Date   

Jewish Community in Lida #belarus

Irene Newhouse <einew@...>
 

Leon Lauresh, a resident of Lida, just informed me of the URL to a page for
Lida's Jewish Community! Yes, 10 years ago, a Jewish Community was organized
again. The URL is http://lidajews.narod.ru There's an English version.
There are of course links on the Lida Shtetlink home page & on theShtetLink
what's new page.

Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI
webmaster, Lida District ShtetLink

_________________________________________________________________
Dream of owning a home? Find out how in the First-time Home Buying Guide.
http://special.msn.com/home/firsthome.armx


Belarus SIG #Belarus Jewish Community in Lida #belarus

Irene Newhouse <einew@...>
 

Leon Lauresh, a resident of Lida, just informed me of the URL to a page for
Lida's Jewish Community! Yes, 10 years ago, a Jewish Community was organized
again. The URL is http://lidajews.narod.ru There's an English version.
There are of course links on the Lida Shtetlink home page & on theShtetLink
what's new page.

Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI
webmaster, Lida District ShtetLink

_________________________________________________________________
Dream of owning a home? Find out how in the First-time Home Buying Guide.
http://special.msn.com/home/firsthome.armx


Kossuth Ference cemetery sections #hungary

ARGould21@...
 

To Steve Stein and others:
My mother and her siblings were members of the Kossuth Association. They are buried in Block 7 of a Kossuth section in Mount Hebron Cemetery in New York. I also have an uncle buried in Block 6 in a Kossuth section in Beth Israel Cemetery in Woodbridge, NJ They were all born in Elyus, Transylvania (now Aleus, Romania)not far >from Cluj.
I have always wanted to do research on the organization, but have not because I have been busy with the IAJGS indexing project in the Newark, NJ cemeteries - where incidentally, I have found several "Hungarian" sections in Union Field cemetery (in Newark, not Queens): the Oesterricher Ungarische section and the Star of Jacob-Ungarische sections.
Alice Gould
West Caldwell, NJ

Moderator VK: Please continue this discussion off-list unless message is of general interest.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Kossuth Ference cemetery sections #hungary

ARGould21@...
 

To Steve Stein and others:
My mother and her siblings were members of the Kossuth Association. They are buried in Block 7 of a Kossuth section in Mount Hebron Cemetery in New York. I also have an uncle buried in Block 6 in a Kossuth section in Beth Israel Cemetery in Woodbridge, NJ They were all born in Elyus, Transylvania (now Aleus, Romania)not far >from Cluj.
I have always wanted to do research on the organization, but have not because I have been busy with the IAJGS indexing project in the Newark, NJ cemeteries - where incidentally, I have found several "Hungarian" sections in Union Field cemetery (in Newark, not Queens): the Oesterricher Ungarische section and the Star of Jacob-Ungarische sections.
Alice Gould
West Caldwell, NJ

Moderator VK: Please continue this discussion off-list unless message is of general interest.


Beyond the Basics Seminar, NYC #hungary

Robert Friedman <rfriedman@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society announces:

Beyond the Basics -- A Full-Day Genealogical Seminar

Learn >from the experts: a variety of topics will be
covered in depth by experienced instructors, including
Gary Mokotoff, Neil Rosenstein, Karen Franklin, Estelle
Guzik, and other recognized authorities. Several classes
will highlight the remarkable collections available at
the Center for Jewish History and elsewhere in NYC.
Other presentations include Reading Tombstones, Holocaust
Research, Court Records, Vital Records, Naturalization
Records, Polish Research, and Computers and Genealogy.

In the final session of the day, Stephen Morse will
present "One-Step Webpages: A Potpourri of Genealogical
Search Tools."

Beyond the Basics
May 16, 2004
8:45 am - 5:15 pm

Hebrew Union College
One West Fourth Street
New York, NY

For further information, fees and registration,
e-mail info@... or call (212) 294-8326.

Co-sponsors:
Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute
American Jewish Historical Society
American Sefardi Federation
Leo Baeck Institute
Yeshiva University Museum
YIVO Institute for Jewish Research


January 2004 update for Yizkor Book Project #hungary

Joyce Field
 

Happy Presidents' Day to All.

My apologies to all for the late update on additions to the Yizkor
Book site for January 2004. I was out of town during the time I
usually prepare this monthly report but the efficient volunteers for
the Yizkor Book Project continued to work and donors continued to
submit new translations. Without these two important groups the
translation project could not exist. I can never thank them enough.

