

<< lived in or near Grodno Gubernyia, including Bialystok, Jalowke, Krynki,
Porozowa, Volkovysk and Wolpa. This was the family WISHNIATSKY, with
additional names (marriages, etc.) of BLECHOCHEVSKY, CHERNITSKY, DOLGIN,
GLASSER, GOLDBERG, >>

Several of the towns you mentioned I am also researching and have also
visited. In addition to the towns underlined above, Swisloch (Sislovitch),
Brest Litovsk, Liscov.

They are all in the same general area east of Bialystok. The chernitsky
is very similar to the family name but each brother changed to another
name: CAPLAN, SCHOCHET and WOLPE or WOLLFE. The name MALAT also seems
to be mentioned with roots in France.

The Bialystok name is PESHKIN. My great great grandmother was burried
in Krinki: Zisal nee Peshkin. Three husbands, Margolis, Goldberg and
last Abramson.

Lucille Gudis
New York, NY
LGud@aol.com


Re: BREGMAN from Pinsk #belarus

Patrick Gordis <pgordis@...>
 


Subject: Re: FELDMANs in Pinsk
From: NFatouros@aol.com
Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 13:50:52 EDT

(Mme. Gutmann too has some ancestors, WISOTSKY, BREGMAN and possiblY
JASELMAN >from Pinsk.)
Various BREGMAN also appears in the Pinsk memorial book. One Bregman was
among the 35 martyrs of a pogrom during the occupation of the Polish army
in Pinsk in 1919. Also, Yosef Avraham BREGMAN, born in Pinsk in 1881 has
a short biography (p. 304)--he was later a Zionist who settled in Tel Aviv.
His father, Mordechai BREGMAN was a grandson of Chernobyl Rabbi Mordechai
[TWERSKY???, 1770-1837--founders of a dynasty of Chasidic Rabbis] and his
mother was the daughter of the Stoliner Rav [???Asher PERLOV, 1827-1873 --
Member of the Karlin (a section of Pinsk) Chasidic Dynasty].

If interested, one could compile a large bibliography on Chasidic genealogy
and biography. Personally, I am not too well acquainted with this
literature--most of my ancestors were followers of the Vilna Gaon and my
g-g-g grandfather a functionay at the Mir Yeshiva was described as a "great
opponent of the Hasidic movement".

Elsewhere (in the Lexicon of Modern Yiddish Literature, which I have on
hand), I noticed a two volume autobiography of another Bregman native to
the Pinsk vicinity:

AUTHOR: Bregman, She. (Shmuel), 1891-1942.
TITLE: Durkh krig un revolutsye / S. Bregman.
PUB. INFO: Kharkov ; Kiev : Tsentrfarlag, 1932.
DESCRIPTION: 2 v. ; 18 cm.

SUBJECTS: *S1 Bregman, Sh. (Shmuel), 1891-1942.
*S2 World War, 1914-1918--Personal narratives, Jewish.

Given the Zeitgeist of the Soviet Union in the 1930s (when my maternal
grandfather was arrested as an "enemy of the people" and sent to the Gulag
for 20 years), there is probably not extensive family history (if any) in
this narrative, but if possible those interested in this family should try
to locate a copy and check.

I agree with at least part of Mr. Gordis' dictum on Jewish genealogy:
"Learn languages and go to the library..." but I am not so sure I concur
with his saying that "all the rest (i.e., the Internet, computer research,
databases etc.) is commentary."
Thanks to Ms. Fatouros for her thoughtful comments on my dictum on Jewish
Genealogy: "Learn languages and go to the library, all the rest (i.e.,
Internet, computer research, databases etc.) is commentary".
My dictum was not meant to be directed at her or anyone specifically.

I think one could objectively prove that for those researching Jewish
ancestry in Belarus only a very tiny fraction of real information can be
found (at least presently) either on the Internet or in the English
language (in printed sources). >from this follows the obvious conclusion
that to do real research requires extensive book (or printed source) and
archival research which is only really possible by learning the fundamental
languages of this region (at least to some extent): Hebrew, Yiddish and
Russian. For Belarus Jewish genealogy in particular, every minute spent
improving one's knowledge of relevant foreign languages is worth many
times over browsing the Internet.


Potrick Gordis
Berkeley, CA
pgordis@wenet.net


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: BREGMAN from Pinsk #belarus

Patrick Gordis <pgordis@...>
 


Subject: Re: FELDMANs in Pinsk
From: NFatouros@aol.com
Date: Sat, 28 Aug 1999 13:50:52 EDT

(Mme. Gutmann too has some ancestors, WISOTSKY, BREGMAN and possiblY
JASELMAN >from Pinsk.)
Various BREGMAN also appears in the Pinsk memorial book. One Bregman was
among the 35 martyrs of a pogrom during the occupation of the Polish army
in Pinsk in 1919. Also, Yosef Avraham BREGMAN, born in Pinsk in 1881 has
a short biography (p. 304)--he was later a Zionist who settled in Tel Aviv.
His father, Mordechai BREGMAN was a grandson of Chernobyl Rabbi Mordechai
[TWERSKY???, 1770-1837--founders of a dynasty of Chasidic Rabbis] and his
mother was the daughter of the Stoliner Rav [???Asher PERLOV, 1827-1873 --
Member of the Karlin (a section of Pinsk) Chasidic Dynasty].

