Date   

Genealogy Course - Weekly from NOW until 13 December #unitedkingdom

Laurence Harris <Laurence@...>
 

There are still some places available on the course below and there are many
more interesting sessions to come.

Laurence Harris
Member of Council
Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

INTERESTING GENEALOGY TALKS IN RADLETT

Monday evenings >from 11 October till 13 December 2005.

Richard Pearlman, Vice President of JGSGB, presents a series of talks on
Jewish Genealogy at Radlett and Bushey Reform Synagogue, Watling Street,
Radlett.

COLLECTING DEAD RELATIVES

Lecturers and experts will surprise you with GOSSIP, VIOLENCE, SCANDAL, SEX
& DEATH and all in the cause of plotting your family trees.

There will be fascinating evenings with specialists on Poland, Lithuania and
South Africa, interactive story-telling and sessions on COMPUTERS in
GENEALOGY.

One of the highlights will be a session with David Jacobs, founder member
and Vice President of JGSGB.

First session FREE, then £45 for the course or £5 each session.
For more information contact RICHARD PEARLMAN at < richard@pearlman.co.uk >


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Genealogy Course - Weekly from NOW until 13 December #unitedkingdom

Laurence Harris <Laurence@...>
 

There are still some places available on the course below and there are many
more interesting sessions to come.

Laurence Harris
Member of Council
Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

INTERESTING GENEALOGY TALKS IN RADLETT

Monday evenings >from 11 October till 13 December 2005.

Richard Pearlman, Vice President of JGSGB, presents a series of talks on
Jewish Genealogy at Radlett and Bushey Reform Synagogue, Watling Street,
Radlett.

COLLECTING DEAD RELATIVES

Lecturers and experts will surprise you with GOSSIP, VIOLENCE, SCANDAL, SEX
& DEATH and all in the cause of plotting your family trees.

There will be fascinating evenings with specialists on Poland, Lithuania and
South Africa, interactive story-telling and sessions on COMPUTERS in
GENEALOGY.

One of the highlights will be a session with David Jacobs, founder member
and Vice President of JGSGB.

First session FREE, then £45 for the course or £5 each session.
For more information contact RICHARD PEARLMAN at < richard@pearlman.co.uk >


JRI-Poland coming to Washington, DC area #poland

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

"What's New in Jewish Records Indexing - Poland"
and
"Interpreting Galician Vital Records In The JRI-Poland Database."

On Sunday, November 21, the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington
(JGSGW) will sponsor a dual presentation by Mark Halpern entitled "What's
New in Jewish Records Indexing - Poland" and "Interpreting Galician Vital
Records In The JRI-Poland Database." This is a combined presentation of two
of the three JRI-Poland lectures that were featured at the IAJGS Conference
in Jerusalem this summer. The meeting will be held at Congregation Har
Shalom, Falls Road, Potomac, MD. A schmooze session will start at 1:30 PM
and the program will follow at 2:00 PM.

JRI-Poland is continuing to expand its online searchable database to the
indices of available Jewish Records >from current and former territories of
Poland. With more than 2.4 million indices, this database has helped in
countless genealogical searches, enabling researchers to trace their
families' growth and migration inside Poland. The JRI-Poland database has
also been a resource in genetic and family health research and in efforts by
those in Poland today to trace their Jewish heritage. The presentation will
outline the new developments in the project as well as the many other
initiatives being launched and planned by JRI-Poland, and will include
examples of the family connections that have resulted >from using the
JRI-Poland database. It will also cover recent developments in the
JRI-Poland Order Processing System, launched in November 2003. This point
and click "shopping basket system" enables researchers to order records >from
the Polish State Archives via JRI-Poland's Order Processing Center and
credit card facilities.

The presentation will continue with the language of the records, the
geography of Galicia, a short history of the Jews in Galicia, and a review
of the history of civil record keeping in Galicia with specific emphasis on
the effect on the Jewish community. Pages containing sample vital record
from periods between the 1820s and 1920s will be reviewed. The headings of
the columnar forms used for Galician record keeping will be shown along with
translations so that Galician researchers can understand the records they
acquire.