During January we produced 6 new entires and 17 updates. They are
flagged in the alphabetical listing at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html

New entries:

Pinkas HaKehillot Lita:
-Dotnuva
-Rumsiskes (Romsishok)
-Siluva
Pinkas HaKehillot Poland:
-Jagielnica, Ukr
Yidishe Shtet
-Dotnuva
-Siluva

Updates:
-Brzeziny, Poland
-Byarosa, Belarus
-Czyzew, Poland
-Dusetos, Lith
-Bedzin, Poland
-Gabin, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/gombin/gombin.html
-Gabin, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/gombin2/gombin2.html
-Gorodenka, Ukr
-Lida, Belarus
-Lenin, Belarus
-Losice, Poland
-Mlawa, Poland
-Oradea, Romania
-Ruzhany, Belarus
-Sosnowiec, Poland, volume 1
-Sosnowiec, Poland, volume 2
-Wyszogrod, Poland


There are many books yet to be translated, waiting only for an eager
volunteer to step up to coordinate a translation project. Our Yizkor
Book Project staff is available to help you through the
process. Please contact me if you are willing and able to coordinate
a translation project. Or, if you have Hebrew or Yiddish translation
skills, you might want to start by volunteering to translate a
chapter >from the Pinkas HaKehillot on your ancestral town. Informaton
at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/donation/ will explain part of
the process.

Many of our projects are fundraising projects. You can help by
contributing money to pay to have these books professionally
translated. The current fundraising projects are listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html.

Thanks again for all the help and support our readers have provided
to the Yizkor Book Project over the years. We hope that these new
translations will help you with your research.

Joyce Field
jfield@...
Yizkor Book Project Manager
JewishGen, VP, Research


Hungary SIG #Hungary January 2004 update for Yizkor Book Project #hungary

Joyce Field
 

Happy Presidents' Day to All.

My apologies to all for the late update on additions to the Yizkor
Book site for January 2004. I was out of town during the time I
usually prepare this monthly report but the efficient volunteers for
the Yizkor Book Project continued to work and donors continued to
submit new translations. Without these two important groups the
translation project could not exist. I can never thank them enough.

During January we produced 6 new entires and 17 updates. They are
flagged in the alphabetical listing at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html

New entries:

Pinkas HaKehillot Lita:
-Dotnuva
-Rumsiskes (Romsishok)
-Siluva
Pinkas HaKehillot Poland:
-Jagielnica, Ukr
Yidishe Shtet
-Dotnuva
-Siluva

Updates:
-Brzeziny, Poland
-Byarosa, Belarus
-Czyzew, Poland
-Dusetos, Lith
-Bedzin, Poland
-Gabin, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/gombin/gombin.html
-Gabin, Poland: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/gombin2/gombin2.html
-Gorodenka, Ukr
-Lida, Belarus
-Lenin, Belarus
-Losice, Poland
-Mlawa, Poland
-Oradea, Romania
-Ruzhany, Belarus
-Sosnowiec, Poland, volume 1
-Sosnowiec, Poland, volume 2
-Wyszogrod, Poland


There are many books yet to be translated, waiting only for an eager
volunteer to step up to coordinate a translation project. Our Yizkor
Book Project staff is available to help you through the
process. Please contact me if you are willing and able to coordinate
a translation project. Or, if you have Hebrew or Yiddish translation
skills, you might want to start by volunteering to translate a
chapter >from the Pinkas HaKehillot on your ancestral town. Informaton
at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/donation/ will explain part of
the process.

Many of our projects are fundraising projects. You can help by
contributing money to pay to have these books professionally
translated. The current fundraising projects are listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html.

Thanks again for all the help and support our readers have provided
to the Yizkor Book Project over the years. We hope that these new
translations will help you with your research.

Joyce Field
jfield@...
Yizkor Book Project Manager
JewishGen, VP, Research


Hungary SIG #Hungary Beyond the Basics Seminar, NYC #hungary

Robert Friedman <rfriedman@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society announces:

Beyond the Basics -- A Full-Day Genealogical Seminar

Learn >from the experts: a variety of topics will be
covered in depth by experienced instructors, including
Gary Mokotoff, Neil Rosenstein, Karen Franklin, Estelle
Guzik, and other recognized authorities. Several classes
will highlight the remarkable collections available at
the Center for Jewish History and elsewhere in NYC.
Other presentations include Reading Tombstones, Holocaust
Research, Court Records, Vital Records, Naturalization
Records, Polish Research, and Computers and Genealogy.

In the final session of the day, Stephen Morse will
present "One-Step Webpages: A Potpourri of Genealogical
Search Tools."

Beyond the Basics
May 16, 2004
8:45 am - 5:15 pm

Hebrew Union College
One West Fourth Street
New York, NY

For further information, fees and registration,
e-mail info@... or call (212) 294-8326.