If interested, one could compile a large bibliography on Chasidic genealogy
and biography. Personally, I am not too well acquainted with this
literature--most of my ancestors were followers of the Vilna Gaon and my
g-g-g grandfather a functionay at the Mir Yeshiva was described as a "great
opponent of the Hasidic movement".

Elsewhere (in the Lexicon of Modern Yiddish Literature, which I have on
hand), I noticed a two volume autobiography of another Bregman native to
the Pinsk vicinity:

AUTHOR: Bregman, She. (Shmuel), 1891-1942.
TITLE: Durkh krig un revolutsye / S. Bregman.
PUB. INFO: Kharkov ; Kiev : Tsentrfarlag, 1932.
DESCRIPTION: 2 v. ; 18 cm.

SUBJECTS: *S1 Bregman, Sh. (Shmuel), 1891-1942.
*S2 World War, 1914-1918--Personal narratives, Jewish.

Given the Zeitgeist of the Soviet Union in the 1930s (when my maternal
grandfather was arrested as an "enemy of the people" and sent to the Gulag
for 20 years), there is probably not extensive family history (if any) in
this narrative, but if possible those interested in this family should try
to locate a copy and check.

I agree with at least part of Mr. Gordis' dictum on Jewish genealogy:
"Learn languages and go to the library..." but I am not so sure I concur
with his saying that "all the rest (i.e., the Internet, computer research,
databases etc.) is commentary."
Thanks to Ms. Fatouros for her thoughtful comments on my dictum on Jewish
Genealogy: "Learn languages and go to the library, all the rest (i.e.,
Internet, computer research, databases etc.) is commentary".
My dictum was not meant to be directed at her or anyone specifically.

I think one could objectively prove that for those researching Jewish
ancestry in Belarus only a very tiny fraction of real information can be
found (at least presently) either on the Internet or in the English
language (in printed sources). >from this follows the obvious conclusion
that to do real research requires extensive book (or printed source) and
archival research which is only really possible by learning the fundamental
languages of this region (at least to some extent): Hebrew, Yiddish and
Russian. For Belarus Jewish genealogy in particular, every minute spent
improving one's knowledge of relevant foreign languages is worth many
times over browsing the Internet.


Potrick Gordis
Berkeley, CA
pgordis@wenet.net


Report on Visit to Rogachev #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

Dear SIG Members,

As promised, I am providing another report about my recent trip to
Belarus.

Cindy and I, along with our driver Alec and translator/guide Irina,
departed Mogilev at around 10 AM on Thursday, August 19, for Rogachev. We
traveled along highway M 20, following the path of the Dneiper River as
we passed by Bykhov and a few other villages before turning onto highway
A 181 to Rogachev. The ride was spectacular, with forests, farms, rivers
and lakes, and lots of goats, cows, horses, ducks, chickens, turkeys, and
other animals. There was almost no traffic on the journey.

We reached Rogechev, one of my ancestral towns, around noon and
immediately went to the government building where the local historical
museum is located. Unfortunately, the museum was closed because the
worker was on vacation. Our interpreter found a very old man getting
ready to depart the building and asked him about the location of Jewish
sites in the shtetl. He was not Jewish, but said his next door neighbor
was an old Jewish lady and could help us. He squeezed into the car and
directed us to his apartment building a few blocks away. We rang the door
bell and there was no response. One of the other residents who was
sitting in the yard said the women we were looking for had gone out, but
she could take us to the home of another old Jewish women who lived
nearby. We walked with her to an old wooden house typical of the shtetl
houses that our ancestors lived in. She came out of the house to greet
us and gave us the story of how she survived the Holocaust as well as the
fate of the Jews who did not hide in the forest or flee on foot to the
East. She told us how the people burned their own homes so they would
not fall into the hands of the advancing German army. When I asked her
were the synagogue was, she pointed to a house just across the street
from her home and related that the synagogue had been burned down and
that a family residence had been built on the site. She also said that
her father had been the head of the hedder (Jewish school) in the town,
but that the building no longer existed. By this time, the old man that
we had met in the government building arrived again and brought the
leader of the Jewish community, Ginda Kapelan. He also said his neighbor
had returned and wanted to meet with us. We walked back to the apartment
and there were several people sitting in the yard. One was a 88 year old
women who looked like 120 years old (The people in the villages age very
rapidly and generally look 20 years older then Americans of the same
age). Her mind was not all there and we couldn't really get too much
information >from her. We went into the dark apartment of the
lady we were originally looking to find and Mrs. Kapelan along with our
interpreter joined us. She told us about her hard life and her family who
now lived in Mogilev. She also showed us old family photos. Most of my
interview with her is recorded on video tape, which I still have not had
time to review. I showed Ms. Kapelan, a women of about 50 years, the
Exordinary Commission list for Rogechev which I had obtained >from the US
Holocaust Memorial Museum before my trip. She and the old women
recognized most of the Jewish families that were on the list and it
brought tears to their eyes and they recited the names. I offered to
leave the list with them, but they said they had no where to store it.
Actually, Mrs. Kapelan was a volunteer who passed out the limited food
parcels >from the JDC for the elderly. As a volunteer, she received no
money for what she was doing. She felt it was her responsibility to
help. The old lady asked me to help her take town an old wooden box >from
the top of a cabinet in her sitting room. She then showed us the hand
sewed linen table cloths, napkins and doilies that she had made many
years before when her eyes where better. She wanted to give my wife,
Cindy, the linens and I told her she should give them to her children and
grandchildren, but she they they were not interested in having such
things. She insisted that we take them back to America. I told her we
could do that unless we paid for them. I had to force the money on her.
She hugged us and started to cry, apparently her own children and
grandchildren rarely visited her and she was so happy to have someone
take an interest in her. We took some more photos and left the apartment
after sad goodbyes.

