Date   

Re: Vredehoek Shul, Cape town. #southafrica

Haim pogrund
 

Dear Beryl,

The Vredehoek Shul aka as the Beit Hamidrash Hachadash was exactly that.
It was the successor to the Constitution Street Shul which I do
remember vaguely >from my childhood. I remember the creaking wooden
floors and the very special atmosphere which exuded >from the old
books as well as >from the very religious members of the congregation.
It closed down in 1939 or 1940 or thereabouts because of the change
in ethnicity of the area and the movement of the Jewish population,
and the Vredehoek Shul became it's successor.The Constitution Street
Shul was the most orthodox shul in Cape Town and was true to the
Litvak Misnagid tradition.
The first Rabbi of the new Vredehoek Shul and who came >from the
Constitution Street Shul, was the very revered and fine Jew, Rabbi
M.Chaim Mirvish, a Lithuanian Rabbi in the true tradition. He was the
Sandak at my Brit Mila and I recall subsequently visiting him just
before my Barmitzvah with my mother to obtain his blessing.
Upon his death, his position was filled by Rabbi E.Duchinsky, a
different type of Jew entirely, of Hungarian origin but very
knowledgeable and erudite in his own way. He was a survivor of the
Shoa.
An interesting story which is told by Phil Greenstein who was the
Shul secretary at the time, I think demonstrates the nature of the
man.
A member of the congregation had died and for one reason or another
the Hevra Kadisha could not carry out it's function so that when
Greenstein told Duchinsky of the problem, he said, "Come on Phil
let's go," and off they went to the house of the deceased. While
Greenstein stood petrified and sweating profusely in the far corner
of the room, Duchinsky or "Dutch" as we affectionately called
him,rolled up his sleeves and carried out this most important and
holy task of Tahara or cleansing of the dead before burial.This,
indicates more tha anything the nature of the man.
If I am not very much mistaken he was followed by Reverend Marcus
upon leaving for Israel.
The Reverend Rabinowitz you mention was a special individual and a
fine Jew to boot. He was the Baal Tefilla or Hazzan Sheini of the
Shul and his energetic but reedy "davening" on the High Festivals
still rings in my ears. He sported a small white goatee with a little
bit of fluff under the lower lip. He was not a rabbi. Among his great
talents was the Shofar Blozzen which was enough to "awaken the dead
or the fox >from his lair in the morning." His progeny were very
musical as well and were part of the local secular musical scene in
Cape Town.
I hope that this answers many of your questions. I recall as well the
various "Kamitte" members of the Shul and the genteel bickering that
would go on continually over the years.
It is a pity that this Shul has died as have so many others of
the South Africa that we knew.Sadly,this is the death knell of
perhaps one the finest Jewish Communities in the Golah of the
twentieth century.
"Yihieh Zichro Baruch"

Haim Pogrund
Jerusalem.


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Re: Vredehoek Shul, Cape town. #southafrica