Researchers with limited resources always must make decisions on how to
spend their research dollars. Strategies for acquiring vital records with
the most relevant genealogical information will be presented - which types
of records and which years as well as other important hints. The type of
information and the quality of that information varies depending on the
timeframe of the record and the town of that record. Specific record will be
presented that show the wide variety of information that could be available.

Mark Halpern has been actively researching his Polish and Galician roots for
the last eight years. Mark is a board member of Jewish Records Indexing -
Poland. He coordinates the JRI-Poland ordering process, the indexing of
eastern Galician records at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw and the indexing at
the Bialystok Archives. He is also President of the Jewish Genealogical
Society of Greater Philadelphia (JGSGP). He is the originator and
coordinator of BIALYGen, the Bialystok Region Jewish Genealogy Group and
coordinates a project to index and restore the Jewish Cemetery in Bialystok,
Poland. Mark has written many articles concerning Galician records for The
Galitzianer.

For directions to Har Shalom and additional information regarding JGSGW, see
out website at http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw/.

Marlene Bishow
VP - Programs

KATZ: Zhuravno, Galicia > NYC
DEUTSCHER, NUSSBAUM: Rozniatow, Galicia > NYC
SINGER: Belarus (Grodno?) > NY > CT
SOMMERS: Lithuania > Wales > York PA, Baltimore
HANTMAN/GANTMAN: Smilovichi & Novy Sverzhn' Belarus >NYC > CT
BISHOW (BJOVSKY) : Russia (Ukraine?) > New Orleans > Baltimore
KULPE: Siauilai, Lithuania>Philadelphia PA & Birmingham, AL
SATTENSTEIN: Papile, Lithuania >Philadelphia


JRI Poland #Poland JRI-Poland coming to Washington, DC area #poland

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

"What's New in Jewish Records Indexing - Poland"
and
"Interpreting Galician Vital Records In The JRI-Poland Database."

On Sunday, November 21, the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington
(JGSGW) will sponsor a dual presentation by Mark Halpern entitled "What's
New in Jewish Records Indexing - Poland" and "Interpreting Galician Vital
Records In The JRI-Poland Database." This is a combined presentation of two
of the three JRI-Poland lectures that were featured at the IAJGS Conference
in Jerusalem this summer. The meeting will be held at Congregation Har
Shalom, Falls Road, Potomac, MD. A schmooze session will start at 1:30 PM
and the program will follow at 2:00 PM.

JRI-Poland is continuing to expand its online searchable database to the
indices of available Jewish Records >from current and former territories of
Poland. With more than 2.4 million indices, this database has helped in
countless genealogical searches, enabling researchers to trace their
families' growth and migration inside Poland. The JRI-Poland database has
also been a resource in genetic and family health research and in efforts by
those in Poland today to trace their Jewish heritage. The presentation will
outline the new developments in the project as well as the many other
initiatives being launched and planned by JRI-Poland, and will include
examples of the family connections that have resulted >from using the
JRI-Poland database. It will also cover recent developments in the
JRI-Poland Order Processing System, launched in November 2003. This point
and click "shopping basket system" enables researchers to order records >from
the Polish State Archives via JRI-Poland's Order Processing Center and
credit card facilities.

The presentation will continue with the language of the records, the
geography of Galicia, a short history of the Jews in Galicia, and a review
of the history of civil record keeping in Galicia with specific emphasis on
the effect on the Jewish community. Pages containing sample vital record
from periods between the 1820s and 1920s will be reviewed. The headings of
the columnar forms used for Galician record keeping will be shown along with
translations so that Galician researchers can understand the records they
acquire.

Researchers with limited resources always must make decisions on how to
spend their research dollars. Strategies for acquiring vital records with
the most relevant genealogical information will be presented - which types
of records and which years as well as other important hints. The type of
information and the quality of that information varies depending on the
timeframe of the record and the town of that record. Specific record will be
presented that show the wide variety of information that could be available.