Mrs. Kapelan told us there were actually two Jewish cemeteries in
Rogachev, the old and the new. We departed by car to the old Jewish
cemetery. It was located on a plot of ground that overlooked the Dnieper
River. There were cows and goats grazing in the cemetery which was not
really maintained, but at least it wasn't overgrown with trees and
vegetation as we found the Mogilev Jewish cemetery. I would estimate that
there were approximately 400 stones still remaining. Some had been
weathered over time so they could no longer be read. Others had sunk
into the ground and were only partially readable. The earliest stones
probably dated >from the 1700 an 1800's, but there were post revolution
(1917) stones in one section of the cemetery which were in the typical
Soviet style, with little or no Hebrew, Russian inscriptions, in many
cases the etched image of the deceased. We even saw grave markers that
were made of sheet metal because relatives could not afford a stone
monument. The metal monuments were rusting apart and deteriorating
rapidly. I noticed large areas of the cemetery were there were no
stones, but >from the way the land had settled, there were obviously
burials on the land. I also saw graves that had been dug up and asked
Mrs. Kapelan what had happened. She said that has people had immigrated
from Rogachev to Israel or the US, the people who could afford it had
reburied their relatives in the "new" Jewish cemetery because it was
better maintained. While there was a fence around part of the cemetery,
it was not secure. There did not appear to be any signs of vandalism,
but there were kids playing in part of the cemetery. We took lots of
photos of stones, but did not have time to adequately photograph every
marker. None of us could really read Hebrew and in fact there was no one
left in the town who could ready Hebrew. One other item of interest was
the many sheds adjacent to the cemetery. When I asked what they were, I
was told it was a brick factory that had been built on part of the
cemetery around 1946. No one seemed to know what happened to stones that
were in that part of the cemetery, but >from the way the cemetery was laid
out, it appears they built over the oldest part.

Mrs. Kapelan guided us to the "new" Jewish cemetery which was on the
outskirts of town. Actually it was a community cemetery with a "Jewish
section". It appeared well maintained for the most part, but because of
immigration, there was no one to take care of many of the Jewish graves
and they looked untended and overgrown. We were told that the Jewish
section was full and there were no more empty plots. Mrs. Kapelan pointed
out some very well maintained graves where the site was totally covered
by squares of stone or marble to prevent the growth of vegetation. This
was done by people who were immigrating to Israel in the next few days
and wanted to be sure that the graves would be maintained.

I asked Mrs. Kapelan if anyone had a list of names of Jews buried in
either cemetery. Unfortunately, none existed. I asked her if there was
someone who could prepare such a list and gave her some money to get the
project started. She said she would only be able to do the stones with
Russian writing, since there was no one to read Hebrew left in the
shtetl. I also asked her to prepare a list of the current Jewish
residents, with there addresses. She said she already had such a list
for the people on pension, but did not have it for the younger
population. She said that no Rabbi ever visits this shtetl and she said
I was the first American she could remember coming to visit Rogachev. I
asked her what the old Jews of the town needed and she said vitamins,
medicine, and eye glasses. I told her we could easily get the people eye
glasses >from Minsk if she could gather the lens requirements and we could
also arrange to have vitamins delivered to her for the elderly. When I
asked what support she was getting >from the Joint Distribution Committee
(JDC), she said they got up to four very small food parcels a year, no
medicine, a very rarely some vitamins. (This is about the same story I
received when I spoke to the elderly Jews in Mogilev). Mrs. Kapelan
explained that there were several old Jews who were house bound and could
not go out to have their eyes measured. I told her I would make
arrangements in Minsk for an optometrist to make house calls so we could
get eye glasses for these people. (Note: Before departing Minsk, I left
funds with Yuri Dorn, President of the, Union of Religious Jewish
Congregations in the Republic of Belarus, to transport an optometrist to
Rogachev and two other nearby shtetls so the eyes of the shut-ins could
be measured and arranged to have glasses delivered to them.

