Date   

Re: Shabtai #ukraine

Moshe & Esther Davis <davis@...>
 

It was usually given to someone who was
born on the Sabbath.
Or to a child who is being named after a relative named Shabsai.


Moshe & Esther Davis


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Shabtai #ukraine

Moshe & Esther Davis <davis@...>
 

It was usually given to someone who was
born on the Sabbath.
Or to a child who is being named after a relative named Shabsai.


Moshe & Esther Davis


Holocaust memorial in Berlin #germany

EllnKahn@...
 

My cousin just sent me the following information:

The website for the new Holocaust memorial in Berlin 2001-2002 (in English)
is at:

http://www.holocaust-mahnmal.de/

Ellen Kahn Homewood,Illinois EllnKahn@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Please do NOT send URL citations to this list if you
have not visited the website yourself and found it working well.

We also would appreciate your suggestions regarding how to navigate
the website. MOD1


German SIG #Germany Holocaust memorial in Berlin #germany

EllnKahn@...
 

My cousin just sent me the following information:

The website for the new Holocaust memorial in Berlin 2001-2002 (in English)
is at:

http://www.holocaust-mahnmal.de/

Ellen Kahn Homewood,Illinois EllnKahn@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Please do NOT send URL citations to this list if you
have not visited the website yourself and found it working well.

We also would appreciate your suggestions regarding how to navigate
the website. MOD1


Seek Daniela and Leslie LANDSBERGER #germany

HMaut70937@...
 

I am trying to locate Daniela and Leslie LANDSBERGER, children of Herbert
and Gys LANDSBERGER, last known to live in RIDGEFIELD, CONN, for research of
the WOLFF family.

Herb Mautner, Sherman Oaks, California


German SIG #Germany Seek Daniela and Leslie LANDSBERGER #germany

HMaut70937@...
 

I am trying to locate Daniela and Leslie LANDSBERGER, children of Herbert
and Gys LANDSBERGER, last known to live in RIDGEFIELD, CONN, for research of
the WOLFF family.

Herb Mautner, Sherman Oaks, California


immigration to Bangor, Maine #lithuania

Polina <polina-olsen@...>
 

Do you have information about emigration >from Kovno or Vilna to Bangor,
Maine? My Grandfather, Samuel Charloch, emigrated in 1900 and worked as a
Lumberjack.

I wondered if this was common and if anyone knew the usual port of entry?

Any information or ideas are greatly appreciated.

Best Regards,

Polina Olsen
Polina-Olsen@attbi.com
Portland, OR


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania immigration to Bangor, Maine #lithuania

Polina <polina-olsen@...>
 

Do you have information about emigration >from Kovno or Vilna to Bangor,
Maine? My Grandfather, Samuel Charloch, emigrated in 1900 and worked as a
Lumberjack.

I wondered if this was common and if anyone knew the usual port of entry?

Any information or ideas are greatly appreciated.

Best Regards,

Polina Olsen
Polina-Olsen@attbi.com
Portland, OR


Re: International Tracing Cards---ITT #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

i believe the international red cross (the source of the data that was transferred to yad vashem) added a card for each survivor that they had record of, and added an additional card for each inquiry about a person. in some cases these inquiries can also be useful for tracing family, since they list the name and address of someone who tried to find the person after the war. (for more information see <http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/arc.txt>.)

it seems a little peculiar to be listing a camp survivor in 1951, six years after the end of the war, so perhaps the card was created by a request by her or about her.


....... tom klein, toronto


"Gary Gershfield" <gmgkpc@hotmail.com> wrote:

I received a photocopy of my great-grandmother's International
Tracing Card-ITT >from Yad Vashem,who informed me that they did not
have this particular file # in their library.
My great-grandmother emigrated to New York after the
war.The card was dated 1951 with all of her particulars such as date
and place of birth,next of kin,etc.
By having this card appear,does this mean she was in
a concentration camp?
I already wrote to the Red Cross.
Any other suggestions to this mystery? Sincerely,
Gary Gershfield Forest Hills,NY Resaerching SZIRMAY


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: International Tracing Cards---ITT #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

i believe the international red cross (the source of the data that was transferred to yad vashem) added a card for each survivor that they had record of, and added an additional card for each inquiry about a person. in some cases these inquiries can also be useful for tracing family, since they list the name and address of someone who tried to find the person after the war. (for more information see <http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/arc.txt>.)

it seems a little peculiar to be listing a camp survivor in 1951, six years after the end of the war, so perhaps the card was created by a request by her or about her.