Mark Halpern has been actively researching his Polish and Galician roots for
the last eight years. Mark is a board member of Jewish Records Indexing -
Poland. He coordinates the JRI-Poland ordering process, the indexing of
eastern Galician records at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw and the indexing at
the Bialystok Archives. He is also President of the Jewish Genealogical
Society of Greater Philadelphia (JGSGP). He is the originator and
coordinator of BIALYGen, the Bialystok Region Jewish Genealogy Group and
coordinates a project to index and restore the Jewish Cemetery in Bialystok,
Poland. Mark has written many articles concerning Galician records for The
Galitzianer.

For directions to Har Shalom and additional information regarding JGSGW, see
out website at http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw/.

Marlene Bishow
VP - Programs

KATZ: Zhuravno, Galicia > NYC
DEUTSCHER, NUSSBAUM: Rozniatow, Galicia > NYC
SINGER: Belarus (Grodno?) > NY > CT
SOMMERS: Lithuania > Wales > York PA, Baltimore
HANTMAN/GANTMAN: Smilovichi & Novy Sverzhn' Belarus >NYC > CT
BISHOW (BJOVSKY) : Russia (Ukraine?) > New Orleans > Baltimore
KULPE: Siauilai, Lithuania>Philadelphia PA & Birmingham, AL
SATTENSTEIN: Papile, Lithuania >Philadelphia


Re: What's my Hebrew/Yiddish name? #general

Hank Mishkoff
 

Based on these two posts I would guess your Hebrew name is Chanoch Henoch
(these two names go together very often)...

Do you know why the two names often go together? Is it something like Aryeh and
Leyb, where they mean the same thing in Hebrew and Yiddish?

Hank Mishkoff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: What's my Hebrew/Yiddish name? #general

Hank Mishkoff
 

Based on these two posts I would guess your Hebrew name is Chanoch Henoch
(these two names go together very often)...

Do you know why the two names often go together? Is it something like Aryeh and
Leyb, where they mean the same thing in Hebrew and Yiddish?

Hank Mishkoff


Re: What's my Hebrew/Yiddish name? #general

hfpjc
 

Well, Hank, it appears to me that your first name is Hanoch Chanoch-a common
first-name combination. As for Chazkel, to the best of my knowledge it is a
Yiddish version of the Hebrew name Yechezkel.

Hope I was of some assistance.
Good Luck!

Toby Mendlowitz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Re: What's my Hebrew/Yiddish name? #general

hfpjc
 

Well, Hank, it appears to me that your first name is Hanoch Chanoch-a common
first-name combination. As for Chazkel, to the best of my knowledge it is a
Yiddish version of the Hebrew name Yechezkel.

Hope I was of some assistance.
Good Luck!

Toby Mendlowitz


Re: What's my Hebrew/Yiddish name? #general

seforimlover
 

Based on these two posts I would guess your Hebrew
name is Chanoch Henoch (these two names go together
very often) Hatzkel (shortened form of Yechezkel).

Best wishes,

Yehuda Herskowitz


--- "Scheimer, Deborah" <Deborah.Scheimer@fnf.com>
wrote:

My husband's grandfather's name was Henry Jacobson.
His Yiddish name was
(I'm taking liberty with the spelling) Chanoch, with
the gutteral 'ch'
at the beginning and the end.

Scheimer Deborah
My given names are Henry Charles, I was named after
my two grandfathers.

When I first went to Hebrew School (nearly 50 years
ago), my teacher
asked us to ask our parents what our "Jewish" names
were. I have a
memory that is pretty strong (but may be inaccurate
just the same) that
my Mom said that my name was something like "Hinay
Anoch Haskel."
<snip>

Hank Mishkoff <<


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: What's my Hebrew/Yiddish name? #general

seforimlover
 

Based on these two posts I would guess your Hebrew
name is Chanoch Henoch (these two names go together
very often) Hatzkel (shortened form of Yechezkel).