While I did not have any personal genealogical break threw in Rogachev, I
hope that further research in the Minsk archives will uncover more
information to help me locate where some of my family lived. Perhaps some
of the grave stones I photographed will help me or other members of the
SIG in locating long lost family ties. I plan to go back to Rogachev on
my next visit to Belarus and if there are others interested in going,
please get in touch with Joanna Fletcher <jfletcher@jewishgen.org> in the
JewishGen ShtetlSchlepper Office.



David M. Fox
Reply to: <fox@erols.com>
Arnold, MD
Belarus SIG Co-Coordinator


Researching: Minsk: TSIVIN (SIVIN), RABINOWITZ, GUREVITCH, FEIN
Mogilev & NYC: SCHENDEROFF (OV), TSIVIN, SHER, FEITELSON
Rogachev(BYL) & NYC: FYTELSON (FEITELSON), TELSON, COHEN
Popielniki, Dzurow, Banila (UKR): FUCHS, HUDES, MECHLAWICZ, TISCHLER,
LOBEL, LABALVITCH


Belarus SIG #Belarus Report on Visit to Rogachev #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

Dear SIG Members,

As promised, I am providing another report about my recent trip to
Belarus.

Cindy and I, along with our driver Alec and translator/guide Irina,
departed Mogilev at around 10 AM on Thursday, August 19, for Rogachev. We
traveled along highway M 20, following the path of the Dneiper River as
we passed by Bykhov and a few other villages before turning onto highway
A 181 to Rogachev. The ride was spectacular, with forests, farms, rivers
and lakes, and lots of goats, cows, horses, ducks, chickens, turkeys, and
other animals. There was almost no traffic on the journey.

We reached Rogechev, one of my ancestral towns, around noon and
immediately went to the government building where the local historical
museum is located. Unfortunately, the museum was closed because the
worker was on vacation. Our interpreter found a very old man getting
ready to depart the building and asked him about the location of Jewish
sites in the shtetl. He was not Jewish, but said his next door neighbor
was an old Jewish lady and could help us. He squeezed into the car and
directed us to his apartment building a few blocks away. We rang the door
bell and there was no response. One of the other residents who was
sitting in the yard said the women we were looking for had gone out, but
she could take us to the home of another old Jewish women who lived
nearby. We walked with her to an old wooden house typical of the shtetl
houses that our ancestors lived in. She came out of the house to greet
us and gave us the story of how she survived the Holocaust as well as the
fate of the Jews who did not hide in the forest or flee on foot to the
East. She told us how the people burned their own homes so they would
not fall into the hands of the advancing German army. When I asked her
were the synagogue was, she pointed to a house just across the street
from her home and related that the synagogue had been burned down and
that a family residence had been built on the site. She also said that
her father had been the head of the hedder (Jewish school) in the town,
but that the building no longer existed. By this time, the old man that
we had met in the government building arrived again and brought the
leader of the Jewish community, Ginda Kapelan. He also said his neighbor
had returned and wanted to meet with us. We walked back to the apartment
and there were several people sitting in the yard. One was a 88 year old
women who looked like 120 years old (The people in the villages age very
rapidly and generally look 20 years older then Americans of the same
age). Her mind was not all there and we couldn't really get too much
information >from her. We went into the dark apartment of the
lady we were originally looking to find and Mrs. Kapelan along with our
interpreter joined us. She told us about her hard life and her family who
now lived in Mogilev. She also showed us old family photos. Most of my
interview with her is recorded on video tape, which I still have not had
time to review. I showed Ms. Kapelan, a women of about 50 years, the
Exordinary Commission list for Rogechev which I had obtained >from the US
Holocaust Memorial Museum before my trip. She and the old women
recognized most of the Jewish families that were on the list and it
brought tears to their eyes and they recited the names. I offered to
leave the list with them, but they said they had no where to store it.
Actually, Mrs. Kapelan was a volunteer who passed out the limited food
parcels >from the JDC for the elderly. As a volunteer, she received no
money for what she was doing. She felt it was her responsibility to
help. The old lady asked me to help her take town an old wooden box >from
the top of a cabinet in her sitting room. She then showed us the hand
sewed linen table cloths, napkins and doilies that she had made many
years before when her eyes where better. She wanted to give my wife,
Cindy, the linens and I told her she should give them to her children and
grandchildren, but she they they were not interested in having such
things. She insisted that we take them back to America. I told her we
could do that unless we paid for them. I had to force the money on her.
She hugged us and started to cry, apparently her own children and
grandchildren rarely visited her and she was so happy to have someone
take an interest in her. We took some more photos and left the apartment
after sad goodbyes.