....... tom klein, toronto


"Gary Gershfield" <gmgkpc@hotmail.com> wrote:

I received a photocopy of my great-grandmother's International
Tracing Card-ITT >from Yad Vashem,who informed me that they did not
have this particular file # in their library.
My great-grandmother emigrated to New York after the
war.The card was dated 1951 with all of her particulars such as date
and place of birth,next of kin,etc.
By having this card appear,does this mean she was in
a concentration camp?
I already wrote to the Red Cross.
Any other suggestions to this mystery? Sincerely,
Gary Gershfield Forest Hills,NY Resaerching SZIRMAY


Subcarpathian project #hungary

Jordan Auslander <jausland@...>
 

I've been developing a composite picture af what Jewish records are in
the Uzgorod/Zarkapatska archives through what record abstracts Lou
Schonfeld asd I have been able to obtain, this is a preliminary
inventory, please forgive the lost formatting

200 books of Jewish records to 1895 then 1600 combined volumes
JEWISH Record books: B=birth, M=marriage, D=death
Beregovo city BMD 1877-1885
Irshava dist. BMD 1851-1879
BMD 1851-1878
BM 1888-1895
D 1871-1878
B 1857-1895
(D 1871-1881)
Veliki Berezny dist. #1650-7, 9 B 1857-1886;1886-1895
Perecin dist. #1650-7, 9 B 1846-1884
B 1867-1883
M 1837-1885
M 1857-1885;1886-1895
D 1849-1885
D 1858-1885; 1886-1895
Vinogradava dist. B 1873-1895
M 1882-1895
D 1882-1895
Nyzhi Vorota, Volevetsky dist. B 1851-1885; 1886-1895
D 1876-1895
Svalava B 1876-1886; 1887-1896
Svalyava district B 1851-1885;1886?1895
Alsó & Felsö Szlatina (Uzhorod dist.) D 1900-1906
Alsó & Felsö Szlatina (Rakchiv dist.) D 1900-1906 (no Jews)
Szlatina village (Rakchiv dist.) D 1900-1907; 1907-1919 (no Jews)
Seredne (Uzhorod dist.) #1684-9 B 1865-1885; 1887-1895
1680 (1890); 1686-88 M 1862-1885; 1887-1895
1668, 1688 D 1865-1885; 1887-1895
ShepselOberlander’s death is not registered for 1915 ? 1940 (Serednye),
since 1930 ?1943 there are no books available.
Uzhorod (city&dist.) old ritual B 1844-1849#1691; 1850-1878#1689-91;
1886-1895
M 1853-1883
M, D 1863-1885
M, D 1883-1895
D 1852-1883; 1883-1885; 1886-1895
Uzhorod (city&dist.) new ritual B 1869-1885; 1886-1894
M 1869-1885
D 1883-1885
Chop town (Uzhorod dist.) B 1886-1905
#1700 (B1863-83); 1706, (1)711 M 1879-1885
D 1876-1885; 1886-1896
Veliki Kapusany,Slovakia B 1866-1884
B 1880-1885; 1886-1895
B 1876-1885; 1886-1895
M, D 1876-1885
B,M, D 1862-1885
Sobrance, Slovakia B 1849-1885; 1886-1895
M 1860-1895
D 1850-1895
Mukacevo dist (book numbers: 1642, 1643, 1644, 1645, 1646)
B 1863-1869; 1870-1885; 1886-1895
B 1895-1896 #1580
M 1886-1895
D 1886-1895
B1896 #717 (dupes w/I)
B1897 #718
B1899 #720
B1900 #721
B1902 #722
B1903 #723
B1904 #724
B1905 #725
B1906 #726
B1907-10 #727
B1911-13 #728
B1914-16 #729
B1919 #730
B1920-21 #731
B1924-25 #732
B1927-29 #201
B1928-29 #733
B1934-36 #921
B1936 #735
B1937 #737 inc. late regs.
B1937-38 #738
B1939 #739
B1939-40 #740
M1898 #746-54
D1895-1931 #757-770
Mukacevo town & suburb B 1859-1884
B 1891 #1661; 1892 #1662; 1893; 1894
#1673, 1674, 1668-80 M 1891; 1892-1893; 1894
D 1891 #1663; 1891-1893 # 1666, #1665; 1894
Ujdavidhaza (other years not available) B 1895-1907
M 1895-1902; 1906-1906; 1921-1932
D 1895-1899; 1900-1903; 1909-1930; 1944
Ljuta (Velki Berezny) B 1899 #177
B 1900 #179
B 1901 #178
B 1907 #180
B 1907-09 #181

Uzhorod dist.: births year-vol
1902-03; 35-36 #1583
1907-09 #957
1910 #1550
1913 #1509
1914 #1557
1913-14 #955
1932 #1597
1930 #1454
1938 #1553