Haim pogrund
 

Dear Beryl,

The Vredehoek Shul aka as the Beit Hamidrash Hachadash was exactly that.
It was the successor to the Constitution Street Shul which I do
remember vaguely >from my childhood. I remember the creaking wooden
floors and the very special atmosphere which exuded >from the old
books as well as >from the very religious members of the congregation.
It closed down in 1939 or 1940 or thereabouts because of the change
in ethnicity of the area and the movement of the Jewish population,
and the Vredehoek Shul became it's successor.The Constitution Street
Shul was the most orthodox shul in Cape Town and was true to the
Litvak Misnagid tradition.
The first Rabbi of the new Vredehoek Shul and who came >from the
Constitution Street Shul, was the very revered and fine Jew, Rabbi
M.Chaim Mirvish, a Lithuanian Rabbi in the true tradition. He was the
Sandak at my Brit Mila and I recall subsequently visiting him just
before my Barmitzvah with my mother to obtain his blessing.
Upon his death, his position was filled by Rabbi E.Duchinsky, a
different type of Jew entirely, of Hungarian origin but very
knowledgeable and erudite in his own way. He was a survivor of the
Shoa.
An interesting story which is told by Phil Greenstein who was the
Shul secretary at the time, I think demonstrates the nature of the
man.
A member of the congregation had died and for one reason or another
the Hevra Kadisha could not carry out it's function so that when
Greenstein told Duchinsky of the problem, he said, "Come on Phil
let's go," and off they went to the house of the deceased. While
Greenstein stood petrified and sweating profusely in the far corner
of the room, Duchinsky or "Dutch" as we affectionately called
him,rolled up his sleeves and carried out this most important and
holy task of Tahara or cleansing of the dead before burial.This,
indicates more tha anything the nature of the man.
If I am not very much mistaken he was followed by Reverend Marcus
upon leaving for Israel.
The Reverend Rabinowitz you mention was a special individual and a
fine Jew to boot. He was the Baal Tefilla or Hazzan Sheini of the
Shul and his energetic but reedy "davening" on the High Festivals
still rings in my ears. He sported a small white goatee with a little
bit of fluff under the lower lip. He was not a rabbi. Among his great
talents was the Shofar Blozzen which was enough to "awaken the dead
or the fox >from his lair in the morning." His progeny were very
musical as well and were part of the local secular musical scene in
Cape Town.
I hope that this answers many of your questions. I recall as well the
various "Kamitte" members of the Shul and the genteel bickering that
would go on continually over the years.
It is a pity that this Shul has died as have so many others of
the South Africa that we knew.Sadly,this is the death knell of
perhaps one the finest Jewish Communities in the Golah of the
twentieth century.
"Yihieh Zichro Baruch"

Haim Pogrund
Jerusalem.


A word about copyrights #yizkorbooks

Harriet Brown <hnbrown@...>
 

Dear Yizkor Book Project list members,

Copyright is an issue that comes up frequently when translating yizkor
books. Like other organizations, JewishGen has put in place certain legal
requirements, such as donor agreements, to insure that neither JewishGen
nor the Yizkor Book Project violates copyrights in translating and putting
online text >from yizkor books.

The question of what is copyrighted and what is not can be confusing.
Recently someone at JewishGen came across a site that has a terrific
explanation of some of the complexities of this issue. For anyone who is
interested, that explanation may be found at
http://www.ancestry.com/library/view/columns/eastman/3714.asp.

Happy reading!

Harriet Brown
Madison, Wisconsin, USA
Yizkor Book Project volunteer


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks A word about copyrights #yizkorbooks

Harriet Brown <hnbrown@...>
 

Dear Yizkor Book Project list members,

Copyright is an issue that comes up frequently when translating yizkor
books. Like other organizations, JewishGen has put in place certain legal
requirements, such as donor agreements, to insure that neither JewishGen
nor the Yizkor Book Project violates copyrights in translating and putting
online text >from yizkor books.

The question of what is copyrighted and what is not can be confusing.
Recently someone at JewishGen came across a site that has a terrific
explanation of some of the complexities of this issue. For anyone who is
interested, that explanation may be found at
http://www.ancestry.com/library/view/columns/eastman/3714.asp.

Happy reading!

Harriet Brown
Madison, Wisconsin, USA
Yizkor Book Project volunteer


Norwegian Jews before the second world war #belarus

Eshel <eshel@...>
 

“-historien om Kristansundsjødene” is a new book (in Norwegian) written by
Ove Borøchstein published last year by Ibs forlag in Norway. The book
describes the Jews that came to the city of Kristansund >from about 1910, The
Jewish community in Kristansund and the end of this community in the Second
World War.
The book names most of the Jews that lived in the city (about 400) and write
some details about the most famous families (include many pictures). The
book describes the background for Jews immigration to Norway, their
occupation and the relation with the rest of the population.
The most known families described in the book are:
BODD, MOSES, BENKOW, DWORSKY, REIFF, MENDEL, FISCHER, MALINIAK, KORITZINSKY,
HIRSCH, BERMANN, BORØCHSTEIN and GRANSTEIN.