Co-sponsors:
Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute
American Jewish Historical Society
American Sefardi Federation
Leo Baeck Institute
Yeshiva University Museum
YIVO Institute for Jewish Research


Farkasvolgy cemetery in Budapest #hungary

Tomer Brunner <tomerbr@...>
 

Shalom H-siggers,
I'm trying to identify a location of a cemetery probably in Budapest.
According to a letter written in 1919, my g-g-grandmother was buried
at that year in the FARKASVO:LGY orthodox cemetery.
Before seeing this letter I assumed she was buried in the cemetery at Czorsz
street
in Buda, where my g-g-grandfather is buried.
My g-g-grandmother used to live in Budapest before her death and I'm quite
sure that
the location of this cemetery is in or near Budapest.

Does anyone know where this cemetery is?

Thanks very much and SHAVUA TOV!
Tomer Brunner, Israel.

please reply to both tomertomer22@... and tomerbr@...


Markowitz - Clevaland and Vajnaz? #hungary

Israel P <isai8v10@...>
 

We just found a 1902 Ellis Island reference to Israel Pikkhol (age 17) of "Vajnaz
Hungary" who may be a Pikholz descendant. The only clue we have beyond that is
that he was going to "friend Beni Markowicz in Cleveland Ohio" who in 1905 is
listed at Markowitz with the Cleveland address 364 Woodland Avenue, and has a
brother Moses.

This is obviously a longshot, but on the outside chance that someone may know
something, I am inquiring after that family. There are many candidates on
switchboard.com, so I am starting here.

(The Pickholtz family of Cleveland would have no idea who this is.)

Israel Pickholtz


Re: US-immigrant given names data -- Your help sought #hungary

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Dear H-Siggers,

I am continuing my research to collect and post in the Hungary Given Names
Data Base on JewishGen (< www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >) the
Hebrew, Yiddish, and secular names used by Jews in Hungary who were born
there during the period 1795-1925.

This data base also contains, for Hungary-based sets of Jewish and secular
names used in Hungary, the English names they adopted upon immigration to
the US, and corresponding secular names adopted in other "foreign"
countries. This type of information is of use to researchers who are not
aware of all the given names their ancestors might have used in Hungary,
but do know their English names in the US, as well as, in reverse, to
researchers who are not aware of all the given names their ancestors might
have used in the US, but who do know at least some of their names used in
Hungary. It is known that there is a statistical linkage between the
Jewish/secular given name groupings used by Jews in European countries and
the secular names adopted by immigrants to "foreign" countries.

While I am attempting to collect the secular names adopted in all ten
"foreign" countries included in the Hungary Given Names Data Base, I am at
present concentrating my efforts on those emigrants who migrated to the US.

Acquiring linked English names adopted by US-immigrants >from Hungary is a
difficult task. There are only four basic methods which can be
used: 1. Collect gravestone readings >from cemeteries where it is known
that all or most of those buried there were emigrants >from Hungary, or
2. Collect Hebrew, Yiddish, and secular given names >from the family trees
of individual genealogists where there are emigrants >from Hungary who
immigrated to a "foreign" country, or 3. Collect gravestone readings >from
all Jewish cemeteries in the country if the assumption can be made that all
or most of those Jews who immigrated to that country came >from Hungary, or
4. Collect names >from Landsmanshaftn and other records of meetings, etc.
where the assumption can be made that all or most of those whose names are
mentioned had immigrated to that country >from Hungary.

For Hungarian emigrants, the third alternative is not feasible for all
countries of the world to which Hungarian Jews immigrated, as far as I know
(although it might be feasible for Lithuanian immigrants to South Africa,
for example). Similarly, the fourth alternative is not feasible for most
countries of the world, since it was not always the practice to create such
organizations, as was commonly done by US Landsmanshaftn; furthermore,
such name lists when they do exist, turn out to be mostly ONLY the secular
name of the person.

However, the first approach may be feasible if it can be shown that those
buried in certain "foreign" cemeteries were actually emigrants >from Hungary
during the appropriate period. Proving or being able to assume that this
was the case is a difficult problem, as stated by Rabbi Avrohom Marmorstein
who wrote in a recent posting: "He was sure that not all those buried
there were of Hungarian origin" when speaking of an elderly member of the
Society associated with the Hungarian Union Fields Cemetery in Queens.

Never the less, some Hungary SIG members may be aware (as I am not) of some
such cemeteries, and furthermore, that gravestone readings of ALL names
there were transcribed in a data base -- including the Hebrew and Yiddish
names which came with the immigrants >from Hungary, as well as the English
names they adopted in the US, or other local secular names adopted in other
"foreign" countries.