Uzhorod dist.: deaths year-vol
1908 #1563
1909 #1564
1910 #1558
1914 #1510
1919 #1640
1921 #763
1927 #768
1934-35 # 770
1934 #964
1934-36 #1645

Uzhorod suburbs: type, year-vol
B1881-85 #1694
B1888-90 #1695
B1888 #1704
B1882 #1705
B1886-94 #1710
B1892-95 +/- #1695
D1892 #1698
M1872 #1708
D1882 #1708

Mukacevo town
B1886-90

M1891-92
D 1891,1893


Jordan Auslander, NYC

Moderator VK: Jordan, thanks so much for this info about records available in the Uzhorod archives. Many of us are interested in organizing a project to transcribe records that are only available in this location. I, for one, have been trying to find the exact records >from Sobrance that you have confirmed are in Uzhorod. H-SIG would be interested in any suggestions you have regarding the best approach for organizing a project to gain access to this data.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Subcarpathian project #hungary

Jordan Auslander <jausland@...>
 

I've been developing a composite picture af what Jewish records are in
the Uzgorod/Zarkapatska archives through what record abstracts Lou
Schonfeld asd I have been able to obtain, this is a preliminary
inventory, please forgive the lost formatting

200 books of Jewish records to 1895 then 1600 combined volumes
JEWISH Record books: B=birth, M=marriage, D=death
Beregovo city BMD 1877-1885
Irshava dist. BMD 1851-1879
BMD 1851-1878
BM 1888-1895
D 1871-1878
B 1857-1895
(D 1871-1881)
Veliki Berezny dist. #1650-7, 9 B 1857-1886;1886-1895
Perecin dist. #1650-7, 9 B 1846-1884
B 1867-1883
M 1837-1885
M 1857-1885;1886-1895
D 1849-1885
D 1858-1885; 1886-1895
Vinogradava dist. B 1873-1895
M 1882-1895
D 1882-1895
Nyzhi Vorota, Volevetsky dist. B 1851-1885; 1886-1895
D 1876-1895
Svalava B 1876-1886; 1887-1896
Svalyava district B 1851-1885;1886?1895
Alsó & Felsö Szlatina (Uzhorod dist.) D 1900-1906
Alsó & Felsö Szlatina (Rakchiv dist.) D 1900-1906 (no Jews)
Szlatina village (Rakchiv dist.) D 1900-1907; 1907-1919 (no Jews)
Seredne (Uzhorod dist.) #1684-9 B 1865-1885; 1887-1895
1680 (1890); 1686-88 M 1862-1885; 1887-1895
1668, 1688 D 1865-1885; 1887-1895
ShepselOberlander’s death is not registered for 1915 ? 1940 (Serednye),
since 1930 ?1943 there are no books available.
Uzhorod (city&dist.) old ritual B 1844-1849#1691; 1850-1878#1689-91;
1886-1895
M 1853-1883
M, D 1863-1885
M, D 1883-1895
D 1852-1883; 1883-1885; 1886-1895
Uzhorod (city&dist.) new ritual B 1869-1885; 1886-1894
M 1869-1885
D 1883-1885
Chop town (Uzhorod dist.) B 1886-1905
#1700 (B1863-83); 1706, (1)711 M 1879-1885
D 1876-1885; 1886-1896
Veliki Kapusany,Slovakia B 1866-1884
B 1880-1885; 1886-1895
B 1876-1885; 1886-1895
M, D 1876-1885
B,M, D 1862-1885
Sobrance, Slovakia B 1849-1885; 1886-1895
M 1860-1895
D 1850-1895
Mukacevo dist (book numbers: 1642, 1643, 1644, 1645, 1646)
B 1863-1869; 1870-1885; 1886-1895
B 1895-1896 #1580
M 1886-1895
D 1886-1895
B1896 #717 (dupes w/I)
B1897 #718
B1899 #720
B1900 #721
B1902 #722
B1903 #723
B1904 #724
B1905 #725
B1906 #726
B1907-10 #727
B1911-13 #728
B1914-16 #729
B1919 #730
B1920-21 #731
B1924-25 #732
B1927-29 #201
B1928-29 #733
B1934-36 #921
B1936 #735
B1937 #737 inc. late regs.
B1937-38 #738
B1939 #739
B1939-40 #740
M1898 #746-54
D1895-1931 #757-770
Mukacevo town & suburb B 1859-1884
B 1891 #1661; 1892 #1662; 1893; 1894
#1673, 1674, 1668-80 M 1891; 1892-1893; 1894
D 1891 #1663; 1891-1893 # 1666, #1665; 1894
Ujdavidhaza (other years not available) B 1895-1907
M 1895-1902; 1906-1906; 1921-1932
D 1895-1899; 1900-1903; 1909-1930; 1944
Ljuta (Velki Berezny) B 1899 #177
B 1900 #179
B 1901 #178
B 1907 #180
B 1907-09 #181