Best wishes,

Yehuda Herskowitz


--- "Scheimer, Deborah" <Deborah.Scheimer@fnf.com>
wrote:

My husband's grandfather's name was Henry Jacobson.
His Yiddish name was
(I'm taking liberty with the spelling) Chanoch, with
the gutteral 'ch'
at the beginning and the end.

Scheimer Deborah
My given names are Henry Charles, I was named after
my two grandfathers.

When I first went to Hebrew School (nearly 50 years
ago), my teacher
asked us to ask our parents what our "Jewish" names
were. I have a
memory that is pretty strong (but may be inaccurate
just the same) that
my Mom said that my name was something like "Hinay
Anoch Haskel."
<snip>

Hank Mishkoff <<


How to Graft branch to your family tree. #general

Reuben Gross <reubendgross@...>
 

Many people responded to my request for help on grafting branches >from one
family tree to another. Thanks to all of you.Many more asked me for the
solution I received. Here is the deal:
Most important, make sure you have a backup copy of your tree before you
start monkeying around.
1. Open up the file that you want to take the branch >from and create a
descendent tree >from the oldest ancestor you want to include.
2. >from the File menu click "Copy/ export individuals on descendant tree"
You'll need to give it a new name.
3. Go to tree that you want to graft this branch onto and Merge the file
with the newly created file

Reuben Gross


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen How to Graft branch to your family tree. #general

Reuben Gross <reubendgross@...>
 

Many people responded to my request for help on grafting branches >from one
family tree to another. Thanks to all of you.Many more asked me for the
solution I received. Here is the deal:
Most important, make sure you have a backup copy of your tree before you
start monkeying around.
1. Open up the file that you want to take the branch >from and create a
descendent tree >from the oldest ancestor you want to include.
2. >from the File menu click "Copy/ export individuals on descendant tree"
You'll need to give it a new name.
3. Go to tree that you want to graft this branch onto and Merge the file
with the newly created file

Reuben Gross


JewishGen Holocaust Database - Update #hungary

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce the addition of 100,000
new records to the JewishGen Holocaust Database
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

There are ten new datasets, and two updated datasets.
The ten new datasets are:

* "Sharit HaPlatah":
Names of 61,387 Jews who survived the Holocaust, published in 1946
by the "Central Committee of Jews in Bavaria" in Munich.

* Displaced Persons >from Bergen-Belsen to Sweden:
Data on 1,600 DPs >from various countries in Bergen-Belsen and
moved to Sweden, 24 July 1945. >from U.N. documents.

* Tirgu Mures Deportation List, 1944:
Over 4,000 Jews deported >from Tirgu Mures (Maros-Vasarhely) in 1944.

* Tirgu Mures Ghetto List, 1945:
Over 2,000 residents of the Tirgu Mures ghetto, as of Jan 8 1945.

* Transnistria: Jews Receiving and Sending Support:
Lists of Jews >from the Regat (pre-WWI Romania) who sent money
to Jews in the ghettos of Transnistria.

* Jews murdered near Sabac, Serbia:
Data on over 1,000 members of the Hechalutz Zionist youth
group murdered in Zasavica near Sabac (Serbia).

* Jewish Women who lived in Dortmund, Germany:
Data on 877 Jewish women who lived in Dortmund, Germany
between 1930 and 1943.

* Polish Children Survivors:
Data on Polish children >from Lucjan Dobroszycki's
"Survivors of the Holocaust in Poland".

* The Tehran Children:
Data on over 2,000 Polish refugee children in
Persia, >from "Dzieci Syjonu, The Children of Zion".

* Hungarian Jewish KMSZ (Military Forced Laborer) List:
List of 4,497 Jews who died while serving in the Munkaszolgalat
(Civilian Labor Service) during World War II.

