Date   

JewishGen's 2001 Odyssey - A Look Forward into the New Millennium! #galicia

Shelley K. Pollero <rkpollero@...>
 

From: Susan E. King <susan.king@jewishgen.org
Subject: JewishGen's 2001 Odyssey - A Look Forward into the New
Millennium!-Second Edition <grin>

Because of an error the following message did not appear in its
entirety when it went out last night, nor did it appear in the index or
digest versions of the JewishGen Mailing List. Here's how it should have

looked to everyone! <grin>



The numbers are in... and by the looks of it... the year 2000 has
been another banner year for JewishGen, once again, no exception.

- Over 42,000 submitters in the JGFF and over 3.3 million
searches performed in 2000
- Over 1457 submitters to the Family Tree of the Jewish People
representing nearly 2,000,000 names
- Over 32,000 messages posted to JewishGen and the SIG and
Research Group mailing lists in the year 2000
- Over 36 million hits this past year to the JewishGen site with
an additional 5 million searches executed on nearly 5 million
records all powered by JewishGen's servers
- 255 Yizkor Book Translations Online up >from 155 this time last
year for a total of 100 new translations
- 422 ShtetLinks pages (up >from 319 last year) with nearly 1193
localities spoken for

Truely, an impressive set of statistics!

One has only to look at the accomplishments of this organization
over the last year to realize what can really happen when diverse

people >from all corners of this earth--numbering in the
thousands-- come together with a common mission and purpose,
participating and sharing in what we believe is one of the
largest grass roots efforts ever undertaken to preserve our
history for future generations.

And what's in store for 2001? Here are some highlights...

Data collection and indexing:

1) Through our ongoing partnerships with Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum there are over 55 million
records awaiting us all.

2) Through JewishGen's OWBR Project, effort is well underway to
index and record millions of burials in Jewish cemeteries
throughout the world.

3) JewishGen is busily engaged in establishing and solidifying
contacts and partnerships with other organizations, institutions,
museums and with our counterparts currently living in the Eastern
European Jewish communities.

4) JewishGen has developed a plan for our database infrastructure
(All Country, All Topic, All Holocaust) which is going to take an
effort far beyond the capabilities of our current database team's
volunteer time. This means the pressing need for both full time
professional technical staff and volunteers with technical
skills.

5) JewishGen will be continuing to pursue avenues and costs for
implementing a document management and retrieval system to link
to our award winning website.

Education:

1) JewishGen has been recognized throughout the world for the
educational value of so many of our projects, including the
Yizkor Book Translation Project, ShtetLinks, ShtetlSchleppers, to
name a few. These projects are being expanded as we speak and we
look forward to everyone's participation.

2) We are developing a host of Youth Projects to educate the
younger generation and bring them into our grass roots efforts.
You'll be hearing a lot more on this throughout the new year.

3.) JewishGen has software to offer real time Chat Rooms where we
can hold ongoing lectures and classroom instruction on a host of
topics of interest to us all.

Fundraising:

1) JewishGen is in final preparations of both a strategic plan
and fundraising outline to present to funding organizations all
over the world.

2) JewishGen has just launched the JewishGenMall and is
continuing to expand the products and resource materials
available.

3) JewishGen must increase the number of financial supporters
among the tens of thousands who use our services. We improved
this year and are now up to 2,146 contributors which is progress,
but still represents only a very tiny fraction of those who use
JewishGen daily.

We do want to thank all of you who have come forward this past
year in sharing your knowledge, your skills and your financial
resources.

To insure this is a 2001 Odyssey for all of us, we can only lay the
groundwork to achieve the project goals and to just maintain the
current level of usage. We must all begin to ask some very
serious questions of ourselves:

Where can I best get involved?

What skills can I bring to this table?

What project is most interesting to me so that I can feel a
part of this worthy effort?

How can I help, individually and through contacts, to assist
JewishGen reach the financial level it must to properly staff and
manage all these projects for me and my family, today and into
the future?