Uzhorod dist.: births year-vol
1902-03; 35-36 #1583
1907-09 #957
1910 #1550
1913 #1509
1914 #1557
1913-14 #955
1932 #1597
1930 #1454
1938 #1553

Uzhorod dist.: deaths year-vol
1908 #1563
1909 #1564
1910 #1558
1914 #1510
1919 #1640
1921 #763
1927 #768
1934-35 # 770
1934 #964
1934-36 #1645

Uzhorod suburbs: type, year-vol
B1881-85 #1694
B1888-90 #1695
B1888 #1704
B1882 #1705
B1886-94 #1710
B1892-95 +/- #1695
D1892 #1698
M1872 #1708
D1882 #1708

Mukacevo town
B1886-90

M1891-92
D 1891,1893


Jordan Auslander, NYC

Moderator VK: Jordan, thanks so much for this info about records available in the Uzhorod archives. Many of us are interested in organizing a project to transcribe records that are only available in this location. I, for one, have been trying to find the exact records >from Sobrance that you have confirmed are in Uzhorod. H-SIG would be interested in any suggestions you have regarding the best approach for organizing a project to gain access to this data.


Re: Auschwitz or elsewhere? #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

i can't give you a definitive answer, but certainly not all hungarian jews were sent to auschwitz.

apart >from the men taken into the army's labour battalions, my mother's family, for example, were taken to austria as slave labourers.

and >from family anecdotes, the red army encircled budapest, but took its time entering the city, so the "front line" may have been quite some distance away by then. also, "after liberation" could mean many months later.

have you tried checking the records of the red cross? they kept records of both survivors and of subsequent inquiries, and were probably the source for locating your great grandmother.



....... tom klein, toronto

ps. exemptions to the deportations were rare. my grandfather was a decorated veteran, and an officer, but was deported anyway.


"Rivka Nessim" <rnessim@zahav.net.il> wrote:


Virtually all the information I have of my grandfather's family in
Budapest comes >from a letter received >from my great aunt after the
war, which was subsequently lost. My grandmother passed the
information on to me orally, and so far, all my research has
confirmed the details she gave me. One detail bewilders me and I
wonder if any of you could throw light on it:

According to my grandmother, her sister in law wrote that after
liberation she had travelled to the camp and brought her mother back
to Budapest. (My g.aunt was married to a war veteran and for this
reason was not deported together with her parents.) Her mother, my
great grandmother, died shortly after. Until recently I assume my
great grandparents were deported to Ausschwitz.

I have been told however, that the above story is incredible, and
physically impossible: the countryside on the way to Auschwitz was
one big war front, and there were no passenger trains. How could a
single woman have travelled all that way and back in just a few days,
crossing war zones, and on the return trip burdened with a very
frail, ill, elderly mother?

However, my great grandmother's death certificate does indeed
indicate that she died in Budapest shortly after liberation.

Could it be that some of the Jews of Budapest were taken to a transit
camp closer than Auschwitz? And would they have been able, from
there, to let their as yet undeported family in Budapest know where
they were?

Regards,

Rivka Nessim Ramot HaShavim, Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Auschwitz or elsewhere? #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

i can't give you a definitive answer, but certainly not all hungarian jews were sent to auschwitz.

apart >from the men taken into the army's labour battalions, my mother's family, for example, were taken to austria as slave labourers.

and >from family anecdotes, the red army encircled budapest, but took its time entering the city, so the "front line" may have been quite some distance away by then. also, "after liberation" could mean many months later.

have you tried checking the records of the red cross? they kept records of both survivors and of subsequent inquiries, and were probably the source for locating your great grandmother.



....... tom klein, toronto

ps. exemptions to the deportations were rare. my grandfather was a decorated veteran, and an officer, but was deported anyway.


"Rivka Nessim" <rnessim@zahav.net.il> wrote:


Virtually all the information I have of my grandfather's family in
Budapest comes >from a letter received >from my great aunt after the
war, which was subsequently lost. My grandmother passed the
information on to me orally, and so far, all my research has
confirmed the details she gave me. One detail bewilders me and I
wonder if any of you could throw light on it:

According to my grandmother, her sister in law wrote that after
liberation she had travelled to the camp and brought her mother back
to Budapest. (My g.aunt was married to a war veteran and for this
reason was not deported together with her parents.) Her mother, my
great grandmother, died shortly after. Until recently I assume my
great grandparents were deported to Ausschwitz.