We've also updated the following two datasets:

* Dachau Indexing Project:
Over 11,000 records added, for a total of over 128,000 records.

* North Bavarian Jews:
Now over 6,000 records total.

Thanks to all the volunteers who have made these possible,
especially project coordinators Nolan Altman and Mike Kalt.


The JewishGen Holocaust Database is a collection of 74 datasets,
containing over 900,000 entries about Holocaust victims and survivors.
It can be searched at < http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

Warren

Warren Blatt
JewishGen Editor-in-Chief
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


Hungary SIG #Hungary JewishGen Holocaust Database - Update #hungary

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce the addition of 100,000
new records to the JewishGen Holocaust Database
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

There are ten new datasets, and two updated datasets.
The ten new datasets are:

* "Sharit HaPlatah":
Names of 61,387 Jews who survived the Holocaust, published in 1946
by the "Central Committee of Jews in Bavaria" in Munich.

* Displaced Persons >from Bergen-Belsen to Sweden:
Data on 1,600 DPs >from various countries in Bergen-Belsen and
moved to Sweden, 24 July 1945. >from U.N. documents.

* Tirgu Mures Deportation List, 1944:
Over 4,000 Jews deported >from Tirgu Mures (Maros-Vasarhely) in 1944.

* Tirgu Mures Ghetto List, 1945:
Over 2,000 residents of the Tirgu Mures ghetto, as of Jan 8 1945.

* Transnistria: Jews Receiving and Sending Support:
Lists of Jews >from the Regat (pre-WWI Romania) who sent money
to Jews in the ghettos of Transnistria.

* Jews murdered near Sabac, Serbia:
Data on over 1,000 members of the Hechalutz Zionist youth
group murdered in Zasavica near Sabac (Serbia).

* Jewish Women who lived in Dortmund, Germany:
Data on 877 Jewish women who lived in Dortmund, Germany
between 1930 and 1943.

* Polish Children Survivors:
Data on Polish children >from Lucjan Dobroszycki's
"Survivors of the Holocaust in Poland".

* The Tehran Children:
Data on over 2,000 Polish refugee children in
Persia, >from "Dzieci Syjonu, The Children of Zion".

* Hungarian Jewish KMSZ (Military Forced Laborer) List:
List of 4,497 Jews who died while serving in the Munkaszolgalat
(Civilian Labor Service) during World War II.

We've also updated the following two datasets:

* Dachau Indexing Project:
Over 11,000 records added, for a total of over 128,000 records.

* North Bavarian Jews:
Now over 6,000 records total.

Thanks to all the volunteers who have made these possible,
especially project coordinators Nolan Altman and Mike Kalt.


The JewishGen Holocaust Database is a collection of 74 datasets,
containing over 900,000 entries about Holocaust victims and survivors.
It can be searched at < http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

Warren

Warren Blatt
JewishGen Editor-in-Chief
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


Re: What's my Hebrew/Yiddish name? #general

Scheimer, Deborah <Deborah.Scheimer@...>
 

My husband's grandfather's name was Henry Jacobson. His Yiddish name was
(I'm taking liberty with the spelling) Chanoch, with the gutteral 'ch'
at the beginning and the end.

Scheimer Deborah

As I've been doing research over the years, I've come to recognize that
some given names that appear to be different may actually be the same,
in that either they're nicknames or Yiddish/Hebrew versions of the same
name. Now I'm puzzled about my own name, and I'm hoping that someone can
help me figure it out.

My given names are Henry Charles, I was named after my two grandfathers.

When I first went to Hebrew School (nearly 50 years ago), my teacher
asked us to ask our parents what our "Jewish" names were. I have a
memory that is pretty strong (but may be inaccurate just the same) that
my Mom said that my name was something like "Hinay Anoch Haskel."

I've since learned that Charles is a fairly common English equivalent
for Haskel, and I've also learned that my Grandfather Charles' "real"
name was, indeed, Haskel. (BTW, is "Haskel" Hebrew or Yiddish? Does it
mean anything, or is it just a name?) So I'm fairly satisfied about my
middle name, it's my first name that continues to puzzle me.