Mrs. Kapelan told us there were actually two Jewish cemeteries in
Rogachev, the old and the new. We departed by car to the old Jewish
cemetery. It was located on a plot of ground that overlooked the Dnieper
River. There were cows and goats grazing in the cemetery which was not
really maintained, but at least it wasn't overgrown with trees and
vegetation as we found the Mogilev Jewish cemetery. I would estimate that
there were approximately 400 stones still remaining. Some had been
weathered over time so they could no longer be read. Others had sunk
into the ground and were only partially readable. The earliest stones
probably dated >from the 1700 an 1800's, but there were post revolution
(1917) stones in one section of the cemetery which were in the typical
Soviet style, with little or no Hebrew, Russian inscriptions, in many
cases the etched image of the deceased. We even saw grave markers that
were made of sheet metal because relatives could not afford a stone
monument. The metal monuments were rusting apart and deteriorating
rapidly. I noticed large areas of the cemetery were there were no
stones, but >from the way the land had settled, there were obviously
burials on the land. I also saw graves that had been dug up and asked
Mrs. Kapelan what had happened. She said that has people had immigrated
from Rogachev to Israel or the US, the people who could afford it had
reburied their relatives in the "new" Jewish cemetery because it was
better maintained. While there was a fence around part of the cemetery,
it was not secure. There did not appear to be any signs of vandalism,
but there were kids playing in part of the cemetery. We took lots of
photos of stones, but did not have time to adequately photograph every
marker. None of us could really read Hebrew and in fact there was no one
left in the town who could ready Hebrew. One other item of interest was
the many sheds adjacent to the cemetery. When I asked what they were, I
was told it was a brick factory that had been built on part of the
cemetery around 1946. No one seemed to know what happened to stones that
were in that part of the cemetery, but >from the way the cemetery was laid
out, it appears they built over the oldest part.

Mrs. Kapelan guided us to the "new" Jewish cemetery which was on the
outskirts of town. Actually it was a community cemetery with a "Jewish
section". It appeared well maintained for the most part, but because of
immigration, there was no one to take care of many of the Jewish graves
and they looked untended and overgrown. We were told that the Jewish
section was full and there were no more empty plots. Mrs. Kapelan pointed
out some very well maintained graves where the site was totally covered
by squares of stone or marble to prevent the growth of vegetation. This
was done by people who were immigrating to Israel in the next few days
and wanted to be sure that the graves would be maintained.

I asked Mrs. Kapelan if anyone had a list of names of Jews buried in
either cemetery. Unfortunately, none existed. I asked her if there was
someone who could prepare such a list and gave her some money to get the
project started. She said she would only be able to do the stones with
Russian writing, since there was no one to read Hebrew left in the
shtetl. I also asked her to prepare a list of the current Jewish
residents, with there addresses. She said she already had such a list
for the people on pension, but did not have it for the younger
population. She said that no Rabbi ever visits this shtetl and she said
I was the first American she could remember coming to visit Rogachev. I
asked her what the old Jews of the town needed and she said vitamins,
medicine, and eye glasses. I told her we could easily get the people eye
glasses >from Minsk if she could gather the lens requirements and we could
also arrange to have vitamins delivered to her for the elderly. When I
asked what support she was getting >from the Joint Distribution Committee
(JDC), she said they got up to four very small food parcels a year, no
medicine, a very rarely some vitamins. (This is about the same story I
received when I spoke to the elderly Jews in Mogilev). Mrs. Kapelan
explained that there were several old Jews who were house bound and could
not go out to have their eyes measured. I told her I would make
arrangements in Minsk for an optometrist to make house calls so we could
get eye glasses for these people. (Note: Before departing Minsk, I left
funds with Yuri Dorn, President of the, Union of Religious Jewish
Congregations in the Republic of Belarus, to transport an optometrist to
Rogachev and two other nearby shtetls so the eyes of the shut-ins could
be measured and arranged to have glasses delivered to them.

While I did not have any personal genealogical break threw in Rogachev, I
hope that further research in the Minsk archives will uncover more
information to help me locate where some of my family lived. Perhaps some
of the grave stones I photographed will help me or other members of the
SIG in locating long lost family ties. I plan to go back to Rogachev on
my next visit to Belarus and if there are others interested in going,
please get in touch with Joanna Fletcher <jfletcher@jewishgen.org> in the
JewishGen ShtetlSchlepper Office.