Please let us know your interests by reading and answering the
requests we will be making for volunteers in the near future.
Please share your ideas and your skills so we can find a place
for you on this team. And please, help us get a jump start into
the new millennium with a tax deductible contribution so we can
all begin to concentrate on these invaluable projects rather than
on "Imagining the World..."! <grin>

So, despite the continuing growth and despite the day to day
challenges of the year 2000, here we go! We are off into 2001,
into a new millennium...sharing all the thrills and joys of
connecting and re-connecting family...of educating and bringing
new meaning to our Jewish heritage, one we hope you will share
with us... in peace, in health and with a new prosperity.

Below you will find a message that came into JewishGen's Yizkor
Book Project which verbalizes some of the meaning of the work
everyone is doing to preserve our history for future generations.
Perhaps, after the first reading it will give us all better
insight into why JewishGen is engaged in the projects we hold so
dear to our hearts. Knowledge of our history can indeed
bridge gaps towards better understanding and mutual respect...
and these qualities are indeed a precursor for PEACE! Please take
a few moments to read it, to feel it and to look beyond the words
to perhaps a new meaning and dimension to what we are all doing
together in one of the greatest grass roots effort ever!

from all of us at JewishGen, we wish you and your families a very
happy, healthy and prosperous New Year!

Susan

Susan E. King
President
JewishGen, Inc.

******************************************
Dateline: Plock, Poland - December 24, 2000
To: JewishGen Yizkor Book Project

I have just read your material and decided to write a few words
to you. I am a young Pole (29) and I have been interested in the
Yedwabne tragedy for a few weeks. The very first thing I came
across about Yedwabne was a huge article published by a Polish
daily newspaper "GAZETA" in November. It was a kind of public
response after publishing a book by Gratz (I haven't read it
yet). I have to admit that the Yedwabne tragedy really shocked
me. It is extremely painful for me for two reasons. The first one
is that I can't believe that such things had happened (though I
am not doubtful at all) and the second is that almost nothing is
being done to "reconcile" the two nations. All those murders
should have been punished many years ago. I totally support your
efforts towards revealing the truth about this mass murder. I
often ask myself why it is so hard to understand, accept and
respect, why it is far easier to hate, ignore and underestimate.
I am a young man and I am trying to be as far objective as I can.
I adore Isaac B. Singer literature and I find a lot about Jewish
customs, living and history through reading his books. Nobody has ever
forced me to do that. There are a lot of young people like me and of
course many others who could be described as anti-semitic. Hate isn't born
from itself. It is born because of certain thoughtless actions >from some
narrow-minded Poles and Jews. I think that the truth about Yedwabne must
come to light and that light should be seen by everyone. At the same time I
would really wish Jewish communities (especially in the US) made
efforts towards reconciliation and creation of new relationships
between Poles and Jews. Opening people's minds seems still
difficult. I am writing this on Christmas Eve - one of the
greatest holidays of Christianity and I think that it might shed
a ray of hope and light on our relationships. These are just a
few words that I wanted to say. They don't bring anything
important but ...... with respect, understanding and hope for
better future

M.J.


Submitted by
Shelley Kellerman Pollero, Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
Severna Park, Maryland
rkpollero@starpower.net


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia JewishGen's 2001 Odyssey - A Look Forward into the New Millennium! #galicia

Shelley K. Pollero <rkpollero@...>
 

From: Susan E. King <susan.king@jewishgen.org
Subject: JewishGen's 2001 Odyssey - A Look Forward into the New
Millennium!-Second Edition <grin>

Because of an error the following message did not appear in its
entirety when it went out last night, nor did it appear in the index or
digest versions of the JewishGen Mailing List. Here's how it should have

looked to everyone! <grin>



The numbers are in... and by the looks of it... the year 2000 has
been another banner year for JewishGen, once again, no exception.