After my Mom told me that my first name was either Hinay or Anoch (or
both), my Hebrew School teacher said that my Hebrew name would be
Hanoch. I've never known what my Grandfather Henry's "Jewish" name was,
but at a recent family reunion one of my older cousins told me that she
remembered my grandfather, whom she called "Uncle Enoch"!

In my research, I've yet to discover any family members
named Enoch or Hanoch, but I have stumbled across a few men named
Heniah, which sounds awfully close to what I remember my Mom telling me
all those years ago.

So, here are all of the names that I figure might be my
first name:

* Hinay
* Heniah
* Anoch
* Enoch
* Hanoch

Are these all variations of the same name? Are some Hebrew
and some Yiddish? And as with Haskel: Does the name mean anything, or is
it just a name?

Sorry to be so long-winded, and thanks for your help!

Hank Mishkoff <<


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: What's my Hebrew/Yiddish name? #general

Scheimer, Deborah <Deborah.Scheimer@...>
 

My husband's grandfather's name was Henry Jacobson. His Yiddish name was
(I'm taking liberty with the spelling) Chanoch, with the gutteral 'ch'
at the beginning and the end.

Scheimer Deborah

As I've been doing research over the years, I've come to recognize that
some given names that appear to be different may actually be the same,
in that either they're nicknames or Yiddish/Hebrew versions of the same
name. Now I'm puzzled about my own name, and I'm hoping that someone can
help me figure it out.

My given names are Henry Charles, I was named after my two grandfathers.

When I first went to Hebrew School (nearly 50 years ago), my teacher
asked us to ask our parents what our "Jewish" names were. I have a
memory that is pretty strong (but may be inaccurate just the same) that
my Mom said that my name was something like "Hinay Anoch Haskel."

I've since learned that Charles is a fairly common English equivalent
for Haskel, and I've also learned that my Grandfather Charles' "real"
name was, indeed, Haskel. (BTW, is "Haskel" Hebrew or Yiddish? Does it
mean anything, or is it just a name?) So I'm fairly satisfied about my
middle name, it's my first name that continues to puzzle me.

After my Mom told me that my first name was either Hinay or Anoch (or
both), my Hebrew School teacher said that my Hebrew name would be
Hanoch. I've never known what my Grandfather Henry's "Jewish" name was,
but at a recent family reunion one of my older cousins told me that she
remembered my grandfather, whom she called "Uncle Enoch"!

In my research, I've yet to discover any family members
named Enoch or Hanoch, but I have stumbled across a few men named
Heniah, which sounds awfully close to what I remember my Mom telling me
all those years ago.

So, here are all of the names that I figure might be my
first name:

* Hinay
* Heniah
* Anoch
* Enoch
* Hanoch

Are these all variations of the same name? Are some Hebrew
and some Yiddish? And as with Haskel: Does the name mean anything, or is
it just a name?

Sorry to be so long-winded, and thanks for your help!

Hank Mishkoff <<


HOROWITZ - Hollywood #rabbinic

Scott Rosenberg <sdavidr@...>
 

For all you HOROWITZ researchers out there comes this bit of
HOROWITZ trivia. I stumbled across a website that lists a rather
interesting HOROWITZ family. The HOWARDS (originally HOROWITZ) are
better known as The Three Stooges. According to this website, Jerome
Lester "Curly" HOWARD (HOROWITZ) was Yehuda Leib ben Reb Shlomo
Natan HaLevi HOROWITZ.