I have been told however, that the above story is incredible, and
physically impossible: the countryside on the way to Auschwitz was
one big war front, and there were no passenger trains. How could a
single woman have travelled all that way and back in just a few days,
crossing war zones, and on the return trip burdened with a very
frail, ill, elderly mother?

However, my great grandmother's death certificate does indeed
indicate that she died in Budapest shortly after liberation.

Could it be that some of the Jews of Budapest were taken to a transit
camp closer than Auschwitz? And would they have been able, from
there, to let their as yet undeported family in Budapest know where
they were?

Regards,

Rivka Nessim Ramot HaShavim, Israel


Re: Auschwitz or elsewhere? #hungary

Ga'bor Hirsch <hirsch@...>
 

It is difficult to give a proper answer to Rivka Nissim's quuestion.
Person deported to Auschwitz only seldomly remained in there. In
majority in the cases they were distributed to many other camps. (my
mother in September to Stutthof, my girl cousin to Bergen-Belsen, my
cousin to Ravensbruck, I stayed in Auschwitz/Birkenau). Auschwitz itself
was a conglomeration of 39 camps. Auschwitz I the main camp. Auschwitz
II or Birkenau the camp were the Hungarian transports arrived and the
selection on the ramp took place. Auschwitz III with many working camps
like Monowitz or Buna an industrial plant of I.G. Farben.
The evacuation itself started already earlier, in October the BIII or
Mexico subcamp evacuated 12'799 women 961 girl were moved to BII c
subcamp, , block or barracks were dismantled and transferred inside
the "Reich" if I am correct to Bergen-Belsen. The endphase of the
evacuation started on 18. Januar.

"Approximately 65,000 prisoners initially evacuated trom Auschwitz were
sent in more than 130 transports to over ten concentration camps deep
within the Reich. The make up of individual transports are presented in
Appendix XVII. This information, assembled in table form, shows that the
largest percentage of evacuees were sent to KL Buchenwald (later KL
Dora-Mittelbau) and KL Flossenburg. Over 11,000 people were deported
from Auschwitz to each of these camps. Large groups were also sent to
Bergen-Belsen (over 3,700), Dachau (over 6,000), Gross-Rosen (at least
4,000), Mauthausen (almost 6,000), Natzweiler (around 3,500),
Ravensbruck (over 9,000), Sachsenhausen (around 2,200) and Neuengamme
(at least 750).
It has not been possible to establish the destinations of all the
transports evacuated >from Auschwitz, therefore the above mentioned
figures are only approximate and in some cases definitely lower than
they should be. The figure of 4,000 for prisoners sent in over 15
transports to Gross-Rosen seems to be particularly low."

The above lines are >from Andrzej Strzelecki's book "The evacuation,
dismantling and liberation of KL Auschwitz". In the various camps about
7000 inmates were liberated by the 60th. Army of the 1st. Ukrainan
Front commanded by General Pawel Kurozkin on the 27. January 1945.
The majority of the inmates were ill and weak and had to be treated, a
few were strong enough to start the journey home. A friend, 12 year old
twins of >from Hajduboszormeny, my uncle etc. so there was some chance to
return home and possible the other way too. The majority like me, were
taken to different places, in an earlier mail I listed several camps
(Hirek az elhurcoltakrol) were liberated inmates of different camps
waited several month for transports back home. (I returned Sept, 7 month
after liberation)

According my experiance, the most promising way was inquiery by the ITS
(International Tracing Service) a Red Cross organisation in Arolsen were
they collected and still collect information >from camps etc. of
deportees, prisoner of war, DP-s etc. It was in my mother's case more
effective as Yad Vashem.

International Tracing Service
Grosse Allee 5-9
34444 Arolsen
Germany

Holocaust and War Victims Tracing and Information Center
4700 Mount Hope Drive
Baltimore, MD 21215-3231
Phone: 410-764-5311
Fax: 410-764-4638

David Deutsch schrieb:

Rivka,

My father was in Auschwitz, where he, his parents, and younger sister
were deported to from, I think, Debrecen. Only my father survived, and
based on his description of events, and those of others who survived,
I believe the following happened:

As the Russian's approached, Auschwitz was hurriedly evacuated by the
Nazis, and many or all of the surviving inmates were forced to march
on foot great distance westward into the heart of remaining
German-held territory. Many died >from the forced march, which I
believe took place during winter weather. Those who survived ended up
in concentration camps in Germany proper (not sure if all survivors
were put in the same camp or distributed through assorted camps). My
father ended up in Dachau, where he was liberated by the Americans.