- Over 42,000 submitters in the JGFF and over 3.3 million
searches performed in 2000
- Over 1457 submitters to the Family Tree of the Jewish People
representing nearly 2,000,000 names
- Over 32,000 messages posted to JewishGen and the SIG and
Research Group mailing lists in the year 2000
- Over 36 million hits this past year to the JewishGen site with
an additional 5 million searches executed on nearly 5 million
records all powered by JewishGen's servers
- 255 Yizkor Book Translations Online up >from 155 this time last
year for a total of 100 new translations
- 422 ShtetLinks pages (up >from 319 last year) with nearly 1193
localities spoken for

Truely, an impressive set of statistics!

One has only to look at the accomplishments of this organization
over the last year to realize what can really happen when diverse

people >from all corners of this earth--numbering in the
thousands-- come together with a common mission and purpose,
participating and sharing in what we believe is one of the
largest grass roots efforts ever undertaken to preserve our
history for future generations.

And what's in store for 2001? Here are some highlights...

Data collection and indexing:

1) Through our ongoing partnerships with Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum there are over 55 million
records awaiting us all.

2) Through JewishGen's OWBR Project, effort is well underway to
index and record millions of burials in Jewish cemeteries
throughout the world.

3) JewishGen is busily engaged in establishing and solidifying
contacts and partnerships with other organizations, institutions,
museums and with our counterparts currently living in the Eastern
European Jewish communities.

4) JewishGen has developed a plan for our database infrastructure
(All Country, All Topic, All Holocaust) which is going to take an
effort far beyond the capabilities of our current database team's
volunteer time. This means the pressing need for both full time
professional technical staff and volunteers with technical
skills.

5) JewishGen will be continuing to pursue avenues and costs for
implementing a document management and retrieval system to link
to our award winning website.

Education:

1) JewishGen has been recognized throughout the world for the
educational value of so many of our projects, including the
Yizkor Book Translation Project, ShtetLinks, ShtetlSchleppers, to
name a few. These projects are being expanded as we speak and we
look forward to everyone's participation.

2) We are developing a host of Youth Projects to educate the
younger generation and bring them into our grass roots efforts.
You'll be hearing a lot more on this throughout the new year.

3.) JewishGen has software to offer real time Chat Rooms where we
can hold ongoing lectures and classroom instruction on a host of
topics of interest to us all.

Fundraising:

1) JewishGen is in final preparations of both a strategic plan
and fundraising outline to present to funding organizations all
over the world.

2) JewishGen has just launched the JewishGenMall and is
continuing to expand the products and resource materials
available.

3) JewishGen must increase the number of financial supporters
among the tens of thousands who use our services. We improved
this year and are now up to 2,146 contributors which is progress,
but still represents only a very tiny fraction of those who use
JewishGen daily.

We do want to thank all of you who have come forward this past
year in sharing your knowledge, your skills and your financial
resources.

To insure this is a 2001 Odyssey for all of us, we can only lay the
groundwork to achieve the project goals and to just maintain the
current level of usage. We must all begin to ask some very
serious questions of ourselves:

Where can I best get involved?

What skills can I bring to this table?

What project is most interesting to me so that I can feel a
part of this worthy effort?

How can I help, individually and through contacts, to assist
JewishGen reach the financial level it must to properly staff and
manage all these projects for me and my family, today and into
the future?

Please let us know your interests by reading and answering the
requests we will be making for volunteers in the near future.
Please share your ideas and your skills so we can find a place
for you on this team. And please, help us get a jump start into
the new millennium with a tax deductible contribution so we can
all begin to concentrate on these invaluable projects rather than
on "Imagining the World..."! <grin>

So, despite the continuing growth and despite the day to day
challenges of the year 2000, here we go! We are off into 2001,
into a new millennium...sharing all the thrills and joys of
connecting and re-connecting family...of educating and bringing
new meaning to our Jewish heritage, one we hope you will share
with us... in peace, in health and with a new prosperity.