You can read more here:

http://home.earthlink.net/~ddstuhlman/crc51.htm

Scott Rosenberg
Minnesota, USA

Searching:
SOSNITZER, LITVIN/LITWIN (all spellings), LEVITAN (all spellings),
Bobroisk and Smorgon, Belarus; GLICKMAN/GLECKMAN (or other spellings)
Kholopenichi, Vitebsk, Smorgon and Minsk, Belarus; and Minnesota,
Seattle, Washington and Chicago, Illinois, USA; and MoisesVille,
Argentina. YAFFEY, Lithuania, North Dakota and Minnesota, USA.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic HOROWITZ - Hollywood #rabbinic

Scott Rosenberg <sdavidr@...>
 

For all you HOROWITZ researchers out there comes this bit of
HOROWITZ trivia. I stumbled across a website that lists a rather
interesting HOROWITZ family. The HOWARDS (originally HOROWITZ) are
better known as The Three Stooges. According to this website, Jerome
Lester "Curly" HOWARD (HOROWITZ) was Yehuda Leib ben Reb Shlomo
Natan HaLevi HOROWITZ.

You can read more here:

http://home.earthlink.net/~ddstuhlman/crc51.htm

Scott Rosenberg
Minnesota, USA

Searching:
SOSNITZER, LITVIN/LITWIN (all spellings), LEVITAN (all spellings),
Bobroisk and Smorgon, Belarus; GLICKMAN/GLECKMAN (or other spellings)
Kholopenichi, Vitebsk, Smorgon and Minsk, Belarus; and Minnesota,
Seattle, Washington and Chicago, Illinois, USA; and MoisesVille,
Argentina. YAFFEY, Lithuania, North Dakota and Minnesota, USA.


Help with place name in ship's manifest #hungary

David Sencer
 

Ancestry.com is offering a free opportunity to search ship records if
you enter through

http://olivetreegenealogy.com/ancestry/free.shtml

This was described in the October 15, JewishGen Discussion Group.

My grandparents' origins have been mysteries, other than that they emigrated >from Hungary in the 1880's and that they came separately. Through the index of passengers I have found both my grandfather, Ignatz (Singer) and my grandmother Bertha Senser with the first four of their children. The manifest for my grandmother's ship apparently has the place of origin more than just the country. The problem is I can't read it and I am not sure anyone can. It looks like Albany or Arbeny. Shtetl/Seeker offers Orveny and Orvenyes.

If any of you have Ancestry.com or are willing to try the Olive
Tree approach and find the ship Moravia arriving in New York in May 1885 my grandmother and four kids are on page 25. If anyone can help with the locale, I would be most grateful.

I have attached a copy of part of the page but I can't seem to make it open. It has been screened for virus.

Thanks for any assistance.

Dave Sencer
Atlanta, GA

Moderator: This is a one-time mention of a free service offered by a commercial site. To protect subscribers >from viruses, JewishGen lists never sends messages with attachments. David can forward the page to Viewmate where subscribers can examine the document and may be able to answer his question.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Help with place name in ship's manifest #hungary

David Sencer
 

Ancestry.com is offering a free opportunity to search ship records if
you enter through

http://olivetreegenealogy.com/ancestry/free.shtml

This was described in the October 15, JewishGen Discussion Group.

My grandparents' origins have been mysteries, other than that they emigrated >from Hungary in the 1880's and that they came separately. Through the index of passengers I have found both my grandfather, Ignatz (Singer) and my grandmother Bertha Senser with the first four of their children. The manifest for my grandmother's ship apparently has the place of origin more than just the country. The problem is I can't read it and I am not sure anyone can. It looks like Albany or Arbeny. Shtetl/Seeker offers Orveny and Orvenyes.

If any of you have Ancestry.com or are willing to try the Olive
Tree approach and find the ship Moravia arriving in New York in May 1885 my grandmother and four kids are on page 25. If anyone can help with the locale, I would be most grateful.

I have attached a copy of part of the page but I can't seem to make it open. It has been screened for virus.

Thanks for any assistance.

Dave Sencer
Atlanta, GA

Moderator: This is a one-time mention of a free service offered by a commercial site. To protect subscribers >from viruses, JewishGen lists never sends messages with attachments. David can forward the page to Viewmate where subscribers can examine the document and may be able to answer his question.