In addition, the second approach is feasible for researchers who have
recorded all of the known names of their ancestors -- Hebrew, Yiddish,
Hungarian secular, and European secular names. If such given name sets can
be extracted >from your data base, and if they are for Hungarian emigrants
to the US who were born in Hungary during the period 1795-1925, I would be
most grateful to receive the lists. I do not need or want to know the
surnames or other information about these persons in your family tree.

Can anyone help me with this difficult problem?

Thanks in advance,

Jerry

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: US-immigrant given names data -- Your help sought #hungary

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Dear H-Siggers,

I am continuing my research to collect and post in the Hungary Given Names
Data Base on JewishGen (< www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >) the
Hebrew, Yiddish, and secular names used by Jews in Hungary who were born
there during the period 1795-1925.

This data base also contains, for Hungary-based sets of Jewish and secular
names used in Hungary, the English names they adopted upon immigration to
the US, and corresponding secular names adopted in other "foreign"
countries. This type of information is of use to researchers who are not
aware of all the given names their ancestors might have used in Hungary,
but do know their English names in the US, as well as, in reverse, to
researchers who are not aware of all the given names their ancestors might
have used in the US, but who do know at least some of their names used in
Hungary. It is known that there is a statistical linkage between the
Jewish/secular given name groupings used by Jews in European countries and
the secular names adopted by immigrants to "foreign" countries.

While I am attempting to collect the secular names adopted in all ten
"foreign" countries included in the Hungary Given Names Data Base, I am at
present concentrating my efforts on those emigrants who migrated to the US.

Acquiring linked English names adopted by US-immigrants >from Hungary is a
difficult task. There are only four basic methods which can be
used: 1. Collect gravestone readings >from cemeteries where it is known
that all or most of those buried there were emigrants >from Hungary, or
2. Collect Hebrew, Yiddish, and secular given names >from the family trees
of individual genealogists where there are emigrants >from Hungary who
immigrated to a "foreign" country, or 3. Collect gravestone readings >from
all Jewish cemeteries in the country if the assumption can be made that all
or most of those Jews who immigrated to that country came >from Hungary, or
4. Collect names >from Landsmanshaftn and other records of meetings, etc.
where the assumption can be made that all or most of those whose names are
mentioned had immigrated to that country >from Hungary.

For Hungarian emigrants, the third alternative is not feasible for all
countries of the world to which Hungarian Jews immigrated, as far as I know
(although it might be feasible for Lithuanian immigrants to South Africa,
for example). Similarly, the fourth alternative is not feasible for most
countries of the world, since it was not always the practice to create such
organizations, as was commonly done by US Landsmanshaftn; furthermore,
such name lists when they do exist, turn out to be mostly ONLY the secular
name of the person.

However, the first approach may be feasible if it can be shown that those
buried in certain "foreign" cemeteries were actually emigrants >from Hungary
during the appropriate period. Proving or being able to assume that this
was the case is a difficult problem, as stated by Rabbi Avrohom Marmorstein
who wrote in a recent posting: "He was sure that not all those buried
there were of Hungarian origin" when speaking of an elderly member of the
Society associated with the Hungarian Union Fields Cemetery in Queens.

Never the less, some Hungary SIG members may be aware (as I am not) of some
such cemeteries, and furthermore, that gravestone readings of ALL names
there were transcribed in a data base -- including the Hebrew and Yiddish
names which came with the immigrants >from Hungary, as well as the English
names they adopted in the US, or other local secular names adopted in other
"foreign" countries.

In addition, the second approach is feasible for researchers who have
recorded all of the known names of their ancestors -- Hebrew, Yiddish,
Hungarian secular, and European secular names. If such given name sets can
be extracted >from your data base, and if they are for Hungarian emigrants
to the US who were born in Hungary during the period 1795-1925, I would be
most grateful to receive the lists. I do not need or want to know the
surnames or other information about these persons in your family tree.

Can anyone help me with this difficult problem?

Thanks in advance,

Jerry

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary Farkasvolgy cemetery in Budapest #hungary

Tomer Brunner <tomerbr@...>
 

Shalom H-siggers,
I'm trying to identify a location of a cemetery probably in Budapest.
According to a letter written in 1919, my g-g-grandmother was buried
at that year in the FARKASVO:LGY orthodox cemetery.
Before seeing this letter I assumed she was buried in the cemetery at Czorsz
street
in Buda, where my g-g-grandfather is buried.
My g-g-grandmother used to live in Budapest before her death and I'm quite
sure that
the location of this cemetery is in or near Budapest.

Does anyone know where this cemetery is?