Below you will find a message that came into JewishGen's Yizkor
Book Project which verbalizes some of the meaning of the work
everyone is doing to preserve our history for future generations.
Perhaps, after the first reading it will give us all better
insight into why JewishGen is engaged in the projects we hold so
dear to our hearts. Knowledge of our history can indeed
bridge gaps towards better understanding and mutual respect...
and these qualities are indeed a precursor for PEACE! Please take
a few moments to read it, to feel it and to look beyond the words
to perhaps a new meaning and dimension to what we are all doing
together in one of the greatest grass roots effort ever!

from all of us at JewishGen, we wish you and your families a very
happy, healthy and prosperous New Year!

Susan

Susan E. King
President
JewishGen, Inc.

******************************************
Dateline: Plock, Poland - December 24, 2000
To: JewishGen Yizkor Book Project

I have just read your material and decided to write a few words
to you. I am a young Pole (29) and I have been interested in the
Yedwabne tragedy for a few weeks. The very first thing I came
across about Yedwabne was a huge article published by a Polish
daily newspaper "GAZETA" in November. It was a kind of public
response after publishing a book by Gratz (I haven't read it
yet). I have to admit that the Yedwabne tragedy really shocked
me. It is extremely painful for me for two reasons. The first one
is that I can't believe that such things had happened (though I
am not doubtful at all) and the second is that almost nothing is
being done to "reconcile" the two nations. All those murders
should have been punished many years ago. I totally support your
efforts towards revealing the truth about this mass murder. I
often ask myself why it is so hard to understand, accept and
respect, why it is far easier to hate, ignore and underestimate.
I am a young man and I am trying to be as far objective as I can.
I adore Isaac B. Singer literature and I find a lot about Jewish
customs, living and history through reading his books. Nobody has ever
forced me to do that. There are a lot of young people like me and of
course many others who could be described as anti-semitic. Hate isn't born
from itself. It is born because of certain thoughtless actions >from some
narrow-minded Poles and Jews. I think that the truth about Yedwabne must
come to light and that light should be seen by everyone. At the same time I
would really wish Jewish communities (especially in the US) made
efforts towards reconciliation and creation of new relationships
between Poles and Jews. Opening people's minds seems still
difficult. I am writing this on Christmas Eve - one of the
greatest holidays of Christianity and I think that it might shed
a ray of hope and light on our relationships. These are just a
few words that I wanted to say. They don't bring anything
important but ...... with respect, understanding and hope for
better future

M.J.


Submitted by
Shelley Kellerman Pollero, Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
Severna Park, Maryland
rkpollero@starpower.net


Alien Registration Number- useful in research? #general

Steven Jacobs <noahben99@...>
 

I recently received a copy of my grandfather's
Petition for Naturalization. The papers included his
Alien Registration number. I am wondering if anyone
knows if having this number could lead me to any new
information, such as an application he may have filled
out when applying for the alien registration number.
If so, could you give me any lead on how I persue
this?
What might I expect or hope to find?

Thanks!

Steven Jacobs


Re: Immigration to USA through Canada #general

Howard M. Rensin <hrensin@...>
 

The immigrant records of those entering Canada are in the Canadian
Archives in Ottawa and the U.S. records of those who crossed >from Canada are
in the National Archives in Washington with copies at different branches. I
believe the N.Y.C branch of the National Archives also has copies of those
records on microfilm.
The records of those who crossed >from Canada where often kept on 3x5
cards and that is the format you will see them in when you review the
microfilm. The hand writing can be 'challenging'.
Good luck.

My grandfather, Harry Weinar (originally Weinarab?), came to the USA
through Canada >from Russia (possible Sevestopol). Is there any way
one can find lists of immigrants who entered >from Canada? I don't
think he was in Canada for very long. Any ideas?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Alien Registration Number- useful in research? #general

Steven Jacobs <noahben99@...>
 

I recently received a copy of my grandfather's
Petition for Naturalization. The papers included his
Alien Registration number. I am wondering if anyone
knows if having this number could lead me to any new
information, such as an application he may have filled
out when applying for the alien registration number.
If so, could you give me any lead on how I persue
this?
What might I expect or hope to find?

Thanks!