My point is that if your grand-aunt went to fetch your
great-grandmother *after* liberation of Auschwitz by the Russians,
there wouldn't have been anyone left in Auschwitz to fetch, even if
all the other considerations you cited hadn't been an issue as well
(which of course they were). It seems more likely that your
great-grandmother somehow survived the death march and ended up in
Germany proper, where, after liberation, she'd have been placed in in
a DP camp, where your grand-aunt would have been able to retrieve her.

Kind regards,

David Deutsch

Rivka Nessim wrote:

Virtually all the information I have of my grandfather's family in
Budapest
comes >from a letter received >from my great aunt after the war, which was
subsequently lost. My grandmother passed the information on to me
orally,
and so far, all my research has confirmed the details she gave me. One
detail bewilders me and I wonder if any of you could throw light on it:

According to my grandmother, her sister in law wrote that after
liberation
she had travelled to the camp and brought her mother back to
Budapest. (My
g.aunt was married to a war veteran and for this reason was not deported
together with her parents.) Her mother, my great grandmother, died
shortly
after. Until recently I assume my great grandparents were deported to
Ausschwitz.

I have been told however, that the above story is incredible, and
physically
impossible: the countryside on the way to Auschwitz was one big war
front,
and there were no passenger trains. How could a single woman have
travelled
all that way and back in just a few days, crossing war zones, and on the
return trip burdened with a very frail, ill, elderly mother?

However, my great grandmother's death certificate does indeed
indicate that
she died in Budapest shortly after liberation.

Could it be that some of the Jews of Budapest were taken to a transit
camp
closer than Auschwitz? And would they have been able, >from there, to let
their as yet undeported family in Budapest know where they were?

Regards,

Rivka Nessim
Ramot HaShavim, Israel


Latin Translation - Viewmate #hungary

Gary Luke <feraltek@...>
 

Two small samples of Latin text in old Germanic handwriting are on
ViewMate. They are >from the cover page of a list of fixed names taken on by
Jews of Arva megye in 1787. Associated with this list are three more pages
of Latin text, each with far more than these two samples.

The files can be found on the ViewMate site at
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html
Files VM2012 and VM2013

Please email any response directly to me, at feraltek@zeta.org.au

Thanks for any help

Gary


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Auschwitz or elsewhere? #hungary

Ga'bor Hirsch <hirsch@...>
 

It is difficult to give a proper answer to Rivka Nissim's quuestion.
Person deported to Auschwitz only seldomly remained in there. In
majority in the cases they were distributed to many other camps. (my
mother in September to Stutthof, my girl cousin to Bergen-Belsen, my
cousin to Ravensbruck, I stayed in Auschwitz/Birkenau). Auschwitz itself
was a conglomeration of 39 camps. Auschwitz I the main camp. Auschwitz
II or Birkenau the camp were the Hungarian transports arrived and the
selection on the ramp took place. Auschwitz III with many working camps
like Monowitz or Buna an industrial plant of I.G. Farben.
The evacuation itself started already earlier, in October the BIII or
Mexico subcamp evacuated 12'799 women 961 girl were moved to BII c
subcamp, , block or barracks were dismantled and transferred inside
the "Reich" if I am correct to Bergen-Belsen. The endphase of the
evacuation started on 18. Januar.

"Approximately 65,000 prisoners initially evacuated trom Auschwitz were
sent in more than 130 transports to over ten concentration camps deep
within the Reich. The make up of individual transports are presented in
Appendix XVII. This information, assembled in table form, shows that the
largest percentage of evacuees were sent to KL Buchenwald (later KL
Dora-Mittelbau) and KL Flossenburg. Over 11,000 people were deported
from Auschwitz to each of these camps. Large groups were also sent to
Bergen-Belsen (over 3,700), Dachau (over 6,000), Gross-Rosen (at least
4,000), Mauthausen (almost 6,000), Natzweiler (around 3,500),
Ravensbruck (over 9,000), Sachsenhausen (around 2,200) and Neuengamme
(at least 750).
It has not been possible to establish the destinations of all the
transports evacuated >from Auschwitz, therefore the above mentioned
figures are only approximate and in some cases definitely lower than
they should be. The figure of 4,000 for prisoners sent in over 15
transports to Gross-Rosen seems to be particularly low."