Thanks very much and SHAVUA TOV!
Tomer Brunner, Israel.

please reply to both tomertomer22@... and tomerbr@...


Hungary SIG #Hungary Markowitz - Clevaland and Vajnaz? #hungary

Israel P <isai8v10@...>
 

We just found a 1902 Ellis Island reference to Israel Pikkhol (age 17) of "Vajnaz
Hungary" who may be a Pikholz descendant. The only clue we have beyond that is
that he was going to "friend Beni Markowicz in Cleveland Ohio" who in 1905 is
listed at Markowitz with the Cleveland address 364 Woodland Avenue, and has a
brother Moses.

This is obviously a longshot, but on the outside chance that someone may know
something, I am inquiring after that family. There are many candidates on
switchboard.com, so I am starting here.

(The Pickholtz family of Cleveland would have no idea who this is.)

Israel Pickholtz


Re: Hungarian-English-Hungarian dictionary #hungary

BruceKitty@...
 

Thank you ! It is a good recommendation. Apprreciate your helpfulness!
Kitty


Help with Hungarian Death Record #hungary

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

Hello all.

I need some help figuring out a death record >from the town of Gavavencsello
from 1876. The column headings are in German.
The first column is the first and last name of the deceased ("des
Berstorbenen"). The next column is for the month-day and year of the death.
The next column is the place of birth ("Geburts=Ort") and the next column is
the occupation of the deceased (Stand oder Beschaeftigung").

If I have any German translations wrong, please correct.

Across the columns for birthplace and occupation is written a person's name.

Does anyone have any idea whether this would be the father or a witness or a
brother?

The entire page of 25 names is in the identical format.

On the page are two names. One is the name of my Grandfather, but he didn't
die until 1944 and that was in the US. The other is an unfamiliar family
member. The person whose name spans the two columns is my Great-grandfather.

I am speculating that he was the brother or witness to the deaths of his two
brothers and that my Grandfather was subsequently named after the deceased
brother.

Appreciate any help.

Sam Schleman
Malvern, PA
Samara99@...


Hungary SIG #Hungary Help with Hungarian Death Record #hungary

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

Hello all.

I need some help figuring out a death record >from the town of Gavavencsello
from 1876. The column headings are in German.
The first column is the first and last name of the deceased ("des
Berstorbenen"). The next column is for the month-day and year of the death.
The next column is the place of birth ("Geburts=Ort") and the next column is
the occupation of the deceased (Stand oder Beschaeftigung").

If I have any German translations wrong, please correct.

Across the columns for birthplace and occupation is written a person's name.

Does anyone have any idea whether this would be the father or a witness or a
brother?

The entire page of 25 names is in the identical format.

On the page are two names. One is the name of my Grandfather, but he didn't
die until 1944 and that was in the US. The other is an unfamiliar family
member. The person whose name spans the two columns is my Great-grandfather.

I am speculating that he was the brother or witness to the deaths of his two
brothers and that my Grandfather was subsequently named after the deceased
brother.

Appreciate any help.

Sam Schleman
Malvern, PA
Samara99@...


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Hungarian-English-Hungarian dictionary #hungary

BruceKitty@...
 

Thank you ! It is a good recommendation. Apprreciate your helpfulness!
Kitty


Re: Hungarian Union Fields - Thanks #hungary

John Epstein <johnebos@...>
 

Thank you

On 2/12/04 9:02 PM, "Barbara Kaufman" <babsk@...> wrote:


The Hungarian Society Of New York (old name)
Mutual Benevolent Society Of 1865 Inc
These are one and the same. The phone number of the Hungarian Cemetery, which
is owned by the Society, is 718-366-3434 and the gentleman in charge is Irving
Lichtenfeld.
Barbara Kaufman
Mt. Vernon, NY

Researching: Rosett/Roseth/Rozett in Slovakia
Steinberger in Spisske Podhradie and Spisska Nova Ves
Friedman in Pecovska Nova Ves
Moskowitz in Pasdisoce, Slovakia
Grunstein/Greenstein in Munkacs


Re: The name "Gizel" #hungary

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

Hello all.

I was the original poster of the question about "Gizel" being equivilent to
"Katie" in the US. I want to thank all that replied and offered their
expereince.

I had posted the question because of my confusion when looking at the BMD
records for a town in Hungary in which I found a "Gizel" in the birth
records with a birth date that corresponded to someone known here as Kate,
but then found a Gisella in the death records.

Further research indicates that they were separate people. The "Gizel" was
in fact known as "Kate" in the US. Her gravestone indicates her name as
Kate and her Hebrew name as "Gitel".

Thanks again to all who replied.

Sam Schleman