Searching: HOLTZMAN/GOLCMAN >from Stolin and Pinsk. LASKOV >from Borisov.
LIFSHITZ >from Mena (Ukraine). KRUGMAN >from Kiev (Ukraine).

Eshel Tzur
Norway
eshel@bigfoot.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus Norwegian Jews before the second world war #belarus

Eshel <eshel@...>
 

“-historien om Kristansundsjødene” is a new book (in Norwegian) written by
Ove Borøchstein published last year by Ibs forlag in Norway. The book
describes the Jews that came to the city of Kristansund >from about 1910, The
Jewish community in Kristansund and the end of this community in the Second
World War.
The book names most of the Jews that lived in the city (about 400) and write
some details about the most famous families (include many pictures). The
book describes the background for Jews immigration to Norway, their
occupation and the relation with the rest of the population.
The most known families described in the book are:
BODD, MOSES, BENKOW, DWORSKY, REIFF, MENDEL, FISCHER, MALINIAK, KORITZINSKY,
HIRSCH, BERMANN, BORØCHSTEIN and GRANSTEIN.

Searching: HOLTZMAN/GOLCMAN >from Stolin and Pinsk. LASKOV >from Borisov.
LIFSHITZ >from Mena (Ukraine). KRUGMAN >from Kiev (Ukraine).

Eshel Tzur
Norway
eshel@bigfoot.com


Birth/Marriage Certificates #belarus

jacquey@...
 

I am interested in finding the birth & marriage certificates for my
grandfather, JACOB GITTEN, who was born in Romonov, Mogilov in 1882
and was married somewhere between 1902 - 1910. Does anyone have any
suggestions?
JACQUEY MOSS
PHOENIX, ARIZONA, USA
reply to:
jacquey@juno.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus Birth/Marriage Certificates #belarus

jacquey@...
 

I am interested in finding the birth & marriage certificates for my
grandfather, JACOB GITTEN, who was born in Romonov, Mogilov in 1882
and was married somewhere between 1902 - 1910. Does anyone have any
suggestions?
JACQUEY MOSS
PHOENIX, ARIZONA, USA
reply to:
jacquey@juno.com


Leizer/Eliezer & "There Once Was a World" #general

Pamela Weisberger <thewks@...>
 

Varda Epstein asked if the name "Leizer" was a kinui for "Eliezer" or a
Yiddish translation.

I had also wondered the same thing since I was told that my great
grandfather's name was "Eliezer Besser" but the Jewish Polish Records
Indexing Project (and other documents I've received) list only a "Layzar
Besser" who appears to be the same person. Then in reading recently a
wonderful book "There Once Was a World" by Yaffa Eliach, I found a
reference to a judge named "Reb Eliezer Yeshoshua Eilkanski," who
was "known affectionately" as "Reb Layzer Dayyan." >from this I feel
fairly certain that one is a nickname (and easier to trip off the tongue)
for the other, and, even on more formal occasions--such as signing as a
witness for a birth--an Eliezer would identify himself as a "Layzer."

(I also highly recommend the above-mentioned book which may be familiar to
most genners but new to me. At more than 800 pages it is "A 900-Year
Chronicle of the Shtetl of Eishyshok" published in 1998 by Little-Brown &
Co, 1999 in paperback by First Back Bay. Even though I have no connection
to this shtetl, I feel I have gained incredible insights into the
day-to-day existence of my relatives who lived in other places throughout
Eastern Europe. In chapters such as "Heder Education," "The Bathhouse,"
"Market Day," "Rites of Passage," "Medical Care," 'Emigration to
America," "In Hiding," etc. the author has vividly captured the
essence...and the universality of the Jewish experience in whatever shtetl
our ancestors called home.)