Steven Jacobs


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Immigration to USA through Canada #general

Howard M. Rensin <hrensin@...>
 

The immigrant records of those entering Canada are in the Canadian
Archives in Ottawa and the U.S. records of those who crossed >from Canada are
in the National Archives in Washington with copies at different branches. I
believe the N.Y.C branch of the National Archives also has copies of those
records on microfilm.
The records of those who crossed >from Canada where often kept on 3x5
cards and that is the format you will see them in when you review the
microfilm. The hand writing can be 'challenging'.
Good luck.

My grandfather, Harry Weinar (originally Weinarab?), came to the USA
through Canada >from Russia (possible Sevestopol). Is there any way
one can find lists of immigrants who entered >from Canada? I don't
think he was in Canada for very long. Any ideas?


Re: Locating Kuzmina #hungary

AttilaRona@...
 

Beregszilv=E1s was in Bereg County, which was between M=E1ramaros and Szabol=
cs=20
Counties. Beth Long is correct, they are the same, Kuzmino is the Russian=20
name, now it is in Munkacsevo County.

Attila R=F3na


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Locating Kuzmina #hungary

AttilaRona@...
 

Beregszilv=E1s was in Bereg County, which was between M=E1ramaros and Szabol=
cs=20
Counties. Beth Long is correct, they are the same, Kuzmino is the Russian=20
name, now it is in Munkacsevo County.

Attila R=F3na


Re: áòðééï: 1828 tax census #hungary

Chaim Frenkel <chaimf@...>
 

Unusual among ashkenazim.

But what if the father died before the son was born.

<chaim>

"TS" == Tsvi Sinai <t_sinai1@netvision.net.il> writes:
TS> As it is quite unusual that a son has the same first name as his father
TS> unlike the Gentile
TS> custom - junior ), it would be his grandfather, which was and still is quite
TS> customary.

TS> Tsvi Sinai, Givatayim, Israel

On the 1828 census, only the names of heads of households are listed. Most
likely, this is the father of your g-g-grandfather, who had the same first
name.
--
Chaim Frenkel Nonlinear Knowledge, Inc.
chaimf@pobox.com +1-718-236-0183


Re: Jewish Naming Customs #hungary

Chaim Frenkel <chaimf@...>
 

Bukovina might be more inclined to the sephardic customs.

<chaim>

"DaB" == David and BethLong <dnblong@cts.com> writes:
DaB> Hello List;
DaB> Thanks to all who corrected me on the naming question. I'm not Jewish
DaB> myself, and was unaware of the custom. In my own research (Bukovina
DaB> Szekely), the opposite is true; the first son is nearly always named after
DaB> the father (and the first daughter after the mother)

DaB> Beth Long

DaB> As it is quite unusual that a son has the same first name as his father
DaB> unlike the Gentile
DaB> custom - junior ), it would be his grandfather, which was and still is
DaB> quite
DaB> customary.

--
Chaim Frenkel Nonlinear Knowledge, Inc.
chaimf@pobox.com +1-718-236-0183


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: áòðééï: 1828 tax census #hungary

Chaim Frenkel <chaimf@...>
 

Unusual among ashkenazim.

But what if the father died before the son was born.

<chaim>

"TS" == Tsvi Sinai <t_sinai1@netvision.net.il> writes:
TS> As it is quite unusual that a son has the same first name as his father
TS> unlike the Gentile
TS> custom - junior ), it would be his grandfather, which was and still is quite
TS> customary.

TS> Tsvi Sinai, Givatayim, Israel

On the 1828 census, only the names of heads of households are listed. Most
likely, this is the father of your g-g-grandfather, who had the same first
name.
--
Chaim Frenkel Nonlinear Knowledge, Inc.
chaimf@pobox.com +1-718-236-0183


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Jewish Naming Customs #hungary

Chaim Frenkel <chaimf@...>
 

Bukovina might be more inclined to the sephardic customs.