The above lines are >from Andrzej Strzelecki's book "The evacuation,
dismantling and liberation of KL Auschwitz". In the various camps about
7000 inmates were liberated by the 60th. Army of the 1st. Ukrainan
Front commanded by General Pawel Kurozkin on the 27. January 1945.
The majority of the inmates were ill and weak and had to be treated, a
few were strong enough to start the journey home. A friend, 12 year old
twins of >from Hajduboszormeny, my uncle etc. so there was some chance to
return home and possible the other way too. The majority like me, were
taken to different places, in an earlier mail I listed several camps
(Hirek az elhurcoltakrol) were liberated inmates of different camps
waited several month for transports back home. (I returned Sept, 7 month
after liberation)

According my experiance, the most promising way was inquiery by the ITS
(International Tracing Service) a Red Cross organisation in Arolsen were
they collected and still collect information >from camps etc. of
deportees, prisoner of war, DP-s etc. It was in my mother's case more
effective as Yad Vashem.

International Tracing Service
Grosse Allee 5-9
34444 Arolsen
Germany

Holocaust and War Victims Tracing and Information Center
4700 Mount Hope Drive
Baltimore, MD 21215-3231
Phone: 410-764-5311
Fax: 410-764-4638

David Deutsch schrieb:

Rivka,

My father was in Auschwitz, where he, his parents, and younger sister
were deported to from, I think, Debrecen. Only my father survived, and
based on his description of events, and those of others who survived,
I believe the following happened:

As the Russian's approached, Auschwitz was hurriedly evacuated by the
Nazis, and many or all of the surviving inmates were forced to march
on foot great distance westward into the heart of remaining
German-held territory. Many died >from the forced march, which I
believe took place during winter weather. Those who survived ended up
in concentration camps in Germany proper (not sure if all survivors
were put in the same camp or distributed through assorted camps). My
father ended up in Dachau, where he was liberated by the Americans.

My point is that if your grand-aunt went to fetch your
great-grandmother *after* liberation of Auschwitz by the Russians,
there wouldn't have been anyone left in Auschwitz to fetch, even if
all the other considerations you cited hadn't been an issue as well
(which of course they were). It seems more likely that your
great-grandmother somehow survived the death march and ended up in
Germany proper, where, after liberation, she'd have been placed in in
a DP camp, where your grand-aunt would have been able to retrieve her.

Kind regards,

David Deutsch

Rivka Nessim wrote:

Virtually all the information I have of my grandfather's family in
Budapest
comes >from a letter received >from my great aunt after the war, which was
subsequently lost. My grandmother passed the information on to me
orally,
and so far, all my research has confirmed the details she gave me. One
detail bewilders me and I wonder if any of you could throw light on it:

According to my grandmother, her sister in law wrote that after
liberation
she had travelled to the camp and brought her mother back to
Budapest. (My
g.aunt was married to a war veteran and for this reason was not deported
together with her parents.) Her mother, my great grandmother, died
shortly
after. Until recently I assume my great grandparents were deported to
Ausschwitz.

I have been told however, that the above story is incredible, and
physically
impossible: the countryside on the way to Auschwitz was one big war
front,
and there were no passenger trains. How could a single woman have
travelled
all that way and back in just a few days, crossing war zones, and on the
return trip burdened with a very frail, ill, elderly mother?

However, my great grandmother's death certificate does indeed
indicate that
she died in Budapest shortly after liberation.

Could it be that some of the Jews of Budapest were taken to a transit
camp
closer than Auschwitz? And would they have been able, >from there, to let
their as yet undeported family in Budapest know where they were?

Regards,

Rivka Nessim
Ramot HaShavim, Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary Latin Translation - Viewmate #hungary

Gary Luke <feraltek@...>
 

Two small samples of Latin text in old Germanic handwriting are on
ViewMate. They are >from the cover page of a list of fixed names taken on by
Jews of Arva megye in 1787. Associated with this list are three more pages
of Latin text, each with far more than these two samples.

The files can be found on the ViewMate site at
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html
Files VM2012 and VM2013

Please email any response directly to me, at feraltek@zeta.org.au

Thanks for any help

Gary


Using Viewmate effectively #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear all:

Viewmate is an extraordinary resource (*). It allows publishing
photos, documents, vital records and everything else one can imagine.
It's almost certain that somebody will decipher what the publisher's
eyes can't.

However my experience indicates that many publishers undermine their
effort to get answers to their questions. Allow me to offer some tips
on how to improve your chances to discover what you are looking for.

1) *Phrase carefully* your questions. Sometimes they are very
confusing. "I would like to know what is written in the 2nd column".
>from left to right or vice versa? On which line? Instead of such a
vague question, why not mark the column in question with a number or
by circling it? "Do you recognize the person on this photo?" Where
and when was it taken? Can you determine the country or place? In
other words, give as many clues as you can and your chances for an
answer will increase.