David M. Fox
Reply to: <fox@erols.com>
Arnold, MD
Belarus SIG Co-Coordinator


Researching: Minsk: TSIVIN (SIVIN), RABINOWITZ, GUREVITCH, FEIN
Mogilev & NYC: SCHENDEROFF (OV), TSIVIN, SHER, FEITELSON
Rogachev(BYL) & NYC: FYTELSON (FEITELSON), TELSON, COHEN
Popielniki, Dzurow, Banila (UKR): FUCHS, HUDES, MECHLAWICZ, TISCHLER,
LOBEL, LABALVITCH


If You're In Washington . . . #belarus

Al Bell <allbell@...>
 

Someone who lives in Washington asked about finding information about his
relatives in the Russian Empire.

a) If you live somewhere near the National Archives building, you're in
the clover! Just volunteer to trade look-ups of U.S. immigration and
census records for look-ups of other types of records.

b) The Vsia Rossia business directory is a GREAT resource for learning
about business people and professionals who worked in Russia around the
turn of the century. If you have any ability to decipher Cyrillic
whatsoever, you can probably get some information out of the microfilm
version. It's also very interesting to see how capitalistically modern
Russia used to be. It looks >from the Vsia Rossia that cities like Minsk
and Moscow were really as up-to-date, at least in superficial ways, as
Chicago or New York. My guess is that the Library of Congress, Johns
Hopkins Library, or some other Washington-area library has a copy of the
directory on microfilm.

If all else fails, you could always come up and look at the film in the
Slavic and Baltic Room at the New York Public Library.

I know that people have already put huge chunks of the Vsia Rossia online,
but I think it's totally worth taking the time to look at the microfilm
yourself and make your own copies, even if you have to get someone else to
help you with the translation.

c) People here will probably say, "Go to the Family History Center and get
the revision lists!" But, my personal impression >from trying to look
through Russian revision lists yesterday is that this is a really
difficult thing to do for a normal amateur. The best thing for the typical
family historian is to go look at the revision lists at the Family History
Center, reflect on the fact that teachers have a point when they complain
about illegible handwriting, then go hire one of the researchers who
advertises on www.jewishgen.org.

A.L. Bell
Kansas City, Missouri
allbell@vnet.net


Belarus SIG #Belarus If You're In Washington . . . #belarus

Al Bell <allbell@...>
 

Someone who lives in Washington asked about finding information about his
relatives in the Russian Empire.

a) If you live somewhere near the National Archives building, you're in
the clover! Just volunteer to trade look-ups of U.S. immigration and
census records for look-ups of other types of records.

b) The Vsia Rossia business directory is a GREAT resource for learning
about business people and professionals who worked in Russia around the
turn of the century. If you have any ability to decipher Cyrillic
whatsoever, you can probably get some information out of the microfilm
version. It's also very interesting to see how capitalistically modern
Russia used to be. It looks >from the Vsia Rossia that cities like Minsk
and Moscow were really as up-to-date, at least in superficial ways, as
Chicago or New York. My guess is that the Library of Congress, Johns
Hopkins Library, or some other Washington-area library has a copy of the
directory on microfilm.

If all else fails, you could always come up and look at the film in the
Slavic and Baltic Room at the New York Public Library.

I know that people have already put huge chunks of the Vsia Rossia online,
but I think it's totally worth taking the time to look at the microfilm
yourself and make your own copies, even if you have to get someone else to
help you with the translation.

c) People here will probably say, "Go to the Family History Center and get
the revision lists!" But, my personal impression >from trying to look
through Russian revision lists yesterday is that this is a really
difficult thing to do for a normal amateur. The best thing for the typical
family historian is to go look at the revision lists at the Family History
Center, reflect on the fact that teachers have a point when they complain
about illegible handwriting, then go hire one of the researchers who
advertises on www.jewishgen.org.

A.L. Bell
Kansas City, Missouri
allbell@vnet.net


Re: ROGOVIN, Saul #belarus

Hibits1914@...
 

Hi

I thought he pitched for the Phillies - but in any case, I had a friend -
Donnie Harris - in Worcester, Mass., who was Saul's cousin.
The Harris'es lived on Commodore Rd. in Worcester >from the fourties to at
least 1965.
May still be there.

Kim Walker
Hibits1914@aol.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: ROGOVIN, Saul #belarus

Hibits1914@...
 

Hi

I thought he pitched for the Phillies - but in any case, I had a friend -
Donnie Harris - in Worcester, Mass., who was Saul's cousin.
The Harris'es lived on Commodore Rd. in Worcester >from the fourties to at
least 1965.
May still be there.

Kim Walker
Hibits1914@aol.com


Plain Text Please #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

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post your message and will do so when it comes to us in plain text
only.

Thanks for your cooperation,
Latvia Sig moderator


Latvia SIG #Latvia Plain Text Please #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

I would appreciate it if you could read this message and send only plain
text messages. The following is the message that is generated when a
message is received that is not in plain text. Please sign your messages.