<chaim>

"DaB" == David and BethLong <dnblong@cts.com> writes:
DaB> Hello List;
DaB> Thanks to all who corrected me on the naming question. I'm not Jewish
DaB> myself, and was unaware of the custom. In my own research (Bukovina
DaB> Szekely), the opposite is true; the first son is nearly always named after
DaB> the father (and the first daughter after the mother)

DaB> Beth Long

DaB> As it is quite unusual that a son has the same first name as his father
DaB> unlike the Gentile
DaB> custom - junior ), it would be his grandfather, which was and still is
DaB> quite
DaB> customary.

--
Chaim Frenkel Nonlinear Knowledge, Inc.
chaimf@pobox.com +1-718-236-0183


Re: More 1869 census records #hungary

korman3 <korman3@...>
 

In reply to an inquiry about the status of filming in Nitra and
Bratislava, I got an interesting reply >from the Morman library in Salt
Lake. Apparently, 1869 census records for the counties of Bars,
Esztergom, Komarom, Nitra, Abuaj-Torna and Szepes have been added to the
catalog. The trick is that you can only get the film numbers >from the
catalog that is in Salt Lake, they are not online yet and are not on the
most recent CD roms that the branch libraries have.

I have asked them to send me a printout of all of the film numbers and
towns to which the films apply. Presuming that I receive this, I will
make the information available to all of you, probably by giving it to
our webmaster to somehow get it into the HSIG database.

As for the filming status, they declined to provide any information.

Debbi


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: More 1869 census records #hungary

korman3 <korman3@...>
 

In reply to an inquiry about the status of filming in Nitra and
Bratislava, I got an interesting reply >from the Morman library in Salt
Lake. Apparently, 1869 census records for the counties of Bars,
Esztergom, Komarom, Nitra, Abuaj-Torna and Szepes have been added to the
catalog. The trick is that you can only get the film numbers >from the
catalog that is in Salt Lake, they are not online yet and are not on the
most recent CD roms that the branch libraries have.

I have asked them to send me a printout of all of the film numbers and
towns to which the films apply. Presuming that I receive this, I will
make the information available to all of you, probably by giving it to
our webmaster to somehow get it into the HSIG database.

As for the filming status, they declined to provide any information.

Debbi


Re: US Census Records and the American Community Survey #hungary

Herb Meyers <herbiem@...>
 

The survey sounds much like the long census form some people received
last year as part of the regular census.

Herb Meyers
Boulder, CO
herbiem@mindspring.com

-----Original Message-----
From: moishe@langsam.com <moishe@langsam.com>
To: Hungarian SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Date: Wednesday, January 03, 2001 1:16 PM
Subject: US Census Records and the American Community Survey


Hi,

I know there has been some talk of preserving your own census
responses. I
would like to present a new dimension to the US Census and ask if
anybody
knows if this also took place prior to 1930?

I just received >from the US Dept of Commerce an American Community
Survey.
The Census Bureau describes it as a survey to provide more timely data
than
data typically collected once every ten years. It is 22 pages long and
asks


*re: wisdom on name transliterations? #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Joan,

You raise a very important point in genealogical research, mainly
that of East European Jewish subjects surnames spellings. Borders,
rulers and languages have changed so much in that particular region
that it is almost *impossible* to establish the concept of EXACT
spelling.

In my own experience, I found over 15 different variations for the
family name Venetianer which is quite an unique surname. What can
then be said of common surnames such as Weisz, Klein or Schwartz?

Also, never forget that surnames could change according to the
predominant language at a given period of time. In Hungary, for
example, "magyarositas" was a very common practice. Wolf became
Farkas, Stern became Csillag, Weisz became Feher, Feldman became
Mezo:s or Mezei and Klein, Kiss (and so on). The same happened in
other countries of Eastern Europe. Even sephardi Jews, who fled >from
the Inquisition, took German names when they emigrated to German
speaking countries (Montefiori became Blumenthal, Nogueira turned
into Nussbaum and so on).