Pamela Weisberger
thewks@hotmail.com
Santa Monica, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Leizer/Eliezer & "There Once Was a World" #general

Pamela Weisberger <thewks@...>
 

Varda Epstein asked if the name "Leizer" was a kinui for "Eliezer" or a
Yiddish translation.

I had also wondered the same thing since I was told that my great
grandfather's name was "Eliezer Besser" but the Jewish Polish Records
Indexing Project (and other documents I've received) list only a "Layzar
Besser" who appears to be the same person. Then in reading recently a
wonderful book "There Once Was a World" by Yaffa Eliach, I found a
reference to a judge named "Reb Eliezer Yeshoshua Eilkanski," who
was "known affectionately" as "Reb Layzer Dayyan." >from this I feel
fairly certain that one is a nickname (and easier to trip off the tongue)
for the other, and, even on more formal occasions--such as signing as a
witness for a birth--an Eliezer would identify himself as a "Layzer."

(I also highly recommend the above-mentioned book which may be familiar to
most genners but new to me. At more than 800 pages it is "A 900-Year
Chronicle of the Shtetl of Eishyshok" published in 1998 by Little-Brown &
Co, 1999 in paperback by First Back Bay. Even though I have no connection
to this shtetl, I feel I have gained incredible insights into the
day-to-day existence of my relatives who lived in other places throughout
Eastern Europe. In chapters such as "Heder Education," "The Bathhouse,"
"Market Day," "Rites of Passage," "Medical Care," 'Emigration to
America," "In Hiding," etc. the author has vividly captured the
essence...and the universality of the Jewish experience in whatever shtetl
our ancestors called home.)

Pamela Weisberger
thewks@hotmail.com
Santa Monica, CA


Re: Obidiah? #general

M. Kearns <siguiria@...>
 

Is there a female equivalent to Ovadiah?

Menna

On 10 Apr 2001 MBernet@aol.com wrote:
<< I have found an Obidiah Levi whom I think could be the Edward Levi I'm
searching for. I have never heard of this name before? Is Obidiah a
Hebrew name? Would "Edward" be a possible replacement for it? >>
That would be the Hebrew prophet Ovadiah, or, in Emglish rendition,
Obidiah. Like the Arabic name, Abdullah, it means Servant of God. Edward
sounds to me like a good English approximation.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Obidiah? #general

M. Kearns <siguiria@...>
 

Is there a female equivalent to Ovadiah?

Menna

On 10 Apr 2001 MBernet@aol.com wrote:
<< I have found an Obidiah Levi whom I think could be the Edward Levi I'm
searching for. I have never heard of this name before? Is Obidiah a
Hebrew name? Would "Edward" be a possible replacement for it? >>
That would be the Hebrew prophet Ovadiah, or, in Emglish rendition,
Obidiah. Like the Arabic name, Abdullah, it means Servant of God. Edward
sounds to me like a good English approximation.


LIBINE and ROTSTEIN from London, England #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

The following two individuals were born in London and perished in
Convoy #73 >from Drancy, France, May 15, 1944, which went to Kaunas,
Lithuania / Reval, Estonia.

LIBINE, Isidore, born 8/14/1916
ROTSTEIN, Louis, born 04/28/1902

Does anyone know either of these two individuals or their families?

Thank you,
Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen LIBINE and ROTSTEIN from London, England #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

The following two individuals were born in London and perished in
Convoy #73 >from Drancy, France, May 15, 1944, which went to Kaunas,
Lithuania / Reval, Estonia.

LIBINE, Isidore, born 8/14/1916
ROTSTEIN, Louis, born 04/28/1902

Does anyone know either of these two individuals or their families?

Thank you,
Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


Re: Barkaszo, village near Munkacs #hungary

Peter I. Hidas <thidas@...>
 

I would appreciate any information on this village of
Barkaszo in the former Austria-Hungary and Czechoslovakia.
B=E1rkasz=F3
Bereg County, District of Munk=E1cs
population in 1880: 978, 1941: 1680
Jews: 1880: 124; 1910: 117; 1941: 136
In 1941 8.4% declared themselves Jewish nationality, the rest Magyar
one person declared Yiddish his mother tongue

Good hunting!