This mailing list requires the messages be submitted in *plain
text only*. Your message was encoded in MultiPartMime , or
Multipart-alternative, or some other format that is not
supported by our current listserve program. This caused many
people on our list to see a header and no text, or in the case
of our AOL subscribers to not even get the message! Mail to
them was bounced back to us and bounces cost us time, energy
and money for someone to look into all the circumstances causing
bounces. We would appreciate if you would change your outgoing
mail format to be sent in plain text only.

Since there are so many e-mail programs in use we cannot advise
you on how to make this change. If you do not know how to do this,
then please contact your ISP's technical support, or consult the
manual for your e-mail program. We look forward to being able to
post your message and will do so when it comes to us in plain text
only.

Thanks for your cooperation,
Latvia Sig moderator


Re: ROSSOFF from Dokshitsy, Belarus #belarus

dlfrankel@...
 

My grandaunt, Celia PRESSMAN married Israel Rosof (variant spelling on
various documents).
I thought that the Pressmans came >from Dolhinow/Dolginovo but of course
could have moved around to another town. My gfather Pressman claimed to
have been born in Dolhinow but by the time my father was born, they were in
Vileyka. There are many Rosoffs.
D

Diane Frankel
North Miami Beach, FL
dlfrankel@mindspring.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: ROSSOFF from Dokshitsy, Belarus #belarus

dlfrankel@...
 

My grandaunt, Celia PRESSMAN married Israel Rosof (variant spelling on
various documents).
I thought that the Pressmans came >from Dolhinow/Dolginovo but of course
could have moved around to another town. My gfather Pressman claimed to
have been born in Dolhinow but by the time my father was born, they were in
Vileyka. There are many Rosoffs.
D

Diane Frankel
North Miami Beach, FL
dlfrankel@mindspring.com


Jay Lenefsky Update #belarus

suprlmn@...
 

In a message dated 08/26/1999 12:20:59 AM Pacific Daylight Time, Jay Lenefsky
writes:
<< Could you possibly spare a few moments telling the group:
What, who, where you are researching. What resources
you found helpful...... Things like that..........>>

OK, Jay, you've thrown down the gauntlet, so here's my update:
So far, I've learned that almost the entire family, on my father's side,
lived in or near Grodno Gubernyia, including Bialystok, Jalowke, Krynki,
Porozowa, Volkovysk and Wolpa. This was the family WISHNIATSKY, with
additional names (marriages, etc.) of BLECHOCHEVSKY, CHERNITSKY, DOLGIN,
GLASSER, GOLDBERG, GOLDSTEIN, GOLNER, GREENBERG, HOUSE, HUBERFELD, HURWITZ,
KAM, KAPELL, KARP, KOSLOFF / KOSLOVSKY/ KOSLOWSKY, LASSOFF, LEPKOWSKY,
LESHINSKY/ LESZINSKI / LESZCZYNSKY / LICHINSKY, LEVIN / LEVITAN / LEVY,
LIFSHITZ / LIPSCHITS, LOSNICK, MALETSKY / MALYETSKY, MALTZ, MILLSTEIN,
NAISBOURD, NITZBERG, PERLISS, PESHKIN, POCHACHEVSKY, ROGALSKY, RUBENSTEIN,
SCHEGLOVITSKY, SCHNEIDERMAN, SHPERBER / SPERBERG, SIDRANSKY / SIDRUNSKY,
SOLOMON, WATNETSKY, WEINER / WIENER / WILSON / WISHNER, WEINSTEIN, WEISSNER,
YELLIN / JELLIN), YOSHPE / JOSHPE / GOSPE & ZELIKOVITCH.
Special note to 'newbies', i.e., beginners:
Three years ago I barely knew 5 or 6 of these names, but, G-d bless JewishGen
and the databases, my list is still growing -- and that's just on my father's
side. Only last week, someone found me on the JGFF (Family Finder)!! Once
we started comparing notes, there was no doubt whatsoever that we were
related! So the moral of the story is:
1. List every name you know, and update your list each time you learn a new
one.
2. As Jay said, check at least every 6 months.
3. Save every scrap of paper, every hunch, every communication; it may not
fit today, but tomorrow or next week, it just might!
My mother's side is more elusive because so many of her family perished in
the Shoah, but even so, there have been successes along the way. The family
name was SZEJNMAN (Polish spelling) or SCHEINMAN / SHINE / SHYNMAN. Her
father was born in Shereshevo, her mother, JASKOLKA, probably in
Ciechanowiec. [Possible / probable links have been found in Lomza, Suwalki,
and Kalvaria.] When they married, they settled in Bialystok, where all their
children were born. Other names, (marriages, etc.) include GOLDBERG, HASKELL
/ JASKOLL / YASKOLL, NEIDORF, RADDING, SASLAV / SASLOW / SASLAVSKY /
ZASLOVSKY / SUSLOW / SUSLOVSKY.
Thanks to Jay for urging all of us to update, and thanks to you for wading
through all this. If you're even remotely interested in any of the above
names, please contact me as soon as possible: < suprlmn@aol.com > Who knows?
B'shalom,

Susan Pearlman
Northridge, California
nee Szejna-Dwera Szejnman-Koslovsky, in Bialystok.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Jay Lenefsky Update #belarus

suprlmn@...
 