My personal opinion is that ALL variations must be investigated. One
way to establish if a given spelling variation is relevant is to run
a Daitch-Mokotoff (D-M) soundex test. Just to make my point, how
close are the spellings of the surnames Venetianer and Finazie? In
D-M soundex they are almost **identical**! (D-M # 763690 and 764000)

the best
Tom

At 00:00 -0600 03.01.01, Hungarian SIG digest wrote:
>| Date: Mon, 01 Jan 2001 19:46:23 -0500
>| X-Message-Number: 5
>|
>| I have been entering general data into a spreadsheet for a particular
>| Hungarian county for posting on H-SIG, and am wondering whether the group
>| has any wisdom on the most appropriate method to deal with last name
>| spelling issues. ... If anyone has any views on this, please let
>| me know.
>| --Joan Hartman
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-. -.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-. -.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: US Census Records and the American Community Survey #hungary

Herb Meyers <herbiem@...>
 

The survey sounds much like the long census form some people received
last year as part of the regular census.

Herb Meyers
Boulder, CO
herbiem@mindspring.com

-----Original Message-----
From: moishe@langsam.com <moishe@langsam.com>
To: Hungarian SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Date: Wednesday, January 03, 2001 1:16 PM
Subject: US Census Records and the American Community Survey


Hi,

I know there has been some talk of preserving your own census
responses. I
would like to present a new dimension to the US Census and ask if
anybody
knows if this also took place prior to 1930?

I just received >from the US Dept of Commerce an American Community
Survey.
The Census Bureau describes it as a survey to provide more timely data
than
data typically collected once every ten years. It is 22 pages long and
asks


Hungary SIG #Hungary *re: wisdom on name transliterations? #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Joan,

You raise a very important point in genealogical research, mainly
that of East European Jewish subjects surnames spellings. Borders,
rulers and languages have changed so much in that particular region
that it is almost *impossible* to establish the concept of EXACT
spelling.

In my own experience, I found over 15 different variations for the
family name Venetianer which is quite an unique surname. What can
then be said of common surnames such as Weisz, Klein or Schwartz?

Also, never forget that surnames could change according to the
predominant language at a given period of time. In Hungary, for
example, "magyarositas" was a very common practice. Wolf became
Farkas, Stern became Csillag, Weisz became Feher, Feldman became
Mezo:s or Mezei and Klein, Kiss (and so on). The same happened in
other countries of Eastern Europe. Even sephardi Jews, who fled >from
the Inquisition, took German names when they emigrated to German
speaking countries (Montefiori became Blumenthal, Nogueira turned
into Nussbaum and so on).

My personal opinion is that ALL variations must be investigated. One
way to establish if a given spelling variation is relevant is to run
a Daitch-Mokotoff (D-M) soundex test. Just to make my point, how
close are the spellings of the surnames Venetianer and Finazie? In
D-M soundex they are almost **identical**! (D-M # 763690 and 764000)

the best
Tom

At 00:00 -0600 03.01.01, Hungarian SIG digest wrote:
>| Date: Mon, 01 Jan 2001 19:46:23 -0500
>| X-Message-Number: 5
>|
>| I have been entering general data into a spreadsheet for a particular
>| Hungarian county for posting on H-SIG, and am wondering whether the group
>| has any wisdom on the most appropriate method to deal with last name
>| spelling issues. ... If anyone has any views on this, please let
>| me know.
>| --Joan Hartman
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-. -.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-. -.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Re: Workmen's Circle, Arbeter Ring #general

Elliott Terman <termite@...>
 

My MGF and MGM are buried in the Workmen's Circle, Arbiter Ring in the
Wellwood Cemetery in Pinelawn, NY. If you feel so inclined you could
contact the cemetery office. I do not have a current telephone number
right close to me ... but, the number can be gotten >from information
... and even online. Go to http://www.switchboard.com
Elliott Terman
New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Workmen's Circle, Arbeter Ring #general

Elliott Terman <termite@...>
 

My MGF and MGM are buried in the Workmen's Circle, Arbiter Ring in the
Wellwood Cemetery in Pinelawn, NY. If you feel so inclined you could
contact the cemetery office. I do not have a current telephone number
right close to me ... but, the number can be gotten >from information
... and even online. Go to http://www.switchboard.com
Elliott Terman
New York