P.I.Hidas
--
Dr. Peter I. Hidas
thidas@sympatico.ca
peterhidas@yahoo.com

At my home page you can find some of my writings:
http://www3.sympatico.ca/thidas
=46or photographs go to
http://www.community.webshots.com/user/peterhidas


Information #hungary

Mario <m_xeneize@...>
 

Hello all!!
Im Mario Konig >from Israel. My father family are
from Hungary. More
particulary >from SZARVAS but in the 30`s they move to Budapest.
Im new in the genealogy stuff and i want to create my family tree.
Is any one have information about this town in Hungary?
Any one have information about the surnames Konig,Deutsch,Kron?
Thanks.
Mario


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Barkaszo, village near Munkacs #hungary

Peter I. Hidas <thidas@...>
 

I would appreciate any information on this village of
Barkaszo in the former Austria-Hungary and Czechoslovakia.
B=E1rkasz=F3
Bereg County, District of Munk=E1cs
population in 1880: 978, 1941: 1680
Jews: 1880: 124; 1910: 117; 1941: 136
In 1941 8.4% declared themselves Jewish nationality, the rest Magyar
one person declared Yiddish his mother tongue

Good hunting!

P.I.Hidas
--
Dr. Peter I. Hidas
thidas@sympatico.ca
peterhidas@yahoo.com

At my home page you can find some of my writings:
http://www3.sympatico.ca/thidas
=46or photographs go to
http://www.community.webshots.com/user/peterhidas


Hungary SIG #Hungary Information #hungary

Mario <m_xeneize@...>
 

Hello all!!
Im Mario Konig >from Israel. My father family are
from Hungary. More
particulary >from SZARVAS but in the 30`s they move to Budapest.
Im new in the genealogy stuff and i want to create my family tree.
Is any one have information about this town in Hungary?
Any one have information about the surnames Konig,Deutsch,Kron?
Thanks.
Mario


Tamas Stark #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <Lmagyar@...>
 

With permission, I am forwarding the following message >from Professor
Braham:

-----Original Message-----
From: Randolh Braham [mailto:rbraham@gc.cuny.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, April 11, 2001 8:17 PM
To: Louis Schonfeld
Subject: Re: new book and Tamas Stark


Dear Louis. Welcome home. As I already informed you once in my office, Tamas
Stark is highly regarded by his colleagues at the Institute of History of
the Hungarian Academy of Science as an expert on demography and statistics.
He is the author of a large number of studies (monographs and articles) on
the losses of Hungarian Jewry, including the one your correspondent noted.
Professor Geza Komoroczy, the head of the Judaic Studies Institute of the
Academy, identified Stark as a "minimizer," that is someone who is dedicated
to "demonstrate" that the losses of Hungarian Jewry were much lower than
those referred to by other scholars, including myself. His conclusion is
that Hungarian Jewry suffered "only" around 400,000 casualties. My estimate
of the losses is around 550,000. The popularly held view is that the
Hungarian chapter of the Holocaust claimed 600,000 lives. I wish you and
yours a very Happy Passover. Randy


Re: request for additional help finding town #hungary

Peter I. Hidas <thidas@...>
 

Zsuk=F3
Bereg County, Munk=E1csvid=E9ki j=E1r=E1s
population in 1880: 385, in 1941: 700
Jews in 1840: 7, 1880: 54, 1910: 33, 1941: 37

Best wishes,
P.I. Hidas
--
Dr. Peter I. Hidas
thidas@sympatico.ca
peterhidas@yahoo.com

At my home page you can find some of my writings:
http://www3.sympatico.ca/thidas
=46or photographs go to
http://www.community.webshots.com/user/peterhidas