In a message dated 08/26/1999 12:20:59 AM Pacific Daylight Time, Jay Lenefsky
writes:
<< Could you possibly spare a few moments telling the group:
What, who, where you are researching. What resources
you found helpful...... Things like that..........>>

OK, Jay, you've thrown down the gauntlet, so here's my update:
So far, I've learned that almost the entire family, on my father's side,
lived in or near Grodno Gubernyia, including Bialystok, Jalowke, Krynki,
Porozowa, Volkovysk and Wolpa. This was the family WISHNIATSKY, with
additional names (marriages, etc.) of BLECHOCHEVSKY, CHERNITSKY, DOLGIN,
GLASSER, GOLDBERG, GOLDSTEIN, GOLNER, GREENBERG, HOUSE, HUBERFELD, HURWITZ,
KAM, KAPELL, KARP, KOSLOFF / KOSLOVSKY/ KOSLOWSKY, LASSOFF, LEPKOWSKY,
LESHINSKY/ LESZINSKI / LESZCZYNSKY / LICHINSKY, LEVIN / LEVITAN / LEVY,
LIFSHITZ / LIPSCHITS, LOSNICK, MALETSKY / MALYETSKY, MALTZ, MILLSTEIN,
NAISBOURD, NITZBERG, PERLISS, PESHKIN, POCHACHEVSKY, ROGALSKY, RUBENSTEIN,
SCHEGLOVITSKY, SCHNEIDERMAN, SHPERBER / SPERBERG, SIDRANSKY / SIDRUNSKY,
SOLOMON, WATNETSKY, WEINER / WIENER / WILSON / WISHNER, WEINSTEIN, WEISSNER,
YELLIN / JELLIN), YOSHPE / JOSHPE / GOSPE & ZELIKOVITCH.
Special note to 'newbies', i.e., beginners:
Three years ago I barely knew 5 or 6 of these names, but, G-d bless JewishGen
and the databases, my list is still growing -- and that's just on my father's
side. Only last week, someone found me on the JGFF (Family Finder)!! Once
we started comparing notes, there was no doubt whatsoever that we were
related! So the moral of the story is:
1. List every name you know, and update your list each time you learn a new
one.
2. As Jay said, check at least every 6 months.
3. Save every scrap of paper, every hunch, every communication; it may not
fit today, but tomorrow or next week, it just might!
My mother's side is more elusive because so many of her family perished in
the Shoah, but even so, there have been successes along the way. The family
name was SZEJNMAN (Polish spelling) or SCHEINMAN / SHINE / SHYNMAN. Her
father was born in Shereshevo, her mother, JASKOLKA, probably in
Ciechanowiec. [Possible / probable links have been found in Lomza, Suwalki,
and Kalvaria.] When they married, they settled in Bialystok, where all their
children were born. Other names, (marriages, etc.) include GOLDBERG, HASKELL
/ JASKOLL / YASKOLL, NEIDORF, RADDING, SASLAV / SASLOW / SASLAVSKY /
ZASLOVSKY / SUSLOW / SUSLOVSKY.
Thanks to Jay for urging all of us to update, and thanks to you for wading
through all this. If you're even remotely interested in any of the above
names, please contact me as soon as possible: < suprlmn@aol.com > Who knows?
B'shalom,

Susan Pearlman
Northridge, California
nee Szejna-Dwera Szejnman-Koslovsky, in Bialystok.


Shtetl List Additions #belarus

Carleolady@...
 

I was very excited to see that Monastyrshtina (now in Smolensk) was found to
be originally part of Mstislavl uezd, Mogilev gubernia. To whoever did that
research at the conference (I presume)--I thank you! Can someone give a
little background here? How was it determined that it was indeed part of the
Pale? Is there any more information that might prove useful to those of us
researching in that area? Again, thanks very much. I look forward to hearing
about this development.

Elaine Bush
researching SHANIN or SHEINEN, Monastyrshtina, Mogilev; Ekaterineslav,
Ukraine (Luhansk)
FRUMHOFF


Belarus SIG #Belarus Shtetl List Additions #belarus

Carleolady@...
 

I was very excited to see that Monastyrshtina (now in Smolensk) was found to
be originally part of Mstislavl uezd, Mogilev gubernia. To whoever did that
research at the conference (I presume)--I thank you! Can someone give a
little background here? How was it determined that it was indeed part of the
Pale? Is there any more information that might prove useful to those of us
researching in that area? Again, thanks very much. I look forward to hearing
about this development.

Elaine Bush
researching SHANIN or SHEINEN, Monastyrshtina, Mogilev; Ekaterineslav,
Ukraine (Luhansk)
FRUMHOFF