2) Size the scan to allow the *best reading*. Try it yourself on your
computer and see if you can view the scan clearly. If the original is
bad, make a xerox copy and reinforce the writing with a black pen,
then scan. Even photographs can be improved by Xeroxing them. Too
small and too large scans are difficult to read mainly if they
contain old handwriting. Small scans mix up letters, large scans can
result faded.

3) Use the *correct resolution*. For viewing a picture or handwriting
on the screen 72 dots per inch are recommended (and sufficient).
Larger resolutions only serve to enlarge the picture, extending their
downloading time and, in some cases, turning the scan illegible.

4) Scan in *black and white*. Usually it reads better then color
scans, mainly handwritings. Even old photographs show better in grays
then in their original sepia color.

5) *Improve scans* before publishing them. Most of the scanning
programs allow to improve contrast, luminosity and brightness. Try
these controls and find the best match by trial and error. This is
specially important when publishing tombstone inscriptions which may
look faded on the original picture. Augmenting contrast and balancing
luminosity may do the trick of turning a bad photo into something
legible.

6) Mention the *full URL path* to your scan.
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=1000
(where 1000 is the number of your picture) takes one directly to your
scan, whereas http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html only
shows Viewmate's entry page. And *don't forget* to mention the
Viewmate number of your picture!

7) Corollary of the above: *always* add "http://" to the URL address.
Inside an email message such addressing scheme allows
(double)clicking on it and jumping directly to the pointed page.
Without that prefix one is forced to copy the address, switch to the
browser and paste it in the location box.

8) *Repeat your question* on the page containing your scan. People
read your message, then try to decipher your request jumping to the
pointed page. Meantime they already forgot your question.

9) Send emails *thanking* for all replies received, even those which
missed the answer. Courtesy pays off in future requests.

I hope you will find this useful.
Wishing to all a "git yur" :-)
Tom

(*) Show your appreciation for this extraordinary service by visiting
JewishGen-erosity <http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/>


Hungary SIG #Hungary Using Viewmate effectively #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear all:

Viewmate is an extraordinary resource (*). It allows publishing
photos, documents, vital records and everything else one can imagine.
It's almost certain that somebody will decipher what the publisher's
eyes can't.

However my experience indicates that many publishers undermine their
effort to get answers to their questions. Allow me to offer some tips
on how to improve your chances to discover what you are looking for.

1) *Phrase carefully* your questions. Sometimes they are very
confusing. "I would like to know what is written in the 2nd column".
>from left to right or vice versa? On which line? Instead of such a
vague question, why not mark the column in question with a number or
by circling it? "Do you recognize the person on this photo?" Where
and when was it taken? Can you determine the country or place? In
other words, give as many clues as you can and your chances for an
answer will increase.

2) Size the scan to allow the *best reading*. Try it yourself on your
computer and see if you can view the scan clearly. If the original is
bad, make a xerox copy and reinforce the writing with a black pen,
then scan. Even photographs can be improved by Xeroxing them. Too
small and too large scans are difficult to read mainly if they
contain old handwriting. Small scans mix up letters, large scans can
result faded.

3) Use the *correct resolution*. For viewing a picture or handwriting
on the screen 72 dots per inch are recommended (and sufficient).
Larger resolutions only serve to enlarge the picture, extending their
downloading time and, in some cases, turning the scan illegible.

4) Scan in *black and white*. Usually it reads better then color
scans, mainly handwritings. Even old photographs show better in grays
then in their original sepia color.

5) *Improve scans* before publishing them. Most of the scanning
programs allow to improve contrast, luminosity and brightness. Try
these controls and find the best match by trial and error. This is
specially important when publishing tombstone inscriptions which may
look faded on the original picture. Augmenting contrast and balancing
luminosity may do the trick of turning a bad photo into something
legible.

6) Mention the *full URL path* to your scan.
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=1000
(where 1000 is the number of your picture) takes one directly to your
scan, whereas http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html only
shows Viewmate's entry page. And *don't forget* to mention the
Viewmate number of your picture!

7) Corollary of the above: *always* add "http://" to the URL address.
Inside an email message such addressing scheme allows
(double)clicking on it and jumping directly to the pointed page.
Without that prefix one is forced to copy the address, switch to the
browser and paste it in the location box.

8) *Repeat your question* on the page containing your scan. People
read your message, then try to decipher your request jumping to the
pointed page. Meantime they already forgot your question.

9) Send emails *thanking* for all replies received, even those which
missed the answer. Courtesy pays off in future requests.

I hope you will find this useful.
Wishing to all a "git yur" :-)
Tom

(*) Show your appreciation for this extraordinary service by visiting
JewishGen-erosity <http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/>